Cut through power tool - how to repair | AVForums

Cut through power tool - how to repair

WeegyAVLover

Distinguished Member
Hello,

I was using my 2100w router at the weekend and I think as I put it down the blade was still spinning and I have some how cut through the power cable enough for it to now no longer work.

1CD6964C-8B42-4EB5-A704-E1FA43AF4187.jpeg

It only has a live and neutral wire which I think is because it is double insulated (but that is a little beyond my level of knowledge). So I am looking for the best/easiest way to repair it.

I had been looking at these:
Amazon product
But not sure if they are suitable or not as I cannot see a rating against them and there was also a posted picture in the review section one having melted damage.

Anyone got any better suggestions for me?
 

IronGiant

Moderator
How much did you cut off? The "best" way to fix it would be to open the tool up, remove the existing piece of (hopefully) short cable and re-attach the piece with the plug on it in it's place. But this rather depends on how it's wired up internally.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
I'd say either as above or:-

Solder the wires together, then heat shrink wrap the individual cables, then heat shrink wrap the outer cable.

Or buy the kind of connector you often get on garden tools like this


Obviously, this only applies if the break is at a convenient place and the connector is rated for the amperage as the power tool.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Amusing to read how many reviewers of the Screwfix one are mending hedge trimmers :laugh:
 

WeegyAVLover

Distinguished Member
Cable I cut off is roughly in the middle.
I have found something similar now to @John7 suggested except it has a lot more reviews:
Amazon product
so I will go for that as these are similar to what I have used in my garden to connect up new uplighters.

Cheers for the help.

@IronGiant - When I had been looking on Amazon I found some many of these connectors and the amount of people asking about hedge trimmer cable fixes made me laugh as well.
 

John7

Well-known Member
Except that's a plug/socket not a "cable connector" ;)

If you do use a plug/socket, make sure you put the plug section (visible pins) on the appliance side of the cable.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Well spotted :)
 

Russa

Well-known Member
Choc bloc and a bit of tape.

I cut through my titan hedge trimmer within about 3 mins of being back from screwfix, wouldn't mind but the cable is bright orange.
 

brunation

Well-known Member
I would just buy new cable. With a hedge trimmer, IIRC, those connectors sit about 6" from the handle. With it half-way down the cable, I would be concerned about it snagging when using the router.
 

WeegyAVLover

Distinguished Member
Except that's a plug/socket not a "cable connector" ;)

If you do use a plug/socket, make sure you put the plug section (visible pins) on the appliance side of the cable.
Good point dude.
I decided to avoid the plug option as that is more for when I have a proper setup in a workshop.
I have bought the one in the link you sent me.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
I would just buy new cable. With a hedge trimmer, IIRC, those connectors sit about 6" from the handle. With it half-way down the cable, I would be concerned about it snagging when using the router.

If you don't want to open the appliance up, you could snip the cable about 8" from the handle and use a new cable with those connectors.
 

Boo Radley75

Well-known Member
I did exactly the same thing with my flymo and fixed it, no problem. Simply strip away half an inch of the black outer rubber. Strip quarter an inch of the inner blue and brown rubber. Tightly twist the correct wires together. Individually, tightly wrap each of both inner wires together, individually with electric tape. Then do the same with the outer black rubber.
 

John7

Well-known Member
I did exactly the same thing with my flymo and fixed it, no problem. Simply strip away half an inch of the black outer rubber. Strip quarter an inch of the inner blue and brown rubber. Tightly twist the correct wires together. Individually, tightly wrap each of both inner wires together, individually with electric tape. Then do the same with the outer black rubber.
This is not a “simple“ fix, I’m afraid. What you have done is very dangerous and you should not be using the appliance until you fix it properly.

Electrical insulating tape provides no mechanical coupling and continuity of the outer rubber covering, meaning that the cable sections can easily be pulled apart, exposing live wires. Also, simply twisting mains wires together (especially such a short length of 6mm) is not good enough. They need to be soldered or mechanically clamped and well insulated.

Insulating tape provides no waterproofing or mechanical strength and over time, the adhesive softens and weakens allowing the tape to fall off or be easily dislodged.

For your own safety, please remove this dangerous repair and fit a proper, waterproof and secure cable jointing solution
 

Donald duck

Distinguished Member
I cut through my circular saw cable, went with a flash, I then picked the cable up and received a shock. 🙄 🤣

The best thing to do for safety is to take it to a tool repair shop, they'll renew the cable.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
This is not a “simple“ fix, I’m afraid. What you have done is very dangerous and you should not be using the appliance until you fix it properly.

Electrical insulating tape provides no mechanical coupling and continuity of the outer rubber covering, meaning that the cable sections can easily be pulled apart, exposing live wires. Also, simply twisting mains wires together (especially such a short length of 6mm) is not good enough. They need to be soldered or mechanically clamped and well insulated.

Insulating tape provides no waterproofing or mechanical strength and over time, the adhesive softens and weakens allowing the tape to fall off or be easily dislodged.

For your own safety, please remove this dangerous repair and fit a proper, waterproof and secure cable jointing solution
I'd also recommend completely replacing the damaged lead.
 

AMc

Distinguished Member
I have to admit my old hedge trimmer had a choc block and tape repair for quite a while :rolleyes:.
I figured it was on an RCD and I was the only person to use it so it would be OK.
The trimmer died and I borrowed my Dad's to finish the job and you guessed it :blush:

Looking into repairing or replacing the lead I looked over YouTube etc. and came to the conclusion I'd been pushing my luck quite badly - risking pulling the live wires out of the choc block when moving the tool etc. exposing 230v in a damp environment. Stupid really and not worth the risk vs. spending a couple of quid on a safe repair. Lesson learned.

Luckily my Dad's Bosch hedge trimmer has a plate on the bottom and screw connectors so it was simple to make a 100% safe repair. Bosch also do exploded diagrams and sell spares!
In similar circumstances that would be my preferred choice - shorten the cable and connect it in the device.

I also briefly considered the plug/socket option as per post #2. I'd consider that just as safe and secure but as others mentioned make sure the exposed prongs are on the tool side of the connection not the live side.
 

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