Home - USS Constitution Museum
SHIP:  
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
MUSEUM:  
10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Join us on Social

We add new content regularly, so check our handles daily.

Anchor Icon

Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Last week, we flew kites on the lawn of the elegant Commandant's House at Charlestown Navy Yard. Located next to the Museum, the house was built in 1805 and first occupied by USS Constitution Captain Samuel Nicholson and his family. Six commanders of "Old Ironsides" served as Commandants of the Navy Yard and lived in this beautiful home overlooking "Old Ironsides" and Boston Harbor. Built for entertaining and family living, the beautiful house is set apart from the rest of the industrial setting of the Yard. Guests of the home include Presidents James Monroe and Andrew Johnson.

Today, the house has been preserved by the National Park Service as part of Boston National Historical Park and is used as meeting space.
... See MoreSee Less

Last week, we flew kites on the lawn of the elegant Commandants House at Charlestown Navy Yard.  Located next to the Museum, the house was built in 1805 and first occupied by USS Constitution Captain Samuel Nicholson and his family. Six commanders of Old Ironsides served as Commandants of the Navy Yard and lived in this beautiful home overlooking Old Ironsides and Boston Harbor. Built for entertaining and family living, the beautiful house is set apart from the rest of the industrial setting of the Yard. Guests of the home include Presidents James Monroe and Andrew Johnson. 

Today, the house has been preserved by the National Park Service as part of Boston National Historical Park and is used as meeting space.

After the War of 1812 and service leading USS Constitution, Captain Charles Stewart commanded the Mediterranean, Pacific, and Home Squadrons, as well as the Philadelphia Station and Navy Yard. He also served as a commissioner of the Navy. In 1837, he became the first and only captain of the ship-of-the-line USS Pennsylvania. Mounting 120 guns, she was the largest sailing warship in the U.S. Navy, but was soon thought too expensive to maintain and therefore laid up. In 1840, some considered Stewart a possible nominee for the presidency. By 1852, he was the service’s senior officer; he was officially ranked as “senior flag officer” in 1859. With the implementation of a new ranking system in 1862, Stewart was made the senior rear admiral on the retired list, and served as a consultant to President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. Stewart died on November 6, 1869 and was interred in Philadelphia’s Woodlawn Cemetery. He had served for more than 71 years.🇺🇸

Stewart’s service has been subsequently recalled in the naming of two destroyers (1902 and 1920) and a destroyer escort (1943). ⚓

#huzzah
#OldIronsides
#MeetTheCaptain
#LeaderSHIP

📸 Painting, Oil on Canvas; By Orlando S Lagman after Thomas Sully; C. 1965; Courtesy Naval History and Heritage Command
... See MoreSee Less

After the War of 1812 and service leading USS Constitution, Captain Charles Stewart commanded the Mediterranean, Pacific, and Home Squadrons, as well as the Philadelphia Station and Navy Yard. He also served as a commissioner of the Navy. In 1837, he became the first and only captain of the ship-of-the-line USS Pennsylvania. Mounting 120 guns, she was the largest sailing warship in the U.S. Navy, but was soon thought too expensive to maintain and therefore laid up. In 1840, some considered Stewart a possible nominee for the presidency. By 1852, he was the service’s senior officer; he was officially ranked as “senior flag officer” in 1859. With the implementation of a new ranking system in 1862, Stewart was made the senior rear admiral on the retired list, and served as a consultant to President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. Stewart died on November 6, 1869 and was interred in Philadelphia’s Woodlawn Cemetery. He had served for more than 71 years.🇺🇸 

Stewart’s service has been subsequently recalled in the naming of two destroyers (1902 and 1920) and a destroyer escort (1943). ⚓ 

#huzzah
#OldIronsides
#MeetTheCaptain
#LeaderSHIP

📸 Painting, Oil on Canvas; By Orlando S Lagman after Thomas Sully; C. 1965; Courtesy Naval History and Heritage Command

1 CommentComment on Facebook

My favorite after Melhuish

Who was the Captain who adeptly maneuvered USS Constitution to safety, away from British frigates in pursuit at Marblehead, MA, in April 1814? Captain Charles Stewart was born in #Philly in 1778 and entered the merchant service at age 13. Later joining the Navy, he served in the Mediterranean Squadron aboard the frigates UNITED STATES and CONSTELLATION before commanding the brig SYREN, where he oversaw a raid on Tripoli. When the War of 1812 began, Stewart commanded the frigate CONGRESS and then CONSTELLATION before being ordered to Boston to command CONSTITUTION in June 1813. He is particularly known for leading "Old Ironsides" to victory over the British men-of-war CYANE and LEVANT in February 1815. 🇺🇸 ⚓ Huzzah! We send up cheers to honor and remember Captain Charles Stewart.

His story doesn't end with his service aboard USS CONSTITUTION.... stay tuned for more of his story!
... See MoreSee Less

Who was the Captain who adeptly maneuvered USS Constitution to safety, away from British frigates in pursuit at Marblehead, MA, in April 1814? Captain Charles Stewart was born in #Philly in 1778 and entered the merchant service at age 13. Later joining the Navy, he served in the Mediterranean Squadron aboard the frigates UNITED STATES and CONSTELLATION before commanding the brig SYREN, where he oversaw a raid on Tripoli. When the War of 1812 began, Stewart commanded the frigate CONGRESS and then CONSTELLATION before being ordered to Boston to command CONSTITUTION in June 1813. He is particularly known for leading Old Ironsides to victory over the British men-of-war CYANE and LEVANT in February 1815. 🇺🇸 ⚓  Huzzah! We send up cheers to honor and remember Captain Charles Stewart. 

His story doesnt end with his service aboard USS CONSTITUTION.... stay tuned for more of his story!

Check out the windsocks Museum guests made this week! There's still more chances to get in on the wind-powered fun. Come make your windsock as our April Vacation Week activities conclude on Saturday in the Museum from 11 am - 3 pm, no registration necessary. Details: bit.ly/3GgW9cM ... See MoreSee Less

Check out the windsocks Museum guests made this week! Theres still more chances to get in on the wind-powered fun. Come make your windsock as our April Vacation Week activities conclude on Saturday in the Museum from 11 am - 3 pm, no registration necessary. Details: https://bit.ly/3GgW9cMImage attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment
Load more