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Portal:New York (state)

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Location of New York state in the United States

New York is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States. It was one of the original thirteen colonies forming the United States. With a total area of 54,556 square miles (141,300 km2), New York is the 27th largest state; its population of more than 20 million people in 2020 makes it the fourth most populous state in the U.S. The state is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south and Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east; it has a maritime border with Rhode Island, east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec to the north and Ontario to the northwest. It is sometimes referred to as New York State to distinguish it from New York City, which is its largest city.

Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area. With an estimated population of 8.36 million in 2019, New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the premier gateway for immigration to the United States. The New York City metropolitan area is one of the most populous in the world. A global city, New York City is home to the United Nations Headquarters, and has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, as well as the world's most economically powerful city. The next four most populous cities in the state are Buffalo, Rochester, Yonkers, and Syracuse, while the state capital is Albany.

New York has a diverse geography. The southern part of the state is in the Atlantic coastal plain and includes Long Island and several smaller associated islands, as well as New York City and the lower Hudson River Valley. The large Upstate New York region comprises several ranges of the wider Appalachian Mountains, and the Adirondack Mountains in the northeastern lobe of the state. The north–south Hudson River Valley and the east–west Mohawk River Valley bisect these more mountainous regions. Western New York is considered part of the Great Lakes region and borders on Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, and Niagara Falls. The central part of the state is dominated by the Finger Lakes, a popular vacation and tourist destination. (Full article...)

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Manhattan (/mænˈhætən, mən-/), known regionally as the City, and the urban core of the New York metropolitan area, is the most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City, and coextensive with New York County, one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. Manhattan serves as the city's economic and administrative center, cultural identifier, and historical birthplace. The borough consists mostly of Manhattan Island, bounded by the Hudson, East, and Harlem rivers; as well as several small adjacent islands. Manhattan additionally contains Marble Hill, a small neighborhood now on the U.S. mainland, separated from the rest of Manhattan by the Harlem Ship Canal and later connected using landfill to The Bronx. Manhattan Island is divided into three informally bounded components, each aligned with the borough's long axis: Lower, Midtown, and Upper Manhattan.

Manhattan has been described as the cultural, financial, media, and entertainment capital of the world, and the borough hosts the United Nations Headquarters. Anchored by Wall Street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City has been called both the most economically powerful city and the leading financial center of the world, and Manhattan is home to the world's two largest stock exchanges by total market capitalization: the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ. Many multinational media conglomerates are based in Manhattan, and the borough has been the for numerous books, films, and television shows. Manhattan real estate has since become among the most expensive in the world, with the value of Manhattan Island, including real estate, estimated to exceed US$3 trillion in 2013; median residential property sale prices in Manhattan approximated US$1,600 per square foot ($17,000/m2) as of 2018, with Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan commanding the highest retail rents in the world, at US$3,000 per square foot ($32,000/m2) per year in 2017. (Full article...)

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Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959) is an American politician, attorney, educator, and real estate developer. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as the 54th Governor of New York from 2007 until his resignation in 2008.

Born in New York City, Spitzer attended Princeton University and earned his law degree from Harvard. He began his career as a attorney in private practice with New York law firms and as a prosecutor with the office of the New York County (Manhattan) District Attorney. From 1999 to 2006, he served two four-year terms as the Attorney General of New York, earning a reputation as the "Sheriff of Wall Street" for his efforts to curb corruption in the financial services industry. Spitzer was elected Governor of New York in 2006 New York gubernatorial election by the largest margin of any candidate, but his tenure would last less than two years after it was uncovered that he patronized a prostitution ring. He resigned immediately following the scandal, with the remainder of his term served by David Paterson, his lieutenant governor. (Full article...)

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Henry Louis Mencken, a 20th century journalist and social critc.
"New York: A third-rate Babylon."

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Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the 22nd and 24th president of the United States from 1885 to 1889 and from 1893 to 1897. Cleveland is the only president in American history to serve two nonconsecutive terms in office. He won the popular vote for three presidential elections—in 1884, 1888, and 1892—and was one of two Democrats (followed by Woodrow Wilson in 1912) to be elected president during the era of Republican presidential domination dating from 1861 to 1933.

Born to a Presbyterian minister and his wife, Cleveland grew up in upstate New York. In 1881, he was elected mayor of Buffalo and later, governor of New York. Cleveland was the leader of the pro-business Bourbon Democrats who opposed high tariffs; Free Silver; inflation; imperialism; and subsidies to business, farmers, or veterans. His crusade for political reform and fiscal conservatism made him an icon for American conservatives of the era. Cleveland won praise for his honesty, self-reliance, integrity, and commitment to the principles of classical liberalism. He fought political corruption, patronage, and bossism. As a reformer, Cleveland had such prestige that the like-minded wing of the Republican Party, called "Mugwumps", largely bolted the GOP presidential ticket and swung to his support in the 1884 election. As his second administration began, disaster hit the nation when the Panic of 1893 produced a severe national depression. It ruined his Democratic Party, opening the way for a Republican landslide in 1894 and for the agrarian and silverite seizure of the Democratic Party in 1896. The result was a political realignment that ended the Third Party System and launched the Fourth Party System and the Progressive Era. (Full article...)

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Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain
Credit: Brendan Wiltse

The high cliffs of Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain in Chesterfield make the peak the "gateway to Adirondacks" for travelers on the adjacent Adirondack Northway and U.S. Route 9. The mountain's unusual name is a corruption of the Algonquin pohquis moosie for "place of smooth broken rocks". Rock and ice climbers regularly scale those cliffs, and hikers are drawn to the views from the historic fire lookout tower on the 2,180-foot (660 m) summit.

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  • ...that contrary to some beliefs, the Battle of Plattsburgh was decided by the naval engagement and not other means?
  • ...that Hawker v. New York is a law preventing convicted felons from practicing medicine, even when the felony conviction occurred before the law was enacted, as decided by the Supreme Court of the United States?
  • ...that Representatives of the Albany Congress met on a daily basis between June 19 and July 11 to discuss better relations with the Indian tribes and common defensive measures against the French?

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A panoramic view of Times Square, New York City at night
Credit: Kurian Perayil

Times Square is a major intersection in Manhattan, New York City at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue and stretching from West 42nd to West 47th Streets. The Times Square area consists of the blocks between Sixth and Eighth Avenues from east to west, and West 40th and West 53rd Streets from south to north, making up the western part of the commercial area of Midtown Manhattan.

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State facts

  • Total area: 54,555 mi2
    • Land: 47,190 mi2
    • Water: 7,365 mi2
  • Highest elevation: 5,344 ft (Mount Marcy)
  • Population 19,745,289 (2016 est)
  • Admission to the Union: July 26, 1788 (11th)

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