2020 United States House of Representatives elections in New York

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2020 United States House of Representatives elections in New York

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 27 New York seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 21 6
Seats won 19 8
Seat change Decrease2 Increase2
Popular vote 5,084,863 2,978,407
Percentage 61.96% 36.29%
Swing Decrease5.20% Increase5.07%

2020NYUSHouse.svg

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in New York was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the 27 U.S. representatives from the State of New York, one from each of the state's 27 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primary election was held on June 23, 2020.

District 1[edit]

The 1st district is based in eastern Long Island, and includes most of central and eastern Suffolk County, including most of Smithtown and all of Brookhaven, Riverhead, Southold, Southampton, East Hampton, and Shelter Island. The incumbent is Republican Lee Zeldin, who was reelected with 51.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Failed to qualify for ballot[edit]
  • David Gokhshtein, cryptocurrency entrepreneur[7]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Bridget Fleming (D)
U.S. Representatives
State Officials
Notable individuals

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Gregory-John
Fischer
Bridget
Fleming
Perry
Gershon
Nancy
Goroff
Undecided
Honan Strategy Group[A] May 24–31, 2020 640 (LV) ± 3.85% 29% 22% 29%
Global Strategy Group[B] May 26–28, 2020 401 (LV) ± 4.9% 1% 17% 29% 27%
Global Strategy Group[B] Early April 2020 – (V)[b] 1% 16% 33% 11%
GBAO Strategies[C] January 27–30, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 21% 42% 9%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nancy Goroff 17,970 36.1
Democratic Perry Gershon 17,303 34.8
Democratic Bridget Fleming 13,718 27.6
Democratic Gregory-John Fischer 775 1.5
Total votes 49,766 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Nancy Goroff
Executive Branch Officials
U.S. Senators
Organizations
Unions
Newspapers and Publications

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Lean R August 16, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Lean R October 16, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Lean R September 3, 2020
Politico[33] Lean R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Likely R June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Lean R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Lean R June 7, 2020

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Lee
Zeldin (R)
Nancy
Goroff (D)
Undecided
GQR Research (D)[D] October 5–8, 2020 402 (LV) ± 4.9% 49% 48% 2%
Tulchin Research (D)[E] August 5–10, 2020 400 (LV) ±  4.9% 46% 48%
Global Strategy Group (D)[B] August 3–5, 2020 400 (LV) ±  4.9% 47% 42%
Public Policy Polling (D)[D] July 14–15, 2020 1,100 (V) ±  3.0% 47% 40%

Results[edit]

New York's 1st congressional district, 2020[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lee Zeldin 180,855 48.2
Conservative Lee Zeldin 21,611 5.8
Independence Lee Zeldin 3,249 0.9
Total Lee Zeldin (incumbent) 205,715 54.9
Democratic Nancy Goroff 160,978 42.9
Working Families Nancy Goroff 8,316 2.2
Total Nancy Goroff 169,294 45.1
Total votes 375,009 100.0
Republican hold

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is based on the South Shore of Long Island, and includes the southwestern Suffolk County communities of Amityville, Copiague, Lindenhurst, Gilgo, West Babylon, Wyandanch, North Babylon, Babylon, Baywood, Brentwood, Brightwaters, Central Islip, Islip, Great River, Ocean Beach, Oakdale, West Sayville, Bohemia, West Islip and Ronkonkoma, in addition to a sliver of southeastern Nassau County encompassing Levittown, North Wantagh, Seaford, South Farmingdale and Massapequa. The incumbent is Republican Peter T. King, who was reelected with 53.1% of the vote in 2018.[1] On November 11, 2019, King announced he would retire after more than 26 years in Congress.[39]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Andrew Garbarino (R)
Federal Politicians
Organizations

Polling[edit]

Hypothetical polling
with Rick Lazio and Lara Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Rick
Lazio
Lara
Trump
Undecided
WPA Intelligence/Club for Growth[F] November 17–18, 2019 400 (LV) 19% 53% 28%

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew Garbarino 17,462 63.9
Republican Mike LiPetri 9,867 36.1
Total votes 27,329 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Jackie Gordon, Babylon town councilwoman and U.S. Army veteran[58]
  • Patricia Maher, attorney and nominee for New York's 2nd congressional district in 2014[59]
Failed to qualify for ballot[edit]
  • Mike Sax, political blogger[7]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Jackie Gordon (D)
Nationwide executive officials
Federal politicians
State officials
Organizations

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jackie Gordon 25,317 72.8
Democratic Patricia Maher 9,475 27.2
Total votes 34,792 100.0

Green Party[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Harry R. Burger, mechanical design engineer[70]

Independents[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Daniel Craig Ross, administrative assistant and activist[71]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Tossup September 29, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Tossup September 18, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Lean R September 3, 2020
Politico[33] Tossup September 8, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Tossup August 31, 2020
RCP[35] Tossup June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Lean R July 26, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 2nd congressional district, 2020[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andrew Garbarino 158,151 47.2
Conservative Andrew Garbarino 17,434 5.2
Libertarian Andrew Garbarino 1,491 0.4
SAM Andrew Garbarino 303 0.1
Total Andrew Garbarino 177,379 52.9
Democratic Jackie Gordon 144,849 43.2
Working Families Jackie Gordon 6,380 1.9
Independence Jackie Gordon 3,017 0.9
Total Jackie Gordon 154,246 46.0
Green Harry Burger 3,448 1.1
Total votes 335,073 100.0
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district is based on the North Shore of Long Island, and includes the northwestern Suffolk County and northern Nassau County communities of Manhasset, Huntington, Northport, Commack, Dix Hills, Plainview, Bethpage, Hicksville, Syosset, Glen Cove, Roslyn, Port Washington and Great Neck, as well as the far northeastern Queens neighborhoods of Little Neck, Whitestone, Glen Oaks and Floral Park. The incumbent is Democrat Thomas Suozzi, who was re-elected with 59.0% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Melanie D'Arrigo, activist and healthcare professional[72]
  • Michael Weinstock, former prosecutor[73]
  • Thomas Suozzi, incumbent U.S. representative

Endorsements[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Thomas Suozzi (incumbent) 36,812 66.5
Democratic Melanie D'Arrigo 14,269 25.8
Democratic Michael Weinstock 4,284 7.7
Total votes 55,365 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • George A. Santos, finance executive[79]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Likely D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Likely D October 24, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Tom
Suozzi (D)
George
Santos (R)
Undecided
Douma Research (R) August 1–2, 2020 550 (LV) ± 4.2% 50% 39% 11%
Hypothetical polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Democrat
Generic
Republican
Undecided
Douma Research (R) August 1–2, 2020 550 (LV) ± 4.2% 46% 41% 13%

Results[edit]

New York's 3rd congressional district, 2020[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Thomas Suozzi 196,056 52.6
Working Families Thomas Suozzi 9,203 2.5
Independence Thomas Suozzi 3,296 0.9
Total Thomas Suozzi (incumbent) 208,555 56.0
Republican George Santos 147,461 39.6
Conservative George Santos 14,470 3.9
Total George Santos 161,931 43.5
Libertarian Howard Rabin 2,156 0.5
Total votes 372,642 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

The 4th district is based central and southern Nassau County, and includes the communities of Baldwin, Bellmore, East Rockaway, East Meadow, the Five Towns, Lynbrook, Floral Park, Franklin Square, Garden City, Hempstead, Long Beach, Malverne, Freeport, Merrick, Mineola, Carle Place, New Hyde Park, Oceanside, Rockville Centre, Roosevelt, Uniondale, Wantagh, West Hempstead, Westbury and parts of Valley Stream. The incumbent is Democrat Kathleen Rice, who was re-elected with 61.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Cindy Grosz, publicist[80]
  • Douglas Tuman, attorney[80]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Douglas Tuman 10,898 71.7
Republican Cindy Grosz 4,292 28.3
Total votes 15,190 100.0

Green Party[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 4th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathleen Rice (incumbent) 199,762 56.1
Republican Douglas Tuman 139,559 39.2
Conservative Douglas Tuman 13,448 3.8
Total Douglas Tuman 153,007 43.0
Green Joseph R. Naham 3,024 0.9
Total votes 355,793 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is based mostly in southeastern Queens, and includes all of the Rockaway Peninsula and the neighborhoods of Broad Channel, Cambria Heights, Hollis, Jamaica, Laurelton, Queens Village, Rosedale, Saint Albans, Springfield Gardens, and South Ozone Park, as well as John F. Kennedy International Airport, as well as parts of Nassau County including Inwood and portions of Valley Stream and Elmont. The incumbent is Democrat Gregory Meeks, who was re-elected unopposed in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Shaniyat Chowdhury, U.S. Marine Corps veteran and bartender[81]
  • Gregory Meeks, incumbent U.S. representative[82]
Endorsements[edit]
Shaniyat Chowdhury
Organizations

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 50,044 75.8
Democratic Shaniyat Chowdhury 15,951 24.2
Total votes 65,995 100.0

Independents[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Amit Lal, logistics coordinator[7]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 5th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 229,125 100.0
Total votes 229,125 100.0
Democratic hold

District 6[edit]

The 6th district encompasses northeastern Queens, taking in the neighborhoods of Elmhurst, Flushing, Forest Hills, Kew Gardens, and Bayside. The incumbent is Democrat Grace Meng, who was re-elected with 90.9% of the vote, without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Sandra Choi, economic development policy expert[85]
  • Mel Gagarin, activist[86]
  • Grace Meng, incumbent U.S. representative[82]

Endorsements[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Grace Meng (incumbent) 30,759 65.5
Democratic Mel Gagarin 9,447 20.1
Democratic Sandra Choi 6,757 14.4
Total votes 46,963 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Tom Zmich, U.S. Army veteran[92]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 6th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Grace Meng 144,149 61.7
Working Families Grace Meng 14,713 6.3
Total Grace Meng (incumbent) 158,862 68.0
Republican Tom Zmich 67,735 29.0
Conservative Tom Zmich 5,231 2.2
Save Our City Tom Zmich 1,109 0.5
Libertarian Tom Zmich 754 0.3
Total Tom Zmich 74,829 32.0
Total votes 233,691 100.0
Democratic hold

District 7[edit]

The 7th district takes in the Queens neighborhoods of Maspeth, Ridgewood, and Woodhaven; the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Brooklyn Heights, Boerum Hill, Bushwick, Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, Dumbo, East New York, East Williamsburg, Greenpoint, Gowanus, Red Hook, Sunset Park, and Williamsburg; and parts of Manhattan's Lower East Side and East Village. The incumbent is Democrat Nydia Velázquez, who was re-elected with 93.4% of the vote, without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Nydia Velázquez
Organizations

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nydia Velázquez (incumbent) 56,698 80.1
Democratic Paperboy Love Prince 14,120 19.9
Total votes 70,818 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Brian Kelly
Withdrew[edit]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 7th congressional district, 2020[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nydia Velázquez 156,889 69.7
Working Families Nydia Velázquez 34,184 15.2
Total Nydia Velázquez (incumbent) 191,073 84.9
Republican Brian Kelly 29,404 13.1
Conservative Brian Kelly 3,116 1.3
Total Brian Kelly 32,520 14.4
Libertarian Gilbert Midonnet 1,522 0.7
Total votes 225,115 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8[edit]

The 8th district is centered around eastern Brooklyn, taking in Downtown Brooklyn, Bed-Stuy, Canarsie, and Coney Island, as well as a small portion of Queens encompassing Howard Beach. The incumbent is Democrat Hakeem Jeffries, who was re-elected with 94.3% of the vote, without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Garfield Wallace[94]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 8th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hakeem Jeffries 207,111 74.8
Working Families Hakeem Jeffries 27,822 10.0
Total Hakeem Jeffries (incumbent) 234,933 84.8
Republican Garfield Wallace 39,124 14.1
Conservative Garfield Wallace 2,883 1.1
Total Garfield Wallace 42,007 15.2
Total votes 276,940 100.0
Democratic hold

District 9[edit]

The 9th district encompasses Central and Southern Brooklyn, and includes the neighborhoods of Brownsville, Crown Heights, East Flatbush, Flatbush, Kensington, Park Slope, Prospect Heights, Midwood, Sheepshead Bay, Marine Park, Gerritsen Beach and Prospect Lefferts Gardens. Prospect Park, Grand Army Plaza and the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket. The incumbent is Democrat Yvette Clarke, who was re-elected with 89.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Did not qualify for ballot access[edit]

  • Michael Hiller, plaintiff litigator[7]
  • Alex Hubbard, data scientist[7]

Endorsements[edit]

Adem Bunkeddeko (D)
Organizations
Newspapers and media
Chaim Deutsch (D)
State Legislators
Local Officials
Organizations
Unions
Newspapers and media
Isiah James (D)
Organizations

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Yvette Clarke (incumbent) 52,293 54.3
Democratic Adem Bunkeddeko 23,819 24.7
Democratic Isiah James 10,010 10.4
Democratic Chaim Deutsch 9,383 9.7
Democratic Lutchi Gayot 843 0.9
Total votes 96,348 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Constantin Jean-Pierre, nonprofit executive[118]

Serve America Movement[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Joel Anabilah-Azumah, businessman and Reform candidate for New York's 9th congressional district in 2018[119]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 9th congressional district, 2020[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Yvette Clarke 195,758 70.7
Working Families Yvette Clarke 34,463 12.4
Total Yvette Clarke (incumbent) 230,221 83.1
Republican Constantin Jean-Pierre 40,110 14.5
Conservative Constantin Jean-Pierre 3,840 1.4
Total Constantin Jean-Pierre 43,950 15.9
Libertarian Gary Popkin 1,644 0.6
SAM Joel Azumah 1,052 0.4
Total votes 276,867 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10[edit]

The 10th district stretches across the southern part of Morningside Heights, the Upper West Side, the west side of Midtown Manhattan, the west side of Lower Manhattan including Greenwich Village and the Financial District, and parts of southern Brooklyn, including Borough Park. The incumbent is Democrat Jerry Nadler, who was re-elected with 82.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Did not qualify for ballot access[edit]
  • Darryl Hendricks, personal trainer[7]
  • Holly Lynch, former advertising executive[7]
  • Robert Wyman, co-founder of a geothermal heating business[121]
Withdrew[edit]

Debates[edit]

Host

network

Date Link(s) Participants
Lindsey

Boylan

Jonathan

Herzog

Jerry

Nadler

Spectrum News NY1 June 17, 2020 [123] Present Present Present

Endorsements[edit]

Lindsey Boylan
Organizations
Jonathan Herzog
Politicians
  • Andrew Yang, businessman, entrepreneur, non-profit leader and 2020 Presidential Candidate[125]
Individuals

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerry Nadler (incumbent) 51,054 67.7
Democratic Lindsey Boylan 16,511 21.9
Democratic Jonathan Herzog 7,829 10.4
Total votes 75,394 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Cathy Bernstein, financial advisor[141]

Endorsements[edit]

Dylan Stevenson

Independents[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Jeanne Nigro, self-help minister[7]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 10th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerry Nadler 181,215 65.5
Working Families Jerry Nadler 25,095 9.1
Total Jerry Nadler (incumbent) 206,310 74.6
Republican Cathy Bernstein 61,045 22.1
Conservative Cathy Bernstein 5,844 2.1
Total Cathy Bernstein 66,889 24.2
Libertarian Michael Madrid 3,370 1.2
Total votes 276,569 100.0
Democratic hold

District 11[edit]

The 11th district contains the entirety of Staten Island and parts of southern Brooklyn, including the neighborhoods of Bay Ridge, Bath Beach, Dyker Heights, southwestern Gravesend, western Sheepshead Bay, and parts of southern Bensonhurst. The incumbent is Democrat Max Rose, who flipped the district and was elected with 53.0% of the vote in 2018, only the second time the House district flipped blue for the Democratic Party since Republicans won the seat in 1980.[1]

Based on city and state-reported election night results, with all election districts reporting, in 2020 the traditionally conservative 11th district reverted to the Republican Party. While polls had predicted a close race, Conservative/Republican challenger Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis defeated Democratic freshman incumbent Rose to win the seat back for the GOP by a 6.4 point margin. Malliotakis earned 53.2 percent of the vote in the district over Rose's 46.8 percent. Malliotakis won her home borough of Staten Island while Rose won the Brooklyn portion of the district. Rose formally conceded the race to Malliotakis on November 12.[143] Final recanvassing and certification of results happened within 25 days of the November 3 general election.[144][145]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Withdrawn[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Joe Calaredra
Organizations
Individuals

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Nicole Malliotakis 15,697 69.0
Republican Joe Caldarera 7,046 31.0
Total votes 22,743 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Tossup August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Tossup September 4, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Lean D November 2, 2020
Politico[33] Tossup April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Tossup June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Tossup June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Lean D June 7, 2020

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Max
Rose (D)
Nicole
Malliotakis (R)
Other Undecided
Marist College/NBC October 19–21, 2020 650 (LV) ± 4.7% 46% 48% 1% 5%

Results[edit]

New York's 11th congressional district, 2020[38][144][145]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Nicole Malliotakis 143,420 49.0
Conservative Nicole Malliotakis 12,188 4.2
Total Nicole Malliotakis 155,608 53.2
Democratic Max Rose 134,625 46.0
Independence Max Rose 2,573 0.8
Total Max Rose (incumbent) 137,198 46.8
Total votes 292,806 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

District 12[edit]

The 12th district includes several neighborhoods in the East Side of Manhattan, the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn, western Queens, including Astoria and Long Island City. The incumbent is Democrat Carolyn Maloney, who was re-elected with 86.4% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
Declined[edit]
Endorsements[edit]
Lauren Ashcraft
Individuals
Organizations
Carolyn Maloney
State Elected Officials
Local officials
  • Ben Kallos, New York City Councilmember (District 5) since 2014[185]
  • Christine Quinn, Former Speaker of the New York City Council (2006–2013), Former New York City Councilmember (1999–2013)[185]
Organizations
Newspapers and media

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carolyn Maloney (incumbent) 40,362 42.8
Democratic Suraj Patel 37,106 39.4
Democratic Lauren Ashcraft 12,810 13.6
Democratic Peter Harrison 4,001 4.2
Total votes 94,279 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Carlos Santiago-Cano, real estate broker[7]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 12th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carolyn Maloney (incumbent) 265,172 82.3
Republican Carlos Santiago-Cano 49,157 15.3
Conservative Carlos Santiago-Cano 3,904 1.2
Total Carlos Santiago-Cano 53,061 16.5
Libertarian Steven Kolln 4,015 1.2
Total votes 322,248 100.0
Democratic hold

District 13[edit]

The 13th district encompasses the Upper Manhattan neighborhoods of Harlem, Washington Heights, and Inwood, as well the western Bronx neighborhoods of Kingsbridge and Bedford Park. The incumbent is Democrat Adriano Espaillat, who was re-elected with 94.6% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Adriano Espaillat, incumbent U.S. representative
  • James Felton Keith, entrepreneur[7]
  • Ramon Rodriguez, business etiquette executive[7]

Endorsements[edit]

James Felton Keith
Individuals

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adriano Espaillat (incumbent) 46,066 59.3
Democratic James Felton Keith 19,799 25.5
Democratic Ramon Rodriguez 11,859 15.2
Total votes 77,724 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Lovelynn Gwinn, landlord[7]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 13th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adriano Espaillat 202,916 79.6
Working Families Adriano Espaillat 28,925 11.3
Total Adriano Espaillat (incumbent) 231,841 90.9
Republican Lovelynn Gwinn 19,829 7.8
Conservative Christopher Morris-Perry 3,295 1.3
Total votes 254,965 100.0
Democratic hold

District 14[edit]

The 14th district covers the eastern part of the Bronx and part of north-central Queens, including the neighborhoods of College Point, Corona, East Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, and Woodside. The incumbent was Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who had been elected with 78.2% of the vote in 2018.[1] Ocasio-Cortez easily won the primary against former CNBC anchor Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, her large margin of victory was partly attributed by Fortune's Rey Mashayekhi to her substantial fundraising advantage and focus on digital advertising.[195]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
Declined[edit]

Debates[edit]

Host

network

Date Link(s) Participants
Alexandria

Ocasio-Cortez

Michelle

Caruso-Cabrera

Badrun

Khan

Sam

Sloan

BronxNet May 18, 2020 [207] Present Present Present Present
Spectrum News NY1 June 4, 2020 [208] Present Present Present Absent
Endorsements[edit]
Fernando Cabrera (withdrew)
Newspapers and media
Michelle Caruso-Cabrera
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
Executive officials
Federal officials
Labor unions
Organizations
Newspapers and media

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (incumbent) 46,582 74.6
Democratic Michelle Caruso-Cabrera 11,339 18.2
Democratic Badrun Khan 3,119 5.0
Democratic Sam Sloan 1,406 2.2
Total votes 62,446 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • John Cummings, former police officer[221]

Withdrawn[edit]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 14th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (incumbent) 152,661 71.6
Republican John Cummings 52,477 24.6
Conservative John Cummings 5,963 2.8
Total John Cummings 58,440 27.4
SAM Michelle Caruso-Cabrera 2,000 0.9
Total votes 213,101 100.0
Democratic hold

District 15[edit]

The 15th district is located entirely within the Bronx, including the neighborhoods of Hunts Point, Castle Hill, and Tremont. According to the Cook Partisan Voting Index, the 15th district is one of the most Democratic congressional districts in the country, with a PVI of D+39. As a result, victory in the Democratic Primary in the district would be tantamount to election.[citation needed] The incumbent Democrat, José E. Serrano, announced on March 25, 2019 that he had been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and would not be seeking re-election.[226]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Marlene Cintron, president of the Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation[236]
  • David P. Franks Jr., New York City police Sergeant (write-in)[237]
Declined[edit]

Debates[edit]

Host

network

Date Link(s) Participants
Michael

Blake

Rubén

Díaz Sr.

Samelys López Melissa Mark-Viverito Chivona Newsome Jonathan

Ortiz

Julio

Pabon

Tomas

Ramos

Ydanis

Rodríguez

Ritchie

Torres

Frangell

Basora

Marlene

Tapper

Gotham Gazelle May 15, 2020 [245] Present Absent Present Present Present Absent Absent Present Present Present Present Absent
BronxNet June 1, 2020 [246] Present Absent Present Present Present Present Present Present Present Present Present Present
News 12 The Bronx June 9, 2020 [247] Present Absent Present Present Present Absent Present Present Present Present Present Absent
Spectrum News NY1 June 10, 2020 [248] Present Absent Present Present Absent Absent Absent Absent Present Present Absent Absent

Endorsements[edit]

Michael Blake (D)
Federal Politicians
Organizations
Individuals

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Michael
Blake
Rubén
Díaz
Ydanis
Rodríguez
Ritchie
Torres
Melissa
Mark-Viverito
Samelys
López
Other Undecided
Data for Progress May 21–24, 2020 323 (LV) 6% 22% 6% 20% 6% 2% 3%[c] 34%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ritchie Torres 19,090 32.2
Democratic Michael Blake 10,725 18.1
Democratic Rubén Díaz Sr. 8,559 14.4
Democratic Samelys López 8,272 13.9
Democratic Ydanis Rodríguez 6,291 10.6
Democratic Melissa Mark-Viverito 2,561 4.3
Democratic Tomás Ramos 1,442 2.4
Democratic Chivona Newsome 1,366 2.3
Democratic Marlene Tapper 392 0.7
Democratic Julio Pabon 244 0.4
Democratic Frangell Basora 189 0.3
Democratic Mark Escoffery-Bay 153 0.3
Total votes 59,284 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Orlando Molina

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 15th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ritchie Torres 169,533 88.9
Republican Patrick Delices 18,894 9.9
Conservative Patrick Delices 2,237 1.2
Total Patrick Delices 21,221 11.1
Total votes 190,754 100.0
Democratic hold

District 16[edit]

The 16th district contains the northern parts of the Bronx and the southern half of Westchester County, including the cities of Mount Vernon, Yonkers, and Rye. The incumbent was Democrat Eliot Engel.[276]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]

Debates[edit]

Host

network

Date Link(s) Participants
Eliot

Engel

Jamaal

Bowman

Christopher

Fink

Sammy

Ravelo

BronxNet June 2, 2020 [282] Present Present Present Present
Spectrum News NY1 June 9, 2020 [283] Present Present Present Absent

Endorsements[edit]

Jamaal Bowman
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State legislators
Municipal officials
Notable individuals
Organizations
Parties
Newspapers and media
Eliot Engel
Members of U.S. Cabinet
  • Hillary Clinton, 67th United States Secretary of State (2009–2013), Senator from New York (2001–2009) and 2016 Democratic Presidential nominee[306]
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Governors
State legislators
Local officials
Individuals
Unions
Organizations
Newspapers and Media
Andom Ghebreghiorgis (withdrew)

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Eliot
Engel
Jamaal
Bowman
Andom
Ghebreghiorgis
Undecided
Data for Progress[G] June 11–15, 2020 525 (LV) ± 5.1% 36%[d] 52% 11%
Data for Progress September 9–13, 2019 578 (RV) ± 5.7% 29% 10% 1% 60%
Hypothetical polling
with Eliot Engel and Generic Democrat Who is More Liberal
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Eliot
Engel
More Liberal
Democrat
Undecided
Data for Progress September 9–13, 2019 578 (RV) ± 5.7% 35% 20% 46%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jamaal Bowman 49,367 55.4
Democratic Eliot Engel (incumbent) 36,149 40.6
Democratic Christopher Fink 1,625 1.8
Democratic Sammy Ravelo 1,139 1.3
Democratic Andom Ghebreghiorgis (withdrawn) 761 0.9
Total votes 89,041 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 16th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jamaal Bowman 218,514 84.2
Conservative Patrick McManus 41,094 15.8
Total votes 259,608 100.0
Democratic hold

District 17[edit]

The 17th district encompasses the lower Hudson Valley taking in Rockland County as well as northwestern and central Westchester County. The incumbent was Democrat Nita Lowey, who was re-elected with 88.0% of the vote in 2018, without major-party opposition.[1] On October 10, 2019, Lowey announced she was retiring from Congress and would not seek re-election.[326]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Catherine Borgia, Westchester County legislator (endorsed Buchwald)[334]
  • Duane Jackson, Buchanan trustee and candidate for New York's 18th congressional district in 2012[335]
  • David Katz, debt-recovery attorney (endorsed Jones)[336]
  • Catherine Parker, Westchester County legislator (endorsed Jones)[337] (remained on ballot)
  • Jo-Anna Rodriguez-Wheeler, small business owner[338]
Declined[edit]

Campaign[edit]

Following Lowey's retirement, several Democratic candidates announced campaigns for the seat. In the resulting primary, four frontrunners emerged; Mondaire Jones, an attorney who had already announced a primary challenge to Lowey before her retirement, Evelyn Farkas, a former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defence, David Carlucci, a state senator and former member of the Independent Democratic Conference (IDC), and Adam Schleifer, a former federal prosecutor who used his considerable personal wealth to self-finance his campaign.[343] In the ensuing campaign, Carlucci attacked the other three main candidates, accusing them of being carpetbaggers, while Jones also attacked the other major candidates, accusing them of being more akin to Republicans than Democrats.[343] Schleifer attracted personal criticism for using his and his family's wealth to campaign rather than donations, and Farkas also criticised him for refusing to divest from stocks while campaigning.[343] In response, Schleifer called Farkas a "snake", and declared that "all [she] knows is the fog of the beltway".[343]

Debates[edit]

2006 Minnesota's 5th congressional district democratic primary debates
 No. Date & Time Host Moderator Link Participants
Key:
 P  Participant    A  Absent    N  Non-invitee    W Withdrawn
David Buchwald David Carlucci Asha Castlebury-Hernandez Evelyn Farkas Allison Fine Mondaire Jones Adam Schleier
  1[343] 
June 16, 2020
The Business Council of Westchester
Marsha Gordon
Video
P P P P P P P

Endorsements[edit]

David Buchwald
State elected officials
Local elected officials
Unions
Evelyn Farkas
Executive officials
U.S. Senators
  • Bob Graham, former U.S. Senator from Florida (1987–2005), Former Governor of Florida (1979–1987)[349]
  • Carl Levin, former U.S. Senator from Michigan (1979–2015)[350]
U.S. Representatives
State elected officials
Party officials
Individuals
Organizations
Allison Fine
State elected officials
Local elected officials
Individuals
Organizations
Mondaire Jones
Members of U.S. Cabinet
  • Julián Castro, former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2014–2017), former mayor of San Antonio (2009–2014), former 2020 presidential candidate[366]
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Local elected officials
Organizations
Political parties
Newspapers and media
Adam Schleifer
Federal elected officials
Local elected officials
Newspapers and media

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
David
Buchwald
David
Carlucci
Evelyn
Farkas
Mondaire
Jones
Adam
Schleifer
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling June 15–16, 2020 1,141 (LV) - 8% 11% 14% 25% 14% 5%[e] 24%
Data for Progress May 28 – June 3, 2020 302 (V) - 6% 15% 13% 12% 13% 3%[f] 38%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mondaire Jones 32,796 41.9
Democratic Adam Schleifer 12,732 16.3
Democratic Evelyn Farkas 12,210 15.6
Democratic David Carlucci 8,649 11.1
Democratic David Buchwald 6,673 8.5
Democratic Asha Castleberry-Hernandez 2,062 2.6
Democratic Allison Fine 1,588 2.0
Democratic Catherine Parker (withdrawn) 1,539 2.0
Total votes 78,249 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

  • Yehudis Gottesfeld, chemical engineer[383]
  • Maureen McArdle-Schulman, former FDNY firefighter[384]

Withdrawn[edit]

  • Josh Eisen, businessman (running as an independent)[385]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Yehudis Gottesfeld
Newspapers and media

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Maureen McArdle-Schulman 8,492 78.4
Republican Yehudis Gottesfeld 2,338 21.6
Total votes 10,830 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 17th congressional district, 2020[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mondaire Jones 183,976 55.3
Working Families Mondaire Jones 13,378 4.0
Total Mondaire Jones 197,354 59.3
Republican Maureen McArdle Schulman 117,309 35.3
Conservative Yehudis Gottesfeld 8,887 2.7
Independent Joshua Eisen 6,363 1.9
SAM Michael Parietti 2,745 0.8
Total votes 332,658 100.0
Democratic hold

District 18[edit]

The 18th district is located in the mid-Hudson Valley covering all of Orange County and Putnam County, as well as parts of southern Dutchess County and northeastern Westchester County, including the city of Poughkeepsie. The incumbent is Democrat Sean Patrick Maloney, who was re-elected with 55.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Chele Farley, investment banker and nominee for U.S. Senate in 2018[390]

Endorsements[edit]

Chele Farley
Federal officials
Organizations

Third parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Likely D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Lean D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Likely D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Sean Patrick
Maloney (D)
Chele
Farley (R)
Scott
Smith (L)
Undecided
Global Strategy Group (D) October 6–11, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 53% 35% 5%
Hypothetical polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Democrat
Generic
Republican
Global Strategy Group (D) October 6–11, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 48% 43%

Results[edit]

New York's 18th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sean Patrick Maloney 171,161 51.0
Working Families Sean Patrick Maloney 12,924 3.8
Independence Sean Patrick Maloney 3,359 1.0
Total Sean Patrick Maloney (incumbent) 187,444 55.8
Republican Chele Farley 128,611 38.3
Conservative Chele Farley 16,534 4.9
Total Chele Farley 145,145 43.2
Libertarian Scott Smith 2,687 0.8
SAM Scott Smith 477 0.2
Total Scott Smith 3,164 1.0
Total votes 335,753 100.0
Democratic hold

District 19[edit]

The 19th district is based in the upper Hudson Valley and Catskills. The incumbent is Democrat Antonio Delgado, who flipped the district and was elected with 51.4% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Ola Hawatmeh, fashion designer and philanthropist[395]
  • Kyle Van De Water, former Millbrook village trustee and attorney[396]
Withdrew[edit]
Declined[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kyle Van De Water 12,138 57.5
Republican Ola Hawatmeh 8,988 42.5
Total votes 21,126 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Likely D September 29, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Likely D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Lean D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D October 26, 2020
RCP[35] Likely D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Lean D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 19th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Antonio Delgado 168,281 48.0
Working Families Antonio Delgado 22,969 6.6
SAM Antonio Delgado 850 0.2
Total Antonio Delgado (incumbent) 192,100 54.8
Republican Kyle Van De Water 151,475 43.2
Libertarian Victoria Alexander 4,224 1.2
Green Steve Greenfield 2,799 0.8
Total votes 350,598 100.0
Democratic hold

District 20[edit]

The 20th district is located in the Capital District and includes all of Albany and Schenectady Counties, and portions of Montgomery, Rensselaer and Saratoga Counties. The incumbent is Democrat Paul Tonko, who was re-elected with 66.5% of the vote in 2016.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Liz Joy, real estate agent and author[400]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 20th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul Tonko 194,071 54.0
Working Families Paul Tonko 19,678 5.5
Independence Paul Tonko 5,956 1.7
Total Paul Tonko (incumbent) 219,705 61.2
Republican Liz Joy 120,839 33.6
Conservative Liz Joy 17,849 5.0
SAM Liz Joy 758 0.2
Total Liz Joy 139,446 38.8
Total votes 359,151 100.0
Democratic hold

District 21[edit]

The 21st district is based in upstate New York, encompassing the Adirondack Mountains and North Country regions. The incumbent is Republican Elise Stefanik, who was re-elected with 56.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Endorsements[edit]
Elise Stefanik
Organizations

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]
Endorsements[edit]
Tedra Cobb
Organizations

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Likely R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Tossup June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 21st congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Elise Stefanik 169,684 52.9
Conservative Elise Stefanik 15,044 4.7
Independence Elise Stefanik 3,927 1.2
Total Elise Stefanik (incumbent) 188,655 58.8
Democratic Tedra Cobb 122,422 38.2
Working Families Tedra Cobb 9,573 3.0
Total Tedra Cobb 131,995 41.2
Total votes 320,650 100.0
Republican hold

District 22[edit]

The 22nd district is based in central New York and the Mohawk Valley, including the cities of Utica, Rome, Cortland and Binghamton. The incumbent is Democrat Anthony Brindisi, who flipped the district and was elected with 50.9% of the vote in 2018.[1] This is also a rematch of the 2018 election. On February 5, Justice Scott DelConte ordered all of the counties to certify their results leaving Claudia Tenney as the winner by 109 votes.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Withdrawn[edit]

Declined[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Claudia Tenney 23,784 59.6
Republican George Phillips 16,151 40.4
Total votes 39,935 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Tossup July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Tilt D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Lean D November 2, 2020
Politico[33] Tossup April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Tossup June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Tossup June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Lean D June 7, 2020

Endorsements[edit]

Claudia Tenney (R)
Federal Politicians
State officials
Organizations

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Anthony
Brindisi (D)
Claudia
Tenney (R)
Other/
Undecided
Siena College September 27 – October 4, 2020 383 (LV) ± 5% 48% 39% 13%[g]

Results[edit]

New York's 22nd congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Claudia Tenney 143,291 43.88
Conservative Claudia Tenney 12,807 3.92
Total Claudia Tenney 156,098 47.80
Democratic Anthony Brindisi 138,898 42.53
Working Families Anthony Brindisi 11,188 3.43
Independence Anthony Brindisi 5,903 1.81
Total Anthony Brindisi (incumbent) 155,989 47.77
Libertarian Keith Price 6,780 2.08
Total votes 326,566 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

Due to the closeness of the result, a recount occurred. The judge delayed certification pending a review of outstanding contested ballots. Therefore, the seat officially became vacant when Brindisi's term expired on January 3, 2021.[420][421] On February 5, 2021, Judge Scott DelConte ruled that Tenney had won the election by 109 votes.[422] Brindisi conceded the election on February 8.[423]

On March 25th, the federal Department of Justice notified Oneida County, which contains Utica and Rome, of its intent to sue over violations of the National Voter Registration Act and the Help America Vote Act that were revealed during the recount. The DOJ alleged that the Oneida County Board of Elections failed to process at least 2,400 voter registration applications that had been submitted by the deadline, and improperly rejected hundreds of affidavit ballots.[424]

District 23[edit]

The 23rd district is based in the Southern Tier, adjacent to Lake Erie and the state's border with Pennsylvania, and is home to the cities of Jamestown, Elmira, and Ithaca. The incumbent is Republican Tom Reed, who was re-elected with 54.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Casey McDonald, real estate developer and activist[426][427]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Scott Noren, physician and U.S. Army veteran[429][430]
Endorsements[edit]
Tracy Mitrano

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Likely R October 11, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe R June 7, 2020

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Tom
Reed (R)
Tracy
Mitrano (D)
Other/
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D)[H] September 28–29, 2020 1,228 (V) ± 2.8% 47% 40%
Global Strategy Group (D)[H] July 23–26, 2020 502 (LV) ± 4.4% 50% 38%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Republican and Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Global Strategy Group (D) July 23-26, 2020 502 (LV) ± 4.4% 45% 41%

Results[edit]

New York's 23rd congressional district, 2020[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Reed 161,800 51.6
Conservative Tom Reed 15,512 4.9
Independence Tom Reed 3,709 1.2
Total Tom Reed (incumbent) 181,021 57.7
Democratic Tracy Mitrano 116,025 37.0
Working Families Tracy Mitrano 12,951 4.1
Total Tracy Mitrano 128,976 41.1
Libertarian Andrew Kolstee 3,650 1.2
Total votes 313,724 100.0
Republican hold

District 24[edit]

The 24th district is centered around the Syracuse area and contains Cayuga, Onondaga, and Wayne counties, as well as western Oswego County. The incumbent is Republican John Katko, who was re-elected with 52.6% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrew[edit]
  • Roger Misso, U.S. Navy veteran[435]

Endorsements[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Dana
Balter
Francis
Conole
Undecided
GBAO Strategies[1][I] June 4–7, 2020 400 (LV)[b] ± 4.9% 60% 31% 9%
GBAO Strategies[2][I] March 23–25, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 64% 21% 15%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dana Balter 29,531 63.1
Democratic Francis Conole 17,254 36.9
Total votes 46,785 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Tossup October 8, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Tilt R August 7, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Lean R November 2, 2020
Politico[33] Tossup October 11, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Lean R June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Lean R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Likely R June 7, 2020

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
John
Katko (R)
Dana
Balter (D)
Steve
Williams (WFP)
Other Undecided
Change Research October 29 – November 2, 2020 739 (LV) ± 3.9% 44% 46% 4% 2%[h] 3%
Siena College October 20–22, 2020 558 (LV) ± 4.1% 45% 45% 5% 2%[i] 4%
Public Opinion Strategies (R)[J] October 15–18, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 47% 39% 3% 11%
Public Policy Polling (D)[K] October 13–14, 2020 798 (RV) ± 3.5% 43% 45%
Siena College September 28–29, 2020 414 (LV) ± 5.1% 40%[j] 42% 6% 2%[k] 10%
42%[l] 45% 3%[m] 10%
GBAO Strategies (D)[I] August 23–25, 2020 500 (LV) ±  4.4% 46% 48%
Public Opinion Strategies (R) August 12–15, 2020 400 (LV) ±  4.9% 51% 40%
RMG Research July 29 – August 4, 2020 500 (LV) ±  4.3% 40% 37% 23%
DCCC Targeting and Analytics Department (D)[E] June 18–22, 2020 400 (LV) ±  4.9% 45% 48%
Normington, Petts & Associates (D)[K] June 8–10, 2020 400 (RV) ±  4.9% 47% 47%

Results[edit]

New York's 24th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Katko 156,236 45.4
Conservative John Katko 21,086 6.1
Independence John Katko 5,487 1.6
Total John Katko (incumbent) 182,809 53.1
Democratic Dana Balter 147,877 43.0
Working Families Steven Williams 13,264 3.9
Total votes 343,950 100.0
Republican hold

District 25[edit]

The 25th district is located entirely within Monroe County, encompassing Rochester and the surrounding suburbs, including Irondequoit and Brighton. The incumbent is Democrat Joseph Morelle, who was elected with 59.0% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Endorsements[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Morelle (incumbent) 42,955 68.2
Democratic Robin Wilt 20,070 31.8
Total votes 63,009 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • George Mitris, businessman[7]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 25th congressional district, 2020[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph Morelle 187,503 53.9
Working Families Joseph Morelle 14,584 4.2
Independence Joseph Morelle 4,309 1.2
Total Joseph Morelle (incumbent) 206,396 59.3
Republican George Mitris 115,940 33.4
Conservative George Mitris 20,258 5.8
Total George Mitris 136,198 39.2
Libertarian Kevin Wilson 5,325 1.5
Total votes 347,919 100.0
Democratic hold

District 26[edit]

The 26th district is centered around the city of Buffalo and its inner suburbs, including Cheektowaga, Tonawanda, Amherst, Grand Island, and Niagara Falls. The incumbent is Democrat Brian Higgins, who was re-elected with 73.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Ricky Donovan, retired corrections officer[7]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[33] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 26th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brian Higgins 202,400 63.3
Working Families Brian Higgins 20,309 6.4
SAM Brian Higgins 657 0.2
Total Brian Higgins (incumbent) 223,366 69.9
Republican Ricky Donovan 91,706 28.7
Green Michael Raleigh 4,631 1.4
Total votes 319,703 100.0
Democratic hold

District 27[edit]

The 27th district is based in rural western New York and covers the outer suburbs of Buffalo and Rochester. The former incumbent Republican Chris Collins, pled guilty to charges of insider trading and resigned his seat effective immediately on October 1, 2019.[442] Republican Chris Jacobs won the special election to replace Collins on June 23, 2020.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Polling[edit]

Hypothetical polling
Collins vs. Jacobs vs. Parlato
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Chris
Collins
Chris
Jacobs
Beth
Parlato
Other Undecided
Tel Opinion Research July 31 – August 1, 2019 500 (V) 46% 26% 4% 0%[n] 24%
Collins vs. Mychajlw vs. Parlato
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Chris
Jacobs
Stefan
Mychajlw
Beth
Parlato
Other Undecided
Tel Opinion Research July 31 – August 1, 2019 500 (V) 39% 16% 6% 3%[o] 39%
Bellavia vs. Hawley vs. Jacobs vs. Mychajlw vs. Ortt vs. Parlato
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
David
Bellavia
Chris
Jacobs
Stefan
Mychajlw
Other Undecided
Tel Opinion Research July 31 – August 1, 2019 500 (V) 33% 24% 6% 14%[p] 24%
Bellavia vs. Jacobs vs. Parlato
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
David
Bellavia
Chris
Jacobs
Beth
Parlato
Other Undecided
Tel Opinion Research July 31 – August 1, 2019 500 (V) 41% 27% 6% 0%[n] 26%

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Jacobs 40,459 59.6
Republican Beth Parlato 14,805 21.8
Republican Stefan Mychajliw 12,650 18.6
Total votes 67,914 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[30] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[31] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[32] Likely R October 20, 2020
Politico[33] Likely R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[34] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[35] Likely R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[36] Likely R June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

New York's 27th congressional district, 2020[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Jacobs 192,619 50.2
Conservative Chris Jacobs 31,006 8.1
Independence Chris Jacobs 5,260 1.4
Total Chris Jacobs (incumbent) 228,885 59.7
Democratic Nate McMurray 136,686 35.7
Working Families Nate McMurray 12,763 3.3
Total Nate McMurray 149,449 39.0
Libertarian Duane Whitmer 4,877 1.3
Total votes 383,211 100.0
Republican hold

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ a b Not yet released
  3. ^ Ortiz, Pabon and Ramos with 1%
  4. ^ Including voters who lean towards a certain candidate
  5. ^ Castleberry-Hernandez with 3%; Fine with 2%
  6. ^ Fine with 2%; Castleberry-Hernandez with 1%; Parker with 0%
  7. ^ Price (L) with 4%; Undecided with 9%
  8. ^ "Don't recall" with 2%; Did not vote and would not vote with 0%
  9. ^ "Someone else" and would not vote with 1%
  10. ^ Standard VI response
  11. ^ Would not vote with 2%; "Someone else" with 0%
  12. ^ If Williams is removed from the ballot
  13. ^ Would not vote with 3%; "Someone else" with 0%
  14. ^ a b "Refused" with 0%
  15. ^ "Refused" with 3%
  16. ^ Hawley and Ortt with 5%; Parlato with 4%; "refused" with 0%
Partisan clients
  1. ^ Poll sponsored by Fleming's campaign
  2. ^ a b c Poll sponsored by Goroff's campaign
  3. ^ Poll sponsored by Gershon's campaign
  4. ^ a b Poll sponsored by 314 Action, which has endorsed Goroff prior to the sampling period.
  5. ^ a b Poll conducted by the DCCC, which works to elect Democratic candidates.
  6. ^ Club for Growth is an organisation that only supports Republican candidates
  7. ^ Poll sponsored by Bowman's campaign
  8. ^ a b Poll conducted for Mitrano's campaign.
  9. ^ a b c Poll sponsored by Dana Balter's campaign
  10. ^ Poll sponsored by Katko's campaign
  11. ^ a b Poll sponsored by the House Majority PAC, an organization which works to elect Democratic candidates

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  112. ^ a b Tracy, Matt (March 5, 2020). "Homophobes Deutsch, Diaz Endorse Each Other for Congress". Gay City News.
  113. ^ a b Chaim Deutsch [@ChaimDeutsch] (June 21, 2020). "Proud to have the support of the heroes of @misaskim and @ChesedShelEmes. #NY9 🔴🔴🔴🔴🔴🔴🔴🔴 Two days left! Help get our campaign over the finish line by contributing here: t.co/7eVSE6H04H t.co/ZbC9L4fZTg" (Tweet). Retrieved February 2, 2021 – via Twitter.
  114. ^ "DEA Supports Chaim Deutsch for Congress".
  115. ^ "The NYPD PBA Endorses Councilman Chaim Deutsch Congress". CrownHeights.info - Chabad News, Crown Heights News, Lubavitch News.
  116. ^ "Democratic Primary Endorsements". The Jewish Press. June 10, 2020. Retrieved February 26, 2021.
  117. ^ James, Isiah [@isiah4congress] (October 22, 2019). "This campaign started over two watered-down cups of coffee at a neighborhood coffee shop. We are now in the thick of the fight to return this government — our government back to it's [sic] rightful owners —THE PEOPLE. I'm honored to be endorsed by @BrandNew535 t.co/aQjHagzmcz" (Tweet). Retrieved December 24, 2020 – via Twitter.
  118. ^