Juan de la Cueva | Spanish dramatist and poet | Britannica

Juan de la Cueva

Spanish dramatist and poet
Alternate titles: Juan de la Cueva
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Born:
c.1550 Sevilla Spain
Died:
c.1610 Sevilla Spain

Juan de la Cueva, in full Juan de la Cueva de Garoza, (born c. 1550, Sevilla [Spain]—died c. 1610, Sevilla), Spanish dramatist and poet, one of the earliest Spanish writers to depart from classical forms and use national historical subjects.

Cueva differed from his contemporaries in having his plays published, thus transmitting to posterity intact examples of early, albeit mediocre, Spanish drama. Cueva’s plays in the collection Primera parte de las comedias y tragedias (1583; “First Part of the Comedies and Tragedies”), including such works as Tragedia de Ayax Telamón (“Tragedy of Ajax Telamon”) and Tragedia de la muerte de Virginia (“Tragedy of the Death of Virginia”), drew on Greco-Roman themes. Cueva was particularly skilled at adapting medieval Spanish legends and ballads; his Tragedia de los siete infantes de Lara (1588; “Tragedy of the Seven Princes of Lara”) and La muerte del rey don Sancho (1588; “The Death of King Don Sancho”) were later used by Lope de Vega and the Romantic novelists, and his treatise in verse, Ejemplar poético (1606), was an important antecedent of Lope de Vega’s Arte nuevo de hacer comedias (“New Art of Writing Comedies”). Other important plays by Cueva include the mythological farces El saco de Roma y muerte de Borbón (“The Sacking of Rome and the Death of [the Duke of] Bourbon”) and El infamador (1581; “The Slanderer”).