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Democracy Dies in Darkness
(Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post)
Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson’s revelations about conversations before, during, and after Jan. 6 offer new insight that legal experts said could be of use to prosecutors as they weigh a case against Donald Trump.
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Virginia's Glenn Youngkin (R) speaks at a budget-signing ceremony last week in Richmond. (AP)
The Republican governor also plans to headline a Nebraska GOP event, and has begun speaking more often about the needs of “Americans,” not just “Virginians."
Eli Skrypczak, trekking through New Mexico backcountry earlier this month, was returning home on an Amtrak train that derailed. (Courtesy of Dan Skrypczak)
Eli Skrypczak played on his phone Monday afternoon while aboard an Amtrak train hurtling through the heartland of Missouri. The 15-year-old Boy Scout and hundreds of other passengers were unaware of the dump truck ahead that was about to change their lives.
Abortion rights supporters cheer outside a Planned Parenthood clinic in West Hollywood, Calif. (AP)
A data-privacy issue on Planned Parenthood’s website has experts wondering: Do people seeking abortions have any chance at covering their digital tracks?
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(iStock/Washington Post Illustration)
By The WayA Post Travel Destination
High prices, crowded skies and not enough workers: What's not to love about travel this season?
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(Matt Roth for The Post)
The ailment in older adults has received little attention, even though research suggests seniors are more likely to develop it than younger or middle-aged adults.
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Faith Lippincott and daughter Addy, 10, at a sunken boat exposed in Lake Mead. (Roger Kisby for The Post)
Handguns, baby strollers, vintage Coors cans, exploded ordnance and other artifacts are stoking the imagination of those watching the nation’s largest reservoir shrink to about a quarter of its former size.
In poorer, less-wired parts of the U.S., it’s harder to find credible news about your local community. That has dire implications for democracy.
It's unclear how close the Colorado man was before the attack, but the Park Service said it was another case of a visitor getting “too close to the animal.”
This Sept. 21, 2010, photo shows the death chamber at California's San Quentin State Prison. (AP)
RetropolisThe Past, Rediscovered
Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court abolished the death penalty — then reinstated it four years later. Three backers of capital punishment came to regret their position.