AUG 22 by Dave - Issuu

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e the citizens’ gameface WEEK 1

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GAR, Meyers, Coughlin playing last season as separate programs.. Inside

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Ex-Trump campaign chairman guilty of 8 charges

SEXUAL ABUSE IN OUR CHURCHES

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

A judge declared a mistrial on 10 other counts against Paul Manafort on Tuesday. BY MATTHEW BARAKAT, CHAD DAY AND ERIC TUCKER AssociAted Press

of abuse and helping to cover them up. King’s College announced plans to rescind all honors to the men, such as the naming of buildings and honorary degrees. King’s noted it has honored McCormick, who died in 1996, and Timlin, who retired in 2003 and is now 91-years old. Perhaps the most visible honor at King’s is the J. Carroll McCormick Campus Ministry Center at Jackson and Franklin streets, where the Chapel of Christ the King is located.

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Paul Manafort, the longtime political operative who for months led Donald Trump’s successful presidential campaign, was found guilty of eight financial crimes Tuesday in the first trial victory of the special counsel investigation into the president’s associates. A judge declared a mistrial on 10 other counts the jury could MANAFORT not agree on. The verdict was MORE part of a stunning INSIDE one-two punch of bad news for the White cohen pleads House, coming as guilty, the president’s forimplicates mer lawyer, Michael trump in Cohen, was pleading hush-monguilty in New York ey scheme. to campaign finance Page A13 charges arising from hush money payments made to two women who say they had sexual relationships with Trump. The jury returned the decision after deliberating four days on tax and bank fraud charges against Manafort, who led Trump’s election effort during a crucial stretch of 2016, including as he clinched the Republican nomination and during the party’s convention. Manafort, who appeared jovial earlier in the day amid signs the jury was struggling in its deliberations, focused intently on the jury as the clerk read off the charges. He stared down blankly at the defense table, then looked up, expressionless, as the judge finished thanking the jury. “Mr. Manafort is disappointed of not getting acquittals all the way through or a complete hung jury on all counts,” said defense lawyer Kevin Downing. He said Manafort was evaluating all his options.

Please see COLLEGES, Page A8

Please see MANAFORT, Page A13

Butch coMegys / stAff PhotogrAPher

The Most Rev. Joseph C. Bambera, Bishop of Scranton, is interviewed by a reporter on Tuesday in his office at the Diocesan Chancery building in downtown Scranton.

Some accused priests still receive monthly stipend from the diocese BY TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER stAff Writer

SCRANTON — Some Diocese of Scranton priests accused of sexual misconduct who have not been laicized continue to receive a monthly stipend from the diocese to meet their basic needs, the Most. Rev. Joseph Bambera told The Times-Tribune, a

Times-Shamrock newspaper, during an interview Tuesday. Bambera, Scranton’s bishop, said canon law requires that any priest removed from ministry but not laicized, commonly known as being defrocked, be provided a “minimal sustenance” — currently $1,237.50 a month, according to diocese

WATCH VIDEO for video of the one-on-one interview with the Most rev. Joseph Bambera, go to www.citizensvoice.com.

READ MORE

spokesman William Genello. The payments to the priests is among several issues Bambera discussed in the wake of a statewide grand jury report released last week that revealed 301 priests in six dioceses in Pennsylvania sexually abused more

■ Pope to meet victims of clergy sexual abuse while in ireland. Page A8

MORE ONLINE

for coverage of the sexual abuse scandal in the catholic church, visit www.citizensvoice.com/churchscandal.

Please see BISHOP, Page A8

King’s, Misericordia reviewing honors bestowed on bishops accused in sex abuse report BY BOB KALINOWSKI stAff Writer

MArk MorAN / stAff PhotogrAPher

King’s College announced plans to rescind all honors to the former bishops accused of covering up sexual abuse by priests. This includes the campus ministry center at King’s named for former Bishop J. Carroll McCormick.

The two Roman Catholic colleges in Luzerne County are reviewing all past honors bestowed on bishops from the Diocese of Scranton accused of covering up sexual abuse by priests. King’s College in Wilkes-Barre and Misericordia University in Dallas Twp. released statements Tuesday about a statewide grand jury report that implicated three former bishops. The church leaders, Jerome Hannan, J. Carroll McCormick and James C. Timlin, were accused of hearing reports

ADVE RTISE M E NT

City in talks to sell parking garage BY STEVE MOCARSKY stAff Writer

WILKES-BARRE — The city is again in negotiations to sell the Park and Lock East Garage, this time to the city parking authority. Au t h o r i t y E xe c u t ive Director Tom Torbik on Tuesday updated board members about negotiations with the city and said he was amenable to the authority paying the city the appraised value of the garage — $1.55 million. And, the authority would be responsible for paying the remainder of a construction loan on the garage — about $370,000 — to the city Office of

MORE INSIDE city parking authority filing complaint with council over hotel sterling lot. Page A4

the citizeNs’ Voice file

Wilkes-Barre is in negotiations to sell the Park and Lock East Garage to the city parking authority. Community Development, Torbik said, making the sale price nearly comparable to one offered by a private company earlier this year.

MayorTonyGeorge’sadministration started negotiating in 2017 with officials from Washington & Market Street Properties, whose principals, Martin

Mariano and Antonio Rado, own an office building adjacent to the garage. But George couldn’t muster enough support on council for the proposed $2 million sale, so he pulled a sale resolution from a council agenda in May. Among council members’ concerns was keeping the garage as a city asset.

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BUSINESS. . . . . . . C1 EDITORIAL. . . . . . A11 LOTTERY . . . . . . . . A2 CLASSIFIED . .C4-12 HEALTH . . . . . . . . . B7 OBITUARIES A12-13

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If you need an experienced attorney you can TRUST, call ATTORNEY DAVE SABA.

400 Third Avenue, Suite 101 Kingston, PA 18704 info@sabalaw.net

TODAY’S WEATHER BIRTHDAYS. . . . . . A2 CROSSWORD . . . C2 LOCAL . . . . . . . . . . . A3

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When the chips are down and you need someone you can TRUST, Attorney Dave Saba is the kind of lawyer you want by your side. Highly credentialed and experienced, he has successfully handled thousands of cases for area clients. • Personal Injury

COURT NOTES . . A6 HOROSCOPE. . . . C3 WORLD/NATIONA10

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1. Junior high football: Coughlin, GAR, Meyers hold first merged practice 2. Man fleeing from police crashes into W-B home 3. Eliminating school property taxes topic of hearing in W-B 4. Pittston man pleads guilty to importing drugs from China 5. Contractor files lawsuit against Pittston Twp. Sewer Authority

Whatzit Find the familiar phrase, saying or name in this arrangement of letters.

Whatzit? solution: A dime a dozen

Lotteries Pennsylvania Tuesday Pick 2, 1:35 63 (9) Pick 2, 7 97 (4) Pick 3, 1:35 982 (9) Pick 3, 7 800 (4) Pick 4, 1:35 8648 (9) Pick 4, 7 6795 (4) Pick 5, 1:35 40724 (9) Pick 5, 7 02957 (4) Cash 5 2-18-23-26-36 Match 6 14-17-20-21-30-36 Treasure Hunt 2-7-17-18-25 Cash-4-Life, Monday 6-23-27-45-54+1 Powerball, Saturday 24-34-52-61-67+16 Powerplay: 3 Mega Millions, Tuesday 14-16-19-38-57+11 Megaplier: 3

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Yesterday we asked: do you ever eat tV dinners? Yes: 46 percent No: 54 percent

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Property database: An updated version of the Luzerne County Real Estate Database is now available at citizensvoice.com. The searchable database contains information on more than 166,000 properties in the county, including their assessment values, sales data and tax liability. The data now available was updated by the county on June 12. Visit citizensvoice.com/news/data-center.

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Submit news and photos about local people and events to community@ citizensvoice.com. Fax to 570-821-2247. Call 570-821-2069.

Area attorneys honor Schwager for work on

Beyonce

People

governing council

News in the

The Wilkes-Bar re Law & Library Association/the bar association of Luzerne County honored attorney David E. Schwager for his leadership service on the association’s governing council. A special award was presented to Schwager by attorney Jane M. Acri, president of the association. Schwager is currently the vice president of the Pennsylvania Bar Association and also serves as chairman of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania Disciplinary Committee. From left, are attorneys David E. Schwager and Jane M. Acri.

Beyonce reveals her emergency C-section

Mature Worker Program holds mini job fair

Today’s Cash 5 jackpot will be worth at least $125,000. Today’s Treasure Hunt jackpot will be worth $43,000. Today’s Match 6 jackpot will be worth at least $1.16 million.

— AssociAted Press

Obituaries

New Jersey Pick 3, Tues., 412 (2) Pick 4, Tues., 7729 (2) Pick 6, Monday 1-5-11-12-27-34+3 New York Daily, Tues., 605 (11) Win 4, Tues., 8757 (27) Lotto, Saturday 12-24-27-30-40-53+29

Almanac

Today is Wednesday, Aug. 22, the 234th day of 2018. There are 131 days left in the year. In 1787, inventor John Fitch demonstrated his steamboat on the Delaware River to delegates from the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. In 1851, the schooner America outraced more than a dozen British vessels off the English coast to win a trophy that came to be known as the America’s Cup. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln responded to Horace Greeley’s call for more drastic steps to abolish slavery; Lincoln replied that his priority was saving the Union, but he also repeated his personal wish “that all men everywhere could be free.” In 1910, Japan annexed Korea, which remained under Japanese control until the end of World War II. In 1932, the British Broadcasting Corp. conducted its first experimental television broadcast, using a 30-line mechanical system. In 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Vice President Richard Nixon were nominated for second terms in office by the Republican National Convention in San Francisco. In 1985, 55 people died when fire broke out aboard a British Airtours charter jet on a runway at Manchester Airport in England. Today’s Birthdays: Broadcast journalist Morton Dean is 83. Author Annie Proulx is 83. Baseball Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski is 79. Actress Valerie Harper is 79. Pro Football Hall of Fame coach Bill Parcells is 77. Writerproducer David Chase is 73. Pop musician David Marks is 70. Rock singer Roland Orzabal (Tears For Fears) is 57. Rock musician Debbi Peterson (The Bangles) is 57. Rock musician Gary Lee Conner (Screaming Trees) is 56. Singer Tori Amos is 55. Singer Howie Dorough (Backstreet Boys) is 45. Comedian-actress Kristen Wiig is 45. Talk show host James Corden is 40.

NEW YORK — Beyonce revealed she had an emergency cesarean section when she delivered her twins. The singer, in a series of essays in September’s Vogue magazine, says she was 218 pounds and was swollen from toxemia. The 36-year-old says the twins spent many weeks in intensive care and her husband, Jay-Z, was “a strong support system.” She says she put pressure on herself to lose weight in the three months after the birth of her first child. But after the twins, she approached things differently.

The Mature Worker Program (Senior Community Service Employment Program), sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging for LuzerneWyoming Counties, recently hosted a mini job fair at the Wilkes-Barre Boscov’s Department Store atrium. Three local employers spoke to the Mature Worker Program Participants about employment opportunities within their companies. The Mature Worker Program (SCSEP) is a federally funded training program which serves individuals who are at least 55 years old, a resident of Luzerne/Wyoming counties, and meet federal low-income guidelines. Mature Worker Program (SCSEP) provides temporary community service training opportunities to older Americans to prepare them for jobs in their community. The purpose

of the program is to offer a “stepping stone” back into the work force. Once the individual is enrolled in the program, they will receive on-the-job training with local partnering nonprofit organizations or local government offices. The participants train an average of 15-20 hours a week, and are paid a training stipend that is the highest of federal, state or local minimum wage directly by Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). The participants training will be customized to meet the individual needs of the participants and also the needs of the training sites. Some typical tasks performed by the Mature Workers include: providing clerical/office support where they can hone their computer skills, typing, and general office skills. There is also maintenance

training available. The program also provides on-going training programs to teach participants new skills. First row, from left, are Maureen Iskra, ESS; Sharon Brenzel, Geisinger; Fred Pierantoni, Geisinger, and Bob Ryzner Jr., Comfort Keepers. Second row: Gary Matthews, enrollment specialist trainee; Anne Kelly, supportive services/program relations representative trainee; Denise Stalica, Mature Worker Prog ram project director; Sandy Ostrowski, enrollment specialist trainee; Marie Rondinella, enrollment specialist trainee, and Bob Ryzner Sr., enrollment specialist trainee. For information, call Denise Stalica, program director, or Jan Lewis, intake specialist trainee, at 570-8221158.

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Taylor Rylie Martin, daughter of Ryan Martin and Suzy Schappert, is celebrating her 12th birthday today, Aug. 22. Taylor is the granddaughter of Paul and Lee Ann Martin, of Wilkes-Barre, and Mike and Donna Schappert, of Ashley. She is the greatgranddaughter of William Cruikshank, of Wilkes-Barre, and Jean Schappert, of Ashley. Taylor has two brothers, Dylan Martin and Brayden Canevari.

Chloe McDaniels, daughter of William and Jennifer McDaniels, is celebrating her fifth birthday today, Aug. 22. Chloe is the granddaughter of Patricia Hartman and the late Gary Hartman Sr., Deborah McDaniels and the late William McDaniels Sr. She is the great-granddaughter of Doris Remensynder and the late Richard Remensynder Sr., the late William and Josephine Falls, the late James and Dora Hartman and the late Sara and Robert McDaniels. Chloe has a sister, Isabella, 8.

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Volume 40, Issue 326 August 22, 2018

CORRECTIONS A story published in Saturday’s edition of The Citizens’ Voice about Diocese of Scranton priest Martin Boylan incorrectly listed Bishop Joseph Bambera as a member of an independent advisory board that reviewed allegations of sexual abuse by priests. Bambera received an April 5, 2016, letter from a former board member regarding Boylan’s behavior, but the bishop was not a board member. It is our policy to correct errors promptly. To report an error, please call the city desk at 570-821-2056.


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Local WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

A3

Flood-prone West Pittston homes could be elevated Proposed project would cost about $2.5 million. BY ERIC MARK STAFF WRITER

PLAINS TWP. — A proposed flood mitigation project that calls for elevating up to 13 homes in a floodprone area of West Pittston was unveiled at Tuesday’s meeting of the Luzer ne County Flood Protection Authority. Christopher Belleman, the authority’s executive director, said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently informed him the house-elevating project is compatible with the ongoing Wyoming Valley levee-raising project, designed to improve flood protection along the Susquehanna River. A committee of county and emergency management officials had submitted the house-elevating plan to the Corps of Engineers for its approval, which was required for the project to

MICHAEL J. MULLEN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Houses along the Susquehanna River in West Pittston flooded in September 2011. proceed, Belleman said. Plans call for the homes to be raised above “base flood elevation level,” with basements filled in and utility lines re-routed, he said. The authority board on Tuesday approved the project, estimated to cost about $2.5 million. Belleman said that figure is a “rough ballpark” estimate, and emphasized the project is in the early planning stages and

depends upon finding sufficient funding. The authority will pursue hazard mitigation grants through the Federal Emergency Management Agency, as well as Luzerne County Office of Community Development grants and other funding sources, Belleman said. The owners of the impacted homes will likely be required to contribute 5 per-

cent to 10 percent of the cost, according to Belleman. The project will be voluntary, giving property owners the option not to participate, he said. The Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency designated the 13 homes as “repetitive loss properties” or “severe repetitive loss properties” following the major flood of September 2011, when some West

Pittston residents had to evacuate by boat, Belleman said. Attempts to obtain a list of the impacted properties on Tuesday were unsuccessful. T he project must be approved by a multi-county flood mitigation advisory board, which next meets Sept. 6. That board includes representatives of Columbia, Luzerne, Montour, Northumberland and Snyder counties, Belleman said. The project could be rendered moot if West Pittston decides to pursue flood protection measures on its own, according to Belleman. At present, there is no levee protection from the Susquehanna River in West Pittston. That could change someday, according to borough Mayor Tom Blaskiewicz. West Pittston borough council in May approved a grant-funded feasibility study to explore flood mitigation options, Blaskiewicz said. Borough officials hope to

send out a request for proposals to conduct the study soon, he said. Blaskiewicz said borough residents who live along Susquehanna Avenue and areas near the river have said they want flood protection, especially after an ice jam on the river caused flooding problems in January. Belleman agreed. “I would think at this point they would want protection,” he said. H o w e v e r, p u b l i s h e d reports following the 2011 flood noted conflicting opinions between those who wanted better flood protection and those who preferred to maintain a natural setting and clear view of the river. A photograph that accompanied an article in The New York Times showed the following words written in white paint on the side of a West Pittston building: “Levee or view?” Contact the writer: emark@citizensvoice.com 570-821-2117

Former city admin resigns from health department post BY STEVE MOCARSKY STAFF WRITER

According to the AOPC, Hayward did not immediately take the bar exam after graduating from law school in 1996, and instead obtained employment with the City of WilkesBarre. He was a city firefighter for 13 years, and later worked in City Hall as deputy administrator and then as director of the Office of Community Development. He became city administrator in 2001 and lost that position in 2003 after Tom Leighton became mayor. While Hayward receives an annual disability pension of $10,015 for his years as a firefighter, it’s unclear whether the five months of work in the health department will qualify him for an additional pension through the non-uniformed pension fund. George said an employee must work 10 or 12 years for a pension to become vested, depending on the date of hire, and Hayward worked in McGroarty’s administration for close to eight years. But military service can count toward years of city service when calculating pensions, city Administrator Ted Wampole noted, and Hayward has some. Hayward is a veteran of both the U.S. Navy and U.S. Army, according to Citizens’ Voice archives. Wampole said a finance department employee who handles pension calculations was out of the office until later this week, so Hayward’s pension status is still pending. George said his decision to hire Hayward benefitted both Hayward and the city because the position required someone with a bachelor’s degree, and Hayward had a law degree.

WILKES-BARRE — Just five months into his new job with the city health department, a former city administrator gave notice he would retire at the end of the month. James D. Hayward Jr., who was hired in March as a health educator, submitted a resignation notice on Monday with an effective date of Aug. 31, according to city Human Resources Director Nicole Ference. When Hayward was hired, city Administrator Ted Wampole had said his position was one of two that were “created by a grant.” Matthew Engel, who had been working for the city as a parking enforcement attendant, was the other health educator hire. Wampole had said Hayward’s position would pay $26,050 annually, and Engel’s would pay $36,562. He said both positions were advertised, but Engel was the only current city employee to apply. Several other people were subsequently interviewed for the remaining position. Mayor Tony George said Hayward’s resignation took him by surprise. “It was a shock, I could tell you that much,” he said. “He came to me maybe a dozen times looking for a job,” George said, adding that Hayward had told him he needed money for his child’s tuition at a private high school and for classes he needed to get back his law license. Hayward, who turned or will turn 67 this year, practiced law in Pennsylvania from 2004 until his license was suspended twice in 2011 for a total of five years, according Contact the writer: to the Administrative Office smocarsky@citizensvoice.co 570-821-2110, @MocarskyCV of Pennsylvania Courts.

MARK MORAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

NORTHWEST CLEANUP CONTINUES

Northwest Area schools may begin during the week after Labor Day as officials continue assessing damage from Saturday’s fire at the middle/ high school, Principal Ryan Miner said Tuesday. Northwest Area schools were going to start Monday. Labor Day is Sept. 3.

The fire heavily damaged a portion of the middle/ high school’s second floor. Structural engineers were on site Tuesday and will issue a report today, Miner said. A cleaning company started Tuesday and began to make some early progress, he added.

— Michael P. Buffer

Above and below, workers remove debris from inside the school. At right, inspectors look for damage.

MARK MORAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

MARK MORAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO THE MEADOWS NURSING & REHABILITATION CENTER

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ON AUGUST 23 WE ARE CELEBRATING 35 YEARS OF DEDICATION AND COMPASSIONATE CARE TO THE RESIDENTS OF THE MEADOWS NURSING & REHABILITATION CENTER Proudly Owned & Operated by


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Wolf urges Democrats to help boost voter turnout BY MichaeL P. Buffer STAFF WRITER

2016. He noted more Luzerne County voters chose the straight Republican option over straight Democrat for the first time since the 1950s. Yudichak commended Wolf and Democrats on the state Supreme Court for replacing gerrymandered congressional districts in the state. He said Pennsylvania voters, “not Republican bosses,” will elect members to Congress in November, and he predicted Democrats will regain a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives. U.S. Rep. Matt Cartwright also addressed the crowd. Cartwright, a Moosic Democrat serving a third two-year term representing the old 17th Congressional District, faces a challenge from John Chrin for the new 8th Congressional District. Cartwright predicted Democrats will pick up five House seats in Pennsylvania and added several women will win seats. “A lot of women are getting into Congress,” he said, elicit-

ing a large roar of approval. Cartwright also predicted a PLAINS TWP. — Gov. Tom Democratic majority in the Wolf called voting “a moral House will approve legislation imperative” and urged Demothat allows the federal governcrats to help boost voter turnment to negotiate drug prices out this November during a with pharmaceutical compaLuzerne County Democratic nies for Medicare recipients. Party gathering Tuesday. “Democrats are going to “Let’s take our democracy put that on P re s i d e n t back,” Wolf told a large crowd Trump’s desk, and I don’t of more than 300 at the The care if he says it’s his idea,” Woodlands Inn and Resort. Cartwright said, later adding Wolf said more eligible vot“the people get what they ers didn’t vote in 2016 than the want” when democracy THE CITIZENS’ VOICE FILE total number of voters in the works. Tom Torbik, city parking authority executive director, filed a complaint with city presidential election that year. During an interview after council alleging that the new owner of the former Hotel Sterling lot is renting “Are you happy with what his speech, Cartwright comyou have?” Wolf asked the mended jurors who convicted parking spaces there without proper zoning approval. crowd without mentioning former Trump campaign President Donald Trump by manager Paul Manafort on name. eight counts of fraud Tues“No!” the crowd replied in day. unison. “The jury did not rush to Wolf is seeking a second judgement and took its role four-year term in November quite seriously,” said Cart2015 and used it as a prof- to undercut the parking against Republican Scott Wagwright, who noted he has 25 City council will it-producing parking lot authority’s rate, he said. ner. years of experience as a trial have 30 days H&N could rake in as while trying to find a buyState Sen. John Yudichak, attorney. “I am confident in to act on the much as $12,000 per er to develop the land. D-Plymouth Twp., said the the American jury system.” The city charged a flat month, or $144,000 annualcomplaint. Luzerne County Democratic contact the writer: rate of $45 per month to ly, if 200 spaces are rented Party is becoming more inclumbuffer@citizensvoice.com, BY steVe MocarsKY out. The city netted nearpark there. 570-821-2073, @cvmikebuffer sive and is recovering from STAFF WRITER C o u n c i l i n M a r c h ly $113,000 from per mit WILKES-BARRE — The approved selling the prop- fees for the lot in 2017. city parking authority is erty to Gateway Center And it’s unclear whethfiling a complaint with Associates, whose princi- er H&N has yet applied city council alleging that pal, Sam Syla, has plans f o r a p r iv a t e p a rk i n g the new owner of the for- for a $35 million mixed- license from the city or is mer Hotel Sterling lot is use project at the site to paying the 8 percent tax renting parking spaces include a hotel, condo- on parking revenues. That there without proper zon- miniums and retail space. information wasn’t immeing approval. The $600,000 sale closed diately available on TuesTom Torbik, authority June 19. day. executive director, told Torbik said he offered Project engineer George the board at a meeting on Albert said in March that — communicating via city Tuesday that he sent a the company’s goal was to officials — to overlook the complaint to city council break ground within 12 to company’s use of the parnoting that a parking lot 18 months of initiating cels for permit parking if is a non-conforming use the project. H&N agreed to stop withfor t h e p a rc e l s, wh i ch Since the new owner in two months, but the extends from the north- assumed control — H&N owner would not agree to east corner of Market and Investments LLC is the that. River streets to Franklin actual owner of the propCity Administrator Ted Street. erty, according to the deed Wampole said he underCouncil will have 30 — the permit parking rate s t a n d s t h e a u t h o r i t y days to act on the com- i n c r e a s e d t o $ 6 0 p e r board members’ perspecplaint, which could mean month, which still under- tive, but he thinks filing a CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER referring it to the Office cuts the parking authori- compliant is unwarrantPennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf addresses the crowd at a Luzerne County Democratic of Zoning and Planning ty’s rate of $70. ed because he’s seen for enforcement, Torbik Committee reception at the Woodlands in Plains Twp. on Tuesday. To r b i k s a i d h e w a s nothing to indicate that said. opposed to the city leasing use of the parcel for perAfter condemning the spaces at the lower price, mit parking is anything Hotel Sterling in 1998 and but the authority raised but short-ter m — until demolishing the historic no objection because the ground is broken for the structure in 2013 because revenue was going to ben- project. it posed a safety hazard, efit the city. But the city contact the writer: ASSOCIATED PRESS abled people. The court, however, wants the city acquired owner- shouldn’t enable a pri- smocarsky@citizensvoice.com, HARRISBURG — PennsylThe state Supreme Court, a lower court to examine ship of the property in vate, for-profit company 570-821-2110, @MocarskyCV vania’s highest court ruled divided 5-2 along party lines, whether the administration Tuesday that Democratic Gov. ruled that Wolf ’s 2015 execu- violated privacy rights by Tom Wolf did not exceed his tive order formalized a volun- providing the names and authority when he set up a tary system to obtain informa- contact information for the process to give some union tion and discuss issues and 20,000 direct-care workers to rights to home-based workers did not impinge on the Legis- unions interested in orgawho care for elderly and dis- lature’s prerogative. nizing them. FROM PAGE A1 Torbik said the authoritems, which had offices in Mariano and Rado’s office ty would not be interested G e o r g e h a s s a i d h e building adjacent to the in buying the Intermodal included revenue from the East garage, had been pay- from the city because the t h e c i t y authority would have to garage sale in the 2018 city i n g budget, and loss of that $70 per month for each of take out a loan, and revebudgeted revenue was one the 208 spots it leased at nue from parking conof the reasons he cited the East garage, but the tracts the city has with when applying to the state company had announced private entities would be for financially distressed p l a n s t o m o v e t h o s e insufficient to cover the employees to a new office loan payments. status in June. building in CenterPoint Westguard east garage profitable Commerce and Trade Park negotiations T he a u t ho ri t y b o ard in Jenkins Twp. Torbik also said the city also had at the time Officials had said that if UNFURNISHED and authority are in parkopposed the sale. Mariano and Rado owned Drivers General Torbik had told city offi- the garage, they would ing contract negotiations KINGSTON cials it was unlikely that have been able to guaran- with Westguard, a subsid109 North Thomas Ave. Human Resources PROFESSIONAL Modern 1st floor, 1 bedroom, with the authority would be tee parking there, making iary of Berkshire HathaGeneralist modern kitchen and bath. HardDRIVER WANTED Luzerne County able to continue making it easier to attract new ten- way GUARD, which is in wood floors. Heat, hot & cold water, Small family company in business trash included. Off-street parking. the process of moving an annual $150,000 contri- ants. for 20+ years. Steady work, Position: Human Resources $795 plus lease and security. No upgraded equipment, home from a complex on River bution to the city if the Generalist pets. Call 570-474-5023 Deed won’t ALL weekends. Division/Department: Street into the Wilkesgarage was sold to a priFULL or PART Time positions. Human Resources impede sale Barre Center building on CDL Class A, experience required. vate company because the Employment Status: Full Time Email questions & resumes to: Salary: $38,000- $42,000 In April, city Adminis- Public Square. authority wouldn’t be able nets8562@gmail.com Reporting Authority: Director of UNFURNISHED The entities are working to spread its expenses over trator Ted Wampole had OR Call (570) 459-0962 Human Resources said there was a stipulaon a 10-year deal in which a larger number of occuPIKE'S CREEK Summary: This position functions 3 bedroom, tion in the deed for the the insurance company pied parking spaces. 2 bathroom, large yard. Check Out as part of the Human Resources De- Washer / dryer hook up. No pets. He also noted that the East garage that required would pay $45 per parking partment within the Division of Ad- $1,100/month + utilities and securiThe Citizens' Voice's ministration Services. Under limited ty. 570-477-2138, 570-704-9589. Classified Section authority has turned over M a r i a n o a n d R a d o ’ s space per month to accomsupervision, performs responsible nearly $4.5 million to the approval to sell it, so it modate up to 1,000 vehicles professional work assisting with the personnel operation of the County. For The Latest city since 2006 — more than made sense to sell it to — about 750 at the InterWork involves developing and/or $1.5 million of that amount them. But on Tuesday, he modal and about 250 at Job Postings! coordinating programs and policies in assigned areas such as recruitin connection with Park & said that sale stipulation Park & Lock Central. ment, selection, position classificaCHYSTLER Pick It Up The deal could mean as applies only to private Lock East. tion, compensation, employee relaOn Newsstands 2003 TOWNE & tions, employee benefits, and trainmuch as $5.4 million in Torbik said Park & Lock entities. or call 570-821-2010 or COUNTRY VAN ing. Work deals on a continuing bacirculation@citizensvoice.com Because the authority parking revenue for the East is one of the city’s two sis with highly sensitive and confiFor Our Great 176K miles. Good condition. “more-profitable” garages c o u l d b e c o n s i d e re d a authority and city, but Tordential matters, and requires sound Home Delivery judgment, personal initiative and Packages! $5,000 NEGOTIABLE. and noted that the city branch of the city, a sale to bik and Wampole agree discretion in completing assigned Call 510-0113 “took all the (monthly park- the authority would not that use of the revenue tasks. Employee must also exercise tact and courtesy in frequent contact ing) contracts from Park & require approval from should be restricted to with employees, elected officials Lock Central and moved Mariano and Rado, Wam- management, upkeep and and representatives of outside agenClassifieds cies and organizations. maintenance of the garagthem to the Inter modal pole said. City and authority offi- es. garage, leaving the Central The above is a summary only of the position. Please refer to Career OpWampole said he expects and North garages with lit- cials also are negotiating portunities on the Luzerne County taking over management negotiations with Westtle profit. website www.luzernecounty.org for a detailed official job description The authority owns the of the Intermodal Center, guard will be complete by Save 20% which includes Essential Duties & Central and North garages Torbik said, noting that a early September, and the at over 100 area locations every time Responsibilities, Knowledge, Skills you show your as well as a lot on East parking study completed administration will have a & Abilities (KSAs) Northampton Street, while earlier this year recom- contract ready for counFirst Review of applicants is PRESS PASS the city owns the James F. mended that all parking cil’s approval at the Sept. Tuesday, Sept 4, 2018 Please apply through Call The Citizens' Voice for more C o n a h a n I n t e r m o d a l operations should be con- 13 council meeting. When you place your www.governmentjobs.com/ information T ranspor tation Center trolled by one entity rath- contact the writer: careers/luzernecounty ad with a photo. er than split between the smocarsky@citizensvoice.com 570-821-2108 and the East garage. The County of Luzerne is an Call today for pricing! 570-821-2110, @MocarskyCV Geisinger Health Sys- city and authority. EEO/ADA Employer

City parking authority files complaint over Hotel Sterling lot

State Supreme Court upholds Wolf order organizing home health care workers

GaraGe: Park authority would be responsible for paying rest of loan

Work! Get Better Results


WB_VOICE/PAGES [A05] | 08/21/18

18:01 | GAYDOSKRIS

LocaL

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

THE CITIZENS' VOICE A5

Wyoming police chief pleads guilty to theft By James HaLpin STAFF WRITER

WILKES-BARRE — The Wyoming borough police commissioner pleaded guilty Tuesday to a misdemeanor theft charge alleging he stole equipment from his former employer. Michael J. Flanagan, 52, of Harding, pleaded guilty to theft in exchange for prosecutors dropping additional counts of receiving stolen property and tampering with evidence. Magisterial District Judge Thomas F. Malloy Sr. accepted the plea during Flanagan’s preliminary hearing Tuesday and fined him $500 plus court costs. Flanagan did not immediately return a message seeking comment. However his

FLANAGAN attorney, Peter Paul Olszewski Jr., said Flanagan agreed to plead to a reduced charge to clear up what he described as an “inadvertent oversight” in failing to turn over some equipment when the Laflin Borough Police

Department disbanded in December 2014. “He had a long, outstanding career,” Olszewski said. “The things he was accused of taking weren’t converted to his own personal use. They were used in law enforcement over the years, both by him and other departments. So there was certainly no gain for Mike.” Flanagan was the police chief in Laflin at the time the department disbanded as a cost-saving measure, as well as being the part-time police commissioner in Wyoming. According to the charges, officers in the Laflin departm e n t r e c e ive d n o t i c e instructing them to turn in all their gear after council voted to disband. But officers

in Wyoming — where Flanagan was appointed the fulltime police commissioner in December 2015 — later reported seeing Laflin equipment at their headquarters, according to the charges. The complaint alleged Flanagan had stolen a Taser, a portable radio and a Dell laptop from Laflin during the disbanding. Flanagan was arrested last month on felony charges, but under a plea deal he admitted guilt to a third-degree misdemeanor. Olszewski said the conviction does not affect Flanagan’s certification to serve as a police officer. “He can still work as a police officer,” he said. However, Wyoming Borough Mayor Joseph Domi-

nick said he thinks Flanagan, who was suspended without pay after being arrested, should be fired because of the conviction. “The integrity of the police department is at risk,” Dominick said. “Working with neighboring communities and everyone, you really want integrity to be at the forefront of our police department. And I think having the head of the police department as someone who committed a theft doesn’t really sit well with me or with the residents of Wyoming.” The borough council must vote on whether to fire Flanagan, and Dominick said he planned to ask council to convene a special meeting for that purpose. In the mean-

time, Dominick said the officer in charge of the department, Macson McGuirk, has been doing a “great job” and he thinks McGuirk should remain at the helm for the foreseeable future. “With the financial situation of the borough and the fact that we have an early intervention program moving forward with the state governor’s office, I think at this point it would be to the benefit of the residents to sit back and allow the officer in charge of the police department to operate as is now, without Commissioner Flanagan, and then address it down the road,” Dominick said. contact the writer: jhalpin@citizensvoice.com 570-821-2058

in Brief Kingston twp.

based on the project, and are artists, academics, volunalready has a book out by the teers and others whose ‘gasland’ filmaker same name. accomplishments sometimes to give talk — STAFF REPORT skirt the spotlight but are worthy of recognition and The filmmaker behind the nortHeast pa praise. “Gasland” documentary nominate amazing Candidates must be 17 about hydraulic fracturing years old or younger (or 18 for natural gas will be in Kids for 2018 Luzerne County tonight Do you know an Amazing but still in high school through the 2018-2019 school with a new project. Kid? year). Josh Fox will present “The Each fall, The Citizens’ To nominate a child for Truth Has Changed,” an Voice puts together the the Amazing Kids special onstage monologue that Amazing Kids special secsection, email citydesk@citiexplores a variety of topics tion to showcase the talented — environmental pollution, youth in Northeast Pennsyl- zensvoice.com or call 570-8212056. Nominations are due Hurricane Sandy, the 2016 vania. by Sept. 14. U.S. Presidential election The ideal candidate is a Nominations should and more — from 9/11 to the smart, dedicated and inspirinclude the following inforelection of Donald Trump. ing child who is accommation: Fox will perform at 7:30 plished beyond his or her ■ Child’s full name, age, p.m. at Unitarian Universal- years and exhibits a drive to school, grade and hometown. ist Congregation of Wyoexcel. The children we have ■ Explanation of what ming Valley, 20 Church Rd., profiled in past years have makes the child an ideal canKingston Twp. overcome obstacles and didate for the Amazing Kids The project is more than devoted their time and talsection. just a theater performance. ents to helping others. They ■ Contact information for Fox is also creating a movie

the person submitting the nomination. This information will be used to verify the nomination and for followup questions regarding the nomination.

phone at 570-826-1100. A Kirby member pre-sale begins 10 a.m. today. Tickets are $35.50, $45.50, & $63.00, plus applicable fees. Van Zandt is on the road — STAFF REPORT sharing his TeachRock curriculum through professionwiLKes-Barre al development workshops Little steven that will happen at every stop of the tour. coming to Kirby The arts integration Rock and Roll Hall of Famcurriculum uses the lens er Steven Van Zandt of the E of music to help children Street Band is bringing his learn all subjects, with band Little Steven and the innovative lesson plans Disciples of Soul to the F.M. developed by experienced Kirby Center for the Soulfire educators and top experts TeachRock Tour 7:30 p.m. in the field. From social Oct. 18. studies and language arts Tickets go on sale 10 a.m. to geography, media studAug. 24 and will be availies, science, general able at The Sundance Vacamusic, and more: tions Box Office at the F.M. TeachRock has engaging Kirby Center for the Perand meaningful material forming Arts, at www.kirfor every classroom – that bycenter.org and charge by they share with teachers

STEVEN VAN ZANDT and students at no cost. The TeachRock preshow workshop is free to teachers. Teachers who attend the workshop will also receive a free ticket to the show. There are a limited number of spots for each show. Teachers can sign up at teachrock. org/tour. — STAFF REPORT


WB_VOICE/PAGES [A06] | 08/21/18

18:49 | GAYDOSKRIS

LOCAL

A6 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Jehovah’s Witnesses coming to arena Thousands of visitors are coming to Luzerne County this weekend as the Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre Twp. hosts a

three-day convention presented by Jehovah’s Witnesses. The event runs Friday through Sunday.

Jehovah’s Witnesses will travel from across Pennsylvania and New York, creating an expected economic impact of approximately

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$3 million for Luzerne County, according to tourism and marketing organization Visit Luzerne County. Many area hotels, restaurants, shops and other attractions will see increased sales from convention attendees. Janet Hall, executive director of Visit Luzerne County, said Luzerne County’s convenient location and great amenities, such as the variety of hotels and restaurants, make the area an attractive choice for groups, like Jehovah’s Witnesses, who plan conventions or conferences with attendees from across a widespread area. “Major interstates provide easy access for visitors traveling to Luzerne County, while the great hospitality provided by area businesses create an ideal environment for these types of conventions,” Hall said. This is the 11th year that Jehovah’s Witnesses have chosen Luzerne County for one of their annual conventions. The theme of this weekend’s convention is “Be Courageous!” and is one of many like it taking place around the country. The convention features Biblebased programs and is open to everyone at no charge. — Denise AllAbAugh

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Video figures in Penn State frat death preliminary hearing ASSOCIATED PRESS

BELLEFONTE — Security camera footage from the night a pledge suffered fatal injuries inside a Penn State fraternity house is again key evidence as prosecutors seek to convince a judge they have enough evidence to send charges to county court for trial. State College Police Detective David Scicchitano remained on the stand Tuesday when the first day of a preliminary hearing ended in the case of former mem-

bers of Beta Theta Pi. The seven fraternity members are going through another hearing because a county judge reinstated criminal charges that a district judge had dismissed. The charges relate to the February 2017 death of 19-year-old Tim Piazza, of Lebanon, New Jersey. Piazza died of severe head and abdominal injuries after a bid acceptance ceremony. Authorities say he consumed a dangerous amount of alcohol.

COURT NOTES PROPERTY TRANSACTIONS ■ John Puhak et al. to Albaro Estevez Antonio et al., $120,000; Hazleton. ■ Theresa Walasek et al. to Justin Cornell, $180,000; Lake Twp. ■ Peak 7 Investments LLC to Christopher Rue Grover et al., $376,000; Dallas Twp. ■ Nicholas Goida et al. to Lilian D. de Leon de Madera, $75,000; Birbeck Street, Freeland. ■ Susan Hughes et al. to Daniel J. Yule et al., $140,000; Salem Twp. ■ Jugoslav Dujic to American International Relocation Solutions LLC, $123,500; Edge Rock Drive, Butler Twp. ■ American International Relocation Solutions LLC to James E. Hudock, $123,500; Edge Rock Drive, Butler Twp. ■ Deutsche Bank National Trust Company et al. to Vincent Michael Dobinson, $121,065; state Route 92, Exeter Twp. ■ Lucy C. Vavrek to Santina Deno et al., $180,000; Forty Fort.

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■ Jacqueline Lutz to Catherine Ouellette, $134,000; Kingston Twp. ■ Christiana Trust et al. to Janelle Akers, $72,000; Lehman Twp. ■ Darren J. Heiser et al. to Kevin Jeffrey Clocker, $153,000; West Wyoming. ■ Jeffrey J. Paulson et al. to Michael Pickreign et al., $299,000; Rice Twp. ■ Diane Yuschovitz et al. to Fair Realty Investments LLC, $75,000; Pittston. ■ Albert Peters to Eric Sandroski, $160,000; Wyoming. ■ Anne A. Hrycenko to Gerard J. Weihbrecht Jr. et al., $140,000; Plains Twp. ■ Russuell P. Bigus et al. to Turrim LLC, $99,000; Harveys Lake. ■ Loretta B. Zula to Thomas Zak et al., $134,550; South Main Road, Wright Twp. ■ Edward O’Dell et al. to Robert M. Scatena Jr., $115,000; Pittston Twp. ■ Helen Y. Gist et al. Robert A. Cirko Sr. et al., $95,000; Wilkes-Barre. ■ Angela Pierri to Phillip Martlli et al., $157,000; Garden Avenue, Fairview Twp. ■ REO Acquisition I LLC to Nancy Ballard, $74,000; Wright Twp. ■ Patrick Delaney et al. to Raymond C. Grove et al., $89,000; Orchard East, Dallas. ■ Kimberly P. Frey to Christopher Joseph Kovaleski, Swoyersville. ■ SBL Real Estate Inc. to 159 Penn Avenue LLC, $165,000; Exeter. ■ Step by Step Inc. to Bryan D. Kiose, $106,000; WilkesBarre Twp. ■ Cory J. Fleisher et al. to South Franklin LLC, $120,000; South Franklin Street, WilkesBarre. ■ Nicholas F. Bellezza to Reinardo Duran Duran, $120,000; Hazleton.

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WB_VOICE/PAGES [A07] | 08/21/18

18:15 | DULSKYAPRI

LOCAL

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

THE CITIZENS' VOICE A7

Settlement reached in lawsuit against county CYS BY JAMES HALPIN STAFF WRITER

working on the necessary paperwork. The filing does not specify the amount of the settlement, and Centini did not immediately return a message seeking additional information. Luzerne County Chief Solicitor Romilda Crocamo said attorneys for Concern Inc., a contracted foster care placement service, took the lead in the case and that the matter was settled at no cost to the county. The complaint filed last August alleged the children, then aged 3 and 17 months,

WILKES-BARRE — Luzerne County officials have reached a settlement with a mother who alleged child services caseworkers put her two children into a home where they were physically and sexually abused, according to a filing Tuesday. In a letter filed in federal court Tuesday, Wilkes-Barre attorney Shelley L. Centini said the mother, identified in the complaint only as M.J., has reached a settlement with the county and attorneys are

began getting injured and making disturbing allegations about a teenage boy after moving into a mobile home in Ashley and county officials did nothing to intervene despite knowing about his troubled past. “(The boy’s) abuse history was so serious, complex, and well-known that a non-party child behavioral health agency used his case file for training its staff,” the complaint alleged. The mother alleged after being placed into foster parent Kathy Ryan’s care in May 2014, the children began

appearing for visits in dirty clothes, with cuts and bruises. The 3-year-old girl also told her mother that the teenage boy had been sexually assaulting her, the complaint alleged. Luzerne County Children and Youth Services previously sought dismissal of the lawsuit, arguing the allegations that caseworker Jesse Goshert and supervisor Maryann

Rambus failed to act are “essentially unfounded without any factual support.” U.S. District Court Judge A. Richard Caputo in April dismissed one claim against the county, but otherwise rejected the county’s effort to get the lawsuit dismissed. In his opinion, Caputo wrote the allegations Goshert and Rambus placed the children in

a home with a child who had a known history of sexual abuse “are more than sufficient to state a plausible claim of conscience shocking conduct by Goshert and Rambus.” The lawsuit was seeking unspecified damages to be determined at trial. Contact the writer: jhalpin@citizensvoice.com 570-821-2058

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WB_VOICE/PAGES [A08] | 08/21/18

A8 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

22:37 | DULSKYAPRI

SEXUAL ABUSE IN OUR CHURCHES

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Pope to meet victims of clergy sexual abuse while in Ireland BY RICK GLADSTONE THE NEW YORK TIMES

Pope Francis will spend part of his weekend trip to Ireland meeting victims of sexual abuse committed by the clergy there, the Va t i c a n s a i d T u e s d ay, addressing an issue that has enraged Irish Catholics and damaged the church’s standing in that country. The announcement by the Vatican spokesman, G r e g B u rk e , c a m e a s church sexual abuse scandals have threatened to reshape Pope Francis’ legacy and have confronted the Roman Catholic Church with one of its worst crises. Last week a Pennsylvania grand jury released the report of an investigation showing that in a cover-up lasting for 70 years, 301 priests in the state sexually abused more than 1,000 children. It was the broadest examination yet by an American government agency into child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

The Pennsylvania scand a l e ch o e d t h e abu s e s exposed in Boston 16 years a go, punctuating what critics have called the Catholic Church’s ingrained culture of masking criminal conduct, protecting deviant priests and silencing victims. Similar scandals have erupted elsewhere during the pope’s tenure, including in Chile and Australia. Ireland has its own history of sexual abuse committed by clerics and other emotionally wrenching church scandals, most notably the mistreatment of women and girls in the notorious Magdalene Laundries, the for-profit church institutions that survived through much of the 20th century. Burke said at a Vatican news conference that Francis, the first pope to visit Ireland in nearly 40 years, would set aside time to meet with victims of sexual abuse during his visit Saturday and Sunday. He said it would be up to the vic-

gregorio Borgia / associated Press

Pope Francis prays for the victims of the Kerala floods during the Angelus noon prayer in St.Peter’s Square at the Vatican on Aug. 19. tims to decide afterward if they wished to speak publicly. “The important thing for the pope, in these moments, is that it be a moment of prayer, of silence, of listening,” Burke said. The pope has been accused of reacting slowly to well-known sexual abuses by priests. On Monday, in an extraordinarily frank letter addressed to a l l C a t h o l i c s, F r a n c i s assailed the abuses as atrocities committed against children. “With shame and repentance, we acknowledge as an ecclesial community that we were not where we

should have been, that we did not act in a timely manner, realizing the magnitude and the gravity of the damage done to so many lives,” he wrote in the 2,000word letter. “We showed no care for the little ones; we abandoned them.” Critics in Ireland and elsewhere said that the pope’s letter was insufficient and that it offered n o s p e c i f i c s o l u t i o n s. Maeve Lewis, chief executive of One in Four, an organization that helps victims of sexual abuse, told Ireland’s RTE Radio t h at s h e h a d n o d o ub t Francis was sincere but t h at t h e l e t t e r s e e m e d

like just another apology. “There is not one concrete step that the pope mentions in that letter that would really address the problem of child sexual abu s e i n t h e C at h o l i c Church,” she said. Francis is to spend most of his Ireland trip in Dublin, where he will preside over the closing of an international Catholic meeting on the importance of the family. Ireland’s population of roughly 4.8 million is at least 80 percent Catholic, but it has moved significantly away from strong devotion to the church, partly because of the cler-

gy abuse scandals. In what would have been unthinkable a few years ago, voters swept aside generations of conservative Catholic patriarchy in May and repealed a restrictive ban on abortion. The vote was seen as a stinging rebuke to the church. Asked if the abuse scandals could overshadow the pope’s visit, Burke said: “Of course it is not easy to make a normal trip given the recent events in Ireland. Having said this, it is clear that the pope is going to Ireland for a reason, which is the World Meeting of Families. And this will be his emphasis.”

BISHOP: Unclear how many other priests are receiving payments From Page a1

than 1,000 victims, mostly children, over the past several decades. The grand jury report lists 59 accused from the Diocese of Scranton; some names are redacted. The diocese released a list that includes 70 names, including two laymen. Some of the matters Bambera addressed include his decision to refer former Bishop James C. Timlin’s handling of abuseallegationstoanindependentreviewboard;hisownhandling of cases and his decision to withhold releasing the list of accused priests until after the grandjuryreportwasissued. The continued financial support for abusive priests is a controversial issue. Bambera said he has no power to halt the practice. Among the priests continuing to receive financial support is the Rev. Martin Boylan, who was suspended from the ministry in April 2016, based on allegations a then-18-year-old man made that Boylan abused him when he was 8 years old while at St. Vincent’s camp in Honesdale.TheWayneCountydistrict attorney’s office investigated the claims, but no charges were everfiled. Boylan denies the allegation. His case is unique because he is challenging his suspension from the church.

Pope Francis, who has the sole authority to laicize a priest, has not yet decided his fate. “At this juncture he is permanently removed from parish life and the ministry, but he has not been laicized,” Bambera said. “Given the pattern the Holy See is following and given (Boylan’s) age, they will typically at this juncture impose upon him a life of prayer and penance. That is what they typically do in those instances.” It’s unclear how many other priests are receiving payments. Former Bishop Timlin’s case also presents a unique situation. Bambera said the diocese’s independent review board, which consists of three lay people, a priest and a religious sister, typically only investigates cases in which a priest is accused of sexual abuse. Timlin has not been accused of sexual misconduct, but the grand jury report cited numerous cases in which he helped conceal the conduct of abusive priests. Bambera said he referred thematterto theboard to help him evaluate Timlin’s future with the diocese. Timlin has been forbidden from publicly representing the diocese at any events while the investigation is ongoing, Bambera said. The board will help him decide if that ban should remainpermanent.Thereport,

which is expected to be complete by Aug. 31, will be publicly released, Bambera said. “I wanted some objective lens into some of the decisions he made,” Bambera said. “I thought the best place for me to go would be to these group of experts ... who are extremely candid and direct with their recommendations.” Asked if the board could also recommend Pope Francis impose further sanctions on Timlin, Bambera said it’s possible. “How far the Holy See would go in accepting a possible recommendation from them would be beyond my ability to comment,” Bambera said. His referral of Timlin’s case to the board exemplifies his commitment to ensuring all casesarethoroughlyvetted—a commitment he said he made when he became bishop in April 2010 and immediately ordered a review of all abuse cases and began compiling a list of predator priests. Bambera has been criticized for refusing to release the list until after the grand jury report, however. Asked why the Diocese did not release the list of names years ago, Bambera said the review took a significant amount of time as officials went through hundreds of files with a “fine tooth comb.” He noted the diocese did

release the names to district attorneys of all 11 counties it covers in May 2016. “Wewereseriouslyconsidering at that point releasing the list and making it public. Then in September 2016, the grand jury convened,” he said. “Once thegrandjuryconvened,Ifeltit was better to wait and release it in tandem with it.” Bambera said he continues to maintain a zero tolerance policy regarding sexual abuse allegations. Only a handful of cases were reported under his tenure, according to the grand jury report. All the priests were immediately removed from the ministry while the cases were investigated, the report shows. Bambera said he’s hopeful hiscontinuedcommitmentwill eventually help restore trust in the church. He noted each diocese in the state undergoes an audit by an independent agency each year which evaluates safety practices. That includes ensuring staff is properly trained to recognize abuse and that any new allegations are handled appropriately. “I don’t think you restore trust through a single gesture and you certainly don’t restore trust through a gimmick,” he said. “You restore trust when people somehow see your words reflect your actions.” Contact the writer: tbesecker@timesshamrock. com; 570-348-9137

NOT ON DIOCESE LIST the diocese of scranton said it will investigate why several lay people who worked for the diocese and were charged with sexual offenses against children are not included in its list of clergy and lay people accused of abuse. the diocese’s list includes 70 people, compared to 59 people listed in the statewide grand jury report. the citizens’ Voice identified at least three lay people who are not on the list: ■ robert g. smith of Hazleton, a former principal at Bishop Hafey High school, who was charged in 2004 with statutory sexual assault. information on the outcome of his criminal case was not available tuesday. ■ david r. Yarros of scranton, a former teacher at sacred Heart Junior/senior High in carbondale, who pleaded guilty in 2005 and was given a six-month suspended sentence for having lewd conversations online with a student. ■ mark maroni of scranton, a former teacher at st. michael’s school for Boys, who was sentenced in 2001 to 30 to 60 years in prison for molesting three students. the most. rev. Joseph Bambera, bishop of the diocese, said he was unaware of the claims against the men until notified by a reporter tuesday. He said any failure to include the men was not intentional. the diocese will review the cases and try to determine why they were not included.

REPORT ABUSE

— terrie morgan-besecker

■ the survivors Network of those abused by Priests, or sNaP, recommends the Keystone crisis intervention team for those affected by the grand jury’s report. reach the Kcit at 855-767-5248. reach sNaP at www.snapnetwork.org or 877-762-7432. ■ the state attorney general’s office opened the clergy abuse Hotline, 888-538-8541, for those wishing to report sexual abuse. ■ the diocese of scranton’s Victim assistance coordinator, 570-862-7551.

COLLEGES: Grand jury report accused 301 religious leaders statewide of misconduct From Page a1

Misericordia’s president, Thomas Botzman, Ph.D., vowed the school would launch a “methodical and thoughtful review of facilities, honorary designations, de g rees and awards” named after the men and then take appropriate action. “As a Sisters of Mercy institution, our greatest concern is for the victims and families in the grand jury case and any others who have suffered abuse,” Botzman said in a statement. According to the grand

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jury report, a Hazleton police officer in 1968 wrote to McCormick to report a priest, Robert Caparelli, accused of abuse. McCormick, who served as Diocese of Scranton bishop from March 1966 to February 1983, confronted Caparelli and wrote himself “a secret note” found in confidential diocesan archives, the report said. After Caparelli was arrested in the early 1990s for sexually assaulting two altar boys in Pike County, Timlin tried to keep him out of jail by writing a letter to the sentencing judge. Timlin, who was bishop from June 1984 to July 2003, asked the judge to let him send Caparelli

to a Maryland treatment center, a move the bishop said would save the state money, the report said. Caparelli died in prison in 1994. According to the report, Timlin learned in 1986 a priest in Freeland raped a young girl and impregnated her, then arranged for her to have an abortion. Rather than remove him from priesthood, Timlin transfer red the priest, Thomas Skotek, to a parish in Hazleton and then Wilkes-Barre, the report said. Timlin wrote a letter to the priest dated Oct. 9, 1986, and focused on the rape, the report said. “This is a very difficult

time in your life, and I realize how upset you are. I too share your grief,” Timlin wrote, according to a copy of the letter in the g rand jury re por t. “With the help of God, who never abandons us and who is always near when we need Him, this too will pass away and all will be able to pick up and go on living. Please be assured that I am most willing to do whatever I can to help.” The grand jury report accused 301 religious leaders statewide of misconduct, including 59 from the Diocese of Scranton. Contact the writer: bkalinowski@citizensvoice.com 570-821-2055; @cvbobkal

BREAKING NEWS: CITIZENSVOICE.COM


WB_VOICE/PAGES [A09] | 08/21/18

Community

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

mental delays. Featured will be purses from popular brandname designers: Michael Kors, Kate Spade, Coach, Vera Bradley and more. Tickets can be purchased for $20 before the event and for $25 at the door. Admission includes 20 rounds of regular bingo and a complimentary coffee and drink station. Multiple food options and beverages will also be available for purchase. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. with registration and a bingo preview, which allows guests an up-close look at the designer bags. The bingo games will start promptly at 1 p.m. For information, visit their Facebook Page at @RotaryClubofWilkesBarrePA, or contact Christine Mackin at 570-7141246 or via email at cmackin@ wvcakids.org.

Community digest Community digest tells you First Lt. Jeffrey DePrimo Luzerne Foundation 10th what’s happening in your annual golf tournament will town. Submit listings at least now be held Sept. 1 at the one week in advance to comWilkes-Barre Golf Course, due munity@citizensvoice.com, to the rain out of Aug. 11. Go fax to 570-821-2247, mail to 75 to deprimogolf.com to re-register if you were already regisN. Washington St., Wilkestered attend. New registrations Barre, PA 18701, or call 570are encouraged to register by 821-2069. Visit citizensvoice. Aug. 24 to be guaranteed a com for community news. correct size T shirt. Cost is Dual Recovery Anonymous meetings are held at 7 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays at the Triangle 24 Hour Club, 4143 Memorial Highway, Dallas. Dual Recovery Anonymous is for anyone with a desire to stop using alcohol and other intoxicating drugs and a desire to manage emotional or psychiatric illness in a healthy and constructive way. Meetings are open and family members, friends of members or anyone interested in Dual Recovery Anonymous is welcome.

their schedules, lockers assignments and student handbooks. Also, students and parents will have the opportunity to tour the school and meet the teachers, counselors and principals. Ninth grade students who will be attending the Wilkes-Barre Area Career and Technical

Center in the Career Exploration Program also should attend this freshman orientation program. Students enrolled in the Headstart Program at the WBACTC do not have to attend. For information, contact the guidance department at 570-654-2415, ext. 2112.

In Your Citizens’ Voice Thursday, August 23

Every Thursday

Back mountain A flea, craft and vendor sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at the Dallas Chapter Eastern Star Hall, 15 Foster St., Dallas, rain or shine, with inside and outside vendors. Easter Star members wills serve lunch. Welsh cookies will be sold. For information, call Dianne corby at 570675-4893. Tracey’s Hope Hospice And Animal Rescue will hold its 10th annual memorial pet walk and car and bike show on Saturday, Aug. 25, at McDade Park, Pavilion 2, Scranton. Pet walk registration is from 9:45 a.m. to 10 a.m. Blessing of the pets is at 10 a.m. Car and bike show registrations from noon to 1 p.m. Car and bike show is from 1 to 5 p.m. Hot food will be available from noon to 5 p.m., in addition to vendors, games, prizes, Chinese basket auction, and live entertainment. Visit www.traceyshope.com or ww.facebook.com/TraceysHopeHospice.

THE CITIZENS' VOICE A9

Aug. 23, at the senior high school, 5 Stout St., Yatesville. All ninth grade students, newly enrolled transfer students in grades nine through 12 and their parents/guardians are encouraged to attend this orientation program. Report to the high school auditorium at 9 a.m. Students will receive

$75 for cart, golf, dinner and awards. Sign in is at 7 a.m. Shotgun start is at 8 a.m. Wilkes-Barre and Kingston Rotary Clubs will present a designer bag bingo as a fundraiser benefitting the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association on Sunday, Aug. 26, at the Genetti’s ballroom in Pittston area downtown Wilkes-Barre. WVCA offers early childhood education Pittston Area High School will host freshman orientation and therapy services to children, from 9 to 11 a.m. Thursday, including those with develop-

Wyoming Valley

18:21 | BILBOWLEON

Thhis Week in Jumpstart!

The CiTizens’ VoiCe

D N U O R A G N I K L FO

- Local, national artists to jam at Cornstock Folk Festival - Kids’ potty humor inspires children’s book - Pentatonix ready to share a capella prowess with Montage crowd - Peculiar Slurp Shop’s experiments lead to fresh take on ramen - Nanticoke’s Send Request releases album under SharpTone Records

tists to jam Local, national ar Festival at Cornstock Folk 201 8 Aug ust 23,

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WB_VOICE/PAGES [A10] | 08/21/18

21:16 | GAYDOSKRIS

tHE CItIzEns’ VOICE

Nation World

A10

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Russian hacking revealed

BRIEFS KABUL, Afghanistan

Rockets strike Afghan capital

Rockets slammed into the heart of the capital of Kabul on Tuesday as President Ashraf Ghani delivered a speech marking a Muslim holiday, the latest in a series of brazen attacks that highlighted Afghanistan’s deteriorating security. No injuries were reported from the mortar rounds that hit in the diplomatic quarter; one struck near the presidential palace, another near a NATO compound and the U.S. Embassy, according to police official Jan Agha. In response, Afghan helicopter gunships bombed the house from which the rockets were believed to have been launched.

Microsoft says the sites target political groups BY MATT O’BRIEN AssociAted Press

MONTEZUMA, Iowa

Man charged in killing of student A man from Mexico living in the U.S. illegally has confessed to kidnapping college student Mollie Tibbetts while she RIVERA was running in her small Iowa hometown, killing her and dumping her body in a rural field, authorities said Tuesday. Cristhian Bahena Rivera, 24, was arrested and charged with first-degree murder in the death of Tibbetts, whose July 18 disappearance set off a massive search involving state and federal authorities. Rivera led investigators early Tuesday to a body believed to be Tibbetts in a cornfield about 12 miles southeast of Brooklyn, Iowa, where Tibbetts was last seen running.

GREELEY, Colo.

Father-in-law glares at accused killer Frank Rzucek Sr. leaned forward in a Colorado courtroom, weeping with his face in his hands as his son-inlaw, just WATTS feet away, was told Tuesday he could face the death penalty if convicted of killing Rzucek’s daughter and two granddaughters. Collecting himself, Rzucek glared as that sonin-law, Christopher Watts, was escorted back to jail. Thebrief hearingcamea dayaftercourtdocuments revealedthatWattstoldpolice thatitwasRzucek’sdaughter, ShanannWatts,whostrangledthekidsafterhetoldher hewantedaseparation. Watts told police he flew into a rage and strangled his wife and took the three bodies to a remote oil site.

CARACAS, Venezuela

Confusion over new bills in Venezuela Venezuelans confused over the new banknotes popping out of their ATMs on Tuesday resorted to using calculators and conversion charts to figure out the value of each bill as the country’s new currency started circulating. “I still don’t understand it very well,” said homemaker Maritza Vargas, withdrawing a 5 bolivar bill from her Caracas bank. “The truth is that I’m still not clear.” The new currency is part of President Nicolas Maduro’s new plan meant to confront runaway inflation and a plummeting economy. Maduro’s says he’ll also increase the minimum wage on Sept. 1 by more than 3,000 percent and boost corporate taxes — associated press

ABc ViA AP

Jakiw Palij, a former Nazi concentration camp guard, is carried on a stretcher from his home into a waiting ambulance in the Queens borough of New York. Palij is the last Nazi war crimes suspect facing deportation from the U.S.

Ex-Nazi guard, 95, deported by U.S. Called a ‘landmark victory’ in quest to achieve justice. BY MICHAEL R. SISAK, DAVID RISING AND RANDY HERSCHAFT AssociAted Press

BERLIN — A 95-year-old former Nazi concentration camp guard who lived quietly in New York City for decades was carried out of his home on a stretcher by federal agents and flown to Germany early Tuesday in what could prove to be the last U.S. deportation of a World War II-era war-crimes suspect. Jakiw Palij’s expulsion, at President Donald Trump’s urging, came 25 years after investigators first accused Palij of lying about his wartime past to get into the U.S. But it was largely symbolic because officials in Germany have repeatedly said there is insufficient evidence to prosecute him. Trump “made it very clear” he wanted Palij out of the country, and a new German government that took office in March brought “new energy” to expediting the matter, U.S. Ambassador Richard Grenell said. Eli Rosenbaum, the former head of the U.S. office investigating accused Nazi war criminals, said Palij’s removal “is a landmark victory in the U.S. government’s decades-long quest to achieve a measure of justice and accountability on behalf of the victims of Nazi inhumanity.” Palij lived quietly in the U.S. for years, as a draftsman

AssociAted Press

The last Nazi war crimes suspect facing deportation from the U.S. was taken from his New York City home and removed to Germany. and then as a retiree, until nearly three decades ago when investigators found his name on an old Nazi roster and a fellow former guard spilled the secret that he was “living somewhere in America.” Palij, an ethnic Ukrainian born in a part of Poland that is now Ukraine, said on his 1957 naturalization petition that he had Ukrainian citizenship. When their investigators showed up at his door in 1993, he said: “I would never have received my visa if I told the truth. Everyone lied.” A judge stripped Palij’s

U.S. citizenship in 2003 for “participation in acts against Jewish civilians” while he was an armed guard at the Trawniki camp in Nazi-occupied Poland and he was ordered deported a year later. But because Germany, Poland, Ukraine and other countries refused to take him, he continued living in limbo in the two-story, red brick home in Queens he shared with his late wife, Maria. His continued presence there outraged the Jewish community, attracting frequent protests over the years.

Microsoft has uncovered new Russian hacking efforts targeting U.S. political groups ahead of the midterm elections. The company said Tuesday that a group tied to the Russian government created fake websites that appeared to spoof two American conservative organizations: the Hudson Institute and the International Republican Institute. Three other fake sites were designed to look as if they belonged to the U.S. Senate. Microsoft didn’t offer any further description of the fake sites, although it has previously outlined in court filings how this hacking group operated a network of fake sites designed to trick victims into installing malicious software. The Russian Foreign Ministry said that Microsoft’s report reflects a “witch hunt” in the U.S. The ministry said Tuesday that Microsoft’s statement lacked any proof of Russian involvement because “there can’t be any.” The revelation of new hacking efforts arrives just weeks after a similar Microsoft discovery led Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat who is running for reelection, to reveal that Russian hackers tried unsuccessfully to infiltrate her Senate computer network. The hacking mirrors similar Russian attacks ahead of the 2016 election, which U.S. intelligence officials have said were focused on helping to elect Republican Donald Trump to the presidency by hurting his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton. This time, more than helping one political party over another, “this activity is most fundamentally focused on disrupting democracy,” Brad Smith, Microsoft’s president and chief legal officer, said in an interview this week. The FBI said Tuesday it’s aware of Microsoft’s actions to disrupt the sites but the agency wouldn’t provide details about whether it’s working with the company to combat the hacking group. Microsoft’s court filing last week said the hackers “registered or used” the fake domains at some point after April 20. Smith said there is no sign the hackers were successful in persuading anyone to click on the fake websites, which

Sanctions grow WAsHiNGtoN — the trump administration added to its growing list of sanctions against russia on tuesday as U.s. lawmakers urged tighter economic restrictions on Moscow. the treasury department announced two new actions against russian targets: blacklisting two companies and two individuals suspected of trying to circumvent U.s. sanctions imposed in June in response to cyberattacks; and against two russian shipping companies suspected of transferring petroleum products to North Korean vessels in violation of U.N. security council resolutions. While President donald trump has sought closer ties with russian President Vladimir Putin, his administration has intensified economic pressure on Moscow over what it describes as “malign russian activity” in Ukraine and syria and russia’s attempts to disrupt western democracies. — associated press

could have exposed a target victim to computer infiltration, hidden surveillance and data theft. Both conservative think tanks said they have tried to be vigilant about “spear-phishing” email attacks because their global pro-democracy work has frequently drawn the ire of authoritarian governments. “We’re glad that our work is attracting the attention of bad actors,” said Hudson Institute spokesman David Tell. “It means we’re having an effect, presumably.” The Hudson Institute, which promotes American global leadership on multiple fronts, doesn’t always see eyeto-eye with President Donald Trump, particularly with respect to Russia. In April, the institute published a report entitled “Countering Russian Kleptocracy” that laid out a blueprint for punishing Russian corruption and discouraging it through sanctions, including on Russia’s sovereign debt. The International Republican Institute, the GOP counterpart to the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, trains foreign political operatives and parties on how to run elections and govern. Its members help political parties organize campaigns and observe election processes with the aim of fixing flaws and improving public confidence in elections.

Roe v. Wade settled law, Kavanaugh tells senator BY DUSTIN WEAVER AND LISA MASCARO AssociAted Press

WA S H I N G T O N — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh said Tuesday he agrees that the Roe v. Wade decision on abortion rights is settled law, according to Sen. Susan Collins, a Republican from Maine who is a key swing vote on his nomination. Collins held a two-hour meeting with Kavanaugh in her office that she called “very informative.” “We talked at great length about precedent and the application of stare decisis to abortion cases,” Collins said, using the legal term for letting precedent stand. “We talked about executive power. We talked about the Heller gun decision. We

KAVANAUGH

COLLINS

talked about his judicial philosophy. We talked about which judges he admires most or he feels most similar to.” Collins also said she pressed Kavanaugh on whether he considers Roe v. Wade to be established law. “He said that he agreed with what (Chief Justice) John Roberts said at his nomination hearing, in which he said that it was settled law.” That answer could be crucial for Kavanaugh’s chances

of being confirmed. Collins supports abortion rights and has vowed to oppose any nominee who has “demonstrated hostility” to Roe v. Wade. Republicans have a narrow 50-49 majority in the Senate due to the absence of ailing Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and can’t afford a single defection on Kavanaugh if every Democrat votes no. Collins said she would not make a decision on whether to vote for Kavanaugh until after the Senate Judiciary Committee holds confirmation hearings after Labor Day. Yet she has spoken highly of the judge, praising his qualifications. The closed-door session with Collins kicked off a

busy day for Kavanaugh, an appellate court judge who is making the rounds on Capitol Hill. One key meeting Tuesday will be with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York, who is leading the Democratic resistance to his nomination. Schumer downplayed Kavanaugh’s remark about Roe v. Wade, calling it a dodge used by past Supreme Court nominees. “Of course we know Roe is settled law. We need to know if Judge Kavanaugh believes it was correctly decided,” Schumer said, adding that he will ask the judge that question. Schumer also said he plans to ask Kavanaugh to fully support releasing documents from the Bush White

House that Republicans have declined to review. “I hope he comes prepared to answer direct questions,” he said. Democrats complain that Republicans are withholding documents in their rush to confirm Trump’s pick for the court ahead of the midterm elections. Despite Schumer’s efforts to build opposition, several Democrats from states that Trump won in the 2016 election remain undecided on the nominee. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., was noncommittal after meeting with Kavanaugh on Tuesday. She says she talked to the judge about access to health care and getting “dark money” from anonymous donors out of politics.


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16:29 | DULSKYAPRI

tHE CItIzEns’ VOICE

Editorial WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

OUR OPINION

A11

End Gitmo’s costs, failures

A

military judge issued yet another blow Friday to the government’s attempts to prosecute terrorism suspects outside the conventional U.S. justice system. Army Col. James L. Pohl’s ruling raised another warning against the use of torture and highlighted the Guantanamo costly futility of mainwas built as a taining the prison camp at Guantanamo Bay, temporary Cuba. Even though prosecuexpedient. For tors in the civilian justhe sake of tice system have been effective more ef fective than criminal justice their military counterand taxpayers, parts in securing convictions against terrorthe government ists, the Trump adminshould close it. istration insists on keeping open Guantanamo and conducting war court trials of terrorism suspects. Since Sept. 11,2001, civilian prosecutors have secured more than 600 convictions against terrorists, whereas only eight suspects have been convicted in the proceedings at Guantanamo, and several of those have been overturned. The Obama administration attempted to close Guantanamo and move to civilian court the trials of suspects, but was blocked by Congress. Trials for alleged 9/11 planner Khalid Sheik Mohammed and four others are scheduled for next year but hearings on preliminary motions have begun. Military justice rules preclude the use of evidence obtained through torture. Mohammed and the others all were tortured under the direction of the CIA. To evade the prohibition, prosecutors brought in FBI “clean teams” who did not know what information had been divulged, to interrogate the suspects. The judge ruled that prosecutors cannot use “clean team” evidence, either, not necessarily because of what the defendants might have divulged, but because secrecy surrounding torture precludes defense lawyers from questioning those involved. Meanwhile, taxpayers have spent about $6.5 billion on Guantanamo since 2002 and will spend another $454 million this year, about $11 million for each of 41 inmates. It costs about $78,000 per inmate to operate the “supermax” prison at Florence, Colorado. Guantanamo was built as a temporary expedient. For the sake of effective criminal justice and taxpayers, the government should close it.

VISIT THE ’TOONBLOG: COLE.THETIMES-TRIBUNE.COM

COMMENTARY

Why Trump’s politics will outlast him BY TYlER COwEN BLOOMBERG NEwS (TNS)

Democrats, according to a recent Gallup poll, have a more favorable opinion of socialism than of capitalism. I don’t take this to be an endorsement of actual socialism as we might have understood the term four decades ago, however; I see it as the expression of a desire to move much further to the left, and if necessary to think outside the usual boxes. Look at Alexandria OcasioCortez, the Democratic candidate who is likely to represent parts of New York City in the next Congress. Her agenda calls for single-payer health insurance, a federal jobs guarantee and the abolition of ICE. Whether or not you agree, it is striking how much these stances have become part of the broader debate. On the Republican side, the presidency of Donald Trump has taken the party to all sorts of unexpected places, ranging from trade wars against our Canadian ally to a frontal assault on the legitimacy of the FBI. Even before Trump, a Republican Senate was unwilling even to consider the Supreme Court nomination of Merrick Garland, an unprecedented step in modern times. There is a broader pattern here: The space for possible

policy outcomes has opened up. This will have important implications for the future of our republic. On the downside, when outof-the-box or “crazy” ideas are part of the discourse, political polarization will increase yet further. The likes of Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez may well be driving many Trump-skeptical Republicans into the arms of Trump. Many Democrats, in turn, have a sense that Trump and his violations of political norms must be stopped at all costs. And if your party controls all branches of government, the political returns are now greater. Even if your party’s ideas are so unusual or “out there” that they would never get through divided government, you can tailor your electoral strategies toward “sweeping the board.” Furthermore, major election-altering events, such as recessions or unpopular wars, may assume greater historical importance in generating the preconditions for political breakthroughs. The importance of luck is rising. Were you sick and tired of gridlock? Well, welcome to a new political world, in which surprises come every year — at least until Democrats capture the House.

Under divided government, change won’t necessarily stop. It will just come in the form of unilateral executive orders, or through rhetorical and symbolic cultural battles that are extreme compared with a decade or two ago. Every now and then, one party will control all branches of government, and then the rhetoric and the expectations will be in place for some pretty big changes. Not long ago, I thought that even a 5-to-4 conservative Republican majority on the Supreme Court would essentially leave Roe v. Wade in place, for fear of taking this Republican-friendly issue off the national agenda. Now I’m not so sure. All of a sudden, Americans are getting used to the idea that extreme political change is possible, for better or worse, and that means many of them will demand it. In the Trump Era, if I may call it that, it is harder to tell your base that big changes just don’t happen that easily. Is there an upside to this expansion of policy choices? Absolutely. Whether or not you like the current administration, you still might think that, over time, an America with less gridlock will produce more good ideas than bad ones, and that some of the bad ones will eventually be

reversed or corrected. There are also plenty of good ideas that don’t have a partisan tinge one way or the other. Five years ago, I thought the Federal Reserve was far away from adopting “nominal GDP targeting,” an idea supported by many economists on both the right and the left. Today it seems entirely possible that the Fed will move much further in that direction, if only because it wouldn’t be seen as such a big, radical change compared to so many other developments. Trump is probably going to tweet criticism at the Fed no matter what it does, so it might as well just go ahead and do some things it wants to do. Other causes that might have once seemed hopeless or unlikely will now attract more supporters, in the hope that maybe they will prove winners against the odds. The YIMBY (“Yes in My Backyard”) movement to deregulate high-density building, most of all in California, is winning over many enthusiastic young people, among both progressives and libertarians. Maybe these prospects for change will draw more talent and innovation into American politics, and for the better. In the meantime, my advice: Buckle your seatbelts.

Student loans are starting to bite the economy BY DANIEllE DIMARTINO BOOTh BLOOMBERG OpINION

It’s that time of year, when students prepare to head back to the classroom. For many taking the next step in higher education, the question is increasingly, “Is it worth it?” Millions of millennials have already put off settling down because of the rising costs of servicing college debts to the detriment of economic growth. Student loans are now the second-largest category of household debt in America, topping $1.4 trill i o n a n d t r a i l i n g o n ly mortgages at $9 trillion. And while Kor n Fer ry puts the average starting salary for a 2018 college graduate at $50,390, up 2.8 percent from 2017, the justreleased July Consumer Price Index report shows the inflation rate rose 2.9 percent over the last 12 months. Does the phrase “treading water” come to mind?

Donald Farley Chief Operating Officer Mark Altavilla Advertising Director Joe Nealon Circulation Director

A recent re por t by Bloom Economic Research breaks out the demographic challenges that have resulted from the 176 percent increase in student loan debt in the decade through 2017. In the years leading up to the housing crisis and the dramatic loosening of mor tg ag e credit standards, many families tapped readily available home equity to finance pricier higher educations for their children than they would have otherwise been able to afford. After the bust, this avenue was blocked, leaving only the higher education inflation it had fueled. From 2007 through 2017, the CPI rose by 21 percent. Over that same period, college tuition costs jumped 63 percent, school housing surged 51 percent and the price of textbooks by 88 percent. These troubling growth rates wipe away any mystery behind today’s staggering levels of student loan debt, which have almost tripled

from the 2007 star ting point of $545 billion. As of the fourth quarter, student loans represented 10.5 percent of a record $13.1 trillion in U.S. household debt, up from 3.3 percent at the start of 2003. Regardless of income bracket, housing is the biggest line item in family budgets. On that count, the best news for fresh grads is that rent growth appears to be slowing as a flood of apartment supply hits the market. According to RentCafe, the average rent in the U.S. was a record $1,409 in July, a 2.8 percent from a year earlier. While rent growth has stopped outpacing gains in salaries, the level is nevertheless prohibitively high for many, especially those weighed down by student loans the minute they cross the stage. The average student loan payment is $351. Tack that on to average rents and you’re pushing $1,800 before you hit the online grocery app icon on your smart phone,

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the bill for which runs at least $100 a month for most of us. Using college grad s t a r t i n g s a l a r i e s, t h at takes up a large chunk of monthly take-home pay of about $3,400 if you live in Texas or $3,100 if you’re in New York. The latest demographic breakdown available has an end point of 2016. What we know through that period is that 22.4 percent of all U.S. households carried student debt, with the percentage rising to 44.8 percent for those aged 18-34, or $33,000 on average, up from 18.6 percent i n 2 0 0 1 . T h e av e r a g e household has to save for almost six and a half years to cover a 20 percent down payment on a home at current prices, according to a recent study by Zillow’s HotPads. That’s based on the steep assumption that workers can sock away 20 percent of their monthly take-home pay. T he outer bir th-year band for millennials is 1981, making 2018 the year

larry holeva Executive Editor Dave Janoski Managing Editor

millennials are closer to 40 than they are to 30. While homeownership has picked up, it’s been held back for a decade due to the stagnant wage growth coupled with onerous debt burdens. The macroeconomic ramifications are well-documented. Baby boomers house a record level of their millennial offspring who can’t afford to leave home. Birth rates have fallen to a 30-year low as mar riage is put of f. Emanating from this trend is the money not plunked into nesting as families grow, a consequence not lost on Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell. “You do stand to see longer-term negative effects on people who can’t pay off their student loans. It hurts their credit rating, it impacts the entire half of their economic life,” Powell said in March. “As this goes on and as student loans continue to g row and become larger and larger, then it absolutely could hold back growth.”

Clearly, reform of some kind must address the issue of student debt, which is not to say debt relief or outright forgiveness. Institutions of higher learning in this country must take some of the responsibility for the current state of affairs in the nation’s most populous demographic group. And while the misguided cultural stigmatization of vo c at i o n a l e d u c at i o n appears to finally be abating, fur ther inroads to reintroduce balance to t h e workforce must be made. The retur n on investment in a four-year degree isn’t as straightforward as it was for high school grads circa 1988. The reality of cost burd e n s m u s t b e we i g h e d against the quality of life millions have forsaken thanks to the ease with which they’ve been able to finance the higher educ at i o n s t h at h ave re n dered their lives to lower rungs.

lETTER gUIDElINEs Letters to the editor must include the author’s name and town of residence for publication, and a daytime telephone number for confirmation. Letters must be 300 words or fewer and are subject to editing. Mail: Your Voice, The Citizens’ Voice, 75 N. washington St., wilkesBarre, pA 18701 Email: yourvoice@citizensvoice.com Fax: 570-821-2247


WB_VOICE/PAGES [A12] | 08/21/18

oBituaries

A12 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

Minesite Road, Allentown. Visitation, Thursday, 5 to 8 p.m., Stephens Funeral Home Inc., 274 N. Krocks Road, Allentown. PinKosKi, rosalee B. — Kingston. Mass, Saturday, 9 a.m., St. Ignatius Loyola Church, 339 N. Maple Ave., Kingston. PisanescHi, adolph P., Jr. — Wilkes-Barre. Funeral, Wednesday, 11 a.m., E. Blake Collins Funeral Home, 159 George Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Potera, leo P. — Kingston. Funeral, Wednesday, 10 a.m., Lehman-Gregory Funeral Home Inc., 281 Chapel St., Swoyersville. sHaFFer, Boyd a. — Plains Twp. Funeral services, Thursday, 10 a.m., East End Primitive Methodist Church, 79 Laurel St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends, Wednesday, 5 to 7 p.m. and Thursday, 9:30 a.m. until the service. VanBlarGan, Jean louise tompkins — Pittston. Services Wednesday, 7 p.m., Baloga Funeral Home Inc. 1201 Main St., Pittston (Port Griffith). Friends, Wednesday, 4 to 7 p.m. WilliaMs, Griffith t. — Ashley. Funeral services, Friday, 9:30 a.m., George A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley. Mass of Christian Burial, 10 a.m., St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends, Thursday, 5 to 7 p.m. and Friday, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.

Martin Joseph Gilroy Sr. August 20, 2018

Martin Joseph Gilroy Sr., 78, of Wyoming, passed away Monday, Aug. 20, 2018, at Highland Manor Nursing Home, Exeter. Born in Pittston, on Feb. 12, 1940, he was the son of the late Charles and Rita Mulcahey Gilroy. He was a graduate of Pittston Twp. High School and was self-employed in the carpet business. Marty was well known throughout Greater Pittston for his pizza making skills. He loved the New York Giants and Yankees, and he adored his family. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Ellen Gilroy. Surviving are his children, Christine Gilroy, Dupont; Martin Gilroy Jr. and his wife, Lora, Swoyersville; Lori Bryk and her husband, Bryan, Suscon; Donna Deiter and her husband, Kevin, Swoyersville; Megan Psolka and her husband, John, Luzerne; and James Gilroy, Wyoming; grandchildren, Sara, Danielle, Emily, Brandon, Halle,

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Linda L. Kohut

Funeral notices anistransKi, Joseph — Hanover Twp. Friends, Thursday, 4 to 7 p.m., Hugh B. Hughes and Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Christian Burial, Friday, 10 a.m., St. Robert Bellarmine Parish at St. Aloysius Church, 143 Division St., Wilkes-Barre. Please go directly to the church. Hall, Jackson e. — WilkesBarre. Funeral Mass, Thursday, 9:30 a.m., Church of St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception, 130 S. Washington St., WilkesBarre. JanisZeWsKi, suzanne H. — West Pittston. Aug. 25, 2 p.m., chapel, West Pittston Cemetery. JenKins, eleanor r. — Hunlock Creek. Funeral services, Wednesday, 10 a.m., Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 173 E. Green St., Nanticoke. Calling hours, 9 a.m. to service time. Jones, Mildred J. — Shavertown. Funeral services, Wednesday, 7 p.m., Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Friends, 5 to 7 p.m. Kotsull, robert J. — Bear Creek. Celebration of life, Aug. 25, 1 p.m., The Westmoreland Club, 59 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. lanG, tara lee — Salisbury Twp. Celebration of life service, Saturday, 10:30 a.m., Grace Community Church, 1290

20:22 | STANICHSAM

Robert A. Paoletti

August 19, 2018

Linda L. Kohut of Pittston passed away Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018, in Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Twp. Born May 24, 1957, in Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of the late Frank and Christina Brooks Kohut. She was a 1975 graduate of Pittston Area High School and received her bachelor’s degree in social work from King’s College, Wilkes-Barre. Linda was employed as director of community services by Area on the Aging, Wilkes-Barre, for over 40 years, and was a member of several professional organizations. Linda dedicated her life to the rights of animals, the elderly and children. She was also a member of SALSA, Spanish American Leaders Serving All; the Wilkes-Barre Chapter of the NAACP; and a former board member of Ruth’s Place. She was involved in many community activities too numerous to mention. She cared and responded to the needs of any creature or human, especially the needs of her brother, Frank “Butch” Kohut. She was an avid Philadelphia Phillies and Eagles fan. Surviving are her broth-

August 18, 2018

er, Frank “Butch” Kohut, Pittston; aunts, Josephine Haslin and Verna Prawzdik; numerous cousins; and many friends. Funeral services will be held at 9 a.m. Friday from Simon S. Russin Funeral Home Inc., 136 Maffett St., Plains Twp., with a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. Joseph Marello Church, William Street, Pittston. Interment will follow in St. John the Baptist Cemetery, Exeter. Family and friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Blue Chip Animal Refuge, 974 Lockville Road, Dallas, PA 18612.

Anthony M. Wilczynski August 21, 2018

Anthony M. Wilczynski, 75, of Mountain Top, passed away Tuesday morning, Aug. 21, 2018, at Smith Health and Rehabilitation Center. Born in Nanticoke, he was the son of the late Alexander and Mary Simone Wilczynski. Anthony served in the U.S. Army Reserves and worked at Luzerne County Community College for 20 years, prior to retiring. Surviving are his wife, the former Sylvia Sololowski;

daughter, Annette Weiss and husband, Michael; son, Michael Wilczynski and wife, Nicole; and grandchildren, Madison and Brooke Weiss and Anthony Sennett-Wilczynski, all of Mountain Top. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Friday in St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Mountain Top. Friends are invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Parkinson’s Foundation, 200 SE First St. Suite 800, Miami, FL 33131, or at Parkinson.org, would be appreciated.

Robert A. Paoletti, 75, of Mountain Top, lost his battle with cancer on Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. Born Oct. 2, 1942, in Shelburne Falls, Mass., he was a son of the late Antonio and Marion Coutu Paoletti. Bob earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass., in 1964, and a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1968. Upon completion of his doctorate, he began his teaching career at King’s College in the biology department, retiring in May. During his 49-year tenure at King’s, he published articles and chapters in Biochemistry, Journal of Technical Writing and Communication, American Zoologist, Standards for Assessment in Higher Education, Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teaching. He also received numerous institutional and regional awards and honors, including the Max and Tillie Rosenn Award for Teaching Excellence, board member of the year, Northeastern PA chapter, March of Dimes, Father Frank J. O’Hara Distinguished Service Professorship, and Professor of the Year, named by the Aquinas Society (King’s College academic honor society). He was a member of both Alpha Sigma Lambda and Delta Epsilon Sigma Honor Societies. Bob was the ultimate gardener, as evidenced by the beauty of his yard. He spent countless hours working at his passion, and anyone who was able to see and enjoy it will attest his time was well spent. In addition to caring for his own yard, it was not unusual for him to put his gardening knowledge, along with a strong back, into helping family and friends with their yards. Without a doubt his greatest pleasure was being part of his children’s and grandchildren’s lives, he was the consummate “Nono” and

never missed an opportunity to spend whatever time he could with any and all of his grandchildren. He will be greatly missed by his wife, Susan Warner Paoletti; children, Andrew and his wife, Sirosh Paoletti, St. Louis, Mo.; Anthony and his wife, Jennifer Paoletti, Chicago, Ill.; Jill Zelinske McCormack, Mountain Top; and Mark and his wife, Dawn Zelinske, Pottstown; grandchildren, Farzan and Hanann Paoletti; Dominic and Christopher Paoletti; Kyle and Nina McCormack; and Alex and Lauren Zelinske; sister, Toni Ann Paoletti, Keene, N.H.; aunts, uncle, other family and friends. Dr. Paoletti will undoubtedly be remembered by the many lives he enriched as an extraordinary teacher, mentor, colleague and friend. His was truly a life well spent. Bob’s entire family is grateful for the care provided by the doctors, nurses and staff of Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. A celebration of Bob’s life will begin with visitation from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday at McLaughlin’s, 142 S. Washington St.,Wilkes-Barre, and continue with a funeral Mass at 10 a.m. Saturday in Church of St. Jude, Mountain Top. Memorial donations may be made to St. Joseph’s Center, Scranton. Memories and condolences may be shared with Bob’s family at www.celebratehislife.com.

Bryan, Ava, Raina, and John Jr.; sisters, Rita Dominick, Wyoming; and Sally Savon, Swoyersville; and several nieces and nephews. A celebration of Marty’s life will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday from Adonizio Funeral Home LLC, 251 William St., Pittston. Interment will be held at the convenience of the famiAugust 19, 2018 ly. Mary M. Warner, 64, of Har- Apaliski and husband, Jacob, To leave condolences, visit August 21, 2018 Marty’s obituary at www. veysLake,passedawaySunday, Harveys Lake; Jane Hart and Aug. 19, 2018, at her home. husband, Marty, Ormond adoniziofuneralhome.com. Linda E. Witten, 58, of outh; as well as six grandchilBorn in Wilkes-Barre, Mary Beach, Fla.; brother, Daniel R. Edwardsville, passed away dren. was the daughter of the late Warner Jr. and wife, Wendy, Family and friends are Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, at her Daniel R. and Lois Gallagher Port St. Lucie, Fla.; six nieces home, surrounded by her lov- asked to call from 5 to 7 p.m. Warner. She was a graduate of and one nephew; and two August 21, 2018 Friday at Hugh B. Hughes and ing family. Central Catholic High School, great-nieces and three greatSon Inc. Funeral Home, 1044 She was born in Brooklyn, Joanne E. Race, 61, of New York; Cheryl Stan- Kingston, and College Miseri- nephews. N.Y., on June 1, 1960, the Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. Monroe Twp., passed away baugh, Monroe Twp.; Debo- cordia, Dallas. A Mass of Christian Burial For information, or to send daughter of Harry and Sadie Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, in Wil- rah Holden, N.C.; Suanne Marylovedtheoutdoors.She will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m. the family condolences, kes-Barre General Hospital. Hick, N.C.; Kathi Derham- enjoyed hiking and especially Monday in Our Lady of Victo- Colao Witten. She is survived by her sons, please visit the funeral home She was born in Wilkes- mer, Monroe Twp.; Andrea enjoyed boating and sailing on ry Church, Second Street, HarMatthew Witten, Edwards- website at www.hughbBarre, on June 30, 1957, and Delicati, Monroe Twp.; and the lake. veys Lake. Interment will folville; and Mark Witten, Plym- hughes.com. was the daughter of the late Pamela Weidman, Monroe She was a member of Har- low in Oak Lawn Cemetery, John Sr. and Jean Smith Twp; and grandchildren, veys Lake Yacht Club and Har- Hanover Twp. Hoyt. Kaitlyn, Meredith, Daylin, veys Lake Women’s Club. Mary Friends may call from 9 a.m. Joanne resided in Monroe Harper, Lilly and Hadlee. participated in numerous com- Monday until the time of the August 21, 2018 Twp. for her entire life. She A memorial service will be munity service projects. Mary service in the church. was a loving wife, mother held at noon Saturday in was also a member of Our In lieu of flowers, memorial Sharon L. Mayo, 42, of August 20, 2018 and grandmother who loved Noxen Bible Baptist Church, Lady of Victory Church, Har- donations may be made to the Statesville, N.C., and formerplaying with and doting over 3622 PA-29, Noxen, with the veys Lake. Harveys Lake Fire and Ambu- ly Nanticoke, passed away Edward H. Antos Jr., 71, her grandchildren. Rev. Ben Hubbell, pastor, offiPreceding her in death, in lance Association. early Tuesday morning, of Shaver town, passed In addition to her parents, ciating. Visitation will follow addition to her parents, was a Our “Little Miss Harveys Aug. 21, 2018, in Iredell away peacefully Monday, she was preceded in death by the service Saturday in the great-niece, Lainey Johnson. Lake” will be sorely missed by Memorial Hospital, States- Aug. 20, 2018, in Wilkesdaughter, Alice Williams; church. Surviving are her son, Lou- all who had the privilege to ville. Barre General Hospital. and sister, Donna Wallace. Arrangements are by Cur- is Goeringer, Harveys Lake; know her. Funeral arrangements Funeral arrangements, Joanne is survived by her tis L. Swanson Funeral sisters, Lois Brooks and husArrangements have been when complete, will be are pending from Wrohusband of 31 years, Dale Home Inc., Routes 29 and 118, band, Gene, Palm City, Fla.; entrusted to Harold C. Snow- announced by Davis-Dinelli blewski Funeral Home Inc., Race; sons, Alan Williams Jr. Pikes Creek. Susan Young and husband, don Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty and his wife, Kristi, Florida; In lieu of flowers, memori- Anthony, Harveys Lake; Ellen Main St., Shavertown. Fort. St., Nanticoke. and Lee Race and his wife, al donations may be made to Stephanie, Monroe Twp.; Kunkle Fire and Ambulance, daughter, Paige Grove and 14 Firehouse Road, Dallas, her husband, Tyler, Reading; PA 18612. August 21, 2018 brothers, John Hoyt Jr. and Condolences can be made Jo s e p h i n e P. Au s t r a ers passed away Tuesday, Funeral arrangements are Funeral Home Inc., 568 BenJoseph Hoyt, both of Monroe at www.clswansonfuneralMcDermott of Luzerne Tow- Aug. 21, 2018, at home. entrusted to Betz-Jastremski nett St., Luzerne. Twp.; sisters, Bonnie Binger, home.com.

Mary M. Warner

Linda E. Witten

Joanne E. Race

Sharon L. Mayo

Edward H. Antos Jr.

Josephine P. Austra McDermott

Paula J. Bennett

Carrie E. Batchler

August 21, 2018

July 5, 2018

Paula J. Bennett, 55, of HarCarrie E. Batchler, 53, A service will be held privateA memorial service will be Leffler Funeral and CremaArrangements are by Curveys Lake, passed away Tues- lyattheconvenienceof thefam- tis L. Swanson Funeral Home passed away Thursday, July held from 5 to 7 p.m. Satur- tion Services, 435 S. Main St., day, Aug. 21, 2018. 5, 2018. ilyinMountOlivetCemetery. day from Kniffen O’Malley Wilkes-Barre. Inc., Pikes Creek.

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WB_VOICE/PAGES [A13] | 08/21/18

Obituaries / reGiON / NatiON

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Cecelia Kotch August 18, 2018

Cecelia Kotch, 93, of Plymouth, passed away peacefully Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018, in Post Acute Medical Hospital, Wilkes-Barre. She was preceded in death by her husband, Albert, in 1995. Cecelia was employed by Lesley Fay and other sewing factories, prior to retirement. She is survived by her son, Albert Kotch and his wife, Stasia, Plymouth; and her daughter, Maria Olexy and her husband, Anthony, Plymouth; four grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; one great-great-granddaughter to be; sisters, Florence Zlotek, Plymouth; Anna Niezgoda, Allentown; and Jean Jackubowski, Lancaster. She enjoyed spending time with her family, gardening, solving puzzles, completing word finds and shopping at local boutiques. She will be forever missed by her family. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday in All Saints Parish, Willow Street, Plymouth, with the Rev. Jacek J. Bialkowski officiating. Arrangements are by Kielty-Moran Funeral Home Inc., 87 Washington Ave., Plymouth.

Joseph T. Kalinas

August 21, 2018

Joseph T. Kalinas, 72, of Luzerne, passed away Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, surrounded by his loving family. Born in West Pittston, June 17, 1946, he was the son of the late Joseph and Elizabeth Vitanovitz Kalinas. He g r a d u a t e d f r o m We s t Pittston High School, Class of 1964. Joseph was a member of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Kingston. He served in the U.S. Army. Prior to his retirement, he was employed by Balester Optical. He was an avid Penn State, Pittsburgh Steeler and Pittsburgh Penguins fan. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Kimberly Ellen. He is survived by his loving wife, Ellen Jacobs Kalinas, with whom he celebrated his 49th wedding anniversary in May; his son, Joseph and wife, Terri Kalinas; daughters, Noel Kalinas and husband, Tom Klein; Wendy Federici and husband, Eric; seven grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter. Joseph adored his children, grandchildren and his canine companions. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Friday at Howell-Lussi Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming Ave., West Pittston. The Rev. Paul Metzoff will officiate. Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home. Inter ment will be in Memorial Shrine Cemetery, Carverton.

Martin Elwood Walters August 15, 2018

Martin Elwood Walters, 61, of Plymouth, passed away Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, at home. Funeral services will be held at the convenience of the family. Arrangements are by Kielty-Moran Funeral Home Inc., 87 Washington Ave., Plymouth.

Helen Suda August 18, 2018

Helen Suda, 102, of Kingston, died Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018, at ManorCare Health Services, Kingston. She was born in Hastingson-Hudson, N.Y., the daughter of the late Teofil and Maria Cyruk Kijek. Funeral services will be private, in accordance with her wishes.

21:03 | DULSKYAPRI

THE CITIZENS' VOICE A13

Cohen pleads guilty, implicates Trump Michael Cohen said Trump directed him to arrange hush money payments to a porn star and a former Playboy model. by Larry NeuMeister aNd tOM Hays associated Press

NEW YORK — Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer and fixer, pleaded guilty Tuesday to campaignfinance violations and other charges, saying Trump directed him to arrange the payment of hush money to porn star Stormy Daniels and a former Playboy model to influence the election. Cohen’s account appears to implicate Trump himself in a crime, though whether — or when — a president can be prosecuted remains a matter of legal dispute. The guilty plea was part of a double dose of bad news for Trump: It came at almost the same moment his former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was convicted in Alexandria, Virginia, of eight financial crimes in the first trial to come out of special counsel Robert Mueller’s sprawling Russia investigation. In a deal reached with federal prosecutors, Cohen, 51, pleaded guilty to eight counts, including tax evasion. He could get about four to five years in prison at sentencing Dec. 12. In entering the plea, Cohen did not name the two women or even Trump, recounting

instead that he worked with an “unnamed candidate.” But the amounts and the dates all lined up with the $130,000 paid to Daniels and the $150,000 that went to Playboy Playmate Karen McDougal to buy their silence in the weeks and months leading up to the 2016 White House e l e c t i o n . B o t h wo m e n claimed to have had affairs with Trump, which he denies. Cohen, his voice shaky as he answered questions from a federal judge, said one payment was “in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for federal office,” and the other was made “under direction of the same candidate.” Daniel Petalas, a former prosecutor in the Justice Department’s public integrity section, said, “This brings President Trump closer into the criminal conduct.” “The president has certain protections while a sitting president, but if it were true, and he was aware and tried to influence an election, that could be a federal felony offense,” Petalas said. “This strikes close to home.” However, in the charging documents, a news release and comments outside the courthouse, prosecutors did not go as far as Cohen did in open court in pointing the finger at the president. Prosecutors said

craig ruttle / associated Press

Michael Cohen, former personal lawyer to President Donald Trump, leaves federal court after reaching a plea agreement in New York on Tuesday. Cohen acted “in coordination with a candidate or campaign for federal office for purposes of influencing the election.” As cable networks were showing split-screen coverage of the conviction and plea bargain by two of his former loyalists, Trump himself boarded Air Force One on his way to a rally in West Virginia and ignored shouted questions about the men. Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, noted in a statement that “there is no allegation of any wrongdoing

against the president in the government’s charges against Mr. Cohen.” After the court hearing, which ended with Cohen released on $500,000 bail, the lawyer wiped away tears as he gazed out a courthouse window. He left the building and headed straight for a black SUV with tinted windows. A couple of people outside chanted, “Lock him up!” as they recorded the scene with their phones. Under federal law, expenditures to protect a candidate’s

political fortunes can be construed as campaign contributions, subject to federal laws that bar donations from corporations and set limits on how much can be given. “If those payments were a crime for Michael Cohen, then why wouldn’t they be a crime for Donald Trump?” Cohen’s lawyer, Lanny Davis, tweeted. Cohen’s plea follows months of scrutiny from federal investigations and a falling-out with the president, for whom Cohen once said he would “take a bullet.”

MaNafOrt: President called the outcome a ‘disgrace’ From Page a1

The jury found Manafort guilty of five counts of filing false tax returns on tens of millions of dollars in Ukrainian political consulting income. He was also convicted of failing to report foreign bank accounts in 2012 and of two bank fraud charges that accused him of lying to obtain millions of dollars in loans after his consulting income dried up. The jury couldn’t reach a verdict on three other foreign bank account charges, and the remaining bank fraud and conspiracy counts. The outcome, though not the across-the-board guilty ver-

dicts prosecutors sought, almost certainly guarantees years of prison for Manafort. It also appears to vindicate the ability of special counsel Robert Mueller’s team to secure convictions from a jury of average citizens despite months of partisan attacks, including from Trump, on the investigation’s integrity. The verdict also raised immediate questions of whether the president would seek to pardon Manafort, the lone American charged by Mueller to opt for trial instead of cooperate. The president has not revealed his thinking but spoke sympathetically throughout the trial of his onetime aide, at one point suggest-

ing he had been treated worse than gangster Al Capone. The president Tuesday called the outcome a “disgrace” and said the case “has nothing to do with Russia collusion.” The trial did not resolve the central question behind Mueller’s investigation — whether Trump associates coordinated with Russia to influence the election. Still, there were occasional references to Manafort’s work on the campaign, including emails showing him lobbying Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner on behalf of a banker who approved $16 million in loans because he wanted a job in the Trump administration. Manafort urged Kushner to

consider the banker, Stephen Calk, for Secretary of the Ar my. Though Kushner responded to Manafort’s email by saying, “On it!” Calk ultimately did not get an administration post. For the most part, jurors heard detailed and sometimes tedious testimony about Manafort’s finances and what prosecutors allege was a years-long tax-evasion and fraud scheme. Manafort decided not to put on any witnesses or testify himself. His attorneys said he made the decision because he didn’t believe the government had met its burden of proof. His defense team attempted to make the case about the

credibility of longtime Manafort protege Rick Gates, attacking the government’s star witness as a liar, embezzler and instigator of any crimes as they tried to convince jurors that Manafort didn’t willfully violate the law. Gates spent three days on the stand, telling jurors how he committed crimes alongside Manafort for years. He admitted to doctoring documents, falsifying information and creating fake loans to lower his former boss’ tax bill, and also acknowledged stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars without Manafort’s knowledge by filing fake expense reports.

Truck allegedly stolen by fugitive turns up in Schuylkill County by aMaNda CHristMaN staFF Writer

The 64-day search for a wanted fugitive from McAdoo who led law enforcement on a multi-state manhunt has come full circle. Apickuptruckreportedlystolen by Shawn Christy in Maryland on S u n d a y showed up in Rush Twp., Schuylkill CHristy C o u n t y, on Tuesday. The discovery of the red 1997 GMC Sierra pickup around 7:30 a.m. near HT Commons in Hometown prompted local, state and federal law enforcement agencies to search the area around the shopping center, including woods near an industrial park. Rush Twp. police Chief Ken Zipovsky said township police responded to a report of a suspicious vehicle in the Tidewood East Industrial Park and found the stolen pickup. Federal agents and marshals still in the area responded soon after. Zipovsky said officers are working in conjunction with U.S. marshals to provide them whatever assistance they need. At a news conference Tuesday afternoon, Deputy Robert Clark, supervisor of the U.S. Marshals Service fugitive task force, warned residents in the immediate area to be on the

elleN F. o’coNNell / staFF PHotograPHer

A line of State Game Commission vehicles were parked along Tide Road in the Tide Industrial Park in Rush Twp., Schuylkill County, on Tuesday. Pennsylvania Game Commission officers joined state police and federal marshals Tuesday in the search for Shawn Christy. lookout for Christy and to report any sightings. No credible sightings were reported by early Tuesday evening. Clark was joined at the press conference at state police Troop N headquarters in West Hazleton by Trooper Anthony Petroski. They said Christy should not be approached, as he is considered armed and dangerous and has made past threats of violence against anyone who tries to apprehend him. Christy is 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighs about 160 pounds, and is a white male with a light complexion and dark blond hair. He has a tattoo of a cross on his right upper

Rosalie Splendido August 21, 2018

Rosalie Splendido of the Parsons section of WilkesBarre passed away Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, in Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.

Funeral arrangements will be announced by E. Blake Collins Funeral Home, 159 George Ave., WilkesBarre.

arm and a full beard, and speaks with a noticeable lisp. Christy has multiple state arrest warrants in Pennsylvania for burglary, a probation violation and failure to appear for an aggravated assault case. Anyone noticing criminal activity, such as break-ins and stolen items, including license plates and food, also should contact law enforcement, they said. Zipovsky encouraged every person in the area to always lock homes and vehicles and not leave anything of value in vehicles, including keys. Anyone with information about this vehicle or Christy should call 911 immediately,

survivalist, has shown through the roughly two-month search that he can operate in the woods and does not need human contact, Clark said. Alargelawenforcementpresence was spotted in Hometown into the afternoon Tuesday. Hometown is about 6 miles south of Christy’s hometown of McAdoo, but it’s unclear which directionhemayhavetaken. Pennsylvania Game Commission officers joined state police and federal marshals Tuesday in the area of Tide Road near the industrial park. About six Game Commission vehicles were parked on Tide Road near a company called Highwood. Among the places being searched was a roughly 1,900acre swatch of land occupied by the Pitch Hunting Association just to the rear of Walmart in Hometown. The property heads east toward Carbon County, ending on Route 93, according to Ronnie Babbish of the association. It’s full of very thick brush, including scrub oak, hills, rocks and rattlesnakes. One utility road runs through it, he said. Babbish said he received a call from law enforcement Tuesday morning asking him to open the gate to the association land.

U.S. Marshals at 877-WANTED-2 (877-926-8332) or the FBI at 215-418-4000. A cash reward for information leading to his arrest remains at $20,000. Petroski was stern at the news conference when asking citizens to keep their properties locked and alert police immediately of any suspicious activity. “We want him taken into custody as soon as possible,” Petroski said. “He’s very elusive,” Clark said. Apprehending Christy has been a challenge, he said, but law enforcement have greater commitment and resolve to Contact the writer: finding him. achristman@standardspeaker. Christy, a self-proclaimed com 570-501-3584

Obituary submission guidelines the email address for the citizens’ Voice obituaries and photos is obits@citizensvoice.com. Please include the word “obituary” in the subject line of emails. the deadline to submit obituaries is 7:30 p.m. Holiday hours may change. Funeral directors should call the obituary desk at 570-821-2100 to confirm receipt of emails. scanned photos must have a resolution of at least 500 dpi. the person’s head must be at least 2 inches wide and have at least a half-inch of space on each side.


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A14 T HE C IT IZE NS' V O IC E

20:12 | FARRELLSHE

W E DNE SDA Y , A UG UST 22, 2018


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22:01 | MALUSOANTH

tHE CItIzEns’ VOICE

Sports WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

HIGH SCHOOL FIELD HOCKEY

Best of the best

DAVE SCHERBENCO / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

WVC junior field hockey standouts, from left, Valley West’s Rina Tsioles, Crestwood’s Sarah Richards, Wyoming Seminary’s Alex Wesneski and Hannah Maxwell and Coughlin’s Jolene Ulichney all have unique tales from the college recruiting process that will eventually land them at Division I schools.

Some of the area’s top players detail the recruiting process BY MATT BUFANO STAFF WRITER

The opportunities are boundless for a field hockey player in the Wyoming Valley Conference. There are countless ways in which a player can get from point A to point B, which crenique to ates a twisting and turning tale unique every prospect. Alex Wesneski’s field hockey careeer started with a clinic at Dallas High School. S Wesneski became such a coveted play yer that she was an invited guest at The Horseeshoe in Columbus, Ohio, and Cameron Indoo or Stadium for Ohio State football and Duke basketball games, respectively. She will play at Iowa. n with a Rina Tsioles’ playing career began camp at Spartan Stadium. Only a few w years later, Tsioles, at 13, caught Villanova’s attenn few tion during a club tournament. The next years have since provided a long réssumé of high school accomplishments, as well w as a commitment to play for Old Dominion n. Wesneski, Tsioles and at least fou ur other WVC standouts in the Class of 20220 have already given verbal commitments to o major college programs. That leaves uncommitted players like Jolene Ulichney as part of a dying breed; however, the NCAA hopes that new rules will result in more players waiting until junior orr senior year to commit. ampuses “It’s fun to get to look at all these ca and see what they have to offer,” said s the 16-year-old Ulichney. “But it’s a lot of o work keeping in contact with all the coach hes. You have to do a lot of homework off the fiield, too. It’s fun, though, but it’s a big commitm ment. So I’m trying to find the place that I think k is right for me.” i latest Earlier this year, the NCAA touted its legislation by saying some significant changes h would “lead to better decision-making” and ultimately “improve the college experience.”

Still, no decision is easy when high school athletes are being courted by the nation’s top programs, as is often the case in WVC field hockey. Five players entering their junior year — Wesneski and Hannah Maxwell of Wyoming Seminary, Tsioles of Valley West, Ulichney of Coughlin and Sarah Richards of Crestwood — recently detailed what it’s like to be a blue-chip recruit. Sometimes, it’s easy to take the WVC’s success in field hockey for granted. Around here, high school championships are won and colle g e commitments are made so often that, some players believe, there’s a misconception that field hockey is easy. But, Richards clarifies, “We’re just a field hockey powerhouse.”

Part of it, too, are all the nearby people and resources that help players reach their maximum potential. Along with Electric Surge, PA Elite and Majestyx are other prominent clubs in the area, each run by rising high school coaches in Erin McGinley of Wyoming Area and Amy D Daniel of Berwick, respectively. Dan niel graduated from Crestwood in 2007 and ussed her skills to earn a full scholarship to o James Madison. “I sttill think we’re the hotbed of hockey,” Danieel said. “I think we’re so fortunate to have th he coaches we have in this area.” Man ny high school teams offer clinics in the offfseason. Even Paige Selenski and Kelsey y Kolojejchick — local Olympians who reecently retired from the U.S. women’s nation nal team — instructed a pair of camps this pa ast summer. Pluss, the USA Field Hockey headquarters a are just over two hours south at Spook ky Nook Sports in Lancaster County. So w while the youngest players often gravitatee to field hockey for familiar reasons — making friends, learning discipline, having fun — it quickly elevates into h something much more.

Growing up

The landscape Local field hockey is booming. Chris Comiskey is co-director of Electric Surge THE CITIZENS’ VOICE FILE Field Hockey Club Wyoming in Kingston, where Seminary’s he and his wife, Alex Wesneski, left, and Coughlin’s Lunda, offer indoor Jolene Ulichney, two of a number of and d outdoor td ttraining i i from the U-10 age level Division I college prospects out of the Wyoming Valley Conference, battle during a game last season. up.

NFL

Roethlisberger eager to ‘knock that rust off’ ASSOCIATED PRESS

PITTSBURGH — Ben Roethlisberger believes his right arm feels as good as it has in years. The same goes for the rest of the Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback’s body, save for the occasional unwanted collision with a teammate. If the scariest moment Roethlisberger endures all season is the accidental blindside hit from right tackle Marcus Gilbert — who inadvertently knocked the wind out of Roethlisberger during practice last week, sending a br ief scare through the organization and sending Roethlisberger into the concussion protocol as a precaution — the franchise’s all-time leader in

Electric Surge opened five years ago and had four teams of about eight to 10 players per team. Electric Surge had nine teams the following year, then 13, then 21, and Comiskey is anticipating 27 or 28 teams this year. Whereas other sports tend to “weed out” players over time, that’s not usually the case in field hockey. “I’ve coached a lot of kids all the way through,” Comiskey said. “From my experience, most of them stick it out. Maybe it’s just the area. Field hockey’s really big in this area, so that could be a possibility.”

DON WRIGHT / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger throws during practice on Sunday. nearly every significant passing category will take it. “Hopefully, the hardest hit I take all year is from Gilbert and we can laugh at it at the end of the year,” Roethlisberger said withalaughonTuesday.

Maybe, but nobody was laughing when Roethlisberger’s familiar No. 7 was kneeling on the turf at Saint Vincent College. He took a pair Please see STEELERS, Page B5

Rina Tsioles began playing field h hockey in third grade. Within a few years and before she W everr played for Valley West’s varsity, Tsio oles performed well enough on the clu ub circuit to compete at Team US SA’s National Indoor Tournament. There, Villanova made it clear the T Willdcats were interested in Tsioles. ““It got me really excited,” Tsioles rem membered. “I’m like, ‘Oh, my gosh, collleges are looking at me playing.’” In the end, Villanova didn’t work out. t Please see RECRUITING, Page B3

INDYCAR

Wickens has rods placed into spine after Pocono crash ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALLENTOWN — IndyCar driver Robert Wickens had titanium rods and screws placed in his spine to stabilize a fracture associated with a spinal cord injury suffered in a weekend crash at Pocono Raceway. IndyCar said in a statement Tuesday the severity of the spinal cord injury was unknown. Schmidt Peterson Motorsports later said it would not field the No. 6, the car Wickens’ drives, at this weekend’s race in St. Louis. James Hinchcliffe, who injured his hands in the wreck in Pocono, has been cleared to compete and will race at Gateway. Wickens is expected to undergo more surgeries to

treat fractures in his lower extremities and right forearm. He remains in stable condition. His car sailed into the fence at Pocono when he and Ryan Hunter-Reay made slight contact on Sunday. Hunter-Reay’s car spun and Wickens’ car launched over it and into the fence. A large hole was torn into the fence. The race was delayed 2 hours to repair the damage. The 29-year-old Wickens is a rookie in IndyCar but a championship driver in touring cars in Europe. He left that series this year to try IndyCar alongside childhood friend Hinchcliffe. The two Canadians became friends racing against each other in the junior ranks and Hinch-

cliffe lured Wickens back to North America. Hinchcliffe and Wickens drive for Schmidt Peterson Motorsports, and Wickens had been sur prisingly c o m p e t i t ive s i n c e h i s series debut. He was on his way to winning the season opener at St. Petersburg, Florida, until he was spun in the closing laps. Wickens has one pole, four podiums, a pair of runner-up finishes and was sixth in the standings before his crash. He finished ninth in the Indianapolis 500. Team owner Sam Schmidt was paralyzed when he crashed during a test at Walt Disney World Speedway in 2000. The accident left Schmidt a quadriplegic.


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SPORTS

B2 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

CONTACT US Tony Maluso, Sports editor 570-821-2181 tmaluso@citizensvoice.com Steve Bennett, Sports writer 570-821-2062 sbennett@citizensvoice.com Matt Bufano, Sports writer 570-821-2060 mbufano@citizensvoice.com Stephen Connors, Sports copy editor 570-821-2063 sconnors@citizensvoice.com Tyler Piccotti, Sports writer 570-821-2089 tpiccotti@citizensvoice.com Eric Shultz, Sports writer 570-821-2054 eshultz@citizensvoice.com Sports email: sports@citizensvoice.com Fax number: 570-821-2247

LOCAL SPORTS TODAY

High School Girls Tennis Holy Redeemer at Hazleton Area, 4 p.m. Berwick at Valley West, 4 p.m. Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin. 4 p.m. Wyoming Area at Crestwood, 4 p.m. Tunkhannock at Dallas, 4 p.m. MMI Prep at GAR, 4 p.m. Pittston Area at Meyers, 4 p.m. Golf Hazleton Area at Valley West, 1:30 p.m. Nanticoke Area at Crestwood, 3:30 p.m. Pittston Area at Dallas, 4 p.m. Tunkhannock at Coughlin, 4 p.m. Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m. Wyoming Area at MMI Prep, 4:30 p.m. Professional International League Baseball RailRiders at Buffalo, 7 p.m.

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Points Underdog American League BLUE JAYS -$175 ( 9.5 ) Orioles WHITE SOX -$110 ( 8.5 ) Twins A’S -$170 ( 9.0 ) Rangers Astros -$135 ( 8.5 ) MARINERS RAYS -$220 ( 8.0 ) Royals Indians -$115 ( 9.0 ) RED SOX National League BREWERS -$230 ( 9.0 ) Reds PIRATES -$110 ( 8.0 ) Braves NATIONALS -$170 ( 8.5 ) Phillies METS -$158 ( 7.5 ) Giants ROCKIES -$240 (10.5 ) Padres DODGERS -$155 ( 8.0 ) Cards InterLeague Yankees -$190 ( 8.0 ) MARLINS Cubs -$185 ( 9.0 ) TIGERS D’BACKS -$195 ( 8.5 ) Angels NOTE:The number inside the bracket is the over/under run total for the game. NFL Favorite Points Underdog Open Current O/U Thursday BROWNS 3 (41.5) Eagles Friday JETS 2.5 (42.0) Giants WASHINGTON 3 (43.5) Broncos PANTHERS 1 (45.5) Patriots BUCS 3 (45.5) Lions VIKINGS 3.5 (39.5) Seahawks RAIDERS 7 (41.5) Packers Saturday BEARS 2 (47.5) Chiefs STEELERS 4 (45.5) Titans RAMS 3 (42.5) Texans COLTS 1 (43.5) 49ers JAGUARS 3 (40.0) Falcons DOLPHINS PK (41.5) Ravens CHARGERS 2.5 (43.5) Saints Sunday BILLS 1.5 (41.5) Bengals COWBOYS 3 (43.5) Cards College Football Favorite Points Underdog Open Current O/U Saturday Wyoming 4 (46.0) NEWMEXICOST COLORADO ST 14 (57.5) Hawaii HOME TEAM IN CAPS

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES — Placed SS Didi Gregorius on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 20. Recalled INF Luke Voit from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). National League CHICAGO CUBS — Acquired INF Daniel Murphy from Washington for INF Andruw Monasterio and a player to be named or cash consideration. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Optioned RHP Derek Law to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Chris Stratton from Richmond (EL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Traded 1B Matt Adams to St. Louis for cash considerations. Recalled INF Adrian Sanchez and OF Andrew Stevenson from Syracuse (IL). Placed LHP Tommy Milone on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 20. Reinstated RHP Kelvin Herrera from the 10-day DL. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Signed LHP Austin Wright. TEXAS AIRHOGS — Sold the contract of OF Dillon Thomas to the Milwaukee Brewers. Midwest League QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS — Recalled INF Trey Dawson from Tri-City (NYP). Assigned INF Colton Shaver to Buies Creek (Carolina). Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES — Released RHP Justin Lemanski. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Suspended Baltimore CB Jimmy Smith, without pay, for the first four regular-season games for violating the NFL’s personal conduct policy. NFL — WR Victor Cruz announced his retirement. BUFFALO BILLS — Signed P Jon Ryan to a one-year contract. Released K Tyler Davis. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed C Jacob Judd. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed TE Matt Weiser. Waived TE Colin Jeter. TENNESSEE TITANS — Agreed to a contract extension with WR Rishard Matthews through 2019. Agreed to terms with LBs Jeff Knox, Nyles Morgan and Deontae Skinner. Waived LBs Brandon Chubb and Davond Dade and OL Matt Diaz. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES — Signed F Anthony Peluso to a one-year, two-way contract. OTTAWA SENATORS — Announced the resignation of Randy Lee, assistant general manager. American Hockey League SAN DIEGO GULLS — Signed D Terrance Amorosa to a one-year contract. SOCCER National Women’s Soccer League WASHINGTON SPIRIT — Fired Jim Gabarra, coach and general manager. Named assistant coach Tom Torres interim coach and Chris Hummer general manager. COLLEGE LA SALLE — Named Katie Rhodes women’s lacrosse coach. TEMPLE — Named Morgyn Seigfried associate athletic director for digital strategy and production.

23:30 | CONNORSSTE

RADIO / TV TODAY’S RADIO SCHEDULE INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. RailRiders at Buffalo 1340 AM, 100.7 FM MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. Nationals at Phillies 1240 AM, 96.1 FM

TODAY’S TV SCHEDULE LITTLE LEAGUE WORLD SERIES 3 p.m. Japan vs. South Korea 7:30 p.m. Staten Island vs. Honolulu MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2 p.m. Cincinnati at Milwaukee OR Minnesota at Chicago White Sox 7 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia 7 p.m. San Francisco at NY Mets 7 p.m. NY Yankees at Miami 7 p.m. Atlanta at Pittsburgh 7 p.m. Cleveland at Boston 10 p.m. St. Louis at LA Dodgers SOCCER 3 p.m. UEFA Champions League, AFC Ajax vs. FC Dynamo Kyiv 7 p.m. MLS, NY Red Bulls at NY City FC

IL STANDINGS North W L Pct. Lehigh Valley (Phillies) 76 51 .598 RailRiders (Yankees) 65 59 .524 Pawtucket (Red Sox) 59 66 .472 Buffalo (Blue Jays) 58 65 .472 Rochester (Twins) 57 68 .456 Syracuse (Nationals) 55 72 .433 South W L Pct. Durham (Rays) 70 55 .560 Norfolk (Orioles) 65 59 .524 Gwinnett (Braves) 61 64 .488 Charlotte (White Sox) 56 67 .455 West W L Pct. Indianapolis (Pirates) 68 59 .535 Columbus (Indians) 68 59 .535 Toledo (Tigers) 64 62 .508 Louisville (Reds) 54 70 .435 Tuesday Rochester 6, Pawtucket 3 Norfolk at Charlotte, 5:05 p.m. Durham 4, Gwinnett 2 Durham 5, Gwinnett 4 Toledo 5, Louisville 2 Lehigh Valley 4, Syracuse 2, 10 innings Charlotte at Norfolk, 7:05 p.m. Columbus 4, Indianapolis 3, 10 innings Pawtucket at Rochester, 7:05 p.m. RailRiders at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m. Today Charlotte at Norfolk, Game 1, 5:05 p.m. Charlotte at Norfolk, Game 2, TBD Gwinnett at Durham, Game 1, 6:05 p.m. Gwinnett at Durham, Game 2, TBD Toledo at Louisville, 6:30 p.m. Lehigh Valley at Syracuse, 6:35 p.m. Columbus at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m. Pawtucket at Rochester, 7:05 p.m. RailRiders at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m. Thursday Charlotte at Norfolk, 12:05 p.m. RailRiders at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m. Lehigh Valley at Syracuse, 6:35 p.m. Toledo at Louisville, 7 p.m. Columbus at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m. Gwinnett at Durham, 7:05 p.m. Pawtucket at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.

ESPN ESPN MLB NBCSP SNY YES ATTSN-PIT MLB ESPN TNT FS1

NFL PRESEASON

GB _ 9.5 16 16 18 21 GB _ 4.5 9 13 GB _ _ 3.5 12.5

EASTERN LEAGUE Eastern W L Pct. GB N.H. (Blue Jays) 69 55 .556 _ Trenton (Yankees) 68 59 .535 2.5 Reading (Phillies) 60 65 .480 9.5 Binghamton (Mets) 60 67 .472 10.5 Hartford (Rockies) 58 66 .468 11 Portland (Red Sox) 55 70 .440 14.5 Western W L Pct. GB Akron (Indians) 70 56 .556 _ Altoona (Pirates) 69 55 .556 _ Harrisburg (Nationals) 63 61 .508 6 Bowie (Orioles) 60 65 .480 9.5 Erie (Tigers) 60 66 .476 10 Richmond (Giants) 59 66 .472 10.5 Tuesday Portland 3, New Hampshire 2 Reading at Harrisburg, cancelled Altoona 9, Binghamton 2 Bowie 5, Richmond 0 Hartford 7, Trenton 3 Akron at Erie, 7:05 p.m. Today Portland at New Hampshire, Game 1, 5:35 p.m. Portland at New Hampshire, Game 2, TBD Harrisburg at Altoona, 6 p.m. Binghamton at Hartford, 7:05 p.m. Erie at Akron, 7:05 p.m. Richmond at Bowie, 7:05 p.m. Trenton at Reading, 7:15 p.m. Thursday Harrisburg at Altoona, 6 p.m. Binghamton at Hartford, 7:05 p.m. Erie at Akron, 7:05 p.m. Portland at New Hampshire, 7:05 p.m. Richmond at Bowie, 7:05 p.m. Trenton at Reading, 7:15 p.m.

NY-PENN LEAGUE McNamara W L Pct. GB Hudson Valley (Rays) 36 26 .581 _ Brooklyn (Mets) 34 28 .548 2 Staten Island (Yankees) 32 28 .533 3 Aberdeen (Orioles) 29 32 .475 6.5 Pinckney W L Pct. GB Auburn (Nationals) 35 28 .556 _ MahoningValley(Indians) 34 28 .548 .5 State College (Cardinals) 31 31 .500 3.5 Batavia (Marlins) 28 34 .452 6.5 Williamsport (Phillies) 25 36 .410 9 West Virginia (Pirates) 25 38 .397 10 Stedler W L Pct. GB Tri-City (Astros) 35 27 .565 _ Lowell (Red Sox) 33 28 .541 1.5 Vermont (Athletics) 29 33 .468 6 Connecticut (Tigers) 25 34 .424 8.5 Tuesday Mahoning Valley 4, Auburn 1 Lowell 8, Staten Island 0 Tri-City 5, Brooklyn 2 Hudson Valley 6, Connecticut 0 Vermont 6, Aberdeen 2 West Virginia 9, Batavia 2 State College at Williamsport, 7:05 p.m. Today Lowell at Staten Island, 2 p.m. Mahoning Valley at Auburn, 6:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Tri-City, 7 p.m. Hudson Valley at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m. Batavia at West Virginia, 7:05 p.m. Aberdeen at Vermont, 7:05 p.m. State College at Williamsport, 7:05 p.m. Thursday Williamsport at Batavia, Game 1, 5:05 p.m. Williamsport at Batavia, Game 2, TBD Vermont at Lowell, 6:35 p.m. Vermont at Lowell, 6:35 p.m. Connecticut at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Tri-City at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m. West Virginia at Mahoning Valley, 7:05 p.m. Auburn at State College, 7:05 p.m. Staten Island at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.

RailRiders Blog For insight, breaking news and other RailRiders nuggets, visit citizensvoice.com/blogs.

AMERICAN East W L T Pct. New England 2 0 0 1.000 Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 Miami 0 2 0 .000 South W L T Pct. Houston 2 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 1 1 0 .500 Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 Tennessee 0 2 0 .000 North W L T Pct. Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 Cincinnati 2 0 0 1.000 Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500 West W L T Pct. L.A. Chargers 1 1 0 .500 Oakland 1 1 0 .500 Kansas City 1 1 0 .500 Denver 0 2 0 .000 NATIONAL East W L T Pct. N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 Washington 1 1 0 .500 Dallas 0 2 0 .000 Philadelphia 0 2 0 .000 South W L T Pct. Carolina 2 0 0 1.000 Tampa Bay 2 0 0 1.000 New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 North W L T Pct. Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 Chicago 1 2 0 .333 Detroit 0 2 0 .000 West W L T Pct. Arizona 2 0 0 1.000 San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 L.A. Rams 1 1 0 .500 Seattle 0 2 0 .000

PF 63 42 30 44

PA 37 45 15 53

PF 33 34 38 31

PA 23 34 37 61

PF 70 51 37 65

PA 42 40 29 65

PF 41 31 38 51

PA 38 29 31 66

PF 40 32 34 34

PA 37 39 45 68

PF 55 56 39 14

PA 43 38 40 45

PF 82 52 67 27

PA 51 42 70 46

PF 44 37 26 31

PA 32 37 48 43

Thursday’s Games New England 37, Philadelphia 20 Washington 15, N.Y. Jets 13 Green Bay 51, Pittsburgh 34 Friday’s Games N.Y. Giants 30, Detroit 17 Kansas City 28, Atlanta 14 Buffalo 19, Cleveland 17 Carolina 27, Miami 20 Arizona 20, New Orleans 15 Saturday’s Games Jacksonville 14, Minnesota 10 L.A. Rams 19, Oakland 15 Cincinnati 21, Dallas 13 Tampa Bay 30, Tennessee 14 Houston 16, San Francisco 13 Chicago 24, Denver 23 L.A. Chargers 24, Seattle 14 Monday’s Games Baltimore 20, Indianapolis 19 Thursday, Aug. 23 Philadelphia at Cleveland, 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24 New England at Carolina, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m. Denver at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 8 p.m. Green Bay at Oakland, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25 Kansas City at Chicago, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Houston at L.A. Rams, 4 p.m. San Francisco at Indianapolis, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Jacksonville, 7 p.m. Baltimore at Miami, 7 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Chargers, 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 26 Cincinnati at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Arizona at Dallas, 8 p.m.

WNBA EASTERN x-Atlanta x-Washington x-Connecticut Chicago New York Indiana x-Seattle x-Phoenix x-Los Angeles x-Minnesota x-Dallas Las Vegas

W 23 22 21 13 7 6

L 11 12 13 21 27 28

Pct .676 .647 .618 .382 .206 .176

GB — 1.0 2.0 10 16 17

W 26 20 19 18 15 14

L 8 14 15 16 19 20

Pct .765 .588 .559 .529 .441 .412

GB — 6.0 7.0 8.0 11 12

WESTERN

Sunday’s Games

Connecticut 89, Los Angeles 86 Phoenix 96, New York 85 Indiana 97, Chicago 92 Atlanta 93, Las Vegas 78 Seattle 84, Dallas 68 Minnesota 88, Washington 83

Monday’s Games

No games scheduled

Tuesday’s Games

Dallas at Phoenix, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

Wednesday’s Games

No games scheduled

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

’Riders let early lead slip away The score was tied during a rain delay at press time. staFF RepoRt

Justus Sheffield surrendered a one-run lead in his first true appearance as a reliever for the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders against Buffalo on Tuesday in a game that was in a rain delay in the bottom of the ninth inning at press time. The game was tied 1-1 at Coca-Cola Field and Buffalo had a runner on a first base with no outs when the second delay of the game occurred. The start of the game was also delayed by rain for more than 90 minutes. Sheffield entered in the seventh with a 1-0 lead and pitched a perfect frame. But in the eighth, Sheffield gave up back-to-back hits, including a scorched RBI double by Vladimir Guerrero Jr. that tied the game at 1-1. Dwight Smith Jr. led off with a single and Guerrero drilled a ball to the gap in left center to bring home Smith. After a groundout, Anthony Alford reached on an error but Sheffield retired the next two batters to end the inning.

IL BASEBALL The only other game this season that Shef field appeared in but did not start was on June 27 at Lehigh Valley. A.J. Cole started the game and allowed three runs without recording an out. J.P. Feyereisen came in to finish the first inning and then Sheffield entered in the second and threw six shutout innings, allowing six hits and striking out three. Tuesday’s starter for the RailRiders, Nestor Cortes, continued his strong stretch with six shutout innings, allowing six hits with six strikeouts. In his last four starts, he has allowed a total of four runs in 25⅓ innings. On Tuesday, he did work in and out of a few jams. In the fourth, Guerrero led off with single to right. After Lourdes Gurriel Jr. flied out, Alford singled to left. With two on and one out, Reese McGuire singled to center but Devyn Bolasky fielded the ball and fired a strike that one-hopped to catcher Wilkin Castillo and got Guerrero out at the plate by a couple of steps. Tim Lopes walked to load the bases but Cortes struck out

Gunnar Heidt to get out of it. In the sixth inning, Gurriel reached on a one-out single and Alford was hit by a pitch. Cortes then struck out McGuire looking and got Lopes to ground out to end the threat. The RailRiders scored their run in the first inning. Tyler Wade led off the game with his fourth triple of the season. Wade then scored on an Abiatal Avelino ground out to give the RailRiders a 1-0 lead. Buffalo starter Brandon Cumpton threw a seasonhigh eight innings and allowed three hits. After Wade’s triple, he gave up a single to Gio Urshela in the fourth and then retired 10 in a row before giving up a single to Zach Zehner in the seventh. In the race for the wild card, Columbus beat Indianapolis, 4-3, in 10 innings to pull into a tie for the IL West Division lead. The teams are also tied for the wild card lead. Norfolk, which started the day tied with the RailRiders in the race, beat Charlotte, 15-3, in the first game of a doubleheader to stay a game back for the wild card.

POCONO DOWNS Tuesday’s Partial Results First - Pace 1:53.4 4 A And C Artist (Napolitano)22.608.20 6.20 5 Restless (Berry) 36.40 20.00 3 Theon Hanover (Miller) 7.00 Exacta (4-5) $283.40 50 CENT Trifecta (4-5-3) $211.75 10 CENT Superfecta (4-5-3-1) $372.65 Second - Trot 1:56.1 4 Splitsville (Napolitano Jr) 6.80 2.10 3.00 5 Scirocco Jakob (Jackson) 2.40 2.20 1 New Identity (Wallis) 18.20 Exacta (4-5) $11.00 50 CENT Trifecta (4-5-1) $18.80 10 CENT Superfecta (4-5-1-2) $11.13 Daily Double (4-4) $64.40 Third - Pace 1:53.4 4 American Mercury (Buter)3.80 3.00 3.20 3 Scirocco Mistysaid (Jackson) 17.80 9.20 8 Rockin Jimmy Brown (Miller) 6.80

Exacta (4-3) $191.80 50 CENT Trifecta (4-3-8) $229.70 10 CENT Superfecta (4-3-8-7) $223.00 Fourth - Pace 1:52.1 3 Cracklin Rosie (Napolitano Jr)10.003.60 2.60 1 Lk’s Nancy Lee (Napolitano) 3.60 3.40 2 Spinpressive (Taggart Jr) 2.10 Exacta (3-1) $27.40 50 CENT Trifecta (3-1-2) $18.80 10 CENT Superfecta (3-1-2-4) $13.60 Fifth - Trot 1:55.2 4 Dot Dot Dot Dash (Vandervort)8.208.80 3.60 6 Lazurus (Kakaley) 4.60 2.10 1 Noble Anthony (Simons) 4.20 Exacta (4-6) $42.40 50 CENT Trifecta (4-6-1) $47.85 10 CENT Superfecta (4-6-1-3) $28.86 PICK 3 (4-3-4) $410.80 Sixth - Pace 1:53.3 3 Sudden Change N (Berry)13.40 4.60 3.60

4 Yoga Pants (Napolitano) 3.00 2.20 2 Highly Thought Of (Taggart Jr) 6.00 Exacta (3-4) $32.00 50 CENT Trifecta (3-4-2) $49.00 10 CENT Superfecta (3-4-2-5) $29.28 Seventh - Trot 1:56.3 7 Seismic Wave (Allard) 4.80 3.60 3.00 1 Aquillo (Jackson) 14.60 6.80 5 Chucky De Vie (Berry) 2.40 Exacta (7-1) $94.80 50 CENT Trifecta (7-1-5) $118.00 10 CENT Superfecta (7-1-5-2) $108.17 Eighth - Pace 1:53.1 2 HepburnHanover(NapolitanoJr)7.003.80 3.80 6 Pretty Angel Eyes (Kakaley) 17.40 9.20 9 Carly Girl (Taggart Jr) 18.60 Exacta (2-6) $115.80 50 CENT Trifecta (2-6-9) $267.55 10 CENT Superfecta (2-6-9-3) $315.83

TENNIS Men’s World Rankings Through Aug. 19 Singles 1. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 10,040 2. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 7080 3. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 5500 4. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 4845 5. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 4615 6. Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 4445 7. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 4445 8. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 3790 9. Dominic Thiem, Austria, 3485 10. David Goffin, Belgium, 3435 11. John Isner, United States, 3220 12. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 2380 13. Diego Schwartzman, Argentina, 2380 14. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 2190 15. Stefanos Tsitsipas, Greece, 2,042 16. Kyle Edmund, Britain, 1985 17. Lucas Pouille, France, 1915 18. Jack Sock, United States, 1815 19. Roberto Bautista-Agut, Spain, 1810 20. Borna Coric, Croatia, 1780 21. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 1755 22. Marco Cecchinato, Italy, 1734 23. Chung Hyeon, South Korea, 1630 24. Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 1580 25. Milos Raonic, Canada, 1,575

Doubles 1. Mike Bryan, United States, 8115 2. Oliver Marach, Austria, 7040 3. Mate Pavic, Croatia, 6840 4. John Peers, Australia, 6395 5. Henri Kontinen, Finland, 6350 6. Bob Bryan, United States, 5590 7. Jamie Murray, Britain, 5520 8. Bruno Soares, Brazil, 5520 9. Jean-Julien Roger, Netherlands, 5270 10. Juna Sebastiean Cabal, Colombia, 5110 Women’s World Rankings Through Aug. 19 Singles 1. Simona Halep, Romania, 8061 2. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 5975 3. Sloane Stephens, United States, 5482 4. Angelique Kerber, Germany, 5305 5. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 4840 6. Caroline Garcia, France, 4725 7. Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, 4555 8. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, 4105 9. Julia Goerges, Germany, 3815 10. Jelena Ostapenko, Latvia, 3787 11. Daria Kasatkina, Russia, 3525 12. Garbine Muguruza, Spain, 3500

13. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, 3260 14. Madison Keys, United States, 3212 15. Elise Mertens, Belgium, 3090 16. Venus Williams, United States, 2841 17. Ashleigh Barty, Australia, 2740 18. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, 2250 19. Naomi Osaka, Japan, 2245 20. Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, 2068 21. Maria Sharapova, Russia, 2003 22. Barbora Strycova, Czech Republic, 1930 23. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 1878 24. Daria Gavrilova, Australia, 1850 25. Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, 1730 Doubles 1. Timea Babos, Hungary, 7700 2. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 7495 3. Latisha Chan, Taiwan, 7150 4. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6585 5. Barbora Krejcikova, Czech Republic, 6340 6. Andrea Sestini Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 6100 7. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 5295 8. Kristina Mladenovic, France, 5285 9. Gabriela Dabrowski, Canada, 5170 10. Demi Schuurs, Netherlands, 4910

NASCAR NASCAR XFINITY Schedule-Winners Through Aug. 20 Feb. 17 _ PowerShares QQQ 300 (Tyler Reddick) Feb. 24 _ Rinnai 250 (Kevin Harvick) March 3 _ Boyd Gaming 300 (Kyle Larson) March 10 _ DC Solar 200 (Brad Keselowski) March 17 _ Roseanne 300 (Joey Logano) April 7 _ My Bariatric Solutions 300 (Ryan Blaney) April 14 _ Fitzgerald Glider Kits 300 (Ryan Preece) April 20 _ ToyotaCare 250 (Christopher Bell) April 28 _ Sparks Energy 300 (Spencer Gallagher) May 5 _ OneMain Financial 200 (Justin Allgaier)

May 26 _ Alsco 300 (Brad Keselowski) June 2 _ Pocono Green 250 Recycled by J.P. Mascaro & Sons (Kyle Busch) June 9 _ LTi Printing 250 (Austin Dillon) June 17 _ Iowa 250 presented by Enogen (Justin Allgaier) June 30 _ Overton’s 300 (Kyle Larson) July 6 _ Coca-Cola Firecracker 250 (Kyle Larson) July 13 _ Alsco 300 (Christopher Bell) July 21 _ Lakes Region 200 (Christopher Bell) July 28 _ U.S. Cellular 250 presented by The Rasmussen Group (Christopher Bell) Aug. 4 _ Zippo 200 at The Glen (Joey Logano) Aug. 11 _ Rock N Roll Tequila 170 Presented by Amethyst Beverage (Justin Allgaier)

Aug. 17 _ Food City 300 (Kyle Larson) Aug. 25 _ Johnsonville 180, Elkhart Lake, Wis. Sep. 1 _ Sport Clips VFW 200, Darlington, S.C. Sep. 8 _ Lilly Diabetes 250, Speedway, Ind. Sep. 15 _ DC Solar 300, Las Vegas, Nev. Sep. 21 _ Go Bowling 250, Richmond, Va. Sep. 29 _ Drive for the Cure 200, Concord, N.C. Oct. 6 _ Drive Sober 200, Dover, Del. Oct. 20 _ Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas City, Kan. Nov. 3 _ O’Reilly Auto Parts 300, Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 10 _ Ticket Galaxy 200, Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 17 _ Ford Ecoboost 300, Homestead, Fla.

ON THIS DATE 1851 — The U.S. wins the first international yacht race. The schooner America beats 14 British yachts. 1885 — Richard Sears beats Godfrey M. Brinley, 6-3, 4-6, 6-0, 6-3 to win the U.S. men’s national tennis championship held at the Newport (R.I.) Casino. 1898 — Malcolm Whitman beats Dwight F. Davis, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2, 6-1 to win the U.S. men’s national tennis championship held at the Newport (R.I.) Casino. 1948 — The Chicago Cardinals beat the College All-Stars 28-0 in front 101,220 fans at Chicago’s Soldier Field. 1949 — The Philadelphia Eagles beat the College All-Stars 38-0 at Chicago’s Soldier Field. It’s the largest shutout in the series, later matched by Green Bay in 1966. 1950 — Althea Gibson becomes the first black tennis player to be accepted in competition for the national championship. 1961 — Roger Maris becomes the first player to hit his 50th homer in August. He connects off California’s Ken McBride in a 4-3 loss to the Angels. 1965 — In the third inning of a game against Los Angeles, pitcher Juan Marichal of the San Francisco

Giants hits catcher John Roseboro of the Dodgers in the head with his bat. A 14-minute brawl ensues and Roseboro suffers cuts on the head. Marichal thought Roseboro threw too close to his head when returning the ball to Sandy Koufax. 1984 — Evelyn Ashford sets the world record in the 100-meter dash with a clocking of 10.76 seconds in a meet at Zurich, Switzerland. 1987 — Brazil snaps the 34-game winning streak of the U.S. men’s basketball team with a 120-115 victory in the Pan Am Games. Oscar Schmidt scores 46 points to lead Brazil. Cuba wins a record 10 of 12 gold medals in boxing and beats the U.S. 13-9 in the baseball final. 1989 — Nolan Ryan of the Texas Rangers becomes the first pitcher to strike out 5,000 batters in a 2-0 loss to the Oakland Athletics. Ryan fans Rickey Henderson swinging on a 3-2, 96 mph fastball for No. 5,000. 1999 — Jenny Thompson breaks M a r y T. M e a g h e r ’s 1 8 - y e a r- o l d 100-meter butterfly record at the Pan Pacific swim championships. Thompson with a time of 57.88 seconds lowers the mark of 57.93 set by Meagher. 2006 — Sprinter Justin Gatlin receives an eight-year ban from

track and field, avoiding a lifetime penalty in exchange for his cooperation with doping authorities and because an earlier positive drug test was deemed an honest mistake. He forfeits the world record he tied in May, when he ran the 100 meters in 9.77 seconds. 2 0 0 7 — T h e Te x a s R a n g e r s becomes the first team in 110 years to score 30 runs in a game, setting an American League record in a 30-3 rout of the Baltimore Orioles in the first game of a doubleheader. 2008 — Usain Bolt helps Jamaica win the 400-meter relay final in 37.10 seconds for his third gold medal and third world record of the Beijing Games. Bolt becomes only the fourth man, and the first since Carl Lewis in 1984, to win all three Olympic sprint events. Bryan Clay wins the decathlon, the first American to win the 10-discipline event at the Olympics since Dan O’Brien at Atlanta in 1996. 2015 — Ghirmay Ghebreslassie becomes the youngest man to win the marathon at the world championships. The 19-year-old Eritrean enters the Bird’s Nest in Beijing and finishes 2 hours, 12 minutes, 27 seconds to hold off Yemane Tsegay of Ethiopia by 40 seconds.


WB_VOICE/PAGES [B03] | 08/21/18

22:41 | CONNORSSTE

LocaL sports

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

THE CITIZENS' VOICE B3

MAX Field Hockey fills a void in online coverage By Matt Bufano STAFF WRITER

College coaches go out and do their own homework. They talk to club and high school coaches, asking for honest feedback about players. They watch for a player’s technical skill, as well as how they handle adversity and interact with others. “They sit close enough to hear the coaches, too, so they know what the kids are being taught,” said Electric Surge Field Hockey Club co-director Chris Comiskey. But now more than ever, there’s information available

online, as well. While Rivals, 247Sports and ESPN extensively cover football and basketball recruiting, Stephanie Maychack carved out her own lane with MAXFieldHockey.com. “When I had the concept, it was a no-brainer,” Maychack said. “The concept ... took a while to teach people that this could be available. And, now, people kind of rely on it.” Knowing there was a thirst and frustration for lack of national field hockey news, Maychack created

hIGh schooL fIELd hockEy MAX Field Hockey in 2012 when she was in business school at Maryland. “We’ve worked really hard to build this brand,” Maychack said. As it continues growing, more than 127,000 users visited the site last year for a combined 1.13 million views. About 20 percent of its traffic comes from player rankings. College commitment articles and high school team rankings are also popular.

MAX Field Hockey is not just popular because it’s oneof-a-kind, but also because it commits itself to accuracy and gaining the trust of the sport’s community. The rankings and lists are compiled with feedback from many people and sources, including constantly nstantly updatupdat ing spreadsh heets Maychack uses to tracck everything going on in n the National Futures Ch hampionships, Stars and Stripes, S Junior National Camp, C Junior

Olympics, USA Field Hockey, scholastic all-state and wherever else talented players may turn up. “We’re able to see the big picture of these kids,” Maychack said. “We’re to the point now where they’re getting on our lists in seventh and eighth grade and we’re able to fill in as we go.” Maychack is plenty familiar with Northeaste r n Penn-

sylvania, where, on Tuesday, Wyoming Seminary (No. 9) and Valley West (No. 11) landed in MAX Field Hockey’s first batch of high school rankings for in-state teams in 2018. “A lot of those players (in NEPA) will do well in the national stage,” Maychack said. “You can see how those players will do when they go to the Futures events and move up through the pipeline.” contact the writer: mbufano@citizensvoice.com; 570-821-2060; @CVBufano on Twitter

rEcruItInG: Every prospect has a story “Definitely, playing in the WVC is really nice because we are so competitive and we have so many Division I athletes that college coaches come to our games” hannah Maxwell

Wyoming Seminary field hockey player

Alex Wesneski manages to be a two-sport standout, but it issn’t easy. Wesneski recalled earlier in the t summer when she played a fo ourday field hockey tournamentt at Spooky Nook Sports that end ded at 5:30 p.m. Saturday; the neext day, she played four basketb ball games in a tournament in New N Jersey. “Oh, yeah, I was exhausted,” Wesneski said. But the more showcases you y attend, the more likely you u’ll impress, and that’s certain nly been the case for Wesneski. While Wesneski has all the of fensive and defensive skills and tools desired by a field hockey coach, she believes it’s the intangible things that will catch a college coach’s attention. “Just to see that you want to be involved; they like to see a good team player and that you’re working with your teammates, rather than individually,” Wesneski said. Wesneski first heard from Indiana in seventh or eighth grade; received her first offer from Villanova; went on unofficial visits at six schools; and ultimately chose to attend Iowa.

a dozen Division I teams in Pennsylvania and three Division III “We had a little communica- teams in Luzerne County. tion, but after a while, I think I “Definitely, playing in the WVC just thought it wasn’t the right is really nice because we are so fit for me,” Tsioles said. “Other competitive and we have so many colleges started communicating Division I athletes that college with me and I saw more of a coaches come to our games,” Hanfuture with them than Villanova.” nah Maxwell said. Sarah Richards was in a simHowever, you don’t need to play ilar situation at the same time, for a powerhouse like Maxwell’s about eighth grade, when she Wyoming Seminary to be recruitattracted the attention of Dela- ed. ware at a regional USA Field Sub-.500 teams included, 14 Hockey Futures tournament. WVC programs had at least one Richards’ recruiting trail, player on a Division I roster in however, led to Iowa, Lafay- 2017. ette, Louisville, Ohio State, Speaking from experience, Penn State, Syracuse and Tem- Maxwell said players don’t have to ple, as the 2016 national cham- join a club team to be recruited. pion Blue Hens fell behind. However, Maxwell did lead the In each instance, members conference in scoring as a freshof Villanova’s and Delaware’s man and played for a state chamstaff followed NCAA protocol pionship as a sophomore — so she support systems and approached the players’ would have been noticed regardWesneski tried to enjoy the c l u b c o a c h e s , w h o t h e n less. recruiting prorelayed messages to the playFor all players, though, playing ers. cess as best ges. club has its advantages It’s a lot of pressure for the athshe could. “I think the only advantage a of letes, of course, but also for coach- playing club is that you’re But she y playing es like Comiskey, who is expected all year-round — and you’re was admitto know the ins-and-outs as he exposing yourself to different tedly “a litguides players through a compli- competition, not jusst the Wyotle stressed cated process. out” at ming Valley Confeerence,” “We studied up on the rules, but Maxwell said. times, which they change constantly,” Comisled to some ms — Most club team key said. “I think the NCAA’s w h i c h p l a y 5 - o n - 5 conversations doing a nice job — or at least try- indoor, 11-on-11 ou with older uting to — of protecting the student- door — are loadeed. b r o t h e r L . J. athletes to make sure they’re not Wi t h s o f e w w e a k We s n e s k i , a getting bombarded with calls.” tight end at spots, college coacches The NCAA’s latest rule change scout these travel tournaAlbany. says college coaches are not ments in the offseason and allowed to discuss recruiting with find numerous prosp pects. a prospect, in person, until Sept. 1 An obvious disadv vantage of the recruit’s junior year. is that club field hockey Sept. 1 of junior year is also could cost thousand ds of dolwhen schools are allowed to final- lars, and it could mightily m cut ly hold an official visit, in which into time for social activities a and the college hosts the player and other sports. their parents and covers their P a r e n t s a re expenses. forced to While the NCAA tries to curb make tough the trend of early commitments, d e c i s i o n s , it can’t exactly stop it, because as well. CITIZENS’ VOICE FILE players are free to go on academic “A lot of visits. Players’ current coaches m i s s i n g Wyoming Seminary’s could also remain in contact with other kids’ Hannah Maxwell has committed to college coaches and act as a mid- g a m e s , play college field hockey for Wake dle man of sorts. m i s s i n g a Fores stt. For Richards, she fell in love v a c a t i o n with Ohio State at first sight. h e r e o r She’s been on three unofficial vis- there each year — especially over “He always was able to give its and has pledged to play for the the last couple years since it’s really good advice on what I Buckeyes. been a lot more into the recruiting should do,” Alex Wesneski said. “I Tsioles played the field, but it process,” said Hannah’s father, don’t really see him, but he was was Old Dominion — one of Scott Maxwell, who’s missed always there for me when I was he enter enterthe last colleges she two Thanksgivings while at stressed. I would call him and ask tained — that earn ned her the Shooting Star what I should do and everything. verbal commitmen nt. very big help throughout tournament in He was a v “Be patient and d wait Richmond, the wholee time.” for the right colleg ge,” TsiWesnesski was initially hesitant Virginia. oles advised. to visit Io owa, but she wound up making th he trip and not wanting v Being discovered to leave. College coaches will find “My o lder brother told me the best field hock key players picking a college), ‘You’ll (about p no matter what. know. You’ll get a feeling,’” “I think when you’re a good Wesneeski recalled. “When I player on a good d team, people got to o Iowa … it felt like notice,” said PIAA A District 2 field home..” hockey chairman Chris C Gegaris. Many top field hockey playThe WVC houses 22 field hockers in tthe area come from supey programs, eig ght of which portivee and athletic families, have played in a district champiinclud ding Richards, whose onship and/or sttate playoff oldeer brother Kyle plays game in the last four f clu ub lacrosse at Temple; years. an nd Tsioles, whose older CITIZENS’ al to It’s not unusua s ister Foto plays field VOICE FILE spot a college coacch in hockey at Bloomsburg. the stands at onee of Jolene Ulichney, too, C r e s t w o o d ’s those playof f comes from an athletic Sarah Richards games, espeffamily with an older has committed to play cially b r o t h e r, J o h n , w h o college field hockey for since arned a tryout agreeea Ohio State University. there’s men nt last season with the FROM PAGE B1

Wheeling Nailers, the ECHL a f f i l i at e o f the Pittsburgh Penguins. O n e s c h o o l being considered by U l i -

CITIZENS’ VOICE FILE

Valley West’s Rina Tsioles has committed to play college field hockey at Old Dominion.

chney is Old Dominion, where her cousin, Danielle Grega, was a unanimous All-Big East firstteam selection. Grega is the newest member of the U.S. women’s national team. “I lean on her and I hope to follow in her footsteps one day,” Ulichney said of Grega. “She’s always great. She’s helped me out so much.” Meanwhile, Maxwell’s family worked to help her be recruited. As if what she had done on the field wasn’t enough, Maxwell’s father and brother edited and uploaded a freshman year highlight reel to YouTube. Then, Maxwell and her father logged thousands of miles in visiting about 15 campuses from the Bi 10, Big 10 Atlanti Atl tic 10, ACC and beyond. “That really helps you see what you don’t what you like, w like,” Maxwell ssaid. “You kind of get a feel for ev verything.” From the list of schools she axwell and her considered, Ma f a m i ly n a r r ow we d d ow n h e r choices using a variety of athmic factors. letic and academ Maxwell ultim mately gave her verbal committment to Wake Forest, more t han 500 miles south of Wilkees University, where her brotther, Hunnter, plays men’s soc cer. “He kind of helped me kee p an open mind and reminded me o f some things I didn’t really understand as a freshman,” Hannah Maxwell said of her brotheer. “It was nice t o h ave t h a t b i g - b r o t h e r ould make the aspect, so I co best decision po ossible.” And in the ccase of Wesneski, Maxwelll, Tsioles, Ulichney and Ri Richards, if they need advice from their high school coach, it doesn’ t get much better than the likes of Karen Klassner at Wyoming Seminary, Linda Fithian at Valley West, Colleen Wood at Coughlin and Patsy Moratori at Crestwood.

opportunities aplenty A student-athlete’s post-high school career is brighter in field hockey than most sports. “There’s an opportunity out there for anybody who wants it,” said Stephanie Maychock, creator of MAXFieldHockey.com. “Literally anybody who wants to play the sport of field hockey in college, there’s a spot for them. I truly believe that.” High school field hockey play-

ers have about a 1 in 10 shot of continuing their careers in college, and 1 in 38 of playing Division I. Locally, there’s at least 30 WVC alumnae on the rosters at Wilkes, King’s and Misericordia this season, as well as 40 WVC grads playing Division I. Women’s basketball and volleyball — while more popular on a national scale — offer about a 1 in 16 shot of playing in college, and 1 in 88 of playing Division I. While Division III programs do not offer athletic scholarships, how a D-I or D-II school divvies up its scholarship money varies on a case-by-case basis, whether it favors star players, upperclassmen and so on. In the meantime, the Class of 2020 has two more seasons of high school field hockey left to play. “Honestly,” Maxwell said, “nothing is more exciting than winning a district title or playing in the state playoff games.” In addition to the five players featured, juniors Ali Tedik of Coughlin (Temple) and Bari Lefkowitz of Wyoming Seminary (Northwestern) also gave verbal commitments this past summer, and there’s likely more to come. Unburdened from the pressure of choosing their colle g es, though, Wyoming Seminary’s Blue Knights will take the field this season with five Division I commits as they defend their District 2 gold medal and PIAA silver medal. Beyond that and even beyond c o l l e g e, s o m e p l aye r s l i ke Wesneski have expressed hope of one day making the U.S. senior national team. Getting to that point takes teamwork and a push from one another, even if the players are on rival teams during the high school season. “I’ve actually played on teams with all of them,” Richards said of Wesneski, Tsioles, Maxwell and Ulichney, mentioning their intertwining paths in the club field hockey scene. “It’s actually really impressive. It’s crazy how four or five of us already committed. I think playing together for so long, even though we all go to different schools — it’s really helped us to improve.” contact the writer: mbufano@citizensvoice.com; 570-821-2060; @CVBufano on Twitter

Where are they now? View this story at citizensvoice. com/sports to see an interactive map showing where WVC products are playing Division I field hockey.


WB_VOICE/PAGES [B04] | 08/21/18

23:27 | CONNORSSTE

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

B4 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

AMERICAN LEAGUE Boston New York Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore

W 88 78 65 57 37

L 39 46 61 69 89

Pct .693 .629 .516 .452 .294

Cleveland Minnesota Detroit Chicago Kansas City

W 73 59 52 47 38

L 52 65 74 77 88

Pct .584 .476 .413 .379 .302

Houston Oakland Seattle Los Angeles Texas

W 75 75 72 63 56

L 50 50 54 63 71

Pct .600 .600 .571 .500 .441

East Division GB WCGB — — 8.5 — 22.5 10.5 30.5 18.5 50.5 38.5 Central Division GB WCGB — — 13.5 15.5 21.5 23.5 25.5 27.5 35.5 37.5 West Division GB WCGB — — — — 3.5 3.5 12.5 12.5 20 20

Monday’s Games Toronto 5, Baltimore 3 Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 5 Cleveland 5, Boston 4 Tampa Bay 1, Kansas City 0 Oakland 9, Texas 0 Seattle 7, Houston 4

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 5-5 2-8

Str L-3 W-3 W-3 W-2 L-3

Home 44-18 45-20 36-24 31-32 21-40

Away 44-21 33-26 29-37 26-37 16-49

L10 9-1 6-4 4-6 6-4 3-7

Str W-3 L-1 W-1 W-2 L-3

Home 39-24 38-26 33-30 24-39 18-44

Away 34-28 21-39 19-44 23-38 20-44

L10 2-8 7-3 6-4 5-5 5-5

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1

Home 33-29 38-25 38-26 33-30 29-38

Away 42-21 37-25 34-28 30-33 27-33

BRIEFS WASHINGTON

Nationals trade Murphy, Adams The Washington Nationals traded second baseman Daniel Murphy to the Chicago Cubs and first baseman Matt Adams to the St. Louis Cardinals, essentially throwing in the towel on a disappointing season. The third-place Nationals began the day with a losing record of 62-63, 7½ games behind the NL East-leading Atlanta Braves. The Nationals were coming off two consecutive division titles. For Adams, the Cardinals are sending $50,000 to Washington. For Murphy, the Cubs are swapping Class-A infielder Andruw Monasterio and a player to be named later or cash.

Tuesday’s Games Toronto 8, Baltimore 2 Cleveland 6, Boston 3 Detroit 2, Chicago Cubs 1 Tampa Bay 4, Kansas City 1 N.Y. Yankees at Miami (n.) Minnesota at Chicago White Sox (n.) L.A. Angels at Arizona (n.) Texas at Oakland (n.) Houston at Seattle (n.)

Today’s Games Baltimore (Hess 2-7) at Toronto (Pannone 0-0), 12:37 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 7-9) at Chicago White Sox (Rodon 4-3), 2:10 p.m. Texas (Minor 9-6) at Oakland (Jackson 4-2), 3:35 p.m. Houston (Morton 12-3) at Seattle (Gonzales 12-8), 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Lester 13-5) at Detroit (Liriano 3-8), 7:10 p.m. Cleveland (Carrasco 15-6) at Boston (Johnson 4-3), 7:10 p.m. Kansas City (Junis 6-11) at Tampa Bay (TBD), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Lynn 8-8) at Miami (Richards 3-7), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Despaigne 2-1) at Arizona (Buchholz 6-2), 9:40 p.m.

NEW YORK

Posey facing hip surgery

NATIONAL LEAGUE Atlanta Philadelphia Washington New York Miami

W 70 68 62 55 50

L 55 56 63 70 76

Pct .560 .548 .496 .440 .397

Chicago Milwaukee St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati

W 71 70 69 63 55

L 53 57 57 64 70

Pct .573 .551 .548 .496 .440

Arizona Colorado Los Angeles San Francisco San Diego

W 69 68 67 62 49

L 56 56 59 65 78

Pct .552 .548 .532 .488 .386

East Division GB WCGB — — 1.5 — 8 6.5 15 13.5 20.5 19 Central Division GB WCGB — — 2.5 — 3 — 9.5 6.5 16.5 13.5 West Division GB WCGB — — .5 — 2.5 2 8 7.5 21 20.5

Monday’s Games Atlanta 1, Pittsburgh 0 San Francisco 2, Mets 1, 13 innings Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 2 St. Louis 5, L.A. Dodgers 3

L10 6-4 4-6 3-7 6-4 3-7

Str W-2 L-2 L-2 W-1 W-2

Home 34-28 41-22 31-30 25-38 28-35

Away 36-27 27-34 31-33 30-32 22-41

L10 5-5 4-6 8-2 3-7 5-5

Str L-3 W-2 W-1 L-2 L-1

Home 38-23 37-24 34-28 35-33 31-35

Away 33-30 33-33 35-29 28-31 24-35

L10 6-4 8-2 3-7 4-6 3-7

Str W-1 W-4 L-1 L-1 L-1

Home 32-29 31-27 32-31 34-26 23-43

Away 37-27 37-29 35-28 28-39 26-35

Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 1 Detroit 2, Chicago Cubs 1 N.Y. Mets 6, San Francisco 3 Philadelphia at Washington (n.) N.Y. Yankees at Miami (n.) Cincinnati at Milwaukee (n.) San Diego at Colorado (n.) L.A. Angels at Arizona (n.) St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers (n.)

Today’s Games Cincinnati (Stephenson 0-1) at Milwaukee (Peralta 5-4), 2:10 p.m. Atlanta (Teheran 8-7) at Pittsburgh (Williams 10-9), 7:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Eflin 9-4) at Washington (Strasburg 6-7), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Lester 13-5) at Detroit (Liriano 3-8), 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Lynn 8-8) at Miami (Richards 3-7), 7:10 p.m. San Francisco (Kelly 0-1) at N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard 8-3), 7:10 p.m. San Diego (Nix 1-1) at Colorado (Gray 9-7), 8:40 p.m. L.A. Angels (Despaigne 2-1) at Arizona (Buchholz 6-2), 9:40 p.m. St. Louis (Flaherty 7-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Buehler 6-4), 10:10 p.m.

ROUNDUP

Allen, Indians beat Red Sox AssociAted Press

BostoN — center fielder Greg Allen made two superb catches to help fellow rookie shane Bieber hold down Boston, and the cleveland indians beat the red sox, 6-3, on tuesday. Melky cabrera homered for the second straight game and Yan Gomes also connected for cleveland. the indians have won nine of 10, including the first two of the four-game series at Fenway Park. Boston, with the best record in the majors, has lost three in a row for just the second time this season. Allen made the biggest impact with his glove. First, he raced back and slammed into the padded wall to take away an extrabase hit from Xander Bogaerts leading off the fifth inning. then, with the red sox trying to rally in the seventh, Allen again came through. the red sox had already scored once to make it 5-1 and had two on with no outs when Mitch Moreland hit a long drive toward the dirt triangle in deep center. Allen slid to a stop as he caught the ball over his shoulder — it was a sacrifice fly and finished Bieber, but thwarted Boston’s momentum. Braves 6, Pirates 1 At Pittsburgh, dansby swanson had two homers and four rBis, Kevin Gausman breezed through eight innings and the Braves beat the Pirates. Gausman (8-9) gave up four hits with five strikeouts and two walks.

McNeil equaled his career high by getting four hits for the second time since making his major league debut last month. Michael conforto homered and drove in four runs. evan Longoria hit a tworun homer for the Giants, who fell to 3-5 on an 11-game road trip.

Blue Jays 8, Orioles 2 At toronto, Justin smoak and Kendrys Morales hit back-to-back home runs, Aledmys diaz and Billy McKinney also connected, and the Blue Jays beat Baltimore, improving to 9-0 at home against the struggling orioles. Rays 4, Royals 1 At st. Petersburg, Fla., Blake snell helped tampa Bay match a team record with 27 consecutive shutout innings and the rays beat the royals. the scoreless stretch ended when snell (15-5) allowed a fifth-inning solo homer to ryan o’Hearn. snell struck out 11 and gave up four hits in six innings. the left-hander has 13 straight home starts of allowing one earned run or fewer, which is longest stretch in the majors since 1913, according to the elias sports Bureau.

Tigers 2, Cubs 1 At detroit, Jordan Zimmermann pitched six effective innings, Victor Martinez had three hits and the tigers beat the slumping cubs. Zimmermann (6-5) allowed seven hits, struck out five and walked one, Mets 6, Giants 3 continuing chicago’s misery. drew VerHagen, Joe At New York, rookie Jeff McNeil went 4 for 4 and hit Jimenez and shane Greene a go-ahead double with two combined for three innings of one-hit relief, closing out outs in the eighth inning that sent the Mets over the detroit’s second win in seven games. Giants.

MicHAeL dwYer / AssociAted Press

Cleveland Indians’ Greg Allen, right, and Francisco Lindor celebrate after defeating the Boston Red Sox in Boston on Tuesday. Mets 6, Giants 3

Indians 6, Red Sox 3

Tigers 2, Cubs 1

San FranciscoAB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .255 d’Arnaud 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 — c-Duggar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Longoria 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .249 Hundley c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .242 Slater 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .273 Pence lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Hernandez cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .248 Hanson ss-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Stratton p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .114 Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 — a-Crawford ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Totals 32 3 5 3 1 7 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .244 McNeil 2b 4 2 4 1 0 0 .326 Flores 1b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .278 Conforto lf 3 1 1 4 0 1 .237 Jackson cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .284 Bautista rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .199 Plawecki c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .235 Reyes 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .199 Matz p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Oswalt p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Totals 30 6 9 6 1 7 San Francisco ....200 000 001 — 3 5 0 New York.............000 000 24x — 6 9 0 a–struck out for Dyson in the 8th. b–flied out for Oswalt in the 8th. c–grounded out for Watson in the 9th. LOB:San Francisco 3, New York 2. 2B:Slater (5), Hernandez (14), McNeil (5), Flores (24). 3B:Reyes (2). HR:Longoria (13), off Matz. Conforto (18), off Watson. RBIs:Longoria 2 (42), Slater (13), McNeil (9), Conforto 4 (51), Jackson (24). CS:McNeil (1). SF:Conforto. RISP:San Francisco 3 (Pence, Hernandez, Stratton). New York 1 (Plawecki). RISP:San Francisco 1 for 6. New York 3 for 8. RMU:Pence. GIDP:Conforto. DP:San Francisco 1 (d’Arnaud, Hanson, Slater). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stratton 6.1 6 2 2 0 4 86 5.37 Dyson .2 0 0 0 0 2 9 2.76 Watson, L, 4-5 1 3 4 4 1 1 17 2.77 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz 5 2 2 2 1 5 87 4.55 Oswalt, W, 3-2 3 1 0 0 0 1 30 4.84 Lugo 1 2 1 1 0 1 24 2.96 IRS:Dyson 1-0. Umpires:Home, Chad Whitson. First, Lance Barrett. Second, Tony Randazzo. Third, Brian O’Nora. T:2:24. A:24,999 (41,922).

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Brantley lf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .304 Ramirez 3b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .296 Diaz dh 5 0 1 0 0 0 .350 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .246 Cabrera rf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .275 Guyer rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Kipnis 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .221 Gomes c 4 2 3 2 0 0 .250 Allen cf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .257 Totals 37 6 13 6 3 5 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .340 Benintendi lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .300 Martinez dh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .331 Bogaerts ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .281 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .254 Kinsler 2b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .237 Nunez 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .257 Leon c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .204 a-Pearce ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .299 Swihart c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Bradley Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Totals 31 3 5 3 0 9 Cleveland ............000 202 110 — 6 13 1 Boston..................000 000 300 — 3 5 0 a–struck out for Leon in the 8th. E:Kipnis (9). LOB:Cleveland 9, Boston 2. 2B:Brantley (31), Cabrera (8), Allen (5), Benintendi (34), Bogaerts (37), Nunez (19). HR:Cabrera (6), off Eovaldi. Gomes (12), off Thornburg. RBIs:Brantley (68), Alonso (71), Cabrera (26), Gomes 2 (40), Allen (11), Bogaerts (78), Moreland (64), Kinsler (36). SB:Ramirez (28). SF:Alonso, Moreland. RISP:Cleveland 4 (Lindor 2, Alonso, Gomes). Boston 2 (Betts, Moreland). RISP:Cleveland 3 for 11. Boston 2 for 7. RMU:Diaz 2, Kinsler. GIDP:Diaz, Martinez. DP:Cleveland 1 (Lindor, Kipnis, Alonso). Boston 1 (Bogaerts, Moreland). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bieber, W, 7-2 6.1 5 3 3 0 5 82 4.36 Cimber, H, 11 .2 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.51 Miller, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.27 Hand, S, 29-34 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 2.61 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi, L, 5-5 5.1 10 4 4 1 2 87 3.81 Kelly .2 1 0 0 0 1 13 4.15 Workman 1 0 1 1 1 1 17 2.63 Thornburg 1 1 1 1 0 1 22 4.41 Pomeranz 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 6.12 IRS:Cimber 1-1, Kelly 2-2. HBP:Thornburg (Allen). Umpires:Home, Brian Knight. First, Jeremie Rehak. Second, Gerry Davis. Third, Pat Hoberg. T:2:57. A:37,188 (37,731).

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Almora cf 4 0 2 0 1 1 .298 Heyward rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Baez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .290 Rizzo 1b 3 1 2 1 1 1 .267 Zobrist 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .306 Schwarber lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .244 Bote 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .278 Contreras c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 La Stella dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .271 Totals 35 1 8 1 3 9 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .229 Iglesias ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .267 Castellanos rf 3 0 0 1 1 0 .288 Goodrum 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .228 Martinez dh 4 0 3 1 0 0 .253 Adduci 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Mahtook lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .188 McCann c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .225 Reyes cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .235 Totals 31 2 11 2 1 4 Chicago ...............000 001 000 — 1 8 0 Detroit..................200 000 00x — 2 11 1 E:Iglesias (8). LOB:Chicago 10, Detroit 6. 2B:Candelario 2 (24). HR:Rizzo (19), off Zimmermann. RBIs:Rizzo (79), Castellanos (70), Martinez (42). SB:Schwarber (4). CS:Castellanos (1). RISP:Chicago 3 (Baez, Zobrist, Contreras). RISP:Chicago 0 for 5. Detroit 2 for 6. RMU:Heyward, Castellanos, Goodrum. LIDP_ Castellanos, Adduci. GIDP:Contreras. DP:Chicago 3 (Contreras, Baez), (Zobrist, Bote), (Hendricks, Rizzo). Detroit 2 (Goodrum, Iglesias, Adduci), (Iglesias, Candelario). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks, L, 9-10 7 10 2 2 1 3 94 4.04 Chavez 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.01 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zimmermann, W, 6-5 6 7 1 1 1 5 92 4.18 VerHagen, H, 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 5.57 Jimenez, H, 18 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 3.57 Greene, S, 27-30 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 3.78 Umpires:Home, Sean Barber. First, Alfonso Marquez. Second, James Hoye. Third, Quinn Wolcott. T:2:45. A:26,638 (41,297).

Braves 6, Pirates 1 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna lf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .286 Inciarte cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .249 Freeman 1b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .321 Markakis rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .315 Camargo 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Albies 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .275 Suzuki c 3 2 2 1 0 0 .261 1-Flowers pr-c 0 1 0 0 0 0 .226 Swanson ss 4 2 2 4 0 2 .245 Gausman p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .083 b-Reed ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Sobotka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 35 6 8 5 3 6 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .307 Frazier cf-2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Polanco rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .241 Bell 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .263 Cervelli c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .258 Moran 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Newman 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Holmes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Nova p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .022 a-Harrison ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .260 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Marte cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Totals 31 1 5 1 2 7 Atlanta .................000 020 301 — 6 8 0 Pittsburgh............000 000 001 — 1 5 0 a–singled for Nova in the 6th. b–singled for Gausman in the 9th. 1–ran for Suzuki in the 9th. LOB:Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 5. 2B:Suzuki (20), Cervelli (11). HR:Swanson (11), off Nova. Swanson (12), off Feliz. Polanco (20), off Sobotka. RBIs:Suzuki (39), Swanson 4 (52), Polanco (69). RISP:Atlanta 4 (Freeman 2, Camargo 2). Pittsburgh 3 (Bell 2, Newman). RISP:Atlanta 1 for 5. Pittsburgh 0 for 7. RMU:Markakis, Moran. GIDP:Hechavarria. DP:Atlanta 1 (Swanson, Albies, Freeman). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman, W, 8-9 8 4 0 0 2 5 103 3.99 Sobotka 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 1.50 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova, L, 7-8 6 4 2 2 0 4 78 4.20 Feliz 1 3 3 3 1 0 30 6.05 Holmes 2 1 1 1 2 2 42 6.88 HBP:Holmes (Suzuki). WP:Holmes. Umpires:Home, Ben May. First, Dave Rackley. Second, Chris Guccione. Third, Larry Vanover. T:2:36. A:13,280 (38,362).

Rays 4, Royals 1 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .303 4 0 1 0 0 2 .238 Gordon lf Perez c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 4 0 1 0 0 3 .213 Dozier 3b Herrera rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 3 0 1 0 1 2 .237 Duda dh Escobar 2b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .212 4 1 1 1 0 2 .182 O’Hearn 1b Mondesi ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Totals 34 1 8 1 2 16 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Smith rf-lf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .302 4 1 3 1 1 0 .244 Pham lf 1-Gomez pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Wendle 3b 4 0 1 2 1 1 .290 Cron dh 5 0 2 0 0 2 .252 3 0 0 0 1 2 .209 Bauers 1b Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .190 4 1 3 1 0 0 .253 Adames ss Lowe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .091 4 1 2 0 0 0 .291 Perez c Totals 37 4 14 4 3 10 Kansas City .........000 010 000 — 1 8 0 Tampa Bay...........010 201 00x — 4 14 0 1–ran for Pham in the 8th. LOB:Kansas City 8, Tampa Bay 12. 2B:Merrifield (33), Duda (11), Escobar (17), M.Smith (21), Pham (13), Cron (23). 3B:Wendle (5). HR:O’Hearn (5), off Snell. Adames (7), off Sparkman. RBIs:O’Hearn (11), Pham (43), Wendle 2 (44), Adames (19). CS:Merrifield (8). RISP:Kansas City 4 (Dozier, Mondesi 3). Tampa Bay 6 (Pham, Cron 2, Bauers, Adames, Perez). RISP:Kansas City 1 for 8. Tampa Bay 2 for 12. RMU:Gordon, M.Smith, Wendle. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sparkman, L, 0-2 4 7 3 3 3 5 88 5.25 B.Smith 3 5 1 1 0 4 52 6.38 McCarthy 1 2 0 0 0 1 14 3.48 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell, W, 15-5 6 4 1 1 1 11 101 2.07 Kolarek, H, 4 1 2 0 0 0 1 24 4.91 Roe, H, 22 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 3.26 Romo, S, 17-24 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 3.42 Umpires:Home, Carlos Torres. First, Paul Nauert. Second, Angel Campos. Third, Scott Barry. T:3:03. A:9,402 (42,735).

Blue Jays 8, Orioles 2 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mullins cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .333 Villar 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .262 Mancini dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .235 Jones rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .283 Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .163 Nunez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .240 Beckham ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .224 Andreoli lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .250 Joseph c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .215 Totals 34 2 7 2 2 9 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .242 a-Hernandez ph-lf2 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Travis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Smoak 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .255 Morales dh 4 2 3 2 0 1 .257 Pillar cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .257 McKinney lf-rf 3 2 2 3 1 0 .400 Diaz 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .254 Urena ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .268 Maile c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .231 Totals 35 8 12 8 2 4 Baltimore ............010 010 000 — 2 7 2 Toronto.................110 330 00x — 8 12 0 a–lined out for Granderson in the 6th. E:Villar (9), Nunez (9). LOB:Baltimore 7, Toronto 5. 2B:Granderson (21), Pillar (35). HR:Mullins (2), off Gaviglio. Diaz (16), off Bundy. Smoak (19), off Bundy. Morales (17), off Bundy. McKinney (1), off Meisinger. RBIs:Mullins (4), Joseph (16), Smoak (61), Morales 2 (47), McKinney 3 (5), Diaz (38), Maile (27). RISP:Baltimore 4 (Mullins 2, Davis, Joseph). Toronto 1 (Travis). RISP:Baltimore 2 for 6. Toronto 2 for 7. RMU:Jones, Beckham, Andreoli, Smoak. GIDP:Travis, Smoak, Hernandez. DP:Baltimore 3 (Davis, Beckham, Bundy), (Beckham, Villar, Davis), (Beckham, Villar, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy, L, 7-12 4 10 7 7 0 3 72 5.31 Meisinger 1 1 1 1 1 0 19 3.52 Scott 1.2 0 0 0 1 1 27 6.13 Carroll 1.1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.86 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gaviglio, W, 3-6 7 6 2 2 1 7 102 4.94 Petricka 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 4.50 Shafer 1 0 0 0 1 0 21 0.00 Bundy pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.

IRS:Carroll 1-0. WP:Petricka. Umpires:Home, Ryan Blakney. First, Dan Bellino. Second, Phil Cuzzi. Third, Adam Hamari. T:2:39. A:25,855 (53,506).

San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey might need hip surgery that would end his season, Giants general manager Bobby Evans said Tuesday. Posey has been dealing with hip trouble this season. A six-time All-Star, he got a cortisone injection and missed last month’s game. The 31-year-old Posey didn’t start Tuesday night against the New York Mets after catching all 13 innings in a win Monday. Posey is hitting .286 with five homers and 40 RBIs. Since the All-Star break, he is hitting .283 with no homers and nine RBIs.

MIAMI

Marlins’ Urena drops appeal Marlins right-hander Jose Urena dropped his appeal of a six-game suspension for intentionally hitting Atlanta rookie Ronald Acuna Jr. with a pitch. Urena began serving the suspension Tuesday. The Marlins, fearful the Braves might retaliate, had already decided Urena wouldn’t pitch against them during a fourgame series later this week. Urena is expected to return at Boston on Aug. 28. He hit Acuna on the left arm with his first pitch, triggering a melee in the Marlins’ 5-2 loss in Atlanta last Wednesday. Acuna went into the game having homered in five straight games, including four homers in the three games against Miami — three of them leading off.

PHOENIX

Upton goes to DL; Trout on way back The Los Angeles Angels placed Justin Upton on the 10-day disabled list with a cut on his left index finger, but they expect Mike Trout will rejoin the team by the end of the week. The Angels called up outfielder Jabari Blash from Triple-A Salt Lake to take Upton’s place on the active roster. Trout, on the DL with a wrist injury, has been away from the team following the death of his brother-in-law, former Angels pitching prospect Aaron Cox.

CHICAGO

Renteria released from hospital White Sox manager Rick Renteria was released from a Minnesota hospital Tuesday after undergoing tests following an episode of lightheadedness. The 56-year-old Renteria was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center before Monday night’s 8-5 victory over the Twins. Renteria will return to Chicago today and undergo further testing at Rush University Medical Center. “Our thoughts and prayers are with him and his family,” said bench coach Joe McEwing, who is running the team while Renteria is gone. “He sounds good. He’s a very tough individual.” — ASSOCIATED PRESS


WB_VOICE/PAGES [B05] | 08/21/18

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Jets’ ‘New Jack City’ DBs look to ‘control the airways’ BY DENNIS WASZAK JR. ASSOCIATED PRESS

of concussion tests and passed them both, clearing him to make his lone preseason appearance on Sunday when the Steelers host Tennessee. It’s been more than eight months since Roethlisberger last faced guys in differentcolored uniforms, when he threw for a franchise playoffrecord 469 yards and five touchdowns in a playoff loss to Jacksonville. Unlike the 2017 offseason — when he waited weeks before announcing his return — Roethlisberger said right away he would be back in 2018, an endorsement of both the coaching staff and the talent surrounding him in the huddle. Saturday will be the first time Roethlisberger will be hearing Randy Fichtner’s voice in his headset during a game. The Steelers promoted the longtime quarterbacks coach to offensive coordinator in January. Though the low-key Fichtner carries himself differently than his predecessor — the fiery Todd Haley — Roethlisberger expects the offense to “pretty much stay the same.” That’s hardly a bad thing for a group that finished third in total yards while going 13-3 in 2017. The key to earning a fifth straight playoff berth will be turning all those yards into a few more points. Pittsburgh was eighth in the league in average points per game (25.4) due in part to some red zone issues. The Steelers finished a middling 18th in turning red-zone possessions into touchdowns (53 percent). Pittsburgh drafted former Oklahoma State star wide receiver James Washington in the second round, and Washington had a pair of touchdowns last week

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DENNIS WASZAK / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jets cornerback Morris Claiborne leads a group of defensive backs referring to themselves as “New Jack City.”

NFL to go before getting anywhere close to securing their place in NFL lore. “I feel like it still hasn’t made it yet, but we’re pounding away at it,” said Claiborne, who added that all the defensive backs have the shirts. “So, for us right now, it’s going out and laying it out there on the field. Put the name out there and let the people judge to see if it sticks ornot.” The first step, though, is havingthenicknameitself. “It’sjustabrotherhoodthatwe haveinoursecondary,ourcamaraderie,”Mayesaid.“It’stheway we hang out with each other, the wayweplaywitheachother,just thestyleof playwehaveandjust thetypeof attitudeandmentality wecarry.” The safety tandem of Adams and Maye is already considered oneof themostpromisinginthe league,withbothlookingtobuild off solid rookie seasons. “You definitely have to have that swagger out there,” Adams said, “that energy, running to the ball and just playing with that nasty mentality.” Adams has already established himself as a team leader, a guy who leads with emotion and intensity. He finished third on the Jets last year with 83 overall tackles and had two sacks, but is still searching for his first NFL interception.

Maye is bit quieter than Adams, preferring to lead mostly by example. He was fourth on the Jets with 76 tacklesandhadtwoINTs. “He can be phenomenal,” Adams said of Maye. “I think everybody can. As long as we continue to work at the little things, continue to take to the coaching,thesky’sthelimit.” Maye is coming off offseason ankle surgery and has been gradually worked back onto the field. He’s hoping to play some against the Giants on Friday night in the team’s third preseason game, usually the last extensive action starters see beforetheregularseason. “I’m definitely itching to get outthere,”Mayesaid. Claiborne was mostly solid as the Jets’ No. 1 cornerback last season and re-signed with the Jets on a one-year deal. He’ll likely be more of a 1-A this year withJohnsonnowinthemix. After six seasons with the Rams, Johnson came to New York in March when he signed a whopping five-year, $72.5 million contract that included $34 million guaranteed. He was the Jets’ biggest free-agent signing of the offseason, and he’ll be expected to perform like an elite cornerback. “Another playmaker in the back end, man,” Adams said. “A lot of energy.” Johnson has 18 career interceptions, including a careerhigh seven in 2015.

STEELERS: Working with WRs FROM PAGE B1

THE CITIZENS' VOICE B5

against Green Bay including one by outjumping the defender on a 50/50 ball. It’s something they’d like to see more of this fall in general, including from secondyear wideout JuJu SmithSchuster. He wowed at times during his rookie season. Now comes the hard part as the firmly established No. 2 alongside All-Pro Antonio Brown: doing it again. “The key for him is how can he bounce back and not just put together a good year like last year but be better,” Roethlisberger said. “It starts with work and he put in a lot work, effort and time. I am looking forward to what he can do this year.” Roethlisberger isn’t quite sure how long he’ll get a chance to be on the field with Smith-Schuster and the rest of the starting offense this weekend. A couple of scoring

drives early would likely make Roethlisberg er’s appearance a mere cameo. A slow start might result in a bit of a longer stay. Regardless of how he feels, he still expects there to be some issues adjusting to game speed even entering his 15th season. “It’s live action,” Roethlisberger said. “We have been at practice and everything gets a little faster, a little quicker. I hope I don’t get hit, but it’s always good to knock that rust off, too, at some point.” NOTES: WR Eli Rogers was suspended for one week by the NFL for violating the league’s substance abuse policy. Rogers is on the physically unable to perform list while recovering from a torn ACL. Rogers is not expected to be ready by the opening week of the season.

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MADE JUST FOR MEN OVER 50 But now, for the first time ever, there’s a pill made just for older men. It’s called Vesele®. A new pill that helps you in bed by stimulating your body and your brainwaves. So Vesele® can work even when nothing else worked before. The new men’s pill is not a drug. It’s something completely different. Because you don’t need a prescription for Vesele®, sales are exploding. The maker just can’t produce enough of it to keep up with demand. Even doctors are having a tough time getting their hands on it. So what’s all the fuss about?

New men’s pill overwhelms your senses with sexual desire as well as firmer, long-lasting erections. There’s never been anything like it. THE BRAIN CONNECTION Vesele® takes off where prescription drugs only begins. Thanks to a discovery made by 3 Nobel-Prize winning scientists, Vesele® has become the first ever patented supplement to harden you and your libido. So you regain your desire as well as the ability to act on it. In a 16-week clinical study, scientists from the U.S.A. joined forces to prove Nitric Oxide’s effects on the cardio vascular system. They showed that Nitric Oxide could not only increase your ability to get an erection, it would also work on your brainwaves to stimulate your desire for sex. The results were remarkable and published in the world’s most respected medical journals.

THE SCIENCE The study asked men, 45 to 65 years old to take the main ingredient in Vesele® once a day. Then they were instructed not to change the way they eat or exercise but to take Vesele® twice a day. What happened next was remarkable. Virtually

JAW-DROPPING CLINICAL PROOF 100 SATISFACTION RATE (% Patients)

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. — Morris Claiborne’s T-shirt had three words printed on it that represent a new era in the New York Jets’ secondary. “New Jack City” is etched in sharp black letters and framed by a whited-out Manhattan-like skyline, closely resembling the artwork from the soundtrack to the 1991 hit action gangster movie. It’s the nickname defensive backs coach Dennard Wilson gave his group before last season — and it’s the identity by which the likes of Claiborne, Trumaine Johnson, Buster Skrine, Jamal Adams and Marcus Maye want to be known. “We want people to fear us when we walk out,” Claiborne said after practice Tuesday. “We’re going to walk out, we’re going to talk noise and we’re going to play on the edge, but not hurt the team. We’re just going to go out there and leave it out there, from me to Tru to every guy in that room, Buster, everybody — we have the same mindset, and that’s to go out and perform at a high level.” The Jets have struggled the past few seasons in the secondary, finishing 21st in pass defense last year. Those days, this group of DBs is convinced, are over. “We’ve just got to go make a statement,” Claiborne said. “Each and every game, we’ve got to go out and make a statement. Control the airways. That’s the best way I can put it.” Seattle had its “Legion of Boom” secondary with Richard Sherman leading the way, and there have been lots of other colorful and intimidating defensive nicknames in the NFL over the years. Steel Curtain. Doomsday Defense. Monsters of the Midway. Orange Crush. Purple People Eaters. New York Sack Exchange. These Jets have a long way

22:21 | SCHILLINGS

80 60

With Vesele 88.1%

With Vesele 82.0%

40 20 0

Baseline 41.1%

Baseline 47.9%

OVERALL SATISFACTION

DESIRE

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VESELE® PASSED THE TEST “As an expert in the development of sexual dysfunction, I’ve studied the effectiveness of Nitric Oxide on the body and the brain. I’m impressed by the way it increases cerebral and penile blood flow. The result is evident in the creation of Vesele®. It’s sure-fire proof that the mind/body connection is unbeatable when achieving and maintaining an erection and the results are remarkable” said Dr. Damaj.

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HOW TO GET VESELE®

Vesele Baseline

Overall Satisfaction. . . . . . . . . . . . .88.1% Frequency of sex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79.5% Desire for sex. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82% Hardness during sex. . . . . . . . . . . . .85.7% Duration of erection. . . . . . . . . . . . .79.5% Ability to satisfy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83.3%

SUPPLY LIMITED BY OVERWHELMING DEMAND

41.4% 44.9% 47.9% 36.2% 35% 44.1%

every man in the study who took Vesele® twice a day reported a huge difference in their desire for sex. In layman’s terms, they were horny again. They also experienced harder erections that lasted for almost 20 minutes. The placebo controlled group (who received sugar pills) mostly saw no difference. AN UNEXPECTED BONUS: The study results even showed an impressive increase in the energy, brain-power and memory of the participants.

This is the first official public release of Vesele® since its news release. In order to get the word out about Vesele®, Innovus Pharma is offering special introductory discounts to all who call. A special phone hotline has been set up for readers in your area to take advantage of special discounts during this ordering opportunity. The discounts will automatically be applied to all callers. The Special TOLL-FREE Hotline number is 1-800-648-1376 and will be open 24-hours a day. Limited bottles of Vesele® are currently available in your region. Consumers who miss out on our current product inventory will have to wait until more become available. But this could take weeks. The maker advises your best chance is to call 1-800-648-1376 early.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS NOT TYPICAL.


WB_VOICE/PAGES [B06] | 08/21/18

23:14 | MALUSOANTH

SPORTS

B6 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

LOCAL GOLF ROUNDUP Wyoming Valley CC The WVCC Women’s Golf Association competed Tuesday in medal play. Results were: Class A: Debbie Mileski, low gross; Mary Zabreski, low net Class B: Mabel Selig, low gross; Marie Mihalos, low net Class C: Becky Kulbaski, low gross; Molly Churnetski, low net Crystal Class: Maureen Umphred, low gross; Joyce Galli, low net Birdies: Joyce Galli on No. 15, Lisa Miller on No. 14, Molly Churnetski on No. 13 Chip-ins: Carol Lippincott on No. 1, Joyce Galli on No. 12, Karen Kempinski on No. 12, Lisa Miller on No. 14, Mary Zabresky on No. 8, Mabel Selig on No. 5, Marie Mihalos on No. 15 Closet to the pin: Becky Kulboski on No. 5, Molly Churnetski on No. 13, Tassie Perlis on No. 7

Emanon Country Club Jack Delaney, Joe Weiscarger, Chuck Brand and Joe Hughes recently won the championship flight of the Emanon Presidents Day for Autism tournament with a score of 14-under. Championship flight 1. Jack Delaney, Joe Weiscarger, Chuck Brand, Joe Hughes -14 2. Mark Eyet, John Zelonis, Mike Lazevnick, Joe Colangelo -11 3. Jerry Stankiewicz, Kevin Stankiewicz, Ryan Stankiewicz, Justin Stankiewicz -11 4. Len Benfante, Guy Fasciana, Rick Mazar, Frank Noone -10 First flight

The Wyoming Valley Country Club recently held its junior club championship. Left, Nick Werner won the Junior Junior club championship, for golfers ages 13 and under who play a 13-hole event. Ryan Keyes, right, won the junior championship while Jeremy Callahan finished as runner-up. 1. Mike Hetro, John Hetro, Robert Hetro, Larry Lettie -4 2. Tony Zielen, Jim Falzone, Emmit Coolbaugh, Matt Zielen -4 3. Matt Vavrek, Joe Vavrek, Tyler Serbin, Aaron Pietlukiewicz -4 4. Lisa McGee, Jim McGee, Chris O’Brien, Larry O’Brien -4 Second flight 1. Bill Spagnola, Ryan Kittrick, Rod Policare, Al Gunari -1 2. Joe Gaughan, Gene King, Ed Jezorwski, Len Tetlock -1 3. O Hunter, I Hunter, R Brauer, Jan Schneier -1 4. Maria Stravinski, Carl Stravins-

ki, Tony Henderson, Erica Adams -1 The team of Tony Zielen and John Mulhern shot a 5-under-par 63 recently to capture the Ryder Cup Tournament title at Emanon. The tournament had three different formats — modified alternate shot, better ball and captain and mate. Championship flight 1. Tony Zielen-John Mulhern 63 2. Rick Barge-Mike Amitia 65 3. Frank Noone-Joe Weiscarger 65 4. Jack Delaney-Chuck Musto 66 5. Len Benfante-Bill Tighe 66

First flight 1. Mark Kolmsperger-Ralph Harding 69 2. Guy Fasciana-Rick Mazar 69 3. Mark Altavilla-Art Rogo 69 4. Rich Petrillo-Joe Breck 70 5. Randy Marcotte-Sean Gaughen 71 Second flight 1. Butch Koester-Steve Harmonas 74 2. Mike Fiscus Sr.-Mike Fiscus Jr. 74 3. Tony Petrucci-Joe Sholtis 74 4. Charlie Shudginis-Matt Welsch 74

INSIDE TODAY!

Game On!

5. Jim Falzone-Tyler Shipp 75

Blue Ridge Trail The Blue Chip Ladies Golf League on Tuesday played for “Throw Out Worst Hole,” in which Donna Grobelny won the first flight, Judy Cameron second flight and Dee Kovaleski fourth flight. Paula Winchester (blue seven) and Grobelny (ridge seven) each made birdies. Judy Cameron chipped in on blue eight and blue nine, while Grobelny chipped in on ridge seven.

WVC GOLF

Wyoming Area, Sem go 2-0 Wyoming Seminary 141, Coughlin 185, Valley West 203 GAR 244 At Wilkes-Barre Municipal, Wyoming Seminary 141,Meyers 178 Evan Serafin shot a 7-over-par Wyoming Area 157, GAR 241 Wyoming Area 157, Meyers 178 43 and earned medalist honors, while Matt Hamel folMeyers 178, GAR 244 lowed with a 44 and helped At Hollenback, Wyoming lead Coughlin to victory. Seminary and Wyoming Valley West’s Zachary BuzArea each went 2-0 during a inkai fired a 49, as did Coughquad meet where Meyers lin’s Noah Stankinas and Darwent 1-2 and GAR dropped ren Clarke. three matches. Coughlin: Evan Serafin 43, Matt Hamel Wyoming Seminary’s Jer- 44, Noah Stankinas 49, Darren Clarke 49. emy Callahan, Bobby Wilson Valley West: Zachary Buzinkai 49, Sam Saporito 50, Jeff Falcheck 52, Jakob Razand Andrew Maddock each villas 52. fired a 3-over-par 35. J.T. Gober (38) and Cole MMI Prep 167, Berwick 199 Coolbaugh (39) paced WyoAt Valley Country Club, ming Area, while Julian SpeThomas Mayernik paced MMI razza shot a 42 for Meyers. GAR’s Alfonso Francisco Prep with a 2-over-par 37, as he was crowned the medalist in a shot a 49. win for the Preppers. Wyoming Seminary: Jeremy CallahMMI teammate Jessica an 35, Andrew Maddock 35, Bobby WilMcClellan was on Mayernik’s son 35, Adam Rogers 36. Wyoming Area: J.T. Gober 38, Cole heels with a 39. Zach Evans led Coolbaugh 39, Chase Yochem 40, Joe Berwick with a 46. Petrillo 40. Meyers: Julian Sperazza 42, Jack Gilgallon 43, Joey Polanowski 44, Patrick Cunningham 49. GAR: Alfonso Francisco 49, Helen Campbell 61, Yasmany Batista 65, Juan Rojas 69.

MMI Prep: Thomas Mayernik 37, Jessica McClellan 39, Zack Young 45, Noah Long 46. Berwick: Zach Evans 46, Wes Arndt 49, Claudia Geiser 52, Jacob Yacobuski 52.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Love, Oliver, Grier lead AP Preseason AllAmerica team This award winning section is back for the season and features: - Game Schedules - Coach Interviews - Player Profiles and More ... For Home Delivery / 570-821-2010 / citizensvoice.com

Also Available At Your Local Newsstand

NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA’S LARGEST NEWS TEAM

By RALPH D. RUSSO ASSOCIATED PRESS

Heisman Trophy runnerup Bryce Love of Stanford and Outland Trophy winner Ed Oliver of Houston highlight The Associated Press preseason All-America team. Chosen by AP poll voters, the team announced Tuesday also features West Virginia quarterback Will Grier and his teammate, receiver David Sills V. Love, along with Clemson defensive end Clelin Ferrell, Wisconsin linebacker T.J. Edwards and Utah kicker Matt Gay, were the only play-

ers who made first team AllAmerican after last season and first team to start this season. Love ran for 2,118 yards and 8.05 per carry last season and was second to Baker Mayfield in the Heisman Trophy voting. Penn State quarterback Trace McSorely was selected as a second-team All-American. Clemson and Wisconsin led the way with three players on the first team. Alabama and Wisconsin each had a total of five players on the first and second teams combined.


WB_VOICE/PAGES [B07] | 08/21/18

18:16 | DULSKYAPRI

tHE CItIzEns’ VOICE

Health Science WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

ASK THE DOCTORS

Sunscreen pills not an option

Q:

My husband and I are terrible at remembering to wear sunscreen. I don’t like how it feels, and he just plain forgets. I recently saw an ad for sunscreen pills. Could they be an option? We hate to be the bearers of bad news, but no, sunscreen pills don’t work. They have been marketed as dietary supplements that will allow your skin to (magically, it would have to be) ward off sunburn, reduce sun-related aging and even shield you from skin cancer. To paraphrase the Food and Drug Administration, there’s no such thing as a sunscreen pill. The risks posed by unprotected sun exposure are serious enough that the FDA put out a statement in May debunking the claims of sunscreen pill manufacturers. It also sent out warning letters demanding that the companies hawking these pills stop their false advertising, which it said violates federal law. The specific companies mentioned in the FDA’s announcement are Advanced Skin Brightening Formula, Sunsafe Rx, Solaricare and Sunergetic. You’re right to be concerned that you and your husband have been lax in the sunscreen department. From the instant the sun rises to the moment it sets, amid the spectrum of light that it emits is ultraviolet radiation. The wavelengths of UV rays are shorter than those of visible light, which makes them invisible to the naked eye. But the potential damage they can cause to unprotected skin is considerable. UV radiation is broken down into UVA, UVB and UVC rays. (We don’t hear much about UVC, the shortest of the three, because it gets absorbed by the Earth’s ozone layer.) But UVA rays, which are the longest of the three and account for 95 percent of the UV radiation that reaches us on Earth, and UVB rays, which are slightly shorter, do a real number on our skin. UVA, in addition to causing the physiological changes that we call a suntan, penetrates the deepest. It plays a big role in premature aging, and more recent research shows that it plays a part in skin cancers as well. The shorter UVB rays give us sunburns and play a significant role in a range of skin cancers. Both types of UV rays can damage the skin’s cellular DNA and thus give rise to genetic mutations that can lead to cancer. All of this bad news about UV rays would be far more alarming if it weren’t for the existence of sunscreens. Legitimate sunscreens are all applied topically. Each contains a mix of certain types of organic and/or inorganic chemicals, which either deflect, reflect, scatter or absorb the UV rays. The array of legitimate sunscreen products is vast.

A:

ASK THE DOCTORS is written by Robert Ashley, M.D., Eve Glazier, M.D., and Elizabeth Ko, M.D. Send questions to askthedoctors@ mednet.ucla.edu, or write: Ask the Doctors, c/o Media Relations, UCLA Health, 924 Westwood Blvd., Suite 350, Los Angeles, CA, 90095.

B7

Kratom poisonings on rise Sold as herbal supplement to help with opioid withdrawal BY MARI A. SCHAEFER tHE PHiLADELPHiA iNqUiRER

PHILADELPHIA — An unregulated herbal product that advocates say can relieve pain and help with opioid withdrawal has been linked to at least four deaths in the Philadelphia region, but with many authorities failing to track kratom poisonings, there’s no way to know if there are more deaths related to the substance. Kratom, derived from the leavesof aSoutheastAsiantree that is part of the coffee family, has gained popularity in recent years. It is sold online, in gas stations and in smoke shops, and is typically brewed as a tea, chewed, smoked or ingest

In Pennsylvania in Pennsylvania, overdoseFreePA, a website that tracks overdose fatalities, reported there were 27 deaths in 2017 in which mitragynine was present. thirty-seven of Pennsylvania’s 67 county coroners contribute to the database. ed in capsules. An estimated 3 million to 5 million people use kratom, according to the American Kratom Association, a Colorado-based nonprofit founded in 2014 to promote the herbal product. It has become a billion-dollar busi-

ness, according to the Botanical Education Alliance, another kratom advocacy group. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration announced in 2016 it would reclassify kratom as a Schedule 1 drug, similar to heroin or marijuana, a step other nations have taken. But the industry groups lobbied to keep it on store shelves. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says the active ingredient in kratom, mitragynine, is an addictive substance that acts on the brain’s opioid receptors — and is indeed an opioid. Though touted as a stimulant (at low doses), sedative (at

high doses), painkiller, and addiction therapy, kratom has no medical value, the FDA declared in February, and has been linked to at least 44 deaths nationally, though the agency admits tracking is haphazard. The kratom industry, meanwhile, disputes the FDA’s science and data collection, insisting no one has died from kratom use. Still, there are troubling indicators that poisonings are on the rise. The American Association of Poison Control Centers has seen a sixfold increase in calls — from 97 in all of 2016, to 635 so far in 2018 — to its national hotline for kratom

use. Since 2016, it has recorded 10 deaths associated with kratom, three for the product alone, others in combination with other substances. Such mixtures, scientists say, can be especially dangerous because many users don’t think kratom could compound the impact of other opioids, making overdose more likely. NMS Labs, a nationally known forensic laboratory in Willow Grove, started testing for mitragynine about five years ago and is seeing more of it in postmortem toxicology cases, said Vice President Barry Logan, a senior scientist. From January to June, there were 303 deaths in which mitragynine was found, often in combination with other opioids, he said.

HONEYBEES ARE HURTING

What else can pollinate our food? BY CATHERINE M. ALLCHIN tHE NEW YoRK tiMES

OMAK, Wash. — Jim Freese grows apples, pears and cherries on 45 acres in the north-central part of this state, on sagebrushstudded land his grandfather bought in 1910. Walking among trees laden with shiny red cherries, Freese recalled that four years ago his trees were not producing well and his farm was financially struggling. Like many growers, he had been relying on rented honeybees to pollinate his cherry trees every spring, along with wild bees and other insects. But that year, spring was expected to be cool. “Honeybees will just sit in the hive in cooler weather,” Freese said. He needed a way to ensure more flowers would develop into fruit than in the past. At a horticulture meeting, he learned that blue orchard bees — a native species that does not make honey or live in hives — could be used to supplement honeybee pollination. Blue orchard bees will fly at cooler temperatures. Freese bought 12,000 cocoons and set them in his orchard to emerge when the trees bloomed. His investment paid off. “We doubled our cherry production from any previous record year,” he said. His wife, Sandee Freese, said, “The little bees have been a godsend.” The Freese orchard is one of many commercial agricultural operations around the United States considering pollination with alternative bee species now that the honeybee is beset by problems. The honeybee, Apis mellifera, has been the dominant pollinator for decades but now is threatened by pesticides, pathogens, parasites and poor nutrition. Last year, beekeepers in the United States lost an estimated 40 percent of their managed honeybee colonies, according to the Bee Informed Partnership, a nonprofit that advises beekeepers. Some years that number is even higher, according to Mark Winston, a professor of apiculture at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia and author of several books on bees. “Is there another agricultural enterprise that accepts an annual loss of 40-45 percent of its animals?” he asked. These losses drive up prices for farmers who rent honeybees to pollinate their crops, straining their businesses. Honeybee prices have nearly quadrupled since 2004, even as demand for pollination services is growing. One-third of our food — including almonds, apples, blueberries, pears and tomatoes — must be pollinated in order to grow. Some scientists warn of risks to agricultural food supplies if there are not enough pollinators. As honeybee prices continue to rise, farmers are turning to other types of bees — like the blue

ALEx HECHt / tHE NEW YoRK tiMES

Jim Watts, who runs a business providing bees to farmers, stands near his hut for alfalfa leaf cutter bees, in Ontario, Ore. Farmers are turning to alternatives as the dominant species of pollinator, the honeybee, is under siege. At top, a female alfalfa leafcutter bee collects nectar and pollen. orchard bee, the bumblebee and alfalfa leafcutter — that have proved to be effective pollinators of some crops in certain settings. “It’s a question of having the right bee at the right time,” said Theresa Pitts-Singer, a research entomologist at the Department of Agriculture’s Logan Bee Lab. Pitts-Singer and researchers across the country have been studying how so-called integrated crop pollination — or combinations of varying bee species — can help growers ensure reliable pollination. The Integrated Crop Pollination Project, a public-private partnership funded by the Department of Agriculture, has explored habitat enhancement for wild bees, improving farm management practices, and the use of diverse or “alternative” bee species. To explore the economics, PittsSinger and other scientists conducted a cost-benefit analysis of using blue orchard bees and honeybees to pollinate almond trees in California. The analysis, published recently

ALEx HECHt / tHE NEW YoRK tiMES

Jim Watts tinkers with brood cells of alfalfa leafcutter bees. in Journal of Economic Entomology, showed a potential tenfold increase in profit per acre with the introduction of blue orchard bees. Further study is needed to determine whether such an increase is possible in real-world settings, Pitts-Singer said. Scientists noted that farmers would earn greater profits if they

saved blue orchard bee progeny from year to year rather than buying new cocoons every season. That requires careful maintenance of nesting materials and cocoons to prevent disease. In the wild, blue orchard bees make nests in small cracks or holes. But in agricultural settings, artificial nesting blocks or paper tubes are used. Jim Watts of Watts Solitary Bees in Bothell, Washington, has worked with leafcutter bees all his life and started propagating blue orchard bees a decade ago. While the blue orchard bee industry is very small, it is growing rapidly. One of the largest distributors of solitary bees in the country, Watts meets with far mers throughout the West about pollination. Based on their crops and acreage, he provides bees, materials and consulting time to answer questions. “There’s a learning curve the first year or two,” he said. “As people get better at it, they get a better return on their investment.”


WB_VOICE/PAGES [B08] | 08/21/18

22:06 | MALUSOANTH

B8 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

Make A Doctor’s Appointment Online,Anytime. Make your next appointment today at commonwealthhealth.net

80

WILKES-BARRE TODAY

Cloudy most of the time today with brief showers; breezy. Mainly clear tonight; areas of late-night fog.

56 8 a.m m

Precip Chance 75% Humidity 89% Winds NW 12-25 mph

71

Noon

4 p.m m

77

79

Scrantoon 79/57

78 61

Fog in the a.m.; partly sunny

Mostly sunny and pleasant

Partly sunny and pleasant

I-955 DC TO PHILLY:

New York City Clouuds breaking and breezy today 84/65

withh a shower. Clear tonigght.

Pottsville 81/57

Harrisbu urg 86/63

Trenton 85/64

I-800 EASTERN PA: Clouuds breaking andd breezy today withh a shower. Maiinly clear toniight; fog late.

Philadelph hia 86/64 Wilmington 85/64

Atlantic City 85/67

Baltimore 87/63

Ocean City 85/66 Dover 85/65

Cape May 84/66

ALMANAC

Recorded for the 24 hours through 4 p.m. yesterday at the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport

TEMPERATURE

High temperature ............................................. 74° Low temperature ............................................. 67° Yesterday’s average temperature ..................... 71° Normal high ..................................................... 79° Normal low ...................................................... 59° Last year’s high temperature ........................... 85° Last year’s low temperature ............................. 61° Record high ........................................ 95° in 1916 Record low ......................................... 43° in 2000

PRECIPITATION

24-hour precip. ending 4 p.m. Tuesday .......... Trace

Month to date

Year to date

12

12

60

60

10

10

50

50

8

8

40

40

6

6

30

30

4

4

20

20

2

2

10

10

0

0

0

0

Actual 9.48”

Normal 2.37”

Actual 37.86”

Normal 23.99”

SUNDAY

81 58

Hazleton 77/54

Washington, D.C C. 88/65

SATURDAY

77 54

WILKES-BARRE 80/56 State College 76/55

FRIDAY

I-811 HARRISBURG Shown is today’s forecast. AREEA: Some sun Temperatures are retuurning today; a today’s highs and shoower, breezy and mid. Areas of fog Port Jervis tonight’s lows. hum in thhe east tonight. 80/55

Binghamton g 72/5 5 52 Williamsport 81/57

EXTENDED FORECAST

THURSDAY

I-476 LEHIGH VA ALLEY AREA: Breezy today with a shower or two. Areas of fog near the Lehigh Tunnel tonnight. K BORDER I-84 NEW YORK AREA: Some sunn today with brief showers; brreezy. Fog late tonight.

29

Yesterday’s reading

Today’s Forecast

0 50 100 150 200 300 500 0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300 Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous PA Department of Environmental Protection

UV INDEX TODAY

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

0

1

4

3

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon

2 p.m. 4 p.m.

0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme

Seatttle 85/56

86 68

Clouds and sunshine

Billings 79/57

An afternoon t-storm possible

Callicoon 6.67’ 6.01’ -0.66’ 12.0’ Archbald 3.55’ 3.22’ -0.33’ 8.0’ Meshoppen 16.53’ 14.85’ -1.68’ 27.0’

Port Jervis 6.57’ 5.89’ -0.68’ 18.0’ Old Forgge 4.20’ 3.87’ -0.33’ 11.0’ Wilkes-Barre 10.28’ 8.64’ -1.64’ 22.0’ Tunkhannock 3.44’ 2.99’ -0.45’ 11.0’

JERSEY SHORE FORECAST

Humid today; a shower and thunderstorm around in the morning, then a shower or two. Wind from the southwest at 10-20 mph. Patchy clouds tonight. Wind from the northwest at 8-16 mph. Water temperature: 74. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2018

SUN AND MOON Sunrise ...................... Sunset ....................... Moonrise ................... Moonset ....................

Todayy 6:19 a.m. 7:52 p.m. 5:43 p.m. 2:38 a.m.

Planets Rise Mercury ..................... 4:57 a.m. Venus ...................... 10:18 a.m. Mars .......................... 6:51 p.m. Jupiter ..................... 12:48 p.m. Saturn ....................... 4:37 p.m. Uranus ..................... 10:17 p.m.

Full

........ ........ ........ ........

SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT — New bat rules aimed at keeping the ball in play and pitchers safer are having another effect at the Little League World Series: fewer home runs. Until this season, bats were frequently made from reinforced carbon fiber polymer. The problem was that as they were used over time, the bats actually sent balls farther and at higher speeds — sometimes called the trampoline effect. Under a new bat performance standard from USA Baseball, bats in 2018 are now built to act more like the wooden bats used in the majors — less ping and less pop. While keeping pitchers and infielders safer from laser comebackers and line drives, coaches agree the new bats have less power. “Crazy different, man,”

said Kurt Barr, coach of the Michigan team representing the Great Lakes. “You see it out there, it takes almost a perfect shot to hit it over a 225-foot fence. The ball sounds good coming off the bat, the swing looks good and these things just die.” Only 10 home runs had been hit in 21 games as the LLWS reached its midpoint Monday night, with no team accounting for more than one. In 2017, a whopping 61 homers were hit across the tournament and the U.S. champs from Lufkin, Texas, hit 11 by themselves. No pop off the barrel means teams can’t rely on the long ball anymore. Whether that’s a good or bad thing seems to depend on whether you’re asking a coach or a player. “I’ll rethink a lot of my strategy, quite frankly, because I think it’s really hard to hit a home run on a 225-foot field in Little League these days,”

Thursdayy 6:20 a.m. 7:50 p.m. 6:26 p.m. 3:29 a.m.

Set ........ 6:56 p.m. ........ 9:27 p.m. ........ 3:31 a.m. ...... 10:59 p.m. ........ 1:51 a.m. ...... 11:48 a.m.

IN THE SKY Last

New

First

Sep 2

Sep 9

Sep 16

In the sky: The brightest of the three stars in the summer triangle is called Vega. It is in Lyra the harp which looks a lot like a fish in the sky. Source: Longway Planetarium; Flint, MI

Los Angeles 85/69

Newtown Café 724 Hazle St. Ashley (570) 824-5054

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CHEESESTEAK HOAGIE WITH FRENCH FRIES & COLESLAW

20 PCS WINGS $12.00

FLAHERTY’S BAR & KITCHEN OPEN @ 3

DOMINICK’S CAFE WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

PIZZA-BUCK-A-CUT 20 School St., Hudson (570) 829-9612 or (570) 829-9658

(570)823-5199 189 Barney St., W-B

MEXICAN NIGHT Tacos (3) w/1 sauce ..$4.99 Quesadillas w/1 sauce..$5.49 Mini Tacos............$5.25 Mexican Pizza (Bar Pie) .$5.25 Mexican Pizza (6 Cut)....$6.50 Nachos El Grande........ $7.50

BLUE CHEESE & CELERY EXTRA

Corona/Corona Light bottles $3.00 - Margarita’s $4.00

CALL AHEAD FOR TAKE-OUT

COME PLAY KENO

PARKWAY DINER 2271 San Souci Pkwy. Hanover Twp. 570-735-1314 BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS BREAKFAST

PATTE’S

SPORTS BAR & RESTAURANT 65 W. Hollenback Ave., Wilkes-Barre (570) 824-8015

PATTE’S 9TH ANNUAL CAR & BIKE SHOW ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT NATHAN WELBY

2 EGGS, HOMEFRIES, TOAST W/ BACON, HAM OR SAUSAGE $5.99

NATHAN IS A 6 YEAR OLD BOY WHO IS RECEIVING TREATMENT FOR AN INOPERABLE BRAIN TUMOR AT CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA

LUNCH

REGISTRATION: $10 PER VEHICLE GIFT BASKET & GIFT CARD RAFFLE

(SERVED ALL DAY)

1/4 CHEESEBURGER DELUXE ANGUS W/FRIES AND DRINK $6.99 DINNER

BAKED MACARONI & CHEESE W/STEWED TOMATOES & ROLL $8.99 HOMEMADE PIGGIES W/MASHED POTATOES & VEGGIE $9.50 ROAST TURKEY W/ MASHED POTATOES & VEGGIE $9.50 OVEN POT ROAST W/MASHED POTATOES & VEGGIE $9.50 1 BROILED CRABCAKE W/BAKED POTATO & VEGGIE $9.99 BEER BATTERED COD W/ MACARONI & CHEESE & STEWED TOMATOES $10.99

SUNDAY, AUGUST 26TH FROM 11AM-3PM

PRIZES WILL BE DRAWN AT 2PM. DO NOT NEED TO BE PRESENT TO WIN.

TICKETS FOR SALE AT PATTE’S SPORTS BAR WEDNESDAY SPECIALS LUNCH

TURKEY CLUB JR ......................................................$7.95 CAJUN CHICKEN SALAD W/SHREDDED CHEESE..$7.95 RIGATONI W/SAUSAGE............................................. $8.95 DINNER

Atlanta 85/66

El Paso 95/75

Today City Hi/Lo/W 80/58/sh Albany Anchorage 63/54/c 85/66/s Atlanta Atlantic City 85/67/t Baltimore 87/63/sh Boston 81/65/t Buffalo 71/56/sh Cape May 84/66/t Charlotte 88/65/s Chicago 78/60/s Cincinnati 76/56/pc Cleveland 73/56/sh Columbus, OH 73/54/pc Dallas 95/75/s Denver 77/55/s Harrisburg 86/63/pc Hartford 83/61/t Honolulu 90/78/pc Las Vegas 101/81/s Los Angeles 85/69/pc Louisville 80/60/pc Miami 91/77/t Myrtle Beach 89/72/t New Orleans 92/78/s New York City 84/65/t Orlando 90/73/t Philadelphia 86/64/pc Phoenix 99/84/pc Pittsburgh 72/53/t Portland, OR 94/59/s Raleigh 88/62/pc Rochester 73/54/sh San Francisco 71/57/pc Seattle 85/56/pc State College 76/55/pc Syracuse 73/54/sh Tampa 89/77/t Washington, DC 88/65/sh Wilmington, DE 85/64/sh

STEAK NIGHT $16.95

WILD GAME BURGER NIGHT Turkey Burger Bison Burger Venison Burger Elk Burger Wild Boar Burger

Washington 88/65

Kansas City 77/61

NATIONAL CITIES

difficult thing, too, is that not everybody is big, so it makes it really difficult for especially the younger guys that haven’t hit their growth spurt or are that big and strong.” The players are on the opposite side of the fence, unlike the baseballs. “I just wish it was the old bats so it would go farther,” said Ka’olu Holt, a pitcher and third baseman for Hawaii. “(We’d get) more base hits and it would be more exciting because we’d get more hits in and it would be harder for the pitcher.”

CRISNICS IRISH PUB

New York 84/65

Miami 91/77

Shown are today’s noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Barr said. “With that said, I think it’s fantastic. I love the quality of baseball that’s being played, it forces defense, it forces small ball. It forces you as a manager to think about how to move guys over and the whole sacrifice thing.” “It’s not ‘just go up there and just go barrel the ball and flip it over the fence,’ cause that’s frankly what was happening.” Hawaii coach Gerald Oda said the change has had pros and cons. “The good thing about it is that it’s more of a defensive pitching thing, and you take out that sometimes you can just throw the bat out and (the ball) can go. With these bats it will not go,” Oda said. “The

275 ZERBY AVE., KINGSTON - 288-2967

Detroit 75/57

Houston 99/76

LITTLE LEAGUE WORLD SERIES

HAVE YOU TRIED ONE OF OUR DELICIOUS BEEF OR CHICKEN CHEESESTEAKS?? 8-10 OZ OF JUICY MEAT ON A FRESH HOAGIE ROLL, MADE YOUR WAY.

Chicago 78/60 Denver 77/55

New bats, less pop, fewer homers BY TOMMY BUTLER ASSOCIATED PRESS

Min nneapolis 81/61

San Francisco 71/57

RIVER GAUGES

Aug 26

2

84 67

Delaware Mondayy Yesterday 24-hr change Flood stage Lackawanna Monday Yesterday 24-hr change Flood stage Susquehanna Monday Yesterday 24-hr change Flood stage Tunkhannock Monday Yesterday 24-hr change Flood stage

AIR QUALITY INDEX

The presence of man-made particulates affecting aspects of human health.

NATIONAL WEATHER

MONDAY

8 OZ LOBSTER TAIL ................................................. $17.95 HALF ROASTED CHICKEN ..................................... $10.95

Thursday Hi/Lo/W 77/57/pc 58/53/sh 84/66/s 80/63/s 80/59/s 79/63/s 75/60/s 78/63/s 82/61/s 81/64/s 78/58/s 78/58/s 78/57/s 99/79/s 87/56/pc 81/61/s 79/57/s 88/77/c 102/79/s 83/68/pc 81/61/s 90/77/t 84/69/pc 91/75/pc 78/64/s 90/73/t 79/61/s 101/84/pc 74/53/s 75/57/pc 82/56/s 77/57/s 70/56/pc 70/55/pc 73/53/pc 75/56/pc 90/75/t 82/63/s 79/61/s

WORLD CITIES

Friday Hi/Lo/W 82/60/s 61/51/pc 85/68/pc 78/63/s 82/61/s 83/65/s 79/64/s 78/62/s 83/62/s 72/68/t 81/67/pc 81/66/s 80/66/pc 100/78/s 88/59/s 84/63/s 85/59/s 87/76/r 102/80/s 83/67/pc 83/71/pc 90/77/t 84/72/pc 91/76/s 82/66/s 89/74/t 83/63/s 102/83/c 78/61/s 72/54/pc 83/60/s 82/64/s 68/54/pc 71/54/c 76/59/s 80/62/s 90/76/t 84/65/s 82/62/s

Today Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Amsterdam 76/61/pc 74/56/sh 64/53/sh Athens 89/74/s 90/73/s 90/73/s Baghdad 111/81/s 110/83/s 112/85/s Beijing 85/67/c 90/67/s 89/67/s Bermuda 86/80/pc 86/79/pc 86/79/sh Buenos Aires 59/48/s 63/50/pc 56/39/r Cancun 90/76/s 89/75/t 89/76/pc Cape Town 62/49/pc 62/45/pc 68/46/s Caracas 87/73/pc 88/75/t 87/75/t Dublin 65/50/r 60/47/c 59/45/c Frankfurt 89/62/s 87/62/s 76/51/pc Geneva 85/63/pc 82/62/pc 75/54/t Hong Kong 90/82/t 90/80/t 90/81/t Istanbul 87/75/s 87/76/s 86/74/s Jerusalem 83/67/s 85/68/s 88/70/s Kabul 98/61/s 98/61/s 96/58/s London 77/61/pc 72/52/pc 65/51/c Madrid 94/66/s 93/66/pc 94/65/s Melbourne 59/41/c 62/39/pc 62/42/s Montreal 73/53/r 77/61/pc 83/63/pc Moscow 64/46/pc 67/50/s 73/51/s Mumbai 84/78/sh 85/79/sh 85/79/sh Ottawa 70/51/c 77/55/pc 83/60/c Paris 85/61/s 81/55/s 70/52/pc Rio de Janeiro 79/68/pc 84/70/s 87/71/s Riyadh 108/79/s 109/78/s 110/79/s Rome 88/69/pc 87/69/pc 86/69/s St. Thomas 90/80/sh 90/79/pc 89/79/pc San Juan 87/76/pc 89/77/pc 89/77/pc Singapore 88/80/t 89/79/c 87/79/c Stockholm 69/61/sh 75/58/pc 68/50/sh Sydney 62/48/pc 62/50/pc 61/54/pc Tehran 97/74/s 98/73/s 96/72/s Tokyo 90/79/s 86/79/pc 86/79/c Toronto 71/57/pc 79/60/pc 81/66/pc Warsaw 76/56/s 83/64/s 87/61/t Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

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WEDNESDAY NIGHT

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FREE BUS SERVICE - Lower West Side/So.W-B/Nanticoke/W. Nanticoke/Sugar Notch/Ashley Call Irene 822-4030 Between 9 a.m. & 3 p.m. Leave Name - Phone # & Message

RESV. or INFO CALL 824-2588 & Leave Message HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE - AIR CONDITIONED

Ollie’s

An American Restaurant

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West Side Mall, Edwardsville (570) 288-6609

www.OlliesRestaurant.com

WE’RE SERVING OUR BREAKFAST SPECIALS ALL DAY (7AM TIL 10PM)!!!

NUTELLA STUFFED PANCAKES WITH STRAWBERRIES $7.19 DEEP FRIED PEANUT BUTTER BANANA STUFFED FRENCH TOAST $7.59 CRAB CAKE EGGS BENEDICT WITH CHOICE OF POTATO $10.79 CROISSANT BREAKFAST SANDWICH CHOICE OF MEAT, CHOICE OF POTATO $6.50 LOADED BREAKFAST BURRITO: SCRAMBLED EGGS, $6.75 SAUSAGE, BACON, POTATO, JALAPENO, TOMATO, ONION, PEPPERJACK CHEESE.

TONIGHT! WINE & SEAFOOD NIGHT! SPECIAL TONIGHT GLASS OF WINE $3.50

Baked Haddock ..................................................$13.19 Potato Crusted Haddock.....................................$13.19 Haddock Florentine.............................................$13.39 Teriyaki Salmon ..................................................$13.69 Pecan Crusted Tilapia.........................................$12.19 Blackened Salmon..............................................$13.99

Haddock Piccata...........................................................$13.99 Broiled Scallops..................................................$14.49 Shrimp Scampi ...................................................$13.99 Broiled Seafood ..................................................$14.99 (shrimp, scallops and haddock) Stuffed Flounder .................................................$13.99 Crab Cakes.........................................................$12.79

DINNERS INCLUDE A SLICE OF HOMEMADE CAKE OR PIE. Voted the Best: Cheese Steak Buffalo Bites Hot Wings

III GUYS

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WB_VOICE/PAGES [C01] | 08/21/18

18:16 | GAYDOSKRIS

tHE CItIzEns’ VOICE

Business p

p

DOW 25,822.29 +63.60

sCrANTON

Bank to close downtown branch

Debate centers on rounding

As more people opt for digital banking over the branch office, Wells Fargo is closing its branch in downtown Scranton. The branch at 130 Wyoming Ave. is slated to close for good at noon Oct. 14. Bank customers were notified in letters sent Aug. 10, Wells Fargo spokesman James Baum said. Accounts at the closing branch will be consolidated in the one at 101 N. Main Ave. in the city, he said. No other branches in the city are closing.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — It could become the longest bull market ever ... perhaps with an asterisk. S&P Dow Jones Indices, which compiles the benchmark S&P 500 index, and other research firms say the current bull market that began on March 9, 2009, is on track to become the longest in history on Wednesday, at 3,453 days.

— JON O’CONNELL

DiCKsON CiTY

Credit union buys office building

After more than a century behind bars, the beasts on boxes of animal crackers are roaming free. Mondelez International, the parent company of Nabisco, has redesigned the packaging of its Barnum’s Animals crackers in response to pressure from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. PETA, which has been protesting the use of animals in circuses for more than 30 years, wrote a letter to Mondelez in the spring of 2016 calling for a redesign. “Given the egregious cruelty inherent in circuses that use animals and the public’s swelling opposition to the exploitation of animals used

Dairy Queen open in Abingtons

EURO $1.1574 +.0107

Other market analysts say not so fast. They say this bull market would have to run until June 2021 to set the record, claiming the longest bull market ran 4,494 days between Dec. 4, 1987, and March 24, 2000. The debate centers around whether a downturn in 1990 should be considered a bear market — generally accepted by stock market geeks to be a 20 percent decline from a previous high. It also involves the familiar mathematical concept of rounding. In 1990, the S&P 500 declined 19.92 percent from July 16 until Oct. 11. The inde-

pendent research firm CFRA says that period should be considered a bear market because the decline rounds up to 20 percent and because the market surrendered more than half of what was gained in the prior bull market, something that didn’t occur in comparable market downturns. By that reckoning, the bull market that ended on March 24, 2000, began on Oct. 11, 1990, and lasted 3,452 days — a record about to be eclipsed by the current bull market. The other side of the argument holds that the 1990 decline was just a deep “correction” — which market

watchers define as a decline of more than 10 percent but not quite a bear market — and didn’t put an end to the bull market that began in late 1987. Those in that camp also say if the 1990 decline is considered a bear market, then so should other drops of 19-plus percentage points. “We would never try to say that one 19%+ decline should be considered a bear market while another 19%+ decline shouldn’t be,” said analysts from Bespoke Investment Group, in a research note issued last week. For instance, during the

current bull market, the S&P 500 fell 19.39 percent between April 29, 2011, and Oct. 3, 2011, but that decline is not considered by S&P Dow Jones Indices to be a bear market. (To be picky, none of the other 19-plus percentage point declines going back to World War II were 19.5 percent or greater, and by traditional rules of rounding would be rounded down to 19 percent.) The Associated Press recognizes S&P Dow Jones Indices’ conclusion that the current bull market is about to become the longest of all time.

CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / ASSOCIATED PRESS

A box of Nabisco Barnum’s Animals crackers on the shelf of a local grocery store Monday in Des Moines, Iowa. for entertainment, we urge Nabisco to update its packaging in order to show animals who are free to roam in their natural habitats,” PETA said in its letter. Mondelez agreed and started working on a rede-

sign. In the meantime, the crackers’ namesake circus — Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey — folded for good. The 146-year-old circus, which had removed elephants from its shows in 2016 because of pressure from

PETA and others, closed down in May 2017 due to slow ticket sales. The redesign of the boxes, now on U.S. store shelves, retains the familiar red and yellow coloring and prominent “Barnum’s Animals”

lettering. But instead of showing the animals in cages — implying that they’re traveling in boxcars for the circus — the new boxes feature a zebra, elephant, lion, giraffe and gorilla wandering side-by-side in a grassland. The outline of acacia trees can be seen in the distance. “When PETA reached out about Barnum’s, we saw this as another great opportunity to continue to keep this brand modern and contemporary,” said Jason Levine, Mondelez’s chief marketing officer for North America, in a statement. Mondelez is based in Illinois, which passed a statewide ban on circuses with elephants that went into effect in January. More than 80 U.S. cities have fully or partially banned circuses with wild animals, according to Animal Defenders International.

As Amazon courts Atlanta, CAR OF THE DAY mayor touts ‘Gulch’ project

The new Dairy Queen Grill & Chill in South Abington Twp. is officially open. The first of its kind for Lackawanna County, the Dairy Queen at 839 Northern Boulevard held a soft opening Tuesday, and plans a grand opening at a later date. The long-awaited restaurant sells ice cream and food such as burgers, fries and salads. It was raised on the spot once home to a Friendly’s restaurant, which closed in 2012 and had been vacant ever since. Dairy Queen has an ice cream counter at the Viewmont Mall and another Grill & Chill location in Plains Twp., according to Dairy Queen’s website.

2013 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

BY Jeff MArTiN ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATLANTA — With Amazon.com expected to soon name its site for a second headquarters, Atlanta’s mayor said a colossal development planned for downtown represents a once-in-a-lifetime shot to transform the city. Amazon launched a highstakes municipal beauty pageant in January by narrowing its list of potential locations to 20 finalists, including Atlanta. The company has said it expects to declare the winner of the headquarters and its roughly 50,000 jobs by year’s end. Atlanta city council members were given a few more details Tuesday about the potential impact of developing an underused site known as “The Gulch” that could meet Amazon’s search criteria. “We are talking about thousands of jobs, potentially, that would come into this area and also the elephant in the room is that very big company that is looking at

— JON O’CONNELL

OrrViLLe, Ohio

smucker posts fiscal 1Q earnings J.M. Smucker Co. (SJM) on Tuesday reported fiscal first-quarter earnings of $133 million. The Orrville, Ohio-based company said it had net income of $1.17 per share. — assOCiatEd prEss

Stocks of Local Interest 78.81 143.79 53.91 931.75 76.04 39.41 38.59 504.96 22.75 36.20 29.57 13.56 60.14 21.71 2.53 163.02 131.62 30.43 48.89 2.66 50.89 57.47 12.80 12.02

p

GOLD 1192.60 +5.80

BY Dee-ANN DUrBiN ASSOCIATED PRESS

sOUTH ABiNGTON TWP.

161.25 175.17 74.38 1925.00 92.37 48.37 51.06 797.89 33.05 64.42 36.00 30.29 84.00 29.57 5.60 227.13 213.97 44.00 66.11 7.93 73.49 75.68 19.34 14.92

p

NATURAL GAS 2.980 +.039

PETA pushed for the change.

— JON O’CONNELL

AdvAuto AirProd Altria Amazon AmWtrWks Amerigas ArchDan AutoZone BkofAm BigLots BrkfReEn CSS Inds CVS Health CabotO&G ChesEng Cigna Cintas Comcast s CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt Dunkin EmersonEl EgyTrEq s FNBCp PA

p

CRUDE OIL 67.32 +.89

Animal crackers released from their cages

A credit union bought the Park Pointe commercial building in Dickson City for $2 million where it plans to install an administration center. Penn East Federal Credit Union bought the 24,000-square-foot building at 851 Commerce Blvd. and the attached 1.8 acres off Commerce Boulevard from Siniawa VII LP. The credit union plans to house back office departments including accounting, a call center and lending, a statement said. “We’re looking forward to streamlining departments and having a collaborative space to work together,” said Chief Executive Officer Jeff DeBree. Penn East serves customers in Lackawanna, Luzerne and Wyoming counties.

Company

p

S&P 500 2,862.96 +5.91

Longest bull market maybe

Briefs

52 Week High Low

p

NASDAQ 7,859.17 +38.17

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

$18,999 plus tax and tags

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE

A tract of land known to locals in Atlanta as ‘The Gulch’ is shown in January. the city as a place to relocate their headquarters,” Mayor Keisha Lance-Bottoms said at Tuesday’s city council meeting. Planning documents made public earlier this year revealed that Atlanta’s project could include 18 buildings with 9.3 million square feet of office space — more than three times the space in the Empire State Building. Amazon has said it needs up to 8 million square feet of office space for a second headquarters outside Seattle.

Atlanta is working with Los Angeles-based development firm CIM Group on the plans. Details of exactly how the project would be financed have yet to be worked out, city officials said Tuesday. The mayor on Tuesday sought to assure council members that affordable housing is a top priority in the city’s economic development negotiations, and that current residents will not be forced out if new development brings soaring rents and home prices.

C 250 Sport Sedan

Stock #: P7939 • 35,100 miles dicksoncityhyundai.com

1519 Scranton Carbondale Hwy. Scranton

(570) 487-5000

Tuesday, August 21, 2018 VOL (000)

Div

Yld

PE

.24 4.40 2.80f

.1 2.6 4.7 ... 2.0 9.4 2.6 ... 1.9 2.5 6.2 5.3 2.7 1.0 ... ... .8 2.1 2.3 ... 1.9 2.5 6.7 3.5

28 11891 160.15 25 8645 166.10 19 83517 59.93 cc 29962 1883.42 38 4809 88.97 33 3385 40.27 21 28625 50.74 16 1483 767.00 16 530089 31.02 15 6857 48.48 ... 1261 31.63 dd 343 14.98 13 50105 73.69 46 58582 24.50 8 171359 4.56 18 23555 186.05 36 4762 211.94 17 107426 35.74 18 2131 66.49 dd 26549 3.47 30 6232 71.69 29 24737 76.60 22 52073 18.11 14 25717 13.62

1.82 3.80 1.34 .60f 1.20 1.96 .80 2.00 .24 .04 1.62f .76 1.52f 1.39 1.94 1.22 .48

Last

YTD Chg %Chg Company -.69 -.89 -1.06 +6.71 -.39 -.48 -.03 +.14 +.15 -.23 +.15 ... -.93 +.51 +.14 -1.84 -.93 +.31 +.86 -.05 -.85 +1.06 -.07 +.13

+60.6 +1.2 -16.1 +61.0 -2.8 -12.9 +26.6 +7.8 +5.1 -13.7 -9.4 -46.2 +1.6 -14.3 +15.2 -8.4 +36.0 -10.4 +23.7 -18.5 +11.2 +9.9 +4.9 -1.4

Fastenal GenDynam GenMills Greif A HarteHk rs Hershey HomeDp IntPap J&J Snack Kemper LockhdM Lowes M&T Bk McDnlds MetLife Mondelez NBT Bcp NCI BldSy NexstarM PNC PPG s PPL Corp Pearson PennsWd

52 Week High Low 60.79 230.00 60.69 65.60 12.16 115.82 207.61 66.94 159.05 82.53 363.00 108.98 197.37 178.70 55.91 46.54 41.88 23.35 89.75 163.59 122.07 39.90 12.73 50.00

39.79 184.21 41.01 47.97 6.89 89.10 146.89 50.00 124.10 45.60 291.52 70.76 141.12 146.84 43.09 37.42 31.28 13.05 56.65 119.77 100.36 25.30 7.62 39.59

Div

Yld

PE

VOL (000)

1.60f 3.72 1.96 1.68

2.6 1.9 4.2 3.1 ... 2.9 2.1 3.6 1.2 1.2 2.5 1.9 1.8 2.5 3.6 2.4 2.4 ... 1.8 2.6 1.7 5.5 6.7 4.1

26 21 10 17 ... 22 26 17 23 24 39 22 18 24 10 22 19 17 7 13 20 13 ... 18

15565 9341 37677 689 226 9701 36584 16733 416 1501 9058 49162 8857 18739 83747 43961 976 8205 7888 14985 15832 41201 2406 35

2.89f 4.12 1.90 1.80 .96 8.00 1.92f 3.20f 4.04 1.68 1.04f 1.00 1.50 3.80f 1.92f 1.64 .80e 1.88

Last

YTD Chg %Chg Company

60.87 +.73 194.96 +.04 46.13 -1.45 53.43 +.66 6.83 -.17 101.09 -1.35 200.23 +2.30 52.37 +.37 145.30 -.31 79.40 +.45 324.39 +.17 99.74 +.77 177.08 +1.54 161.04 -.64 46.81 +.69 42.56 -.26 +.77 41.02 15.30 +.45 81.40 +2.25 145.12 +.24 111.08 +1.35 29.81 -.31 11.86 +.07 46.21 +.40

Stock Footnotes: g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. rs - Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated.

+11.3 -4.2 -22.2 -11.8 ... -10.9 +5.6 -9.6 -4.3 +15.2 +1.0 +7.3 +3.6 -6.4 -7.4 -.6 +11.5 -20.7 +4.1 +.6 -4.9 -3.7 +20.8 -.8

52 Week High Low

ProctGam Prudentl QstDiag RiteAid SLM Cp Sanofi SearsHldgs SilganHld s SwstnEngy TJX 21stCFoxB UGI Corp UPS B VerizonCm WalMart WsteMInc WeisMk WellsFargo WmsCos

94.67 127.14 116.49 2.80 12.46 50.65 9.63 31.05 6.72 101.80 49.65 55.94 135.53 55.21 109.98 91.64 57.82 66.31 33.67

Local Bank Stocks

Name DIMC FDBC FKYS FNCB

Div $1.12 $0.96 $1.08 $0.16

Last $40.60 $58.86 $26.25 $8.75

Chg -$0.90 -$0.28 $0.00 $0.00

%Chg -2.17% -0.47% 0.00% 0.00%

70.73 92.05 90.10 1.27 9.65 37.43 1.22 26.18 3.42 66.44 24.30 42.51 101.45 43.97 77.50 75.28 31.26 49.27 24.00 Name HONT LDKB NWFL PFIS

Div

Yld

PE

VOL (000)

2.87 3.60 2.00

3.4 3.6 1.8 ... ... 3.7 ... 1.5 ... 1.5 .8 1.9 3.0 4.3 2.2 2.0 2.5 2.9 4.5

22 10 21 2 16 ... dd 17 7 24 19 12 21 7 23 19 23 14 12

83233 14636 7983 121674 35075 34655 22009 4460 179666 90007 43473 6444 25861 114854 105018 14819 682 178401 125369

1.58e .40 1.56 .36 1.04 3.64 2.36 2.08f 1.85 1.20 1.72f 1.36

Div $1.64 $0.32 $0.88 $1.32

Last $106.25 $17.00 $38.26 $45.16

Last 83.90 99.67 110.63 1.44 11.69 42.88 1.23 27.50 5.50 106.46 44.84 54.84 123.01 54.91 96.08 90.88 48.42 58.96 30.52 Chg $0.00 $0.25 $0.50 -$0.24

YTD Chg %Chg +.26 +1.51 -.71 -.01 +.01 +.66 +.01 +.02 +.26 +4.81 +.05 -.74 +.46 +.26 +.08 -.29 +.84 -.07 +.10

-8.7 -13.3 +12.3 -26.9 +3.5 -.3 -65.6 -6.4 -1.4 +39.2 +31.4 +16.8 +3.2 +3.7 -2.7 +5.3 +17.0 -2.8 +.1

%Chg 0.00% 1.49% 1.32% -0.53%


WB_VOICE/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [C03] | 08/21/18

17:20 | FARRELLSHE

W E DNE SDA Y , A UG UST 22, 2018

T HE C IT IZE NS' V O IC E

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HOROSCOPE

BY EUGENIA LAST

UNITED FEATURE SYNDICATE

Aries (March 21-April 19): Take a practical approach to work and dealing with peers. Get along, regardless of what others decide to do. Taurus (April 20-May 20): Your enthusiasm cou-

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dled fairly, and the desire to build a strong relationship should be your intent. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Keep your expenses under control, and be willing to work with what you have. A change will end up grounding you. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Short trips, business meetings and unusual partnerships will all lead to an

THE PHANTOM

By Lee Falk

interesting partnership with someone who brings out the best in you. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Not everyone will agree with the choices you make. An emotional setback is apparent if you can’t get along with someone you live near. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Getting your point heard is important, but so is listening and coming up

with a plan that will satisfy the person you are with. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t trust anyone to take care of something that is important to you. A commitment you make will bring about a financial change. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A change of plans will help ease stress and give you a chance to recap

BUCKLES

FRAZZ

what’s happened and what you want to see unfold. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Dealing with hospitals or financial institutions will be stressful. Make decisions based on facts. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): The input you offer will lead to suggestions and help that will make a difference to the professional choices you are given. By David Gilbert

BABY BLUES

By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

ByJef Mallett

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FRANK & ERNEST

By Stephan Pastis

By Thaves

WUMO POOCH CAFÉ

By Wulff & Morgenthaler

By Paul Gilligan

PAJAMA DIARIES

NON SEQUITUR

By Terri Libenson

By Wiley

THE LOCKHORNS

CRYPTOQUIP

Today’s Cryptoquip Clue: A equals L

MSHA JM

C3

J

MSBV NJT

AUXXAW

XS

The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one letter stands for another. Solution is by trial and error.

MHVVWMXUBV NSS

JB

MAUFFUBV

JPFUGWG: “XGT

By Bunny Hoest and John Reiner

WORD WARP

PSNB

J

MAWBPWGBWMM.”

BRIDGE

BY PHILLIP ALDER NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION

Pierre Corneille, a French dramatist, wrote, “When we conquer without danger, our triumph is without glory.” Bridge players like to make their contracts without danger. What is South’s safest play in this deal? He is in three no-trump, and West leads a fourth-highest heart seven. South starts with seven top tricks: two spades, one heart (given trick one), two diamonds and two clubs. He

can probably get two more winners from diamonds, but must make sure that the defenders cannot cash too many hearts if they take a diamond trick. At trick one, declarer should put up dummy’s king. (He can make the contract if he plays the four, but it is wrong, risking a cold contract with a different layout.) First, suppose the king wins the trick. Then, since East is the danger hand, South leads a low diamond, and if East plays low, declarer covers with his 10. Or, if East plays an honor, declarer takes the trick, leads a

spade to dummy’s king and plays another diamond through East. Here, though, East wins trick one and returns the heart 10. Now West is the danger hand, the one with the heart winners. South ducks this trick, takes the third heart, crosses to the board with a spade and leads a diamond. When East plays the queen, declarer ducks. Or, if East plays a low diamond, South wins the trick and cashes his second high diamond, hoping that West has at most a doubleton.

Yesterday’s Cryptoquip: If you’ve sampled three different teas, what slogan might you have? “Once Lipton, twice chai.”


WB_VOICE - T150 - 1 - 08/22/18

WB_VOICE/SPECIAL_SECTION/PAGES [E01] | 08/19/18

20:22 | SCHILLINGS


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

2 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

KICKOFF 2018 ONLINE: citizensvoice.com/gameface

FacEbOOk: CV Gameface

TwITTEr: @cvgameface

CHRISToPHER DoLAN / STAFF PHoToGRAPHER

Wyoming Area junior quarterback Dominic DeLuca threw for 1,312 yards last season.

INSIDE

abOUT THE cOVEr

Team Previews Berwick .......................... 40 Coughlin ......................... 16 Crestwood ...................... 6 Dallas ............................ 20 Schedule GAR ............................... 18 Find a pull-out version of Hanover Area .................. 10 every team’s schedule at the Hazleton Area ................. 38 center of the Kickoff Edition. Holy Redeemer ............... 28 Pages 24-25 Lake-Lehman .................. 22 Meyers ........................... 14 New digs Nanticoke Area ............... 30 Northwest makes improveNorthwest ...................... 34 ments to Lewis & Miller Pittston Area .................. 12 Memorial Stadium. Page 35 Tunkhannock .................. 32 Williamsport ................... 42 rule changes Safety remains a No. 1 prior- Wyoming Area ................. 36 ity in rule changes. Page 39 Wyoming Valley West ........ 8

The three Wilkes-Barre city schools — Coughlin, GAR and Meyers — will play their final seasons as independent schools. In 2019, the three schools will merge to form one athletic program, signaling the end of a historic era in football in Northeastern Pennsylvania. This year’s cover story, found on page 3, focuses on the teams embarking on the final season. Every Friday in Gameface, we’ll highlight the legendary coaches, players, games and more. Photographed from left, Tyrone Qualls (GAR), Reese Patronick (Meyers) and Jervone Young (Coughlin). Photograph by staff photographer Christopher Dolan.

Unique approach Hanover Area learns tackling from local college rugby coach. Page 11

LFc Preview A look at the top players and teams to watch in the conference. Page 44

WB_VOICE - T150 - 2 - 08/22/18

cOMING FrIDaY

PHOTO crEDITS

Don’t miss the first edition of the weekly Gameface section in Friday’s Citizens’ Voice. It includes a look at Williamsport’s Trey Potts and analysis of every Wyoming Valley Conference game on the slate.

A special thank you to Photos by Andy, Lyons Studio, KDP, Tony Brooks Photography and Golden Photo for their contributions to the 2018 Kickoff edition of Gameface.

WB_VOICE/SPECIAL_SECTION/PAGES [E02] | 08/19/18

GaMEFacE LIVE Join beat writer Steve Bennett for a live chat at 12:30 Fridays at citizensvoice.com.

ScOrESFLaSH Register at citizensvoice.com to have final scores of every WVC football game delivered to your mobile device.

ONLINE EXTra For video and more photos, visit citizensvoice.com/gameface

A publication of The Citizens’ Voice 75 N. Washington St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 570-821-2060 sports@citizensvoice.com

17:36 | CONNORSSTE


KICKOFF 2018

CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

From left, Coughlin senior Jervone Young, GAR junior Tyrone Qualls and Meyers senior Reese Patronick. The three programs will consolidate next season.

BY STEVE BENNETT STAFF WRITER

WB_VOICE - T150 - 3 - 08/22/18

■■■

All three of the current head coaches at the city schools have deep ties to their respective programs. Coughlin’s Ciro Cinti, GAR’s Paul Wiedlich Jr. and Meyers’ Jeff Labatch all played at the schools they coach. The fact is not lost on them that they are the final head coaches at each school. “Now, as we get set to start the season, you are starting to feel it,” Cinti said. “I have been involved with Coughlin football for almost 40 years. You start to think about your own past history with it. We tried to explain to the kids that this

will be the final chapter. But at the same time, a new book will be written. We just want to do the best we can this year. This isn’t the end. It’s the beginning of something new. Another common thread Cinti, Wiedlich and Labatch share is they are preparing for a season and can’t allow the distractions of the consolidation to impact what happens on the field. “We are just taking it day by day,” Labatch said. “We just want to enjoy everything. We just want to enjoy every single day to the fullest. We are going to be welcoming back any alumni who would like to come back and talk to the team.” Wiedlich compared the rumors of the consolidation to getting a sick feeling in his stomach. “Once we started to hear the rumblings, I kind of equated it to knowing a family member or close friend to you is sick,” Wiedlich said.

WB_VOICE/SPECIAL_SECTION/PAGES [E03] | 08/19/18

Please see MERGER, Page 46

17:38 | CONNORSSTE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 3

The cap is off the pen. The book on the Coughlin, Meyers and GAR football programs is open. It’s time to write the final chapter for the three WilkesBarre city schools. The 2018 football season will be the last for the Crusaders, Mohawks and Grenadiers. Next season at this time, the three schools will be playing as one. The consolidation became reality in May when the Wilkes-Barre Area school board voted to merge the athletic programs for the 2019 season. Over the next 10 weeks, stories will be told, memories will be sparked and certainly a few tears will be shed. The history is well documented. Coughlin played its first season in 1892 and finished 2-0. GAR, under head coach Joe McCracken, went 2-5 in 1926, while Meyers finished its inaugural season in 1930 3-3 under head coach Steve Emmanuel.

Along the way, there have been some big games, some big names, some great years and some down years. There have been numerous conference championships won, district titles earned and trips to the state playoffs. The schools have seen former players move on to play at the collegiate level and several played professionally in the NFL.

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

SWAN SONG

Coughlin, GAR, Meyers set for final season before programs consolidate


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

4 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

RADIO / TV ESPN RADIO Aug. 24: Scranton Prep at Dunmore, 7 Aug. 31: Scranton Prep at Scranton, 7 Sept. 7: Valley View at West Scranton, 7 Sept. 8: Abington Heights at Scranton Prep, 2:30 Sept. 14: Scranton Prep at Valley View, 7 Sept. 21: Dunmore at Riverside, 7 Sept. 22: West Scranton at Scranton Prep, 1 Sept. 28: Old Forge at Dunmore, 7 Sept. 29: North Pocono at Scranton Prep, 1 Oct. 5: Scranton Prep at Honesdale, 7 Oct. 12: Scranton Prep at Pittston Area, 7 Oct. 19: Abington Heights at West Scranton, 7 Oct. 20: Lakeland at Scranton Prep, 1 Oct. 26: Scranton Prep at Western Wayne, 7 MAX 102.3 FM Aug. 24: Meyers at Riverside, 6:55 Aug. 31: Dallas at Crestwood, 6:55 Sept. 7: Scranton at North Pocono, 6:55 Sept. 14: Scranton Prep at Valley View, 6:55 Sept. 21: Valley West at Dallas, 6:55 Sept. 22: Pittston Area at Coughlin, 6:55 Sept. 28: Wyoming Area at Lake-Lehman, 6:55

Sept. 29: North Pocono at Scranton Prep, 1:25 Oct. 5: Meyers at Wyoming Area, 6:55 Oct. 12: Riverside at Old Forge, 6:55 Oct. 19: Dunmore at Western Wayne, 6:55 Oct. 26: Wyoming Area at Pittston Area, 6:55

Sept. 7: Selinsgrove at Southern Columbia, 7 Sept. 14: Loyalsock at Bloomsburg, 7 Sept. 21: Southern Columbia at Central Columbia, 7 Sept. 28: Central Columbia at Danville, 7 Oct. 5: Warrior Run at Bloomsburg, 7 Oct. 12: Danville at Shamokin, 7 Oct. 19: Selinsgrove at Danville, 7 Oct. 26: Bloomsburg at Central Columbia, 7

Sept. 15: Old Forge at Holy Redeemer, 7 Sept. 21: Meyers at Hanover Area, 7 Sept. 22: Pittston Area at Coughlin, 7 Sept. 28: Susquehanna at Meyers, 7 Sept. 29: Nanticoke Area at Crestwood, 7 Oct. 5: Valley West at WHLM FM 94.7, Coughlin, 7 104.3, 105.5 Oct. 12: Lake-Lehman at GAR, 7 6 p.m.: The Coach ShepOct. 13: Wyoming Area at tock Show Holy Redeemer, 1 Aug. 24: Abington Heights Oct. 13: Mid Valley at Meyat Berwick, 6:30 SERVICE ELECTRIC ers, 7 Aug. 31: Pittston Area at CHANNEL 2 Oct. 18: Meyers at Holy Berwick, 6:30 Redeemer, 7 Sept. 7: Berwick at WilliamAug. 24: Crestwood at Oct. 19: Pittston Area at sport, 6:30 Coughlin, 7 Crestwood, 7 Sept. 14: Berwick at Valley Aug. 25: Holy Cross at Oct. 20: Nanticoke Area at West, 6:30 Holy Redeemer, 7 Sept. 21: Berwick at SelinAug. 30: Holy Redeemer at GAR, 7 Oct. 26: Berwick at Coughsgrove, 6:30 GAR, 7 lin, 7 Sept. 28: Valley View at Aug. 31: Lake-Lehman at Oct. 27: GAR at Meyers, 3 Berwick, 6:30 Hanover Area, 7 Oct. 5: Berwick at Hazleton Sept. 7: Crestwood at ValWYLN Area, 6:30 ley West, 7 Oct. 12: Crestwood at BerSept. 14: Berwick at Valley Aug. 24: Pottsville at wick, 6:30 West, 7 Hazleton Area, 7 Oct. 19: Dallas at Berwick, 6:30 Oct. 26: Berwick at Coughlin, 6:30 WHLM 930 AM 6 p.m.: The Friday Football Commute (Every Friday) Aug. 24: Central Columbia at Mount Carmel, 7 Aug. 31: Southern Columbia at Mount Carmel, 7 Sept. 1: Bucktail Area at Columbia Montour Vo-Tech, 1

Aug. 31: Valley West at Hazleton Area, 7 Sept. 7: Holy Redeemer at Mahanoy Area Sept. 14: Williamsport at Hazleton Area, 7 Sept. 21: Williamsport at Crestwood, 7 Sept. 28: Valley View at Berwick, 7 Oct. 5: Berwick at Hazleton Area, 7 Oct. 12: Crestwood at Berwick, 7 Oct. 19: Hazleton Area at Coughlin, 7 Oct. 26: Crestwood at Hazleton Area, 7 WQMY Aug. 24: Scranton Prep at Dunmore, 7 Aug. 31: Danville at Loyalsock, 7 Sept. 7: Hazleton Area at Dallas, 7 Sept. 14: Shikellamy at Selinsgrove, 7 Sept. 21: Williamsport at Crestwood, 7 Sept. 28: Valley View at

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T HE C IT IZE NS' V O IC E

W E DNE SDA Y , A UG UST 22, 2018 5

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

6 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

CRESTWOOD EnrollmEnt: Class 4A

nicknamE: Comets

HomEfiEld: Crestwood High School Stadium

tHE coacH Greg Myers 13th season at Crestwood 79-72

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 29 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent at Coughlin Dallas at Valley West Pottsville Williamsport Nanticoke Area at Tunkhannock at Berwick Pittston Area at Hazleton Area

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn With the addition of two teams, the Comets have significantly upgraded their schedule from the last twoyear cycle. Gone are Hanover Area and Wyoming Area. Added are Dallas and Williamsport. The Comets have a stretch of three consecutive weeks where they play at home.

2017 rESUltS Opponent at Pittston Area Wyoming Area Coughlin at Berwick at Pottsville Nanticoke Area at Tunkhannock at Hanover Area Valley West Hazleton Area at Valley View Record: 5-6

Score W, 34-15 W, 21-18 L, 27-14 L, 56-0 L, 13-7 W, 35-7 W, 42-18 W, 42-7 L, 39-7 L, 35-0 L, 51-0

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Garrett Swank 604 yards Chase Passman 414 yards Rushing Nick Grosek 558 yards Pat Rother 553 yards Garrett Swank 126 yards Receiving Brandon Niemenski 194 yds

crestwood seniors Sean foley, left, and chase Passman CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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CRESTWOOD

CESARIO

GROSEK

NIEMENSKI

SWANK

ROSTER

CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Crestwood captains for the 2018 season, from left, Patrick Rother, Chase Passman and Adam Gegaris.

SCOUTING THE COMETS WELCOME BACK

YOUTH IS SERVED

PLAYER TO WATCH Senior quarterback/defensive back Chase Passman returns this season and is looking to stay on the field. Last year, he suffered a seasonending injury in Week 4 against Ber-

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Offensive line The center is Tyler Cesario. The guards are John Schuler and Derek Petrochko. The tackles are Sean Foley and Kevin Frisbie. Curry and Adam Gegaris are the tight ends. The fullbacks are cross-trained to play tight end, as well.

Defensive line Garrett Swank. After Passman The ends are Gegaris, Foley and went down with an injury in Week Cesario. The tackles are Frisbie, Pet4 last season, Swank took over and rochko and Trevor Kinney. threw for 521 yards and seven Linebackers touchdowns. Arnold, Harding, Hawley and CurRunning backs ry are the linebackers. The Comets are set up pretty well Secondary here. Nick Grosek, Patrick Rother, Grosek, Petrosky and Swank are Logan Arnold and Jimmy Hawley are the running backs. Ryan Hard- the corners. Rother, Passman and ing, Jimmy Curry and Arnold are Niemenski are the safeties. the fullbacks. Grosek led the team Special teams POSITION-BY-POSITION last year with 558 yards rushing. BREAKDOWN Swank and Frisbie are the kickers. Rother was second with 553. They Swank kicked 26 extra points last combined for 12 touchdowns. Quarterbacks year. The punters are Rob Figmic Jr. Wide receivers Passman is the starter. The and Chris Kremski. — Steve Bennett backups are Ryan Petrosky and Brandon Niemenski, who caught wick. Passman recovered from the injury early in the winter and was able to play lacrosse in the spring. By the time he was able to devote his time to football, he was deemed 100 percent and ready to go. He was able to participate in every phase of Crestwood’s offseason workouts leading up to the beginning of camp. When healthy, Passman is a player to watch. Prior to the injury, he threw for 414 yards and rushed for 93.

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Yr Jr Jr So Jr Jr Jr Sr Sr So So Sr Sr Sr Sr So So Sr Fr Jr Sr So So So Sr So So So Sr Jr Sr Fr Sr Fr Sr Sr So So Jr Fr Jr Sr Fr Sr Fr Fr So Sr Sr Fr Fr So Fr Fr

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 7

Another interesting position on the field is linebacker, where the Comets could start three sophomores. While that will be a challenge within itself, Myers is excited about the group. They are athletic and physical, but still need to grasp the system. One of the three, Logan Arnold, did see time last year as a freshman.

After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Comets. There is plenty of reason for optimism surrounding the Comets. If Passman returns to his projected form, he gives the Comets a true dual-threat quarterback that understands the system. Niemenski will be fun to watch at wide receiver. His height alone making him a difficult cover for any team’s corners. There is experience at running back with the top two rushers back. The big question mark will be on the defensive side of the ball. The Comets will be young at linebacker. As is the case every year with the Comets, they will be a fundamentally sound football team that will capitalize on the other team’s mistakes. Limiting their own mistakes will be critical in just how good a team this will be.

18 passes last season, returns. At 6-foot-6, he creates matchup problems for the defense. Petrosky, Swank and Brendan DeMarzo will also see time.

Name Brandon Niemenski Garrett Swank Ryan Petrosky TJ Kulak Ryan Miller Zach Baranousky Patrick Rother Eric Biddinger Justin McCue Brendan DeMarzo Rob Figmic Jr. Chase Passman Gerald Riley Chris Kremski Kyle Novak Andy Sodergren Adam Gegaris Brandon Therriault Sam Taney Jimmy Curry Ryan Harding Matt Dean Rob Spaide Nick Grosek Jimmy Hawley Logan Arnold Luke Gillen Jake Smith Dylan Horn Derek Petrochko Jayden Homa Anthony Poyer Joey Frisbie Trevor Kinney Adam Gegaris John Schuler Cody Konschnik Tyler Cesario Josh Snyder Mike Phillips Zach Kline Andrew Hischak Sean Foley Zach Snyder Bret Phillips Jeremy Buzak Kevin Frisbie Nathan Gower Evan Fey Chase Pugh Nephi Crawford John Bonar Jordan Tucker

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

Injuries derailed Crestwood’s plans last year, forcing head coach Greg Myers to adjust on the fly. What Myers is interested in finding out is how well the injured players bounce back, and how much players who took time away or are just coming out for the team for the first time fit in to the scheme of things. The Comets had 54 players on the roster heading into camp. Naturally, some will drop off, but that is a pretty solid number to start with.

BENNETT’S VIEW

No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 24 26 34 36 37 38 40 42 44 45 46 50 51 52 54 55 58 60 61 62 63 64 68 70 71 72 74 75 77 78 79 80 81 86 87 88


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

8 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

VALLEY WEST EnrollmEnt: Class 5A

nicknamE: Spartans

HomEfiEld: Spartan Stadium

tHE coacH Pat Keating 10th season 76-30

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 13 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent Scranton at Hazleton Area Crestwood Berwick at Dallas Wallenpaupack at Coughlin at Ab. Heights (1:30) at Delaware Valley Williamsport

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Keating is not shy when it comes to the 2018 schedule. In fact, he’s confident in saying it’s the toughest in all of District 2. The Spartans open up at home with Scranton, then travel to Hazleton Area. The final three weeks see road trips to Abington Heights and Delaware Valley in consecutive weeks before closing the regular season at home with Williamsport.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score at Scranton L, 58-48 Hazleton Area L, 17-15 Delaware Valley L, 35-25 at Williamsport W, 48-34 Dallas L, 31-18 at Wallenpaupack L, 28-21 Abington Heights W, 38-7 at Berwick L, 44-22 at Crestwood W, 39-7 Coughlin W, 42-0 Abington Heights W, 63-14 at Wallenpaupack W, 35-7 at Whitehall W, 32-21 vs. Arch. Wood L, 41-14 Record: 7-7

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Jake Shusta Rushing Jayden Watkins Carson Canavan Receiving Carson Canavan

981 yards 73 yards 69 yards 11 yards

Valley West senior Jake Shusta CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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VALLEY WEST scoUtinG the spartans GrowinG pains

bennett’s View

This will be one of the youngest Valley West teams in Pat Keating’s time as the head coach. He expects to have several sophomores and juniors on the field this year. This group of seniors is not very big, and the end result will be a young team that will be feeling its way through the season. Four players from last year’s team were penciled into the lineup this year, but for various reasons, they are no longer with the team. Ke at i n g d o e s l i ke t h e younger players in the program and sees potential in the group.

not too deep Valley West is considered to be one of the bigger schools in the WVC, but the Spartans are battling the same issues most other teams are — a small roster. With that in mind, depth is a concern. Coaches always say that one or two injuries can really damage a season, and that looks like it could be the case for Valley West this year. The biggest key for Valley West this year will be staying healthy so the depth does not need to be tested.

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last year, while Canavan h a d 1 1 c a r r i e s fo r 6 9 . Woods averaged 6.0 yards Jake Shusta was pressed per carry, but only rushed into early duty last year and the ball eight times. appeared in 13 games, severwide receivers al of them starts. He completBaranski, Nah-Syr Garner, ed 59.1 percent of his passes for 981 yards and seven Jeremiah Williams, Dylan touchdowns. Baranski is also Nastanski and Rhodes will expected to see time here. form a retooled receiving Donte Rhodes rounds out the group this season. None of the five on the depth chart depth chart. registered a catch last searunning backs son. With the top four rushoffensive line ers from last year gone, the Dylan Brown and Nate Spartans will be looking to find their new featured Mooney are the centers. The back. Carson Canavan, guards are Dave Wildey and Jayden Watkins and Dari- Connor Mikovitch. Breanus Redguard will be the don Tirado and Donald running backs. Brendan Messersmith are the tackWoods, Zach McDaniels les. The tight ends are and Jonathan Stochla are Baranski, Woods and Harut h e f u l l b a c k s . O f t h e nah Jallow.

Quarterbacks

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defensive line Jallow, Stochla and Seth Decker are the ends. The tackles are Mikovitch, Wildey, Messersmith, Tirado and Elijah Cropp.

linebackers Watkins, McDaniels and Redguard are the outside linebackers. Playing inside are Woods, Canavan, Stochla and Norah Anderscavage.

secondary Gar ner, Williams and Rhodes are the corners. The safeties are Baranski, Nastanski and Saquan Portee.

special teams Adam Sivak and Nate Naugle, two soccer players at the school, are the kickers. Baranski is the punter. — Steve Bennett

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roster No 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 21 22 24 25 26 28 33 34 35 42 44 50 52 53 54 55 56 58 61 62 64 66 69 73 74 77 78 79 88 89 93 92 95

Name Ht/Wt Harunah Jallow 6-2/220 Nah-Syr Garner 5-11/170 Nathan Shovlin 6-2/180 Jerimiah Williams 5-9/150 Darius Redguard 5-10/190 Nate Baranski 6-2/215 Dominick Barofski 5-8/150 Dylan Nastanski 5-9/170 Josh Kennedy 5-7/150 Adam Sivak 5-10/175 Josh Koval 5-9/160 Dylan Walko 5-10/170 Dontae Rhodes 5-10/170 Jake Shusta 6-0/180 Quaid Braddy 5-10/200 Zack Tomascik 5-9/150 Aziz Martin 5-10/170 Luis Rivera 5-9/170 Zack McDaniels 5-10/185 Jayden Watkins 5-9/160 Nate Naugle 6-0/150 Jonathan Stochla 6-0/210 Jarrett Kasarda 5-8/160 Brendan Woods 5-11/200 Carson Canavan 5-10/190 Chad Creasing 6-0/200 Connor Mikovitch 5-10/260 Gerard Davis 5-10/280 Mark Raskiewicz 5-10/210 Nate Mooney 5-9/240 Anthony Bottaro 5-9/260 Noah Anderscavage 5-10/180 Dylan Brown 6-1/250 Logan Strickland 5-11/290 Dave Wildey 6-1/215 Elijah Cropp 6-0/270 Tyler Femea 5-10/280 Brandon Tirado 6-1/305 Aiden Golightly 5-9/240 Donald Messersmith 6-1/295 Erik Massaker 6-1/260 Jamir Murphy 6-0/220 Jorge Pina 6-2/215 Seth Decker 6-0/200 Jalen Cropp 6-0/185 Joe Malloy 5-11/180 Jordan Evans 6-1/190

Pos Yr TE/DE Sr WR/DB So WR/DB Sr WR/DB So RB/LB So WR/DB Sr RB/LB So WR/DB Jr WR/DB Jr K Sr RB/LB Fr RB/LB Sr QB/DB So QB/LB Sr RB/LB Sr RB/LB Fr RB/LB Jr RB/LB Jr RB/LB Jr RB/LB Sr K Sr RB/DE So RB/LB So RB/LB Jr RB/LB Sr OL/DE Sr G/DT Sr T/DT Jr G/DE Fr C/DT Jr G/DT Sr G/LB So C/DT Sr T/DT Jr G/DE Sr G/DT So T/DT Fr T/DT Jr C/DT Fr T/DT Jr T/DT Fr T/DT Jr TE/DE Sr TE/DE Sr DE Sr TE/DE So TE/DE Jr

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 9

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position-by-position returning backs, Watkins had 15 carries for 73 yards breakdown

baranski

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

Senior Nate Baranski was brought up to the varsity as a freshman, but left the program for two seasons to focus on baseball. He returns to the team this year and will be used in a variety of ways. Keating referred to Baranski as a player who can and will play several positions. He’s expected to see time at quarterback, receiver and tight end. Defensively, he will settle in at safety.

Valley West running backs, first row, from left, Quaid Braddy, Darius Redguard, Carson Canavan, Brendan Woods and Luis Rivera. Second row, Jayden Watkins, Jarrett Kasarda, Josh Koval, Jonathan Stochla, Zack McDaniels and Zack Tomascik.

After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Spartans. The No. 1 goal is to stay healthy. But let’s face it: When it comes to roster size, Valley West isn’t what Valley West used to be. The Spartans aren’t sending 65 to 70 players out of the tunnel. The Spartans are now on the same level as a lot of the other teams in the WVC, and in some cases will have smaller numbers than several of their opponents. There will be big plays made as well as several mistakes. It will ultimately be all about how the Spartans respond to those mistakes. Last season, particularly early on, when the Spartans made a mistake, it usually led to another, and another one after that. With this group, the key term is going to be patience. The quarterbacks will be working with a fresh set of receivers with little to no varsity experience. The running backs, though they did receive some carries last year, will see their roles increase. But as the Spartans proved last year, it’s not how you start, but how you finish. Don’t forget, Valley West began the year 0-3 and at one point was 1-5. The Spartans eventually caught fire and won the District 2 and subregional championship before being eliminated in the state playoffs by Archbishop Wood. If anything, this will be a fun group to watch develop, and should be a much better team at the end of the year than it will be at the beginning.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

10 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

HANOVER AREA EnrollmEnt: Class 3A

nicknamE: Hawkeyes

HomEfiEld: Joe Gayewski Memorial Stadium

tHE coacH Mike McCree 4th season 6-24

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 29 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent at Athens Lake-Lehman at GAR Riverside Meyers at Holy Redeemer Northwest Lackawanna Trail at Wyoming Area at Nanticoke Area

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn The Hawks open and close the season playing up in classification with the season opener at Athens and the finale against rival Nanticoke Area. In between, the Hawks will see traditional Class A power Lackawanna Trail and WVC Class 3A favorite Wyoming Area. Hanover Area will be tested out of the gate with the first three games on the road.

2017 rESUltS Opponent at Old Forge at Blue Mountain Meyers Mid Valley at Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Area Northwest Crestwood at GAR Nanticoke Area Record: 0-10

Score L, 44-0 L, 40-0 L, 21-12 L, 40-15 L, 28-14 L, 54-14 L, 55-22 L, 42-7 L, 30-13 L, 44-0

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Aaron Hummer 730 yards Rushing Hunter Karpovich 55 yards Connor Hummer 5 yards Joseph Curcio 5 yards Receiving Connor Quaglia 82 yards Bobby Sabecky 19 yards

Hanover area seniors matt Beecham, left, and Justin kopko CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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HANOVER AREA SCOUTING THE HAWKEYES CUlTURE ClUb Hanover Area enters the season looking to find its identity. The 2017 season started off on the wrong foot when only 22 players were dressed for the team’s scrimmage because of some suspensions. Head coach Mike McCree has addressed those issues and isn’t expecting a repeat performance. While other teams are setting goals and thinking of a trip to the district championship game, McCree’s goal this year is to focus on the season opener and win that game. Should the Hawks be able to do that, they will snap a 15-game losing streak that dates back to the 2016 season. The Hawks have showed an improved attitude that began when the offseason weight lifting program started. McCree is expecting that attitude to carry over into the regular season.

NOT WHAT YOU THINK IT mEANS

ditional sense. At Hanover Area, RPO means run power offense, notrunpassoption. With an offensive line that averages 270 pounds, there is no need for the Hawks to spread teams out and get caught up in all the fancy shifts. This team should be able to line up and take the ball to the defense. With a goal to be more physical than last year, the Hawks certainly are capable of doing that.

PlAYER TO WATCH McCree had high expectations for Joe Curcio last year despite him only being a freshman. An early injury removed him from the mix, and this year he’s looking to make an impact on the offensive side of the ball. As long as he remains on the field, Curcio is the type of athlete the Hawks will need on both sides of the ball. He can play QB, wideout and RB.

POSITION-bY-POSITION bREAKdOWN Quarterbacks

The term RPO was a hot topic across all levels of football last Aaron Hummer, who startseason. The Hawks are talking ed nine games last year as a RPO this year, but not in the tra- junior, returns. Curcio is also

back. Last year, Hummer com- Beecham. Two others in the pleted 42.5 of his passes for 730 mix at that spot are Tavon yards and two touchdowns. Hines and LJ Ralston. The tackles are Mike Mieldazis, Jacob Running backs Mercandante, Charles Stewart James McCabe, Cameron and Dereck Knorr. The tight Holeman, Memphis Metcalf, ends are Connor Hummer, Jace Pete Hibbard and Manny Sal- Andrews and Nick Gagliardi. dana are the running backs. defensive line The fullbacks are Justin SteHoleman, Mercandante, fanowicz and Hunter Karpovich. Of the group, Karpovich Gagliardi and Victor Vega are has the most experience with the defensive ends. At tackle 10 carries for 55 yards in 2017. are Beecham, Kopko, MieldaSaldana, a transfer from Nan- zis, Jay Piatt and Halenda. ticoke Area, is a nice upgrade linebackers after averaging 6.5 yards per Insider linebackers are Stecarry on 36 attempts last year. fanowicz, Connor Hummer and Wide receivers Karpovich. Outside linebackers Curcio will play wideout are Curcio, Aaron Hummer, when he’s not at quarterback. Andrews and Sean Cavanaugh. Other receivers are Connor Secondary Quaglia, Jared Kishbaugh, McCabe and Sabecky are the Bobby Sabecky and Tanner Bednarski. None of the receiv- free safeties. The corners are ers on the depth chart caught a Noah Jacobs, Saldana, Quaglia, Bednarski and Matt Salwoski. touchdown pass last year.

Offensive line

Special teams

The centers are Zach HalenAuggie George, who kicked da and Seth Strouse. The seven extra points and two guards are Justin Kopko, who field goals, is the kicker. Kishhas given a verbal commitment baugh is the punter. — Steve Bennett to Army West Point, and Matt

Hawks learn some skills from King’s rugby coach bY STEVE bENNETT STAFF WRITER

KARPOVICH

HAlENdA

ROSTER No 1 2 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 14 17 20 22 24 25 30 32 33

Name Gerald Johnson Auggie George Bobby Sabecky Memphis Metcalf Aaron Hummer Nick Gagliardi Connor Quaglia Noah Jacobs Tanner Bednarski Matthew Salwoski Hunter Karpovich Jared Kishbaugh Joseph Curcio Peter Hibard Sean Cavanaugh James McCabe Austin Stefanowicz Christian Buckly Connor Hummer

Ht/Wt 5-9/155 5-11/175 5-9/140 6-1/205 5-11/185 6-1/200 5-9/145 6-1/160 5-10/150 6-0/170 5-10/185 6-1/155 6-1/195 5-8/150 5-10/170 5-9/155 5-10/215 5-10/135 6-2/220

Pos Yr WR/DB Sr K/P/QB Jr WR/DB So RB/OLB Jr QB/OLB Sr WR/DE So WR/DB Sr WR/DB So WR/DB Jr QB/DB Jr FB/LB So WR/DB Sr QB/DB So RB/DB So FB/OLB Jr RB/DB Sr FB/LB Jr RB/DB Sr TE/LB So

34 36 44 47 56 60 64 65 66 72 74 75 76 77 80 81 82 85 88

Manny Saldana Cameron Holeman Tavon Hines Jace Andrews Anthony Palermo Michael Kocher Seth Strouse Charles Steward Dereck Knorr Zachary Halenda Michael Mieldazis Justin Kopko Matthew Beecham Jacob Mercandante Tyler Jacobs Justice Sheckler Michael Jordan LJ Ralston Christian Rich

6-1/145 5-10/245 5-10/195 5-11/175 5-9/235 5-10/205 5-10/205 6-1/205 5-10/300 5-9/245 6-3/285 6-4/315 6-2/290 6-3/225 5-8/145 5-8/138 5-9/155 5-10/175 5-8/140

RB/DB Jr RB/DE Sr TE/OL Jr TE/OLB Jr OL/DL So OL/DL So OL/DL So OL/DE So OL/DL So OL/DL Jr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Sr OL/DE So RB/DB Fr WR/DB Jr WR/DB Fr TE/DE So WR/DB Sr

bENNETT’S VIEW After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Hawkeyes. Let’s face it, nobody likes to go through a season without a win. But that is what happened to the Hawks last year. The last time Hanover Area went 0-10 was in 2012. The following season, the team bounced back to win four games. Coach McCree is looking for an even bigger turnaround this year. But in order for that to happen, a few things have to go Hanover Area’s way. The biggest priority will be for the offensive line to play up to its capabilities. With a front that averages 270 pounds, the Hawks should be able to run the ball. The line will have to play physical. Size on a roster looks nice and all, but if this group can’t go out and push people around, then there will be problems. The Hawks averaged 3.8 yards per carry last season, and that number needs improve drastically this year. The second thing is better tackling. The third is to just let the coaches do their job. Too much outside noise is never a good thing for a high school football team. If Hanover Area can truly be the physical team it hopes it can be, then good things can happen. If not, this is a team that has the potential to struggle again.

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“I told the Hanover Area players on the first day I know nothing about football,” Kretzschmar said. “I taught them rugby tackling as if they were rugby players. We went with no pads and no helmets. I coached them for 30 minutes as if they were rugby players. We just started from the ground up. I told them there were two rules. You always want to hit with shoulders, and the head always goes to the outside. You have to wrap up in rugby. If not, it could be a penalty or lead to ejection.” Kretzschmar also worked with hand positioning and how to wrap up. “The rest is just basic tackling angles,” Kretzschmar said. “Narrowing down the space between the ball carrier and making dominant tackles against bigger guys. Just some universal things.” While Kretzschmar hopes the Hawks will take his ideas and employ them this season, he saw the Hawks were enthusiastic about what he was teaching and the game of rugby. “We are in the planning stages of starting high school rugby in the area,” Kretzschmar said. “It will be open to any high school team. It’s usually played in the spring, so it won’t interfere with football. I hope to attract local football players. ... It all came from working with Hanover Area.”

A. HUmmER

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

Mike McCree is all about bringing a unique perspective to the game. He called on Shakir Soto and Greg Skrepenak to speak to the team during offseason workouts and broke up the dog days of summer with a new approach to tackling. After the team went 0-10 last season, McCree took it upon himself to make the Hawks better tacklers. Rather than making his team sit throughendlessvideos,McCreebroughtin a local coach to offer hands-on demonstrations. But this wasn’t a traditional football coach. McCree sought the services of King’s College rugby club coach Dr. Jan Kretzschmar, who founded the organization in 2015. Kretzschmar grew up in Germany and came to the United States 10 years ago. He did not begin watching football as we know until he came to the United States. He was aware of the game, but had no connection to it. “Coach McCree reached out to me and asked if I would be interested in collaborating with his football team in regards to teaching rugby tackling,” said Kretzschmar, who played college rugby at Temple. “He asked if any players would be

interested. I figured it may as well be me.” In fact, the first collegiate football game played in 1869 between Princeton and Rutgers was more rugby than it was traditional American football. “It was not until later that they introduced the forward pass, downs and a line of scrimmage that rugby in the United States turned into American football,” Kretzschmar said. McCree got the idea of bringing in a rugby coach after attending the MidAtlantic Football Coaches Clinic at Mohegan Sun Pocono in March. McCree attended a presentation by Army West Point assistant coach John Loose. “Coach Loose did a good presentation about keeping the head out of tackling,” McCree said. “That is when I decided to reach out to coach Kretzschmar.” Kretzschmar said the biggest difference between rugby and football is visually. There are no helmets, pads, or downs of possession in rugby. Possession in rugby is retained until the ball is turned over. Every play in rugby, the ball can be turned over, and the clock never stops. Play continues until there is an infringement. Tackles in rugby can be made from behind, the blind side and from the front.

CURCIO


W E DNE SDA Y , A UG UST 22, 2018

12 T HE C IT IZE NS' V O IC E

PITTSTON AREA EnrollmEnt: Class 4A

nicknamE: Patriots

HomEfiEld: Charley Trippi Stadium

tHE coacH Nick Barbieri Second season 6-5

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 22 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent at Nanticoke Area at Berwick Tunkhannock Dallas at Coughlin at West Scranton Williamsport Scranton Prep at Crestwood Wyoming Area

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Gone are Abington Heights, Valley View and GAR. In comes West Scranton, Scranton Prep and Williamsport. The schedule is challenging, but it gives the Patriots a good gauge on just where they are. The Patriots close out the regular season with the rivalry game against Wyoming Area.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Crestwood at Tunkhannock at Dallas at Valley View GAR at Abington Hts. Berwick Nanticoke Area Coughlin at Wyoming Area at North Pocono Record: 6-5

Score L, 34-15 W, 36-20 L, 38-7 L, 58-20 W, 35-13 W, 51-14 L, 36-0 W, 46-21 W, 21-14 W, 24-21 L, 48-15

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Rushing Dylan Lukachko 131 yards Franny George 49 yards Receiving Andrew Krawczyk 301 yards Brian Giambra 225 yards

Pittston area seniors John delucca, left, and anthony Gorey CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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PITTSTON AREA SCOUTING THE PATRIOTS TIME TO SHINE As Nick Barbieri enters his second season as head coach at Pittston Area, he’ll be doing so needing to replace 19 seniors. That is a difficult task. Barbieri is taking a positive approach to the situation. He’s thrilled with his skill position players, many of who played key roles last season. But there are other spots on the field that will have question marks. Quarterback is one of them. The Patriots are most experienced up front where they return three of the five players who played last year. CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Depth on the line is one of Seniors on Pittston Area, first row, from left, Ryan Winters, Billy Kyttle, Alysha Smigiel, Luchia Carabetta, Aaron the questions that will need Ladd, Nate Wesnak and Seth Sylvester. Second row, from left, are Josh Christ, Ed Galonis, Seth Johnson, Mike to be answered quickly.

HOLd ON TO wHAT yOU GOT The Patriots finished the 2017 season 6-5 overall, and 6-4 in the regular season. In two of those regular-season losses to Berwick and Valley View, the Patriots were outmatched. The other two losses could have gone either way, but thanks to mistakes and turnovers, the Patriots found themselves on the losing end. In the four regular season losses, the Patriots turned the ball over four or more times. That is something Barbieri worked on during the offseason and will continue to do so as the season progresses. Senior of fensive and defensive tackle Riley Brody came out last year as a firstyear player and worked hard enough to earn a starting job. Barbieri said college coaches are intrigued by Brody’s potential. Since he

was new to it all last year, the learning curve was a steep one. But with a lot of hard work, Brody developed into a player to certainly keep an eye on this year. At 6-foot-3, 225 pounds, Brody has room to grow. His frame alone has people raving about his potential.

POSITION-by-POSITION bREAKdOwN Quarterbacks

bENNETT’S VIEw After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Patriots. The ever burning hot seat that seems to be the Pittston Area football job was put on ice last year after Barbieri led the Patriots to the postseason for the first time since 2008. Now, the Patriots are looking to take that next step. The program is certainly heading in the right direction and is in good hands. The team learned a valuable lesson last year, and that was it can go out on a Friday night and compete with the teams on their schedule. The team knocked off Wyoming Area and made it to the postseason. The next step will be to win a playoff game. While the numbers are a little thin in the sophomore class, the numbers are pretty steady elsewhere. Coach Barbieri is looking to build a program, and much like his team, he is headed in the right direction.

Mike Nocito, last year’s backup, looks ready to take over as the starter. Also in the mix are Alex Anastasi and PJ Pisano. Nocito attempted five passes last downs. George had one carry 225 yards. Haas and Higgins year. for 49 yards, while Coe had provide depth at a position one carry for 5 yards. that will be a strength of the Running backs offense this year. wide receivers Dylan Lukachko, Jordan Offensive line O’Boyle and Franny George Andrew Krawczyk, Bryan Ed Galonis is the center. are the running backs. Mike Giambra, Alex Haas and Coe and John Symons are Brennan Higgins are the The guards are Seth Johnson the fullbacks. Lukachko aver- receivers. Krawczyk aver- and Joey Jones. The tackles aged 6.6 yards per carry last aged 18.8 yards per catch, and a r e B r o dy a n d Ja m e s season and scored two touch- Giambra had 11 catches for Murtha. The tight ends are

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defensive line George and Gorey are the ends. The tackles are Brody and Johnson. Playing nose is Hugh Bentham.

Linebackers The middle linebackers are DeLucca and Coe.

Secondary Lukachko and Billy Kyttle are the corners. The safeties are Krawczyk and Tannon Kraklio.

Special teams Luchia Carabetta, a former soccer player on the girls team, is the kicker. During the summer, she was good from 35 yards out on field goals. DeLucca will handle the kickoff duties. Coe is the punter. — Steve Bennett

GEORGE

MURTHA

ROSTER No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 16 18 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 28 33 34 36 38 40 41 42 43 45 46 48 52 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 70 71 74 75 76 77 79 80 81 82 84 90

Name Alex Haas Bryan Giambra Alex Anastasi Brennan Higgins PJ Pisano Andrew Krawczyk Mike Nocito Billy Kyttle Zac Sulima Luchia Carabetta David Behm Devin Shandra Felix Mendez Mike Pugliese Bruce Rydzy Ryan Winters Aaron Ladd Dylan Lukachko Jordan O’Boyle Franny George Mike Coe John Symons Joey Russell DJ Darbenzio Tannon Kraklio Louis Galli Seth Sylvester Bryheem Patterson Ethan Menichini Nate Wesnak Bryan Herron Devin Atkins DJ Branham John Morris Jalynn Singleton Adrian Colon Matt Soy Ed Galonis John Galonis Teagan Reboli Joe Galonis Noah Miller Hugh Bentham Josh Christ Seth Johnson Joey Jones James Murtha Reily Brody Stephen Yanchis Alysha Smigiel Sevion Leak Tony Gorey Joe Cornwall John DeLucca

Ht/Wt 6-4/193 6-1/155 6-0/183 6-0/165 5-10/150 6-2/180 5-11/160 5-7/180 5-10/150 5-4/110 6-4/190 5-10/130 5-8/130 5-10/167 5-9/140 5-10/150 5-8/153 5-8/150 5-8/18 5-10/190 6-1/210 6-0/175 5-9/167 6-0/185 6-0/160 5-9/220 5-11/141 5-10/150 5-7/155 5-7/ 155 5-8/175 5-5/155 6-0/145 5-10/185 5-9/195 5-9/230 5-9/230 6-0/240 6-1/225 5-11/180 6-1/220 5-8/220 5-9/230 5-9/240 5-11/230 6-0/235 6-1/225 6-3/230 6-3/286 5-7/142 5-10/145 6-4/190 5-9/140 5-11/232

Pos Yr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr QB/DB Jr WR/DB Jr QB/DB So WR/DB Jr QB/DB Jr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Jr K Sr WR/DB So WR/DB Jr WR/DB So WR/LB Jr WR/DB So WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr RB/DB Jr RB/DB Sr RB/LB Jr FB/LB Sr RB/LB So WR/DB So FB/LB So WR/DB Sr FB/LB Jr WR/DB Sr WR/DB So TE/LB So FB/LB Sr RB/LB Jr RB/DB So RB/LB Sr FB/LB So OL/DL Jr OL/DL Jr K Jr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Jr OL/DL So OL/DL So OL/DL Sr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Sr OL/DL So K Sr WR/DB Sr TE/LB Sr WR/DB So TE/LB Sr

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 13

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John DeLucca and Tony Gorey. DeLucca and Gorey combined for 13 catches last season.

NOCITO

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

PLAyER TO wATCH

Coe, Tannon Kraklio and Noah Miller. Third row, from left, are John DeLucca, Bryan Giambra, Riley Brody, Alex Haas, Tony Gorey, Joey Jones and D.J. Branham.

LUKACHKO


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

14 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

MEYERS EnrollmEnt: Class 3A

nicknamE: Mohawks

HomEfiEld: Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium

tHE coacH Jeff Labatch Fourth season 19-15

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 13 Oct. 18 Oct. 27

Opponent at Riverside Northwest at Lake-Lehman Montrose at Hanover Area Susquehanna at Wyoming Area Mid Valley at Holy Redeemer GAR (3:30)

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn The Mohawks have a favorable schedule this year. They open at Riverside, host Northwest, then travels to LakeLehman. The opener is a tricky one — it has been a while since the Mohawks and Riverside played. The travel is relatively easy, and the fact that every other game is home means no extended road trips.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score at Lake-Lehman L, 30-23 at Montrose W, 28-6 at Hanover Area W, 21-12 Nanticoke Area W, 26-7 at Holy Redeemer W, 30-9 Dallas L, 42-0 Coughlin L, 35-7 Tunkhannock W, 27-16 at Northwest L, 23-21 GAR W, 26-19, OT at Scranton Prep L, 42-0 Record: 6-5

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Talee Swinney Rushing Kevin Dessoye Nazir Dunell Reese Patronick Receiving Reese Patronick Kevin Dessoye

49 yards 571 yards 52 yards 21 yards 640 yards 193 yards

meyers junior michael Horvath, left, and senior reese Patronick CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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MEYERS

HORvATH

TySON

MAffEI

DESSOyE

ROSTER

WARREN RUDA / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Meyers running backs, from left, Makal Henderson, Kevin Dessoye, Timothy Tyndall and Nazir Dunell.

No 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 17 18 19 20 21

Name Maleek Robinson Ryan Judge Jose Rivera Reese Patronick Corey Brown Nazir Dunell Talee Swinney JJ Carter Tyere Dobson Najese Hood Latroy McBryde Tyler Yelland Kevin Dessoye Dylan Housenick Joevanney Martinez Alfredo Cartegena Jabrail Crumbley Anthony Martinez

Ht/Wt 6-2/195 5-8/150 5-10/175 5-10/175 5-9/170 5-9/175 6-0/170 5-10/185 5-9/160 6-2/190 6-0/165 5-11/165 5-10/180 5-8/150 5-10/165 5-8/150 5-10/150 5-10/175

Pos Yr RB/LB So WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr WR/LB Sr WR/DB Jr RB/DB Sr QB/LB Jr WR/LB Jr WR/DB So WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr RB/LB Sr WR/DB So QB/DB Sr WR/DB Jr WR/DB Jr TE/LB So

22 23 24 25 26 27 50 52 53 54 56 57 58 62 68 71 75 99

Darrian Tyson 6-0/175 Timothy Tyndall 5-9/170 Makal Henderson 5-8/175 Michael Deutsch-Jones5-9/150 David Kasper 6-2/215 Alexander Stanicki 5-10/165 Nelbin Polanco 6-1/245 Kevin Kaskey 6-0/240 Ian Levy 5-10/265 Trey Collins 5-11/190 Justin Eberhardt 6-3/280 Josh Jones 6-0/215 Derek Yaskiewicz 6-0/220 Josh Woodworth 5-10/230 Tommy Le 5-11/205 Michael Horvath 6-4/215 Ryan Maffei 6-1/285 Michael Brown 5-8/145

WR/DB Sr RB/LB So RB/LB So K So P Sr WR/DB Sr G/DE So G/DE Jr G/DT Jr G/DE So C/DT Sr T/DT Jr T/DT Jr G/DT Jr C/DE Jr T/DE Jr T/DT Sr WR/DB Jr

SCOUTING THE MOHAWKS SNAp TO IT

PASTA NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 15

CRISNICS IRISH PUB

bENNETT’S vIEW After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Mohawks. Meyers is a team that you never really know what you are going to get until you see the team play. The Mohawks will have athletes, there is no question about that. Those athletes will be able to make plays. What you need to watch out for is when the defense starts keying on those athletes. Who will step up to make the play when needed? With the Mohawks, it could be someone you expect, or someone you least expect. Either way, this is going to be a competitive football team that will win its share of games. After getting a punt blocked in each of its last five games a year ago, look for a heavy emphasis on special teams. Once the quarterback position sorts itself out, and the defensive rotations are in place, the Mohawks will have the opportunity to be a team to contend with. It is just a matter of how long it will take for some of the question marks to find answers.

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

defensive side of the ball, and completed all three passes he are Najese Hood and Maleek are at their best with the attempted last year for 49 Robinson. Hood had 19 catchOne of the biggest con- defense is flying around and yards. es and four touchdowns last cerns for Meyers coming making plays. year. Running backs into the season is quarterplAyER TO WATCH Defensive line Dessoye and Nazir Dunell back. With Janssen Wilborn In terms of offensive pro- are the featured backs. SimThe ends are Horvath, having graduated, it creates a huge void, not just in terms duction, running back Kevin ply put, the Mohawks are set Kaskey and Jones. The tackof numbers, but leadership. Dessoye was right up there here. Dessoye is a tough run- les are Maffei, Levy and Between running and throw- as far as a player the defense ner, while Dunell is the burn- Eberhardt. ing the ball, Wilborn had needed to key on. He finished er. If Dunell gets out in the linebackers 2,086 yards and 16 touch- last season with 571 yards open, he’s difficult to catch. The inside linebackers are downs. Those are numbers rushing and eight touchWide receivers Patronick, Robinson, JJ that are tough to duplicate. downs. He was more than Dar rian Tyson, Ryan Carter and Christian SwinFortunately, the Mohawks just a ball carrier as he seem to find talented athletes proved to be a capable receiv- Judge, Tyler Yelland and ney. Playing on the outside and put them in the right er out of the back field with Corey Brown are the receiv- are Brown, Jose Rivera, Desspots. Reese Patronick, who 15 catches for an average of ers. Tyson is a transfer from soye and Yelland. played receiver last season 12.9 yards per reception. He Valley West. Brown caught Secondary and caught 45 passes, has will be counted on a bit more three passes last year, while The defensive backs are been a name mentioned to this year on the offensive Judge had one reception. Hood, Dunell, Tyson, Judge step in and play the position. side of the ball. Dessoye is a Offensive line and Tyere Dobson. hard runner who is not DEfENSIvEly The centers are Justin afraid to take the ball Special teams SpEAKING between the tackles, and is Eberhardt and Tommy Le. It’s not necessarily a weak- shifty enough to bounce out- The guards are Ryan Maffei, D av i d K a s p e r, J o e l ness because, again, the side if the hole is closed. He Josh Woodworth and Ian Va z q u e z a n d M i c h a e l Mohawks will be athletic is also very good at keeping Levy. The tackles are Michael Deutsch-Jones are the kickenough, but inside lineback- his feet moving and not going Horvath, Kevin Kaskey and ers. Kasper is the punter. — Steve Bennett er and defensive end are two down on the initial hit. Josh Jones. The tight ends spots on the defensive side of pOSITION-by-pOSITION the ball that coach Jeff bREAKDOWN Labatch is taking a close look at. The Meyers secondary 189 Barney St., W-B 823-5199 • HH 5-7 Daily Quarterbacks will be strong with every2016 TOMATO FESTIVAL SAUCE WARS WINNER! Patronick, Joevanny Marbody returning from last year. There is experience at tinez and Talee Swinney are the outside linebacker spot, the quarterbacks. Patronick but the Mohawks are going led the team in receptions SERVED W/DINNER SALAD, PASTA CHOICES: to need some bodies to step last year with 45. Making the ANGEL HAIR, PENNE, SPAGHETTI, GNOCCHI up and fill the spots inside move from wideout to quarand at the end position. The terback, Patronick has Mohawks are typically a knowledge of the system and ANY PARTY FOR THE PATIO...NOW ACCEPTING RESERVATIONS pretty solid group on the is a hard runner. Swinney FOR GRADUATION, BUSINESS LUNCHEONS, FUNERALS & MORE


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

16 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

COUGHLIN EnrollmEnt: Class 4A

nicknamE: Crusaders

HomEfiEld: Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium

tHE coacH Ciro Cinti 13th season 71-63

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 22 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent Crestwood at Wyoming Area at Nanticoke Area at Tunkhannock Pittston Area at Dallas Valley West at North Pocono Hazleton Area Berwick

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn This marks the final year of Coughlin football following the announcement of the Wilkes-Barre athletic merger for the 2019-20 school year. Coughlin doesn’t play Williamsport and gets Berwick at home. One date to keep in mind is Oct. 26. It’s Coughlin’s final regular season home game in program history.

2017 rESUltS Opponent at Dallas at Scranton Prep at Crestwood Wyoming Area Honesdale Berwick at Meyers Williamsport at Pittston Area at Valley West at Dallas at Valley View Record: 5-7

Score L, 54-7 L, 42-0 W, 27-14 W, 17-14 W, 28-13 L, 24-6 W, 35-7 L, 55-10 L, 21-14 L, 42-0 W, 28-0 L, 40-7

nUmBErS GamE Returning leaders Passing Garrett Wardle Rushing Nino Cinti Receiving Salem Diopp Rafael McCoy

174 yards 22 yards 217 yards 95 yards

clockwise, from top left, junior richard carey, senior Jervone Young, junior rafael mccoy and junior nino cinti CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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COUGHLIN SCOUTING THE CRUSADERS LEADING by ExAmpLE In all his years at Coughlin, head coach Ciro Cinti could always rely on a senior class to provide leadership and guide the underclassmen through the rigors of the season. That’s not the case this year. With just five seniors on the roster, the leadership roles will be coming from the junior class. W h i l e i t m ay s o u n d strange for the junior class to have the loudest voice, there have been no issues. This group of juniors has been through the ups and downs and will be able to speak from experience.

pLAyER TO wATCH Senior fullback/defensive end Jervone Young is entering his fourth season as a starter. Beginning his career as a fullback and remaining there through his sophomore season, Young moved to the offensive line last season to fill in when injurieswereanissue.Oncethe Crusaders got healthy, Young went back to fullback. He’s also one of the toughest defensive end’s in the league to block and he’s very active toward the football. Cinti said Young bench pressed 375 pounds and squatted 500 pounds.

bENNETT’S VIEw After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Crusaders. This will certainly be an interesting final year for the Coughlin football program. Coach Cinti and his coaching staff have been doing a good job of getting the kids to focus on football and nothing else. Just because this will be the final season, nothing has really changed as far as preparation. The Crusaders remained on the same offseason schedule this year as they have in all the previous years Cinti has been the head coach. All the Crusaders can do is prepare for and worry about this season and let the future take care of itself. As for the current state of the program, it figures to be another intriguing year. Coughlin will win the games it is supposed to. The key will be winning a few they aren’t expected to win. There’s a lot of experience on this team, but not a lot of depth. The year will hinge on how well the offensive line plays and how healthy they remain. As usual, this year’s team will be just like all the others Cinti has coached in the past — nobody will look forward to playing the Crusaders. Jonathan Karpian. Last sea- per catch last year and son, the Crusaders attempted McCoy averaged 23.8. 92 passes in 12 games. Offensive line

Running backs

This should be an exciting spot. Sa’id Hollis, Marquise Silva, Antwan Gray-Dates, Aiden Redding and Xavier Carter will all see time. Young is the fullback. Hollis carried the ball five times a year ago, while Young will be used primarily in goal-line situations.

wide receivers

Rafael McCoy, Salem Diop, pOSITION-by-pOSITION Xayvion Proctor, Hollis and bREAkDOwN Nino Cinti are all in the rotation. McCoy will be a player Quarterbacks

to watch since he averaged 6.2 yards per carry. Cinti figures to use him in a variety of roles. Diop has the size to take advantage of mismatches. He averaged 31.0 yards

son and Randall Bednar. The guards are Richard Carey and Gregorio DeLeon. The tackles are Mike Timek, Aarron Warnagiris and Joe Davis. Bednar may also see time at tackle as well. The tight ends are Ben Yozwiak and Silas Armstrong.

Defensive line Armstrong and Young are the defensive ends. Timek, Bednar and DeLeon are the tackles.

Linebackers Redding and Proctor are the outside linebackers. Playing on the inside are Carey, Thompson and Carter.

No 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 11 14 15 17 21 22 29 32 33 36 43 50 51 52

Name Nino Cinti Sa’Id Hollis Antwan Gray-Dates Xayvion Proctor Marquis Silva Chad Regan Jonathon Karpien Salem Diop Rafael McCoy Garrett Wardle Raheem Malik Bolden Tyler Brown Amir Jones Tyler Woolard Aiden Redding Xavier Carter Colin Lee Silas Armstrong Randall Bednar Conor Shedlock Joe Davis

Secondary Hollis, Gray-Dates, Diop and Silva will play corner. Cinti and McCoy are the safeties.

Special teams Chad Regan is the kicker. Logan Davison is the punter. — Steve Bennett

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Matt Thompson Richard Carey Aarron Warnagiris Gregerio DeLeon Connor Lee Michael Timek Coltyn Reese Dahntay Wilkins Ben Yozwiak Jervone Young

OL/LB OL/LB OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL TE/DE RB/DL

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THE CITIZENS' VOICE

Gar rett Wardle, who appeared in nine games last season, is the starter. He threw for 174 yards and one touchdown. The backup is

ThecentersareMattThomp-

ROSTER


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

18 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

GAR EnrollmEnt: Class 3A

nicknamE: Grenadiers

HomEfiEld: Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium

tHE coacH Paul Wiedlich Jr. Ninth season 52-38

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 25 Aug. 30 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 20 Oct. 27

Opponent at Susquehanna Holy Redeemer Hanover Area at Western Wayne Wyoming Area at Northwest at NP Mansfield Lake-Lehman Nanticoke Area at Meyers (3:30)

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn The big game will be the final game of the regular season against Meyers. Before that, the Grenadiers will spend quite a bit of time on the bus. GAR opens the season at Susquehanna and also has trips to Western Wayne and North-Penn Mansfield. The Grenadiers also hit the road for a game against Northwest.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score at Honesdale L, 38-8 at Western Wayne L, 34-0 Nanticoke Area L, 45-6 Lake-Lehman L, 50-12 at Pittston Area L, 35-13 Athens L, 41-6 Wyoming Area L, 44-7 at Northwest L, 45-8 Hanover Area W, 30-13 at Meyers L, 26-19, OT Record: 1-9

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Tyrone Qualls 24 yards Rushing Tyrone Qualls 353 yards Justice Lomas 177 yards Will Johnson 30 yards Receiving Malachai Williams 259 yards Will Johnson 49 yards

Gar junior tyrone Qualls, left, and sophomore noah taylor CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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GAR SCOUTING THE GRENADIERS ON-THE-jOb TRAINING GAR is fine at the skill positions. There is speed and athleticism with plenty of players capable of making a big play. The biggestquestionmarksarealongthe offensive and defensive lines. The lines are inexperienced and young. With just 28 players listed on the preseason roster, depth is a concern. That is nothing new to head coach Paul Wiedlich Jr. He has often had to mix and match players up front to the point where some were actually playing out of position.

bENNETT’S VIEW

WARREN RUDA / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The GAR offensive line, first row, from left, Kashawn Wade, Michael Smeraglio, Omar Degante and Kristian Vasquez. Second row, Vincent Beltran, Andrew Brooks, Junior Pozo, Juan Vicioso and Anthony Nguyen.

after attempting just two pass- son had four catches last year. es a year ago. Wiedlich said Offensive line The Grenadiers finished last Qualls has taken on more of a season 1-9. In five of those nine leadership role. The centers are Adriel Chamlosses, GAR was within two POSITION-bY-POSITION berlain and Kristian Vasquez. touchdowns or less. Wiedlich The guards are Omar Degante, bREAkDOWN was able to identify the probVasquez and Kashawn Wade. lem over the offseason and The tackles are Kareem Jones, Quarterbacks Vincent Beltran and Andrew plans on correcting it this year. GAR had six players attempt Brooks. The tight ends are Mike The biggest issue: GAR wasn’t able to put together four quar- at least one pass last season. Smeraglio and Anthony Nguyen. ters of play until the final few Qualls, the projected starter Defensive line weeks of the season. This year, this year, attempted two of Noah Taylor, Smeraglio and Wiedlich is looking for the them. He did rush for 353 yards team to come out of the gate and one touchdown a year ago. Wade are the ends. Jones, strong and continue playing Kam Taylor will be the backup. Junior Pozo, Beltran and Brooks are the tackles. that way for 48 minutes. Running backs

FINISHING IT OFF

PLAYER TO WATCH

Linebackers

Junior quarterback/linebacker Tyrone Qualls enters his third season on varsity. In his first two years, Qualls has proven to be a playmaker on both sides of the ball. Defensively, he plays all over the field and is expected to be a key contributor to the group. As a quarterback, Qualls will be relatively new to the position

Noah Taylor, Justice Lomas and Christian Hernandez are the Qualls, Lomas and Curtis running backs. Lomas rushed for Smith are the linebackers. 177 yards last season, while TaySecondary ler ran for 23 and Hernandez 16. Safeties are Johnson, Williams, Wide receivers Curon Smith and Hernandez. Malachi Williams, who led Special teams the team in receptions last Noah Taylor will handle year with 15, returns. Will Johnson and Kam Taylor are kicking and punting duties. — Steve Bennett options on the outside. John-

After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Grenadiers. With just 28 players on the camp roster, depth is going to be a concern. Staying healthy is going to be a primary factor for the team’s success. As far as the skill positions are concerned, the Grenadiers should be fine. But what typically sets a good GAR team apart from an average one are the defense and special teams. When GAR is flying around on defense and creating turnovers, the offense has a tendency to feed off the momentum. Same can be said for special teams. When the Grenadiers are returning kicks and punts for scores, or just altering field position, good things happen. The offensive and defensive fronts are a major concern. There are going to be a lot of fresh, young faces lining up. Mistakes are going to happen. But this team can’t afford to let one mistake turn into several.

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Pos Yr WR/DB Sr RB/DB Sr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Jr TE/LB Jr QB/DB So WR/DB So WR/DB Sr WR/DB So RB/DB Sr QB/DB Jr WR/DB Jr K Sr WR/DB Jr WR/DB Jr RB/DB Fr

30 Christian Hernandez 5-8/140 RB/DB Sr 35 Miguel Evertz 5-7/140 WR/DB So 36 Mike Fox 6-1/160 WR/DB Jr 44 Noah Taylor 5-9/205 RB/LB So 50 Anthony Nguyen 5-11/200 OL/LB Fr 56 Junior Pozo 6-1/230 OL/DL Fr 58 Kristian Vasquez 5-8/ 160 OL/LB Jr 60 Adriel Chamberlian 6-1/215 OL/LB So 62 Vincent Beltran 6-1/240 OL/DL So 66 Omar Degante 5-11/175 OL/DL Sr 68 Josh Newell 6-0/215 OL/DL So 70 Andrew Brooks 6-0/265 OL/DL So 76 Juan Vicioso 6-2/210 OL/DL Sr 78 Kashawn Wade 5-9/200 OL/DL Fr 79 Kareem Jones 6-0/210 OL/DL So 84 Mike Smeraglio 6-1/185 TE/DL Jr

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

20 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

DALLAS EnrollmEnt: Class 4A

nicknamE: Mountaineers

HomEfiEld: Mountaineer Stadium

tHE coacH Rich Mannello Fourth season 15-18

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent Tunkhannock at Crestwood Hazleton Area at Pittston Area Valley West Coughlin at Nanticoke Area Valley View at Berwick at Lake-Lehman

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn With Mannello, there is no one game that is more important than the other. But there are a few games that will jump out to fans. With the exception of a Week 9 trip to Berwick followed by an away game with rival Lake-Lehman, Dallas received a decent schedule. Heavy hitters Hazleton Area, Valley West, Coughlin and Valley View are all home games.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score Coughlin W, 54-7 at Berwick L, 23-7 Pittston Area W, 38-7 Scranton Prep L, 35-17 at Valley West W, 31-18 at Meyers W, 42-0 Wallenpaupack W, 21-20 at Wyoming Area W, 21-20, OT Hazleton Area L, 16-13 Lake-Lehman W, 37-6 Coughlin L, 28-0 Record: 7-4

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Michael Starbuck Rushing Danny Meuser Leonard Kelley Michael Starbuck Receiving Luke DelGaudio Matt Maransky

994 yards 633 yards 599 yards 277 yards 184 yards 106 yards

dallas seniors michael anderson, left, and christian motley CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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DALLAS SCOUTING THE MOUNTAINEERS

ROSTER

SOMETHING SpECIAl It’s as important phase of the game as any, and in some respects it can change the momentum of a game. Entering the year, special teams is a major concern for Dallas coach Rich Mannello. Last year, the Mountaineers were fortunate to have Nate Maransky as the kicker. While his extra points and field goals were almost automatic, Maransky had the ability to change field position with his kickoffs and punts. As the new year begins, Mannello is looking for somebody to take over that role.

Up TO pAR Mannello likes to establish the run, but one of his concerns is the interior of the offensive line. It’s not so much the talent or depth, but he’s hoping the group can come together quickly to make an impact. There is plenty of competition amongst the group, but Mannello wants this group to quickly get up to speed. Mannello cross-trains all his offensive linemen so they know each position up front.

plAyER TO wATCH

returning starter at quarterback, a job he has held for the last year and a half. Last season, he threw for 974 yards and 10 touchdowns. He was intercepted six times and completed 48.7 percent of his passes. He also rushed for 277 yards and five scores. RJ Wren and Mike Lukasavage are the backups.

Running backs This is a position of strength for Dallas. Lenny Kelley, who averaged 5.9 yards per carry last season, will be joined by Dan Meuser, who averaged 5.2 yards per carry. Each rushed for nine touchdowns. Also in the mix are Dylan Schuster and Nikolus Gashi. The fullbacks are Taylor Bolesta, Sean Cuba, Jacob Fenske, John Betzko and Logan Young. Bolesta is also being trained at tailback.

Maransky lead an experienced and skilled group. Each caught 10 passes last year and DelGaudio led the team with an average of 18.4 yards per catch. Others who will be playing on the perimeter include Nick Solinsky, Christian Motley and Ben Fife.

Offensive line Xander Shaner, Andrew Menig and Dale Deyo are the centers. Matthew Ferrara, Nate Spare and Andrew Molitoris are the guards. The tackles are Anderson, Josh Balara, Colin Zeiss and Evan Plank. The tight ends are Jack Farrell, Jacob Esposito, Hunter Landon and Zack Chamberlain.

defensive line

Bolesta, Ferrarea, Shaner, Farrell, Zeiss and Landon are the ends. Anderson, Balara, Molitoris, Menig, wide receivers Spare and Plank are the tackLuke DelGaudio and Matt les.

Quarterbacks Michael Starbuck is the

WB_VOICE - T150 - 21 - 08/22/18

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Schuster, Gashi and Chamberlain are on the outside. Playing inside are Cuba, Meuser, Fenske and Betzko.

Secondary Motley, Starbuck, DelGaudio, Solinsky, Lukasavage, Fife and Darren Kerdesky are the corners. Maransky, Kelley, Wren and Jacob Esposito are the safeties. Motely intercepted six passes last season, while Kelley picked off four.

Special teams Mannello was using the summer and training camp to let the sport work itself out. Anderson is expected to be the punter. — Steve Bennett

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DB/WR Fr K/P Jr DB/RB Jr LB/RB Fr DB/WR Fr DL/OL Fr DL/OL Jr DL/OL Sr LB/OL So DL/OL Jr DL/OL Sr DL/OL So DL/OL Fr DL/OL Fr DL/OL Sr DL/OL Fr OL/DL Jr DL/OL So DL/OL Jr LB/OL So DL/OL Fr DL/FB Jr DL/OL Jr DL/TE Jr DL/TE Sr LB/RB Fr DL/OL Jr

After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Mountaineers. Remember two years ago when Dallas was playing almost a dozen freshmen and sophomores? Well, that group is now juniors and seniors. They experienced the growing pains of what it was like to be a wide-eyed youngster taking the field on a Friday night and being physically overmatched. Last year, the team was 7-4 and showed signs of being a mature group that was quicker, faster and physically able to handle the rigors of a full season. As they enter this year, the group is even stronger and faster and more determined. The season ended on a down note in a home playoff loss to Coughlin. While there is a nice group of veterans to build off, there will still be some underclassmen in the mix. Dallas, though, has the experience in all the right places. This is the fourth year of coach Mannello’s tenure, and the gains in speed, size and strength are clearly visible. This group will have high expectations, and rightfully so. If they can get the special teams situation cleaned up and the offensive line can remain healthy, this will be a dangerous football team.

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 21

pOSITION-by pOSITION bREAkdOwN

Photography By Andy

linebackers

Name Ht/Wt RJ Wren 5-9/155 Jackson Wydra 5-9/135 Danny Meuser 5-11/200 Nikolus Gashi 5-7/165 Mitchell Burgess 5-11/165 Michael Starbuck 5-10/160 Michael Lukasavage 5-10/155 Ben Fife 5-8/140 David Biscontini 5-4/120 John Betzko 5-10/180 Matt Lukasavage 5-7/130 Nicholas Solinsky 5-11/160 Jacob Esposito 5-11/160 Gavin Sypniewski 5-6/110 Rocco Ormando 5-4/130 Blaine Rex 5-5/170 Dylan Schuster 5-11/175 Zachary Hill 5-7/160 Luke DelGaudio 6-3/175 Christian Motley 5-6/145 Jacob Fenske 5-9/165 Logan Young 5-7/145 Zeid Aleshemi 5-8/150 Matt Maransky 5-10/150 Matt Jesse 5-10/135 Sean Cuba 5-8/210 Jared Adamski 5-9/135

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

Michael Anderson has developed into one of the top offensive linemen in the conference, and that is taking nothing away from the impact he has had on the defensive side of the ball. Tipping the scales at 300 pounds, Anderson has quick feet and engages his blocks well. He makes it difficult for his blocker to get around, and when he is on the defensive side of the ball, he’s often facing a double-team blocking scheme. Near the end of last season, he was also used as a situational punter, which speaks to his athleticism. And if the team is looking for leadership inside the locker room, they have to look no further than Anderson’s stall.

Quarterbacks, from left, Michael Lukasavage, RJ Wren, Michael Starbuck and Nikolus Gashi.

No 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 28 29 32 33 34


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

22 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

LAKE-LEHMAN EnrollmEnt: Class 4A

nicknamE: Black Knights

HomEfiEld: Edward H. Edwards Stadium

tHE coacH Jerry Gilsky Ninth season 57-34

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent Western Wayne at Hanover Area Meyers at Carbondale at Northwest Wyoming Area Holy Redeemer at GAR at Lack. Trail Dallas

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Lake-Lehman fans can take a sigh of relief now that Berwick and Scranton Prep are off the schedule. Lake-Lehman welcomes Wyoming Area back after the Warriors dropped to 3A for the next two years. The Black Knights get the benefit of playing at home for the first three weeks. The annual rivalry game vs. Dallas is in Week 10.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score Meyers W, 30-23 Northwest L, 25-7 Scranton Prep L, 42-0 at GAR W, 50-12 Hanover Area W, 28-14 Tunkhannock W, 49-31 at Nanticoke Area W, 42-20 Holy Redeemer W, 35-7 at Berwick L, 41-14 at Dallas L, 37-6 at Western Wayne W, 27-26, OT at Scranton Prep L, 54-7 Record: 7-5

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Jake Ferguson 45 yards Rushing Matt Kurtz 731 yards Zack Kojadinovich 516 yds Casey Kaminski 90 yards Receiving Zack Kojadinovich 147 yds

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lake-lehman junior Zack kojadinovich, left, and senior frank kutz CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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LAKE-LEHMAN SCOUTING THE BLACK KNIGHTS DEpTH pERCEpTION Head coach Jerry Gilsky likes his team’s depth. Two years ago, when the Black Knights were hit hard by the injury bug and lost five players for the season, he inserted a group of freshmen and sophomores into the lineup. That move will pay off this year as that group is now juniors and seniors. The depth at multiple positions is creating competition, and that can only help. Even with all that, Gilsky still remains cautious. He reminds this group games need to be won on the field, and it was hard work that earned them their positions.

AIR KNIGHT? Let’s face it: Gilsky has found success running the ball. It takes time off the clock and keeps opposing defenses on the field. He also realizes there has to be some element of the passing game to keep the other team honest. Don’t be surprised to see the Black Knights go to the air a little bit more this year, even if that means surpassing the 87 passing attempts the team had last year. The Black Knights were fine with the high percentage passes out to the flat. It was when they took shots down the field where they struggled. Don’t be shocked to see Lehman try to throw some deep balls this year.

pLAyER TO wATCH

near the goal line. What Gilksy likes the most about him is he competes and has developed into the team leader. If he sees someone taking a play off during practice, Kurtz is the first one to let him know about it.

pOSITION-By-pOSITION BREAKDOwN Quarterbacks Jake Ferguson and Ethan Adams are in contention to be the starting quarterback. Ferguson saw time in six games last season. Gilsky likes Ferguson’s knowledge of the offense. Adams is the younger of the two, but has a quality arm that can get the From left, Frank Kutz, Elmer Souder, TJ Meeham, Matt Kurtz and Josh Durling. ball down the field. tackles are Frank Kutz, Running backs Logan Hoyt and Dakota BENNETT’S VIEw Running the ball is always Heinrich. The tight ends are After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve a focal point of the Lake- Josh Durling, Damien ConkBennett gives his take on the Black Knights. Lehman offense. Zack Koja- lin and Sabaluski. This is going to be an interesting team to watch. dinovich returns after rushThink back to two years ago when Lake-Lehman Defensive line ing for 516 yards and seven was hit hard by injuries and several players were Durling and Souder are touchdowns last year. Casey lost for the year or missed significant time. That Kaminski, who averaged 9.1 the ends. The tackles are forced coach Gilsky to turn to what was then a yards per carry, is also back. Kurtz, Meehan, Lopsky and group of freshmen and sophomores to pick up the They are joined by Ryan Heinrich. slack. Those players received a baptism by fire, so Eiden and Jarrett Cumto speak, and saw quality minutes on the varsity Linebackers mings. The fullbacks are level. Now those players are ready to make a huge impact. The Black Knights are a talented group on Frank Kutz, Dan Kutz, Matt Kurtz and Scott Robboth sides of the ball, but not without some conbins. Kurtz was second on David Horgerbe and Robbins cerns. The secondary, which was a big question the team in rushing last year will be on the outside. Playmark entering last season, still has some queswith 731 yards and 10 touch- ing inside are Cummings tions, but not as many as a year ago. There is inand Sabaluski. downs. experience at quarterback, but with how much the wide receivers Secondary Black Knights run the football, the passing game can take some time to develop. Sure, it will be With the Black Knights K a m i n s k i , M c C r o y, easy to say this is a playoff team, but with eight looking to be a little more Adams, Ferguson, Eiden and teams qualifying for the district playoffs in Class active in the passing game, Giovanni Ferrari are the cor3A, only one team will be left out. All that will be Gilsky is relying on several ners. The safeties are Eiden, left to wonder about this team is what seed it will athletes here. Sean Sabaluski, Bilotti and Matt Glasso. lock up heading into the playoffs. Tyler Bilotti, Floyd McCroy, Special teams Kaminski and Eiden will be Justin Timonte, a soccer called upon when the Black player who has been good Knights elect to go to the air. from 45 yards out during Offensive line summer workouts, is the The center is Wyatt Lop- kicker. Gilsky also is expectsky. The guards are TJ Mee- ing him to punt. — Steve Bennett ham and Elmer Souder. The

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 23

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Name Ht/Wt Casey Kaminski 6-0/185 Giovani Ferrari 5-9/140 Jake Ferguson 5-9/160 Tyler Billotti 6-2/165 Ethan Adams 5-10/165 Jarrett Cummings 5-11/200 Devyn Roote 5-10/160 Josiah Thomas 6-0/155 Tim Schecterly 5-8/160 Matt Galasso 5-9/160 Justin Timonte 6-3/175 Colby Kennedy 5-7/140 Marshall Woodrosky 5-10/150 Zack Kojadinovich 5-10/190 Ryan Eiden 5-10/175 David Horgerbe 6-0/165 Nick Zaboski 6-0/175 Scott Robbins 5-11/230 Danny Kutz 5-11/185 Josh Durling 5-8/210 Matt Kurtz 5-11/245 Sean Hanley 6-4/220 Frank Kutz 6-0/230 Elmer Souder 6-0/210 Damian Concklin 6-1/215 TJ Meeham 6-1/225 Wyatt Lopasky 5-8/230 Chris Traver 5-6/190 Blaise Napierkowski 5-5/210 Dakota Heinrich 6-2/245 Levi Yatsko 5-8/205 Chase Cole 5-10/220 Jacob Prest 5-11/235 Chloe Osborne 5-5/200 Logan Hoyt 5-10/245 Luke Spencer 5-10/160 Sean Sabaluski 6-2/210 Grayson Bruno 5-10/180 Floyd McRoy 5-9/150 William Labar 5-9/140

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

A three-year starter, Matt Kurtz is the heart and soul of the team. The fullback/ defensive tackle has the demeanor of a solid, fundamentally sound player. He reacts to the ball well on defense, and is a punishing runner, especially when he’s

ROSTER No 4 6 7 10 11 15 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 28 29 33 34 43 44 45 50 52 54 55 57 58 61 64 65 66 67 73 75 77 80 81 83 84 88


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

24 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

2018 WVC FOOTB AUG. 24-25

AUG. 30-SEPT. 1

SEPT. 7-8

SEPT. 14-15

BERWICK

Abington Heights

Pittston Area

at Williamsport

at Valley West

COUGHLIN

Crestwood

at Wyoming Area

at Nanticoke Area

at Tunkhannock

CRESTWOOD

at Coughlin

Dallas

at Valley West

Pottsville

William

DALLAS

Tunkhannock

at Crestwood

Hazleton Area

at Pittston Area

Valley

GAR

at Susquehanna (S)

Holy Redeemer (TH)

Hanover Area

at Western Wayne

Wyomin

HANOVER AREA

at Athens

Lake-Lehman

at GAR

Riverside

HAZLETON AREA

Pottsville

Valley West

at Dallas

Williamsport

at Wallen

HOLY REDEEMER

Holy Cross (S)

at GAR (TH)

at Mahanoy Area

Old Forge

at Tunkh

LAKE-LEHMAN

Western Wayne

at Hanover Area

Meyers

at Carbondale

at Nort

MEYERS

at Riverside

Northwest

at Lake-Lehman

Montrose

at Hanov

NANTICOKE AREA

Pittston Area

at Tunkhannock

Coughlin

at Wyoming Area

Western

NORTHWEST

at Lackawanna Trail

at Meyers

at Wyoming Area

Holy Cross

Lake-Le

PITTSTON AREA

at Nanticoke Area

at Berwick

Tunkhannock

Dallas

at Cou

TUNKHANNOCK

at Dallas

Nanticoke Area

at Pittston Area

Coughlin

WILLIAMSPORT

Cent. Mountain

at Altoona

Berwick

at Hazleton Area

WYOMING AREA

at Mid Valley

Coughlin

Northwest

Nanticoke Area

at G

VALLEY WEST

Scranton

at Hazleton Area

Crestwood

Berwick

at Da

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npaupack

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n Wayne

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 25

OCT. 5-6

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

SEPT. 28-29


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

26 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

2017 PLAYOFFS Championship Delaware Valley 31, Hazleton Area 3

EastErn ConfErEnCE a/2a: Northwest 31, Bloomsburg 30 (3 OT) 3a: Nanticoke Area 58, Holy Redeemer 12 Class 6a semifinals Delaware Valley 49, Scranton 28 Hazleton Area 28, Williamsport 27

Class 5a Valley West 63, Abington Heights 14 Championship Valley West 35, Wallenpaupack 7 subregional Championshship Valley West 32, Whitehall 21

Class 3a Class 4a semifinals Quarterfinals Scranton Prep 42, Meyers 0 Berwick 42, Wyoming Area 0 Lake-Lehman 27, Western Wayne Coughlin 28, Dallas 0 26 (OT) Valley View 51, Crestwood 0 Championship North Pocono 48, Pittston Area 15 Scranton Prep 54, Lake-Lehman semifinals 7 Valley View 40, Coughlin 7 Berwick 48, North Pocono 14 Class 2a semifinals Championship Dunmore 34, Mid Valley 13 Valley View 24, Berwick 17, 2 OT

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

28 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

HOLY REDEEMER EnrollmEnt: Class 3A

nicknamE: Royals

HomEfiEld: Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium

tHE coacH Dwayne Downing Third season at Redeemer 4-17

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 25 Aug. 30 Sept. 7 Sept. 15 Sept. 21 Sept. 29 Oct. 5 Oct. 13 Oct. 18 Oct. 26

Opponent Holy Cross at GAR at Mahanoy Area Old Forge at Tunkhannock Hanover Area at Lake-Lehman Wyoming Area (1) Meyers at Northwest

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Gone are Susquehanna, Columbia Montour Vo-Tech, Nanticoke Area, Western Wayne and Athens. In are GAR, Old Forge, Tunkhannock, Hanover Area and Wyoming Area. Old Forge is a traditional Class A power, while Wyoming Area is dropping down to 3A. The Royals open the season at home against Holy Cross, a program that it has had success against.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Holy Cross Susquehanna Mahanoy Area at Western Wayne Meyers at Northwest at Athens at Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke Area CMVT at Nanticoke Area Record: 2-9

Score W, 44-0 L, 54-21 L, 42-0 L, 53-0 L, 30-9 L, 42-14 L, 52-7 L, 35-7 L, 57-14 W, 27-26 L, 58-12

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Colin Conway Rushing Ryan Williams Peter Shay Receiving Colin Conway

13 yards 279 yards 39 yards 226 yards

WB_VOICE - T150 - 28 - 08/22/18

Holy redeemer senior Josh kodish, left, and junior colin conway CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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HOLY REDEEMER

DAOUD

COLAVITTI

WILLIAMS

ROPPELT

ROSTER CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Holy Redeemer’s defensive line, first row, from left, Angel Mandoza, Joe Colavitti, Cole Mayhue, John Callaghan and De’Shawn Knox. Second row, Owen Martin, Alex Hajkowski, Gavin Fincke, Pat Curley, Tom Hajkowski, Michael Dotzel, Ben Schell and Daryl Boich.

SCOUTING THE ROYALS GROWING PAINS Holy Redeemer won two gameslastyearandfounditself in the Eastern Conference championship game. Though the Royals lost, it was a nice experience for this year’s returning players. As the new year begins, head coach Dwayne Downing is looking to see how fast this group can mature. He’s hoping they grow up quickly. Depth is an ongoing concern at Redeemer, but Downing said there are some playmakers on the perimeter and the offensive line is an experienced group. The big key willbehowwellthisgrouphandles adversity.

bENNETT’S VIEW After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Royals. For the first time in a while, or maybe even as far back as the program’s existence, the strength of the team is the offensive line. Coach Downing really likes this group and the potential it provides. The success of the offense will be contingent upon how fast Conway can develop at quarterback and how well the offensive line can protect him. The Royals are going to need to be able to run the football. What the Royals will need to discover this year is a winning attitude. They can’t take the field every week expecting to lose.

The Royals must replace Conway’s production from a year ago. He led the team with 31 catches. Chris Pinkowski, Jack Daoud, Ethan Stoltz, Matt Schuler and Tanner Fenstermacher will see time. As a group, only Daoud caught a pass

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WB_VOICE - T150 - 29 - 08/22/18

Wide receivers

Secondary

The center is Pat Curley. Guards are Josh Kodish and Conway and Shay are the Dan Schuler. Tackles are Gavin corners. The safeties are Fincke, Owen Martin and Tom Pinkowski and Daoud. Hajkowski. Tights ends are Special teams Boich and Alex Hajkowski. Nate Roppelt, who kicked 18 Defensive line extra points and one field goal The names are the same from 25 yards out, is the kicker. from the offensive line and Downing said he will also punt. — Steve Bennett will be moved around between end and tackle. Downing said the players who fit in best at specific spots will get the majority of the playing time, Mayhue is in the mix along with Curley, Fincke, Martin and Tom Hajkowski.

Name Ht/Wt Ryan Bilski 5-8/115 Cole Mayhue 6-2/170 Colin Conway 5-11/180 Jack Daoud 5-6/132 Ryan Williams 5-9/165 Nate Roppelt 5-10/170 Peter Shay 5-10/165 Logan Atcavage 5-6/148 Christian Leon 5-6/142 Ethan Stoltz 5-9/155 Matthew Schuler 6-0/170 Joe Colavitti 5-9/190 Daryl Boich 6-1/210 Michael Dotzel 6-0/230 Ben Schell 5-9/190 Daniel Schuler 6-1/197 Josh Kodish 5-10/245 Tom Hajkowski 6-1/248 De’Shawn Knox 5-7/200 John Callaghan 5-9/218 Angel Mandoza 5-6/190 Gavin Fincke 6-1/275 Owen Martin 6-2/280 Pat Curley 5-10/240 Chris Pinkowski 5-11/170 Tanner Fenstermacher 5-9/170 Anthony Mandoza 6-2/138 Alex Hajkowski 6-3/195

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

sive back Colin Conway was listed as the backup quarterback on last year’s roster and completed the only pass he threw for 13 yards. This year, Conway gets the nod as the starter, moving from receivTAkING THE NExT STEP er, where he led the team in receptions. Conway is arguAs he enters his third sea- ably the team’s best skill son with the program, Down- position player. ing can finally say all the play- POSITION-bY-POSITION ers on the roster are his kids. bREAkDOWN They understand the system and what he expects from Quarterbacks them. The added benefit is the Conway is the starter. The players now fully understand what to expect from Downing. backups are Ryan Williams The biggest step the Royals and Daryl Boich. Conway need to take is learning how attempted just one pass last to win. There have been times season. where the Royals find ways to Running backs lose, and even when things Ryan Williams is the feaare going right, it always appears they are waiting for tured back this year. He finsomething to go wrong. If the ished second on the team in Royals can get over that hur- rushing last year with 279 dle, it will be another positive yards. Peter Shay, Joe Colavitti and Cole Mayhue will be step for the program. in the backfield. Downing PLAYER TO WATCH said Colavitti projects to be Junior quarterback/defen- more of a fullback.

last year. Downing does like are Kodish and Dan Schuler. Playing outside is Williams the potential of this group. and Matt Schuler. Offensive line

No 3 4 7 8 9 10 13 20 22 24 25 34 44 49 50 52 53 55 56 58 65 72 73 74 80 83 87 88


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

30 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

NANTICOKE AREA EnrollmEnt: Class 4A

nicknamE: Trojans

HomEfiEld: Frank Chicknesky Stadium

tHE coacH Ron Bruza Ninth season 33-49

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 29 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 20 Oct. 26

Opponent Pittston Area at Tunkhannock Coughlin at Wyoming Area Western Wayne at Crestwood Dallas at Lakeland at GAR Hanover Area

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn This schedule is a bit challenging, but also fair for the Trojans. They open at home against Pittston Area and close the regular season in the annual rivalry game with Hanover Area. They will hit the road for games against Tunkhannock, Wyoming Area, Crestwood, Lakeland and GAR. Gone from this year’s schedule are Columbia Montour VoTech, Meyers, Northwest, Holy Redeemer and Lehman.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Tunkhannock CMVT at GAR at Meyers Northwest at Crestwood Lake-Lehman at Pittston Area Holy Redeemer at Hanover Area Holy Redeemer Record: 6-5

Score W, 33-21 W, 50-13 W, 45-6 L, 26-7 L, 20-15 L, 35-7 L, 42-20 L, 46-21 W, 57-14 W, 44-0 W, 58-12

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Colby Butczynski Rushing Joe Ammons Receiving Darren Boseman Joe Ammons Keanu Ammons

652 yards 537 yards 469 yards 127 yards 119 yards

WB_VOICE - T150 - 30 - 08/22/18

nanticoke area junior kyle Bobeck, left, and senior Joe ammons CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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NANTICOKE AREA SCOUTING THE TROJANS BUIldING Off lAST SEASON The biggest adjustment for the 2018 Nanticoke Area football team will be moving up in classification. The Trojans are going from 3A to 4A for the next two seasons, and with it comes the challenge of facing some schools they haven’t played in a while. This current group has experience. Last season, the Trojans won the Eastern Conference championship, so this group knows how to win football games. Head coach Ron Bruza has not dwelled too much on the bump in classification, referring to it as an enrollment issue. The Trojans return several players from last year’s EC title team, and have players in the backfield and on the outside that are capable of making big plays.

lImIT TURNOvERS Turnovers severely hurt the Trojans last year. Against Pittston Area, Nanticoke Area turned the ball over five times in its first five possessions. Bruza spent a considerable amount of time during the offseason preaching the importance of hanging on to the ball. With a stronger schedule this season, the Trojans can’t afford to give the opponent any extra possessions.

ROSTER

of the ball. He is just one of those players who comes to practice every day ready to work. His goal is to make himself and his teammates better. He brings a physical presence to the game, and his strength has improved. He will be one of the leaders Bruza is counting on in the field and locker room.

POSITION-By-POSITION BREAkdOwN Quarterbacks Colby Butczynski enters the season as the starter. He took over the role early last season due to injury. He completed 37.2 percent of his passes and threw for nine touchdowns and 652 yards. Devland Heffron and Mike Marcella are the backups.

Running backs Joe Ammons is the halfback and is coming off a year where he carried the ball in six games for 537 yards and six touchdowns. He averaged 10.5 yards per carry. Also in the backfield is John Shoemaker, Colin Kashatus, Austin Cheslaw and Shuquan Douglas.

wide receivers

DAVE SCHERBENCO / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Nanticoke Area offense, first row, from left, Pierson Park, Austin Cheslaw, Nate Penko, Matt Engle, Devon Lohman, Colin Kashatus and Josh O’Borski. Second row, Frank Flynn, Shuquan Douglas, Joe Ammons, John Shoemaker, Colin Siegel and Byrce Hillard. also see time at receiver.

Offensive line

linebackers

season, returns as the kicker. Seth Pelton, Douglas Matt Engle is the punter. — Steve Bennett and Kashatus are the inside linebackers. The outside linebackers are John Shoemaker and Austin Cheslaw.

The centers are Andy Gurzynski and Zack Pelton. The guards are Bobeck and Chris Shon. The tackles are Shane Repasky and Seth PelSecondary ton. The tight ends are Boseman and Keanu Ammyn Gregory and Chase Ammons are the corners. Musick. Szychowski is the safety. defensive line

BENNETT’S vIEw

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OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL TE/DE WR/DB WR/DB TE/LB WR/DB TE/DE

So Sr Sr Jr Sr Fr Jr Sr So So Sr Jr So

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 31

After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the trojans. This year will certainly be a challenging one for the Trojans with the jump up in classification. The key will be patience. Nanticoke Area is going to have to win the games it is supposed to and try to steal a few along the way. With this group, it is possible, but they are going to have to stay healthy. After beginning last year 3-0, injuries hit hard and the result was a five-game losing streak that proved to be the difference between the District 2 playoffs and the Eastern Conference. This group has the potential to surprise a few teams along the way. In order for that to happen, the team will have to play up to its potential.

WB_VOICE - T150 - 31 - 08/22/18

Pos K Ath WR/DB RB/DE WR/DB WR/DB QB/DB RB/DB WR/DB QB/DB WR/DB QB/DB WR/DB RB/DB RB/LB WR/DB RB/DB WR/DB RB/LB RB/LB RB/DB TE/DE RB/DB TE/DE Ath RB/LB RB/DB WR/DB RB/LB RB/LB OL/DL OL/LB OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

Darren Boseman led the team in receptions last year with 12 for 354 yards and six touchdowns. He averaged 29.5 yards per catch. Keanu Ammons averaged 27.5 yards PlAyER TO wATCH per catch. Both are expected Special teams Junior guard/defensive to be key figures in the passThe ends are Joe Ammons tackle Kyle Bobeck is the ing game. Dylan Szychowski and Repasky. The tackles are Ricky Kle padlo, who kicked 38 extra points last anchor up front on both sides and Trevor Grohowski will Kyle Bobeck and Shon.

No Name Ht/Wt 1 Ricky Klepadlo 6-2/175 2 Darren Boseman 6-2/175 3 Keanu Ammons 6-1/175 4 Joe Ammons 6-1/215 6 Jahil Troy-Gaddis 6-1/175 7 Trevor Grohowski 5-11/175 8 Devland Heffron 6-0/175 9 Matt Engle 5-11/185 10 Brycen Sanford 6-2/175 11 Colby Butczynski 6-3/180 13 Bryce Hillard 5-11/165 14 Mike Marcella 5-1/165 17 Dylan Szychowski 6-3/195 20 Nate Penko 5-8/150 22 Devin Lohma 5-9/165 23 Sincere Shiloh 6-1/165 24 Austin Cheslaw 5-11/180 25 Nazir Coates 6-1/180 26 Colin Kashatus 5-8/175 27 John Shoemaker 5-11/175 34 Frank Flynn 5-11/180 35 Dalton Bopp 6-3/170 36 Shuquan Douglas 6-0/190 38 Shane Repasky 6-5/21 39 Brandon Rosario Clark 5-3/115 40 Andy Day 6-0 /185 42 Pierson Park 5-10/170 43 Armani Ventura 5-11/160 44 Oscar Kryznewski 5-10/175 49 Colin Seigel 5-10/170 51 Ed Rodriguez 5-10/205 53 Seth Pelton 6-0/215 56 Elijah Collison 6-4/260 58 Zack Pelton 5-10/170 59 John Novak 5-10/230 60 Andy Gurzynski 6-1/270 62 Daniel Shipierski 5-9/219 65 Kyle Bobeck 6-1/240 66 Scott Audia 67 Henry Sedorchuk 5-6/250 68 Joey Reiser 5-11/235 70 Aaron Marr 6-1/305 71 Chris Shon 5-11/245 72 Michael Partington 6-1/ 215 74 Braden Zaremba 6-2/305 76 John Ames 6-0/270 80 Ammyn Gregory 5-11/205 82 Brian Romero 5-10/165 84 Dylan Tuthill 6-0/ 160 86 Chase Mesick 6-1/210 87 John O’Borski 5-10/150 88 Calvin Brzozowski 6-0/200


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

32 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

TUNKHANNOCK EnrollmEnt: Class 4A

nicknamE: Tigers

HomEfiEld: Memorial Field

tHE coacH Mike Marabell First season

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent at Dallas Nanticoke Area at Pittston Area Coughlin Holy Redeemer at Towanda Crestwood at Wallenpaupack at Mid Valley Midd-West

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Marabell will get his welcome to high school football when the Tigers open up on the road against Dallas. The Tigers close the year at home against Midd-West, a program in its first year. In between, there will be several challenging games. The Tigers play Nanticoke Area, Pittston Area and Coughlin in consecutive weeks. There are also back-toback road games against Wallenpaupack and Mid Valley.

2017 rESUltS Opponent at Nanticoke Area Pittston Area Honesdale at Wyalusing Western Wayne at Lake-Lehman Crestwood at Meyers Towanda Northwest Record: 1-9

Score L, 33-21 L, 36-20 L, 43-31 W, 34-7 L, 32-24 L, 49-31 L, 42-18 L, 27-16 L, 42-35 L, 27-17

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Zack Rogers Jack Chilson Rushing Garrett Hopkins Matt Ramey Receiving Garrett Hopkins Jake Stephens

858 yards 377 yards 490 yards 131 yards 409 yards 415 yards

tunkhannock junior Brett Sickler, left, and senior Zach rogers CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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TUNKHANNOCK SCOUTING THE TIGERS BUY OR SELL Mike Marabell is in his first season as a varsity football coach. He takes over a program that has won four games in the last two years and eight in the last six seasons. Though he had 46 players on the roster heading into training camp, Marabell understands that all won’t make it through to the regular season. Marabell wants to instill discipline in the program, something he felt was lacking in recent years. He also wants the Tigers to play team football and not worry about the stat sheet or what the fans in the stands are thinking.

RAMEY

PETERSON

FRISCO

ROSTER

GETTING TO kNOw YOU

Secondary

Jake Stephens, who had 21 catches for 415 yards and Hopkins is the corner with three touchdowns last year, Rogers playing safety. Hopreturns at receiver. Jake Fris- kins recorded two intercepco, Riley Jones and Nate tions last year. Lord will all play here. Special teams

The Tigers enter the season with two quarterbacks with game experience and both are expected to play. Jack Chilson is the projectOffensive line Marabell said he planned ed starter after throwing for The center is Andrew Slu- on recruiting some players 377 yards and four touchdowns last year. Zach Rog- sark. Tyler Peterson and from the soccer team to be ers threw for 858 yards and Zach Fisher will be the the kicker and punter. — Steve Bennett five touchdowns. The offen- guards. At tackle will be

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BENNETT’S VIEw After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the tigers. Coach Marabell wants 100 percent effort when the Tigers take the field for practice and games. If the Tigers can do that, he believes they will see good things. They no longer have that one running back to pick up yards and make plays in the passing game. Every player on the field is going to need to know his responsibility and execute it to the best of his ability. At the same time, Marabell is not going to be afraid to sit anyone he feels is not buying in to what he is trying to teach. As he sees it, there is someone on the depth chart hungry to get on the field and play. Expect some growing pains this year, but the roster has enough youth that there will certainly be some lessons learned.

Name Troy Simmons Jake Frisco Dylan Henning Jaxson Montross Garret Hopkins Zach Ross Jack Chilson Luke Russell Tyler Chesla Sean Meder Riley Jones Nick Marabell Matt Prebola Jake Stevens Nathan Lord Evan Sackmann Chris Trochak Zach Rogers Shane Wood Ty Konen Isaac Eiden Gavin D’Amato Connor Elgin Michael Sickler Brian Christ Mason Roccograndi Stephen LaFata Ryan Simmons Matt Ramey Stephen Burd Carl Anthony Sergi Montross Bruce Cosner Walter Kamora Tyler Peterson Jaden Kozlowski Ryan Tanner Andrew Slusark John Vogel Zach Fisher Jacob Davenport Colin Porasky David Jervis Seth Reimiller Alex Daily Brett Sickler Jhamal Zacharias Alex Smith Alec Walter Alec Seboe

Ht/Wt 6-2/175 6-1/175 6-1/170 6-0/140 5-8/160 6-0/135 6-5/175 5-8/170 5-10/180 5-10/169 5-8/150 5-10/205 5-8/135 6-5/200 6-3/175 5-10/150 5-7/145 6-0/210 6-3/210 5-9/155 5-9/154 5-6/150 5-7/135 5-7/160 5-10/185 5-7/145 5-10/165 6-1/170 5-10/220 5-5/180 5-8/155 5-10/195 5-9/228 5-10/185 5-10/280 6-1/233 5-11/231 6-0/232 6-2/280 5-8/268 6-1/230 6-0/265 5-6/248 5-10/230 6-0/230 6-3/280 6-1/290 6-0/215 5-8/170 6-1/215

Pos Yr WR/DB Jr WR/DB Jr WR/DB Sr K Jr WR/DB Sr K Sr QB/DB So WR/DB Sr FB/LB Jr WR/DB So WR/DB So TE/DE Fr QB/LB Fr WR/DB Sr WR/DB So WR/DB Jr WR/DB So QB/LB Sr TE/DE So RB/LB Fr WR/DB So RB/LB Jr RB/DB So RB/LB Fr RB/LB So RB/DB Fr WR/DB Jr FB/LB So FB/DE Sr OL/DE Fr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Sr G/DE Fr OL/DL Fr G/DT Sr OL/DL Fr OL/DL Fr OL/DL So OL/DL Fr OL/DL So OL/DL Fr T/DL So OL/DL Fr OL/DL Fr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Jr TE/DL So TE/DE Jr OL/DL Jr FB/LB Jr

The F z

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“G Go Tigers!” 19:55 | CONNORSSTE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 33

BREAkdOwN

FRANK C. LAURI / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Lake-Lehman last season.

No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 21 25 26 27 31 33 36 41 42 44 49 52 55 56 57 58 59 62 65 70 71 72 73 75 76 77 78 82 88 91 99

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

Marabell coached in Tunkhannock’s mini program for seven years. With that said, he has a relationship with the freshmen and sophomores and is still working on establishing the same type of relationship with the juniors and seniors. The senior class is not very big, so there will be a lot of underclassmen taking the field. Marabell w a n t s t o s e e h ow t h e Tigers finish games. He Tunkhannock’s Garrett Hopkins runs the ball in a game vs. wants this group to learn sive scheme will primarily Brett Sickler and Alex Dailey. how to win. depend on who is on the The tight ends are Rogers PLAYER TO wATCH and Jamal Zacharias. field. Senior running back/ Running backs defensive line defensive back Garrett HopGar rett Hopkins and The ends are Ramey and kins has impressed Marabell throughout camp. The coach Gavin D’Amato are the run- Zacharias. The tackles are said Hopkins is an all-around ning backs. Hopkins was Dailey, Peterson, Alex Smith athlete with good instincts second on the team in rush- and Alec Walter. Walter is and does it all on the field. It’s ing with 490 yards and five also expected to slide over to his speed that separates him touchdowns. Matt Ramey, nose at times. from the pack. Hopkins can Brian Chris and Alec Seboe Linebackers turn it up a notch when nec- are the fullbacks. Ramey Stephens, Seboe, Sergey ran for 131 yards and one essary. Montros and Tyler Chesla score. POSITION-BY-POSITION are the linebackers. wide receivers

Quarterbacks

CHILSON


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

34 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

NORTHWEST EnrollmEnt: Class A

nicknamE: Rangers

HomEfiEld: Lewis & Miller Memorial Stadium

tHE coacH Lon Hazlet Fourth season at Northwest 22-11

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent at Lack. Trail at Meyers at Wyoming Area Holy Cross Lake-Lehman at GAR at Hanover Area at Wyalusing Old Forge Holy Redeemer

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Hazlet has never been one to shy away from competition. For the past two seasons, the Rangers played up in classification in all but one week. That changes this year with Northwest getting the benefit of playing all the Class A schools in the district. With a new stadium being built, the Rangers will play their first three games of the year on the road.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score at NP-Mansfield L, 14-10 at Lake-Lehman W, 25-7 Western Wayne L, 35-7 Lackawanna Trail L, 27-6 at Nanticoke Area W, 20-15 Holy Redeemer W, 42-14 at Hanover Area W, 55-22 GAR W, 45-8 Meyers W, 23-21 at Tunkhannock W, 27-17 Bloomsburg W, 31-30, 3OTs Record: 8-3

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing David Piestrak Rushing David Piestrak George May Tyler Stevens Receiving Connor Hazlet Rafael McCoy

1033 yards 484 yards 113 yards 70 yards 509 yards 95 yards

northwest seniors connor Hazlet, left, and david Piestrak CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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NORTHWEST scoUtiNG the raNGers New kids oN the block

wide receivers Connor Hazlet, Bryce Koser, Curtis Gregory and Ryan Wassell are the receivers. FRANK C. LAURI /CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Hazlet caught 30 passes for Construction workers roll and prepare the field for the 509 yards and 10 touchdowns renovation project. last season. Koser had once reception.

offensive line The centers are Jack Wessler and Adam Tarnowski. The guards are Blake Miller, Kevin Boyer, Shane Moss and Carson Savage. The tackles are Brendan Dixon, Liam Reinard, Capece and Nick Wilson. Acornley will see time at tight end.

defensive line Capece, Noss and Dixon are the ends. The tackles are May and Jayden Remensnyder.

linebackers The outside linebackers are Acornley, Wessler, Damian Saunders and Tyler Reakes. Playing inside are Stevens, Miller and Boyer.

secondary The corners are Koser, Gregory, JT Brubaker and Wassell. The safeties are Hazlet, Piestrak, JJ Whitesell and Nate Kuchka.

special teams Wessler, who kicked 33 extra points and seven field goals with a long of 36 yards last year, is the kicker. Wessler, Sam Saxe and Kody Verosky will be the punters.

Stadium almost ready by steVe beNNett STAFF WRITER

Northwest opens the season with three consecutive road games. It’s not an easy task by any means, especially for a program that has struggled out of the gate in the previous three seasons. The wait to play the first home game against Holy Cross in Week 4 will be well worth it. This season, the Rangers will unveil a new stadium that features an artificial playing surface, new lights, new bleachers on the home side, a new press box and a new scoreboard. The school board approved the project in the spring, and it’s estimatedtocost$2.5million. Construction began in late May, and Northwest agreed to play its first three games on the road in the event the project needs more time to be completed.

It’s a necessary upgrade to what was one of the most outdated football stadiums in the WVC. “It’s absolutely beautiful,” Northwest coach Lon Hazlet said. “I have to take my hat off to the school district. We now have a state-of-the-art fieldhouse. We built a new weight room last year. We have a new practice area and now a new stadium. The district made a tremendous commitment to the community and the sports program.” The only part of the old stadium that will not be refurbished is the seating on the visitors side. With Northwest now moving to artificial turf, the only programs in the conference still playing on a grass surface are Hanover Area, Nanticoke Area, Pittston Area, Tunkhannock and Wyoming Area.

— Steve Bennett

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 35

roster No 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 11 12 15 21 23 24 25

Name Lucas Acornley Tyler Stevens JT Brubaker Curtis Gregory JJ Whitesell Connor Hazlet Anthony Theodore David Piestrak Skylar Crispell George May Bryce Koser Damian Saunders John Krzywicki Sam Saxe

Ht/Wt 6-1/190 5-10/210 5-9/165 6-0/165 5-8/ 145 6-1/ 195 5-9/150 6-2/195 5-8/150 5-10/225 6-4/195 5-8/155 5-8/145 6-0/170

Pos Yr RB/DE Sr RB/LB Sr WR/DB Jr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Jr QB/DB Sr WR/DB Fr RB/DB So WR/DB Sr TE/DB Jr WR/DB Jr K/P Sr

35 40 41 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 62 64

Chase Biller Tyler Reakes Austin Benscoter Camdon Capece Jack Wessler Shane Eddinger Kevin Boyer Hunter Hardy Shane Noss Blake Miller Steven Krolick Liam Reinard Eddy Sikora Nick Wilson Aaron Rittle

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6-2/180 5-11/160 5-9/160 6-1/225 5-10/185 5-9/250 6-2/215 6-0/160 6-3/235 6-0/195 5-10/170 5-10/235 5-11/240 6-2/240 5-9/175

TE/LB TE/LB RB/LB OL/DL K/OL OL/DL OL/LB TE/DE OL/DL OL/DE OL/LB OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL

Fr Fr Jr Sr Jr Fr Sr So Sr Jr Fr Fr Jr Jr So

65 66 69 71 72 73 74 78 80 81 84 88 90

Seth Milich 5-10/185 Carson Savage 6-1/215 Brendan Dixon 6-0/250 Adam Tarnowski 5-10/240 JT Verbinski 6-2/230 James Sorber 6-0/205 Jayden Remensnyder 5-11/170 Dom Klass 6-3/210 Ryan Wassel 5-11/170 Nate Kuchka 5-9/155 Colton Hashagen 6-2/170 Jordan Lindbuchler 5-8/150 Jeff Sikora 6-0 /170

OL/DL So OL/DL So OL/DL Jr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Fr OL/DE So OL/DL Fr WR/DB So RB/DB So QB/DB Jr WR/DB Fr WR/DB Sr

wessler

May

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THE CITIZENS' VOICE

As a Class A school, Nor thwest generally doesn’t have the luxury of being able to reload. It’s usually a case of plugging in players who have waited their turn. That will be the deal this year with 13 seniors having graduated FRANK C. LAURI / CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER from last year’s team. Not only is the program look- Northwest captains, from left, Camdon Capece, Connor ing to replace 13 experi- Hazlet, David Piestrak and Tyler Stevens. enced players, the team beNNett’s View will be looking to fill the gap with the leadership After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve that will be lost. That Bennett gives his take on the Rangers. means this senior class, These are a few of the things we will know about Northand for that matter, a bulk west before it takes the field for its first game of the of the juniors who have year: The Rangers will be physical, they will play with a bit of nastiness and they have skill players on the perimebeen around, will need to ter and at quarterback who can make plays. Defensively, step up and provide leaderthey will be a tough group that will look to get after the ship. There are plenty of quarterback. What we also know about Northwest is it is players on the roster who traditionally a slow starting team. In Hazlet’s tenure,the head coach Lon Hazlet is Rangers have never had a winning record after Week 3. excited about. But now that This year, the first three games are on the road, includit is time to be the full-time ing a game with Lackawanna Trail. When you bring up players, not only is he lookLackawanna Trail to coach Hazlet, he says if you ask him ing for them to produce on how many times Northwest has lost to Lackawanna Trail the field, he wants them to since he has been there, the answer is every time. That take control of the locker will have to change. This team will be competitive and room and help lead the way. win its share of games. The biggest question is how it will get out of the gate. A slow start has the potential to FroNt aNd ceNter be devastating. But this is a program that plays its best The strength of the offense football at the end of the year. The Rangers have the pohave been the running backs. tential to be a good to very good team. The Rangers always seem to find that one featured back PositioN-by-PositioN who can carry the team. Part is that he is just a pure athbreakdowN of the running back success lete. He can beat teams with has been a reliable and his arm as well as his legs. Quarterbacks strong offensive line. This But what Hazlet likes the Coming into camp, there year, the Rangers will be most about Piestrak is the inexperienced up front, with way he has developed into a was no question who the just one starter returning in leader since taking over as starter was going to be. Piesleft tackle Camdon Capece. the quarterback in his trak, one of the top quarterThe Rangers do have players sophomore year. The key to backs in the conference, returning on the front five Piestrak’s success this year returns. Last year, he passed who have played, they just will be how well the Rang- for 1,029 yards and 12 touchdon’t have a lot of starts ers can protect him. Pies- downs. He also rushed for 484 treak, a senior, has com- yards and four scores. Tyler under their belts. bined for almost 40 touch- Stevens is the backup. Player to watch downs either rushing or running backs The best way to describe passing as well as 4,000 total quarterback David Piestrak yards. Usually a position of

strength for the Rangers, this year there will be some new faces with minimal experience, but plenty of potential. George May, Stevens and Lucas Acornley are the running backs. May had 10 rushing attempts last season and Stevens had 24.

19:57 | CONNORSSTE


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

36 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

WYOMING AREA EnrollmEnt: Class 3A

nicknamE: Warriors

HomEfiEld: Anthony “Jake” Sobeski Memorial Stadium

tHE coacH Randy Spencer 11th season 53-56

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 13 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent at Mid Valley Coughlin Northwest Nanticoke Area at GAR at Lake-Lehman Meyers at Redeemer (1) Hanover Area at Pittston Area

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Moving down to Class 3A certainly changed the landscape of the schedule. Gone are Wallenpaupack, Crestwood, Berwick, Scranton Prep and Williamsport. Additions include Mid Valley, Northwest, Nanticoke Area, GAR, Lake-Lehman, Holy Redeemer and Meyers. Though you have to figure if the Warriors entertain any thoughts of winning a district title, they will run into Scranton Prep somewhere along the way.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score at Wallenpaupack W, 7-3 at Crestwood L, 21-18 Berwick L, 17-14 at Coughlin L, 17-14 at Scranton Prep L, 24-0 Hanover Area W, 54-14 at GAR W, 44-7 Dallas L, 21-20, OT Williamsport W, 58-42 Pittston Area L, 24-21 at Berwick L, 42-0 Record: 4-7

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Dominic DeLuca 1312 yards Rushing Dominic DeLuca 284 yards Darren Rodney 251 yards Corey Mruk 88 yards Receiving Brian Williams 325 yards Darren Rodney 57 yards

Wyoming area juniors dominic deluca, left, and Samuel Solomon CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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Wyoming Area linemen, first row, from left, Jimmy Miller, AJ Merlino, Bryce Hunkle, Nasir Condry, Samuel Solomon, Derek Ambrosino, Jaryn Polit-Moran, Patrick Nelson, Vincent Bowers and James Gashi. Second row, Jayden Rusyn, Jacob Mikoliczyk, Michael Amato, Shawn Kostak, Stephen Sokach-Minnick, Matt Wycoski, Tyler Jenkins, Thomas Wycoski, Cameron Carr, Dante Bovani, Tierre Rhodes and Jaleem DeJesus. Carr and Ambrosino. Solomon may also slide over to tackle on occasion and will be joined by Wycoski, James Gashi, Stephen Sokach-Minnick, Polit-Moran and Amato. The nose guards are Cegelka, Banashefski, Colby Gashi, Braccini and Anthony Scalzo.

linebackers Mruk, Banashefski, Braccini, Dillon Williams, Elko and Graham are on the inside. Playing on the outside are Rodney, DePietro and Rusyn.

Secondary

bENNETT’S VIEW After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Warriors. This is the Class 3A team that has been the buzz of the offseason. Dropping down from Class 4A, where the Warriors have tasted some success, the Warriors have been tabbed as the team to beat in the conference. They return experience at quarterback, running back and wide receiver. The one question mark is the offensive line. Last year, it was an inexperienced group that was in the developmental stages. This year, the group has several returning starters that are a more mature group that has gotten stronger and quicker. Though they may not be the biggest group, they can move. Also, they have the experience of playing in some pretty big games against some pretty good teams. Health is always a question with the Warriors, who have sustained several damaging injuries over the past several seasons. This team should put up a lot of points on the offensive side of the ball.

The corners are Rodney, Brian Williams, Williamson, DeLuca and Jake Busch. The safeties are DeLuca, Jacob kicking. DeLuca is the puntWilliams and Rodney. er. Last year, Braccini kicked 24 extra points and Special teams had one field goal from 27 FJ Braccini, Aleah Kran- yards. — Steve Bennett son and Josh Cumbo are

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No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 11 15 16 17 19 22 23 25 26 27 29 30 31 33 35 36 38 39 41 42 43 44 47 50 51 52 53 54 57 58 59 62 64 66 68 69 71 72 74 76 85 86 87 88 90 94 95 99

Name Ht/Wt Darren Rodney 6-0/190 Quadre Sessoms 6-0/185 Rocco Pizano 5-6/145 Riley Rusyn 5-9/165 Zajquay Williamson 5-7/160 Brian Williams 6-1/190 Dimitri DePietro 5-10/175 Dominic DeLuca 6-1/185 Derek Ambrosino 6-3/233 Blaise Sokach-Minnick6-2/165 Giovani Sancho 5-10/190 Jacob Williams 5-10/190 Jake Busch 5-10/175 Leonardo Haros 5-9/145 Corey Mruk 5-10/180 Colby Gashi 5-8/165 Charlie Banashefski 5-6/170 Anthony Scalzo 5-7/170 Jesse Cegelka 5-7/180 Vincenzo Giambra 5-7/155 Peter Calimeres 5-7/165 Matt Benton 5-11/170 Enzo Scotto-Diluzio 5-9/185 FJ Braccini 5-9/185 Matt Skilonger 5-7/140 Aleah Kranson 5-7/120 John O’Brien 5-7/140 Cameron Carr 6-4/205 Dillon Williams 6-3/250 Nicholas Elko 6-2/265 Jerrel Chepalonis 5-8/150 Dante Bovani 5-11/200 Bryce Hinkle 5-8/195 Nasir Condry 5-7/200 AJ Merlino 5-10/200 Patrick Nelson 6-1/215 Tierre Rhodes 6-1/255 Michael Amato 5-11/215 Jayden Rusyn 6-0/230 Jaryn Polit-Moran 6-0/220 Vincent Bowers 5-9/190 Shawn Kostak 6-1/235 Jaleem DeJesus 5-8/190 Stephen Sokach-Minnick 6-1/205 Thomas Wycoski 6-4/300 James Gashi 5-8/250 Tyler Jenkins 6-3/200 Matt Wycoski 6-3/275 Jacob Mikoliczyk 6-2/205 Caleb Graham 6-3/210 Tom Collins 5-10/155 Adam Sigman 5-6/120 Samuel Solomon 6-3/295 Jimmy Miller 6-1 /180 Josh Cumbo 5-7/190 Billy Sabatelli 5-10/185

Pos RB WR WR RB RB WR WR QB TE QB WR QB WR RB RB RB RB RB RB RB WR WR RB RB WR K WR TE TE RB WR G C C T T T G G G G T G T T G T T TE TE TE WR RB TE K TE

Yr Jr Jr Fr Jr Jr Jr Sr Jr Jr Fr Sr So Sr Fr Jr So Jr Sr Sr So Sr Sr Jr Jr So Sr Jr Sr Jr Fr So Jr So So So Sr Sr Sr Fr Sr So So So Sr Jr Sr Sr Sr Sr Jr So So Jr Jr Jr Sr

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T HE C IT IZE NS' V O IC E

ca is developing as a leader. DeLuca has the potential to be a playmaker on both sides Last season, Wyoming of the ball. Area’s offensive line was fair- POSITION-by-POSITION ly inexperienced and wasn’t bREAkdOWN very big. That has changed. The Warriors are stronger Quarterbacks and more mature. With DeLuca returns as the maturity comes experience. Those two points of empha- starter after appearing in all sis should make the group 11 games last season, includbetter this year. Early om last ing a playoff game against at year, the coaches were work- Berwick. Last season, the ing on developing this group. Warriors had six players Near the end of the year, it attempt a pass in a game. The was a much more polished backups are Jacob Williams unit. The coaches are hoping and Blaise Sokach-Minnick. that carries over to this seaRunning backs son and the group comes out The running backs are firing off the ball on opening Corey Mruk, Darren Rodney, night. Zajquay Williamson and CharTAkING NOTHING lie Banashefski. The fullbacks fOR GRANTEd are Solomon, Dillon Williams, The fact that the Warriors FJ Bracini, Jesse Cegelka and have been tabbed as the team Nicholas Elko. Rodney rushed to beat should come as no for 251 yards last season, while surprise. They have talent all Mruk ran for 88. Each scored a over the field. Plus, with the touchdown. addition of transfer Sammy Wide receivers Solomon from Valley West, Brian Williams, Dimitri the Warriors have found their fullback and another DePietro, Jake Busch, Jacob force on the defensive line. Williams and Riley Rusyn The Warriors are also mov- are the receivers. Williams ing down from Class 4A to was second on the team in 3A. But that does not auto- receptions with 20 and avermatically translate into easy aged 12.9 yards per catch. wins on Friday nights. Head Offensive line coach Randy Spencer has Stephen Sokach-Minnick, been preaching to the group that hard work got them to Bryce Hinkle and Nasir Condry are the centers. The this point. guards are Michael Amato, PlAyER TO WATCH Jaryn Polit-Moran, Patrick Junior quarterback/defen- Nelson and Dante Bovani. sive back Dominic DeLuca The tackles are Matt Wycoswas thrown into the fire ki, James Gashi, Thomas quickly last year when the Wycoski and Shawn Kostak. Warriors lost their starting The tight ends are Derek quarterback on the fourth Ambrosino, Cameron Carr, play of the season. DeLuca Jacob Mikoliczyk and Caleb came on and had a solid sea- Graham. son, throwing for 1,312 yards defensive line and 17 touchdowns. Spencer The ends are Solomon, is impressed with how DeLu-


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

38 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

HAZLETON AREA EnrollmEnt: Class 6A

nicknamE: Cougars

HomEfiEld: Harman-Geist Stadium

tHE coacH Mike Brennan Fifth season at Hazleton Area 15-28

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent Pottsville Valley West at Dallas Williamsport at Wallenpaupack at Delaware Valley Berwick at Scranton at Coughlin Crestwood

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Being a Class 6A team, the Cougars certainly play bigboy football. They get a break in opening the season at home for the first two weeks, but the guests will be anything but friendly in Pottsville and Valley West. After a trip to Dallas, Hazleton Area returns home to take on a powerful Williamsport team.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Berwick at Valley West Williamsport Abington Heights at Wallenpaupack at Del. Valley Scranton Donegal at Dallas at Crestwood at Williamsport at Delaware Valley Record: 7-5

Score L, 24-10 W, 17-15 L, 28-26 W, 49-19 W, 34-13 L, 28-14 W, 34-8 L, 20-14 W, 16-13 W, 35-0 W, 28-27 L, 31-3

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Sparky Wolk 2183 yards Rushing Damon Horton 679 yards Sparky Wolk 233 yards Receiving David Smith 657 yards Jacob Hunsinger 373 yards Damon Horton 574 yards

Hazleton area seniors damon Horton, left, and Sparky Wolk CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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HAZLETON AREA SCOUTING THE COUGARS IT mAy SOUNd ClICHE Every football coach has the same goal in mind heading into a new season: The team must remain healthy. Some coaches say if they lose the wrong player or two, the season has the potential to spiral out of control. Hazleton Area coach Mike Brennan is no different. His top priority this year will be keeping the Cougars healthy. This year’s team has depth at quite a few spots. That is the good thing. The bad part is there are some spots where the depth is not there. Brennan has used the summer and training camp to build some of that depth.

GETTING dEfENSIvE Brennan feels good about his defensive line. He likes the speed and athleticism in the secondary. He feels there are players at those two spots that can and have proven can make plays. What he’s most concerned about is the linebacker position. He’s not questioning the ability of the players; it’s just they must replace a pair of outstanding linebackers. The five players he expects to play the spot are all capable of doing the job. They begin the season knowing they have some big shoes to fill.

PlAyER TO wATCH Senior wide receiver/ defensive back Nolan Schneider is one of the Cougars to keep an eye on this year. His

ROSTER Fuchick. The guards are Jason Biever and Jefferson Luna. The tackles are Josh Hedrington and Jordan Cunningham. The tight ends are Vinny Damiano and Jared Cunningham.

defensive line Playing on the line this year will be Bryann Zavas, Richie Santos. Seth HunsingHazleton Area captains, from left, Jacob Hunsinger, er, Jared Cunningham, Isaac Garcia, Vinny Damiano and Sparky Wolk, Damon Horton and Dallas Solomon. Fuchick. Santos started contributions go way beyond every game last year at nose. Running backs what appears on the stat Seth Hunsinger played last Damon Horton and Lance year as a freshman. sheet or the box score on Saturday morning. Last year, he Johnson are the running linebackers made two huge plays on the backs. The fullbacks are Dallas Austin Andreuzzi, Bryce defensive side of the ball that Solomon and Kevin Meluskey. helped change the momen- Horton led the team in rushing Reed, Johnson, Solomon, tum in a win over Wallenpau- last year with 679 yards and Horton and Fisher are the pack. Schneider put in the seven touchdowns. He aver- linebackers. The group might necessary work during the aged 5.7 yards per carry. John- be the best running group of offseason to come back big- son carried the ball five times linebackers the Cougars have ger, stronger and faster. His in two games last year. Melus- had in some time. versatility allows him to play key had three carries. Secondary several spots on the field. He wide receivers Wolk and Jacob Hunsingalso hauled in seven passes This is a position of er are the free safeties. Wolk last year for an average of strength for the Cougars. can also slide over to corner 16.4 yards per reception POSITION-By-POSITION David Smith returns as the where he will be joined at most experienced of the group. times by Horton, depending BREAkdOwN Fisher will also see time here. on the package. Smith and Evan Matvas, Nick Damiano, Schneider will also factor Quarterbacks Schneider, Jacob Hunsinger heavily on the back end of S e n i o r S p a rk y Wo l k and Frank Ator will also be the defense. returns as the starter. He here. Smith led the team in Special teams passed for 2,243 yards and 20 receptions with 47 last season. Will Barrientos will do the touchdowns last year. He He averaged 14.0 yards per completed 56.5 percent of his catch and caught six touch- kicking and punting. He passes and only threw six down passes. Jacob Hunsinger appeared in four games last interceptions in 269 attempts. had 33 catches last year, while year before getting injured. He kicked 10 extra points and Matt Fisher, a junior, is the Schneider had seven catches. two field goals. If necessary, backup. Fisher attempted Offensive line Wolk can also punt. four passes last year complet— Steve Bennett The center is Michael ing three of them.

No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 22 23 25 26 27 30 31 33 34 35 37 39 40 42 44 45 47 50

Name Ht/Wt 5-8/145 Luke Russo Mitchell Masten 5-10/155 5-10/165 Matt Fisher Nick Damiano 5-10/155 5-10/155 Evan Matya David Smith 6-2/205 5-11/175 Sparky Wolk Michael Kilker 6-1/185 5-10/160 Christian Price Kellen Warner 5-9/155 6-0/180 Deylis Rodriguez Will Barrientos 5-8/145 6-0/180 Nolan Schneider Ben Zahorchak 5-6/125 5-4/135 Paul Velez Dante Alucci 5-10/200 Henry Polanco 5-8/145 Christopher Gonzalez 5-5/135 Damon Horton 5-10/200 Dante Materella 5-9/160 5-6/140 Michael Lopez Adrian Nivar 5-9/140 Thyre Burchette 5-9/170 Bryce Molinaro 5-10/170 5-9/175 Lance Johnson Bryant Barbush 5-8/155 Frank Ator 5-11/195 Stephen Drasher 6-0/180 6-2/210 Dallas Solomon Raj Patel 5-7/160 6-0/215 Kevin Meluskey Austin Andreuzzi 6-0/190 Aaron Smith 5-10/160 Joel Santos 5-9/175 Richie Santos 5-10/215

Pos Yr Fr K/P WR/DB Fr QB/DB Jr RB/DB So WR/DB So WR/DB Sr QB/DB Sr QB/LB So WR/DB Fr QB/DB So RB/DB So K/P Sr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Jr RB/DB So TE/LB So RB/DB Sr RB/DB So RB/LB Sr RB/LB So WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr RB/LB Sr RB/LB Fr RB/LB Jr RB/LB Fr WR/LB Sr RB/LB So RB/LB Sr WR/DB Jr RB/LB So RB/LB Sr WR/DB So WR/DB Jr OL/LB Jr

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 62 63 65 66 67 70 71 72 74 76 77 78 80 81 82 83 85 86 88 89 90 91 93 94 96

Bryce Reed Damon Vitacco James Bugda Dylan McCoy Michael Fuchick Bryann Zayas Max Barrett Seth Hunsinger Bryan Kelly Isaac Garcia Leo Kelly Daffry Mercedes Jefferson Luna Jordan Cunningham Chris Lopez Jose Cuello Matt Minzola Jason Biever Josh Hedrington Emis Maddox Khewin Tatis Max Gipson Jordan Harayda Jacob Hunsinger Bryce Torstrup Vinny Damiano Jared Cunningham Juan Ortiz Gavin Guza Jeremy Chapman Jhoan Robles Julio Gonzalez Roberto Rivera Yandel Pascal Eliazar Moreno

5-9/190 5-9/190 5-9/180 5-10/170 5-11/265 5-9/190 5-9/180 5-10/195 5-10/250 5-11/235 5-9/190 6-0/230 6-0/285 6-7/265 5-8/200 5-10/270 6-1/260 6-2/265 6-5/270 5-9/230 6-3/280 5-10/235 5-9/160 6-1/185 6-1/185 5-11/200 6-3/235 5-10/180 6-2 /170 6-4/180 5-10/190 6-0/190 5-10/205 6-0/200 5-10/200

OL/LB Jr DL Sr C/LB So OL/DL So OL/DL Sr DL Sr OL/DL So OL/DL So OL/DL Jr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Fr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Sr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Jr OL/DL So OL/DL Sr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Jr OL/DL So OL/DL So TE/LB Sr WR/DB So WR/DB Sr TE/LB Sr TE/DL Jr TE/DL So TE/DL Sr TE/DL So DL Jr DL Sr DL Jr DL So

BENNETT’S vIEw After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Cougars. Optimism is high at Hazleton Area this year. With that comes higher expectations. This year’s team has the biggest expectations since coach Brennan took over the program. It starts with quarterback Sparky Wolk and running back Damon Horton. Add that to the wide receiver position, and there is plenty of excitement as far as the skill positions go. Then there is the defense. The linebackers may not have the experience as in the previous years, but this might be the fastest group the Cougars have had at linebacker in a while. And with that comes the ability to make plays. Brennan really likes the secondary and the potential the group brings. But what the Cougars need to do this year is get over the hump. If this Hazleton Area team can put its head down and keep moving forward, the Cougars might find themselves playing for another subregional championship.

Game officials to enforce equipment violations The National Federation of State High School Association Rules Committee has once again developed a few new rules with player safety being the primary concern. This year, players will notice an increased awareness by game officials during pregame to make sure all uniformed players are properly equipped. “It’s very similar to basketball now,” said veteran PIAA referee Chuck Suppon, who is entering his

WB_VOICE - T150 - 39 - 08/22/18

31st season as an official. “If a player is wearing all the required equipment but is not legally equipped, the official will call timeout and send that player to the sideline.” Suppon said the player in question will have to miss one play, and if a coach elects to burn a timeout, the player must remain on the sideline for one play. An example of a player not being properly equipped will be a dangling mouthpiece, an unbuckled chinstrap or missing knee pads. “It’s imperative right now,” Sup-

pon said. “They are really moving to ensure player safety. We are going to harp on it. You will see heightened awareness in pregame.” There is also a cleat on the market made by Adidas that sells for as much as $150. The shoe has spikes on it and is considered illegal. Rules as far as the kicking game have also been adjusted. If a team is kicking or punting and there is a penalty called on the kicking team, the return team can have the penalty assessed at the succeeding spot. Suppon cited an example of when

during a kick or punt, a player from the kicking team is called for a penalty while the ball is in the air. If the ball is returned to the 35 yard line, the new option will be that the return team may choose to have the penalty assessed from where the play ended. On kickoffs, if the ball is kicked out of bounds at the 34, the receiving team can elect to have the kicking team re-kick, or take 5 yards from where the ball went out of bounds. In this case, the ball would be placed at the 39. “They are putting these rules in

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to increase safety,” Suppon said. “They just want to minimize the number of re-kicks.” Another rule in regards to a passer being a defenseless player has been cleaned up. “There was some confusion if you hit the quarterback while he had the ball, people were still calling roughing the passer,” Suppon said. “They clarified that. Now the quarterback becomes a passer when he throws the pass. If he is tackled while the ball is in his hands, he is considered a runner.”

20:00 | CONNORSSTE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 39

By STEvE BENNETT STAFF WRITER

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

RULE CHANGES


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

40 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

BERWICK EnrollmEnt: Class 4A

nicknamE: Dawgs

HomEfiEld: Crispin Field

tHE coacH Frank Sheptock Third season 18-8

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent Abington Heights Pittston Area at Williamsport at Valley West at Selinsgrove Valley View at Hazleton Area Crestwood Dallas at Coughlin

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn Berwick has the luxury of playing its first two games at home. Then, Berwick hits the road for three straight weeks, heading to Williamsport, Valley West and Selinsgrove. When they finally return home, the Dawgs get the chance to host Valley View before hitting the road again for a trip to Hazleton Area.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score at Hazleton Area W, 24-10 Dallas W, 23-7 at Wyoming Area W, 17-14 Crestwood W, 56-0 Selinsgrove L, 17-6 at Coughlin W, 24-6 at Pittston Area W, 36-0 Valley West W, 44-22 Lake-Lehman W, 41-14 at Williamsport L, 32-27 Wyoming Area W, 42-0 North Pocono W, 48-14 Valley View L, 24-17 2 OT Record: 10-2

nUmBErS GamE Returning leaders Passing Alexander Force

660 yards

Rushing Owen Shoemaker 799 yards Receiving Teagan Wilk Justin Robbins

175 yards 89 yards

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Berwick senior Ben Peck, left and senior Joe lynn CHRISTOPHER DOLAN / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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BERWICK scouting the dAwgs A position of strength One of the positives for Berwick on the defensive side of the ball is the strength of the interior box. Head coach Frank Sheptock really likes the potential of the interior group with the linebackers, defensive line and Teagan Wilk in the middle. That is one of the strengths of this year’s team. Of course, it makes it easier considering the Bulldogs have seven players returning on the defensive side of the ball along with four on offense.

wilk

roster

still A bit young

Owen Shoemaker was primarily a backup last season,

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Name Ht/Wt Mason Laubach 6-2/236 Alexander Force 6-2/155 Jacob Betz 5-10/165 Jarret Groshek 5-9/154 Alexander Sharkuski 5-10/174 Jacob Seely 6-3/191 Teagan Wilk 5-10/181 Justin Robbins 5-9/162 Blane Cleaver 6-2/192 Ryan Laubach 6-0/172 Preston Robbins 5-9/151 Logan Babb 5-8/161 Misael Hernandez 5-8/165 NaQuan Smith 6-1/161 Aiden Mason 5-10/181 Colin Hill 6-1/171 Peyton Williams 6-1/178 Maurice Smith 5-9/145 Stas Hughes 6-1/197 Blake Girton 5-9/160 Blake Maurer 5-8/157 Brandon Spezialetti 5-9/182 Nicholas Heimbach 5-11/195 Cole Martelli 5-11/160 Joshua Daubert 5-9/170 Dallas Schechterly 5-11/198 Owen Shoemaker 5-9/201 Mason Laytar 5-9/198 Eric Montes 6-1/227 Joseph Lynn 5-10/191 Aaron Cashman 5-10/254 Anthony Sisco 6-0/201 Nathan Traugh 5-10/196 Joshua Snyder 6-0/212 Keigan Hunter 6-0/200 Sullivan Slabinski 6-1/237 Ethan Hughes 6-3/283 Josh Santana 6-2/268 Brian Knorr 6-2/255 Jake Lanning 6-1/237 Justyn Eckert 6-2/297 Mike Zalutko 6-2/236 Benjamin Peck 6-2/271 Jordan Young 6-1/226 Trent Strother 6-1/274 Shawn Powell 6-2/285 Colton Ruckle 5-10/226 Gabriel DiPippa 5-9/217 Noah Craig 5-11/256 Kaleb Evans 5-8/160 Cody Smith 5-11/160 Antonio Baratta 5-9/168 William Decker 6-2/212

Pos Yr DL/RB So QB Sr WR/DB Sr WR/DB Sr DB/WR Sr DB/WR Sr DB/WR Jr WR Sr LB/HB So QB/DB Jr WR/DB Jr LB/RB Jr K Sr DB Sr RB/DB Fr DB Sr DB/QB So DB Sr LB/RB So DB Sr RB/DB So RB/LB So LB/FB Jr WR Jr LB So LB/HB Jr RB Sr LB/FB Sr DL/RB Jr LB/RB Sr OL/DL Jr OL/DL Jr OL/DL So DL/OL Sr DL Jr OL Jr OL/DL So DL So OL So OL/DL So OL Sr OL/DL Jr DL/OL Sr OL/DL So DL Jr OL Jr OL Sr OL Jr OL/DL Jr HB/DL So K So DB Jr DL/TE Sr

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20:01 | CONNORSSTE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 41

running backs

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No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 28 29 30 36 39 40 42 44 52 55 56 57 58 60 61 62 64 65 70 71 72 73 74 75 77 78 79 80 82 84 90

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

The Bulldogs are going to be relatively young on offense. There are some pretDAVE SCHERBENCO / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER ty big shoes to fill. What conBerwick defensive backs, first row, from left, Preston Robbins, Jarret Groshek, NaQuan Smith and Jacob Betz. Second cerns Sheptock the most row, Antonio Baratta, Blake Mauer, Payton Willaims, Jacob Seely, Ryan Laubad, Teagan Wilk and Blake Girton. about the offense is the lack of game experience. Shepspecific positions to the Other tackles include Craig tock will be searching to find bennett’s View group with the exception of and Peck. the right combination to best the tight end spot. However, utilize the talent on the field. After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve linebackers Bennett gives his take on the Dawgs. he is pleased with the depth He is also hoping to get better Berwick is always an intriguing team at the beginning Dallas Schechterly, Ryan Lauthe group provides. Noah play from the offensive line, of any new season. This year is no exception. Berwick Craig, Mike Zalutko and bach,AntonioBaratta,JakeSeesomething he feels was not will be tested early on. The three teams the Dawgs lost Ben Peck are retur ning ley and Sharkuski are on the there in the games Berwick to last season are all on the schedule within the first starters. Others in the mix outside. Cleaver, Lynn and lost last season. six weeks of this year. will be Sullivan Slabinski, Schechterlywillplayinside. plAyer to wAtch Coach Sheptock did some experimenting this year, A n t h o ny S i s c o, A a ro n secondary trying to fit players in as one-way players. What will be Junior all-purpose player Cashman, Justyn Eckert interesting to see is how the team responds when it Wilk is expected to be one of Wilk is the free safety. Peyand Colton Ruckle. Of the gets into a physical back and forth game. That was a the most electrifying players group, only Ruckle and Eck- ton Williams, NaQuan question mark last year, and the team responded fairly in the conference this year. ert did not see time last Smith, Robbins and Sharkuswell. The trick will be able to do it again this year. As Wilk, who plays receiver, in year. The tight ends are ki are the corners. long as the depth comes along, expect Berwick to be in the defensive secondary and Blaine Cleaver, Montes and the hunt for a postseason run. special teams on special teams, can make Will Decker. Decker saw Groshek, Blake Girton and plays from any place on the time on the offensive line wide receivers field. He has added size to his but still managed to rush for last year and Sheptock feels Misael Hernandez are the Wilk, Justin Robbins, Alex the time will have a differ- kickers. Sharkuski and Jake frame and was already one 922 yards and 14 touchdowns. of the quickest players in the He averaged 6.8 yards per Sharkuski, Preston Robbins ent presence with the Betz will punt. — Steve Bennett conference. Defensively, he carry. Joe Lynn and Mason and Jarret Groshek are the switch to tight end. led the team with seven inter- Laubach also return. Shep- receivers. Wilk has the most defensive line ceptions returning two of tock plans to give Eric Mon- experience, while Justin Montes, Mason Laubach, tes a look at running back. Robbins had nine catches for them for touchdowns. Decker and JJ Snyder are the Mason Laubach is a bigger 89 yards last year. position-by-position ends. Snyder provides flexiback that gives the Dawgs offensive line breAkdown bility to move around a bit some flexibility. Sheptock did not assign and could see time at tackle. Quarterbacks Alex Force made six starts at quarterback last season after the projected starter missed time to injury. He went 5-1 and finished the year throwing for 660 yards and five touchdowns. Ryan Laubach, who also saw limited time last season, returns.

force


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

42 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

WILLIAMSPORT EnrollmEnt: Class 6A

nicknamE: Millionaires

HomEfiEld: STA Stadium

tHE coacH Charles Crews Jr. Fourth season at Williamsport 25-11

2018 ScHEdUlE Date Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 Sept. 14 Sept. 21 Sept. 28 Oct. 5 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

Opponent Central Mountain at Altoona Berwick at Hazleton Area at Crestwood Scranton at Pittston Area at Delaware Valley Wallenpaupack at Valley West

All games 7 p.m. unless noted

ScHEdUlE BrEakdoWn For the Millionaires, this will be like going from one end of the state to the other all in the span of 10 weeks. Travel is always an issue for Williamsport, but this year the Millionaires have four home games and six away. Two of those road trips will take the team to Altoona and Delaware Valley. The way Crews sees it all, it means a lot of movies and the opportunity for team bonding.

2017 rESUltS Opponent Score at Cent. Mountain W, 34-7 Mifflin County W, 49-26 at Hazleton Area W, 28-26 Valley West L, 48-34 Shikellamy W, 45-38, 2OTs at Scranton W, 38-34 Delaware Valley L, 55-17 at Coughlin W, 55-10 at Wyoming Area L, 58-42 Berwick W, 32-27 Hazleton Area L, 28-27 Record: 7-4

nUmBErS GamE Returning Leaders Passing Joseph Fagnano 2410 yards Rushing Blaze McClements 605 yds Joseph Fagnano 387 yards Marcus Simmons 182 yards Receiving Marcus Simmons 938 yards Colin Esposito 307 yards

Williamsport quarterback Joe fagnano WILLIAMSPORT SUN-GAZETTE

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19:18 | CONNORSSTE


WILLIAMSPORT scoUting the Millionaires Keeping his fingers crossed Just like every other coach, remaining healthy is a top priority for Williamsport’s Charles Crews. The Millionaires have been fortunate, for the most part, to avoid the injury bug. The team did lose all-everything running back Trey Potts last season, but generally speaking the Millionaires have been able to keep the offensive and defensive fronts intact. That has ultimately led the team to being one of the most dominant in the conference in recent years.

he’s bacK Potts is one of the more dynamic running backs to carry the ball in the conference in some time. He suffered a season-ending knee injury before last year. The Minnesota commit rushed for 2,923 yards so far in his career and scored 53 touchdowns. In his absence last season, the Millionaires went to the air a little bit and relied on the arm of Joe Fagnano. Now, Crews has to find a way to work Potts back into the game plan, while at the same time not messing with the rhythm Fagnano and receiver Marcus Simmons developed last season.

offensive line

bennett’s VieW After visiting every team in the WvC, staff writer Steve Bennett gives his take on the Millionaires. You probably didn’t think Williamsport would be able to duplicate its offensive numbers from two years ago. The Millionaires proved you wrong. The team averaged 407.5 yards per game to go along with 36.4 points per game. Insert Potts back into the lineup and this team has the feel of being another offensive juggernaut. Defensively, the Millionaires took a bit of a step back last year, allowing 313.1 yards and 32.4 points per game. The Millionaires are the prohibitive favorite in the big-school division in the WVC. The return of Trey Potts only makes this team more dangerous after the year Joe Fagnano had throwing the ball as a junior. If the defense comes to play, and make plays, look out.

All he did was lead the team in rushing with 605 yards and averaged 4.9 yards per carry. With Potts back in the fold, McClements will serve as a nice complement in the backfield. Defensively is where Crews is expecting to see McClements make an impact this season. After being listed as a linebacker last season, McClements is being moved to defensive end.

position-by-position breaKdoWn Quarterbacks

There’s no question who the starter is this year. Joe Fagnano, who took over the reigns of the offense last seaplayer to Watch son, returns for his senior season. In As a junior, Blaze McClements his first year as the starter, he threw stepped in to fill the void left when for 2,413 yards, 30 touchdowns and Potts was injured. completed 63.4 percent of his passes.

Tucker Kreisher is the center. The guards are Ethan Williamson and Quadir Walker. Beau Smith, Lance Rhinehart and Jason Kelley will be the tackles. Isaac Ritter, Nassir Jones and Avery Campbell are the tight ends. Don’t sleep on the tight end spot for the Millionaires. A Williamsport tight end has been named to the all-state team in each of the last two years.

Kreisher

potts

siMMons

defensive line

Smith, McClements and Ben Garverick are the ends. The tackles are Williamson, Walker, Welsher and He was intercepted four times. He Kreisher. also rushed for 387 yards and seven linebackers touchdowns. Brock Moyer returns as The outside linebackers are Josh the back up. Bernocco and Ethan Williams. Playrunning backs ing inside are Malik Jones, Maxwell Potts, McClements and Ian Goode and Chase Nye. Welshans are the running backs. secondary Potts and McClements are both talThe corners are Aykeem Cowanented runners who will be able to help take the pressure off of Fagna- Connelly, Fagnano and Simmons. no. The safeties are Potts, Moyer, Esposito and Freeman. Wide receivers

Simmons, who caught 72 passes for 938 yards and 11 touchdowns last year, returns. Also back is Colin Esposito, who had 32 receptions for 415 yards and seven touchdowns. Moyer and Keith Freeman will battle it out for the third and fourth receiver spot on the depth chart.

fagnano

special teams

Crews is hoping a kicker and punter will step forward by the end of training camp. Both spots were lost to graduation leaving a big void in the kick game for the Millionaires. — Steve Bennett

roster No 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 17 19 21 22 25 26 30 44 50 51 54 55 56 58 59 61 62 66 67 70 72 76 77 88

Name Ht/Wt Joseph Fagnano 6-3/215 Treyson Potts 5-10/190 Brock Moyer 5-10/170 Dominic Birch 5-11/210 Colin Esposito 5-11/160 Anthony Robinson 5-11/175 Drake Mankey 5-9/190 Carter Sagan 5-10/185 Isaac Ritter 6-4/230 Nassir Jones 6-2/200 Braedon Mazzante 5-9/160 Dallas Griess 5-10/155 Gavin Turner 5-11/155 Aykeem Cowen-Connelly 5-8/160 Marcus Simmons 5-11/185 Joshua Bernocco 6-1/185 Keith Freeman 5-11/165 Blaze McClements 5-8/205 Zackary Hamilton 5-6/140 Malik Jones 5-10/180 Chase Nye 5-8/175 Gabriel Peterson 5-6/155 Hunter Entz 5-6/210 Jason Kelley 5-9/170 Ian Welshans 5-9/215 Beau Smith 6-2/200 Ethan Williamson 6-2/290 Chris Peterson 6-2/285 Evan Zielewicz 6-3/240 Lance DeBrody 5-11/250 Tucker Kreisher 6-3/280 Damian Hill 5-10/280 Dillan Read 6-0/200 Joseph Heim 5-10/195 Matthew Turner 6-4/280 Nickolas Lorson 5-11/185

Pos QB/DB RB/DB WR/DB TE/DT WR/DB RB/LB RB/LB TE/LB TE/DE TE/DE WR/DB WR/QB WR/DB WR/DB WR/DB WR/DB WR/DB RB/LB WR/DB RB/LB OL/LB OL/LB OL/DL OL/DE OL/LB OL/DE OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DT OL/DL OL/DL OL/DE OL/DE OL/DL TE/LB

Yr Sr Sr Jr Sr Sr Sr Jr So Sr So So Fr So Jr Sr Sr Fr Sr Sr So So So So Sr Jr So Jr Jr So So Sr Sr So So Sr So

ASK THE EXPERTS playoff projections Class 6A 1. Williamsport 2. Hazleton Area 3. Delaware Valley 4. Scranton

Class 4A 1. Berwick 2. Dallas 3. Valley View 4. North Pocono 5. Crestwood 6. Pittston Area 7. West Scranton 8. Coughlin

Class 2A 1. Dunmore 2. Riverside 3. Mid Valley 4. Susquehanna Class A 1. Lackawanna Trail 2. Old Forge Note: 6A, 5A and A are subregionals

WB_VOICE - T150 - 43 - 08/22/18

Week 1 Western Wayne at LakeLehman: Playoff rematch.

Big School POY Trey Potts, RB, Williamsport: Dynamic player is coming off a knee injury that sidelined him all of last season. Sparky Wolk, QB, Hazleton Area: He’s one of the best quarterbacks in the WVC after throwing for 2,183 yards as a junior. Small School POY Sammy Solomon, DE/FB, Wyoming Area: At 6-3, 295, this junior will be a force on both sides of the ball. DAviD PiESTRAk, QB, Northwest: Experience, skill and talented receivers make him one to watch.

Breakout Performers Damon Horton, RB, Hazleton Area: Cougars’ top back averaged 5.7 ypc last year. kevin Dessoye, RB, Meyers: Tough runner scored eight touchdowns last season.

Week 6 Hazleton Area at Delaware valley: Take the drive for this showdown.

Week 2 Northwest at Meyers: Big road challenge for the Rangers.

Week 7 Meyers at Wyoming Area: Late season clash in 3A.

Week 3 Hazleton Area at Dallas: Big test for Dallas.

Week 8 valley view at Dallas: Playoff hopefuls square off.

Week 4 Berwick at valley West: Do we need to explain?

Week 9 Hazleton Area at Coughlin: Final regular-season home game in Coughlin’s history.

Week 5 Williamsport at Crestwood: Chance to see Minnesota recruit Trey Potts.

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Week 10 GAR at Meyers: Final chapter in great rivalry.

19:22 | CONNORSSTE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018 43

Class 5A 1. Whitehall 2. Pocono Mountain East 3. Southern Lehigh 4. Valley West

Class 3A 1. Scranton Prep 2. Western Wayne 3. Wyoming Area 4. Lake-Lehman 5. Meyers 6. Lakeland 7. GAR 8. Hanover Area

saVe the dates

player of the year candidates

THE CITIZENS' VOICE

predictions froM the gaMeface staff


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

44 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

KICKOFF 2018

Lackawanna conference adjusts to 4 divisions BY JOBY FAWCETT STAFF WRITER

including a pair of Class 6A all-state players in running back Ryan Obiso and defensive back Dylan Kelly. Still, the Warriors have a deep roster. Josh Balcarcel is expected to make a seamless transition from Obiso after running for 534 yards and John Ruzzano scored three touchdowns. COULD SURPRISE: North Pocono The Trojans return a very important piece to the puzzle for this season. Quarterback Donny Blaine is back for his fourth season as a starter and is closing in on the 4,000yard mark for his career. Plus, the team is going to be huge and experienced up front. Tackles Chase Hinton and Dustin Moss, and guards Jeff Hatala and Hunter Loch are all back and that group has an average size of 6-feet-1, 271 pounds. WHO TO WATCH: Joe Ingulli, Wallenpaupack A gritty, hard-nosed runner, Ingulli has been the focus of the Buckhorns offense for two seasons. He has 1,884 yards in his career and last season helped the team to the District 2 Class 5A final.

A new year brings another new alignment for the Lackawanna Football Conference. With the 2018 season being the start of a two-year cycle in the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association, the 20-team LFC has a new look. It includes a fourdivision format similar to the one used in the first two seasons of the new-look conference in 1998 and 1999. Last season, all three division champions — Delaware Valley (I), Scranton Prep (II), and Dunmore (III) — went undefeated in the regular season and captured District 2 championships to run their records to 12-0 before losing during the state playoffs. And again, all three teams are considered contenders to win LFC titles based upon a poll of league coaches. Valley View, which lost to Scranton Prep, 35-34, last season, gained a small edge over Scranton Prep in Division II, while Old Forge, which had only one loss in Division III, is the slight favorite to win Division IV with Lackawanna Trail a serious threat. Despite the seemingly overwhelming support for DIVISION II the defending champions, FAVORITE: Valley View many coaches feel the gap Last season, the Cougars between those teams and won the District 2 Class 4A their challengers has narchampionship with a thrillrowed this season. ing win over Berwick. The DIVISION I Cougars also took both DelaFAVORITE: Delaware Valley ware Valley and Scranton Expect this program to be Prep to the brink before losthe favorite or among the ing those showdowns late. There are several key favorites every season. Yes, the team lost a tre- parts returning, including mendous amount of talent two-way lineman Brian on both sides of the ball, Durkin, who is top college

prospect. Guard M i ke Sebastianelli and tackle John Shnipes are also allstar linemen. COULD SURPRISE: Honesdale The Hornets have a solid group of linemen including Alex Atcavage, who is quickly becoming one of the top college prospects in the conference. The Hornets will also have a standout all-star defensive lineman back in Isaiah Sims. WHO TO WATCH: Nick Gioia, West Scranton Losing an impact player can really hurt a high school football team. Just ask the Invaders. Last season, Gioia went down with an injury in the first game of the season and the team finished 1-9. He is a quality quarterback and a leader. As a sophomore, he threw for 1,325 yards and 14 touchdowns.

DIVISION III FAVORITE: Dunmore It’s going to take a tremendous effort from a veteran team to knock the Bucks off their championship perch. Dunmore hasn’t lost a division game since 2010. The program has won four straight

District 2 Class 2A championships and will start this season having won 29 straight games in the regular season. Steve Borgia is a returning defensive back from a team that advanced to the PIAA Class 2A semifinals. But the Bucks have only two other starters back on offense and five back on defense. COULD SURPRISE: Lakeland Last season, the Chiefs played with one of the most inexperienced rosters they have had in almost 20 years. Lakeland still made theD2 Class 2A playoffs and returns eight starters on offense, including running back

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COULD SURPRISE: Susquehanna The Sabers have hovered around and been a thorn in the sides of the competition the last several seasons. They retur n nine starters on offense. WHO TO WATCH: Nate Rolka, Lackawanna Trail Entering his fourth season as a starter, Rolka, who is a baseball commit to the University of Delaware as a pitchDIVISION IV er, will try to lead the Lions FAVORITE: Old Forge back to the District 2 Class A The Blue Devils rebound- championship. He has thrown ed in 2017 and returned to a for 2,515 yards in his career. championship level after having a losing record two years ago. Giovanni Spataro, who had more than 1,000 yards as a freshman, and wide receiver Thomas Pidgeon, and it has 11 starters on defense back. WHO TO WATCH: Joe Chylak, Mid Valley A running back in his third season as a starter, Chylak is coming off a very productive year. He had more than 1,300 yards rushing and scored 18 touchdowns.

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Crestwood @ Coughlin

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Lehman @ Hanover

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Redeemer @ GAR

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Crestwood @ WVW

Fri. Sept. 14

Berwick @ WVW

sat. Sept. 15

Old Forge @ Redeemer

Fri. Sept. 21

Meyers @ Hanover

sat. Sept. 22

Pittston @ Coughlin

Fri. Sept. 28

Susquehanna @ Meyers

sat. Sept. 29

Nanticoke @ Crestwood

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2018

46 THE CITIZENS' VOICE

KICKOFF 2018 SERIES HISTORY

ThE CiTizENS’ VOiCE FilE

GAR celebrates after beating Meyers 21-20 to win the first Backyard Brawl Trophy in 2013. The teams will meet for the final time on Oct. 27.

MERGER: Teams playing final seasons FROM PAGE 3

“Once they made the decision to combine all the sports and got the blessing from the PIAA to combine everything, it was like a punch in the gut. You had that queasy feeling in your stomach that it’s really going through. Being in the program one way or another for 30-plus years, the show must go on.” Wiedlich is using the merger as an opportunity to recruit GAR students to come out for the team with the promise they will be part of history. Cinti and Labatch did the same thing. The pitch was met with mixed results as all three schools are struggling with roster numbers. “The kids we have here, they understand they will be the last group of GAR football players,” Wiedlich said. “They know they will get their picture in the yearbook as the last GAR football team before they make the transition. They know what is at stake.” ■■■

All three schools have their traditions. For example, each year GAR wins a district title, the team bus stops at the foot of the South Street Bridge and the players all walk across. Wiedlich said he has thought about having the team do that following the last game of the year. Labatch will have one last go-around with three Meyers’ traditions. “We have our annual breakfast the

WB_VOICE - T150 - 46 - 08/22/18

“They understand they will be the last group of GAR football players.” Paul Wiedlich Jr. GAR football coach

the program. The kids who have played, they know what we do.” ■■■

When the season is complete and all the equipment has been collected it will be time to begin writing a new book. The first chapter will be hiring a head coach. With the board’s recent decision to include GAR in the plans for the new high school, a school name, mascot and colors need to be adopted. Once the new coaching staff is in place, it will be time to get to work. The offseason conditioning program will commence. It will be the first time Coughlin, GAR and Meyers will come together as one in a PIAA sponsored sport. Already in place is the schedule the team will play. Based on the enrollment numbers of the combined schools, the new program will be a Class 6A school. This time next year, the new team will be preparing to play its season opener against Crestwood. Also on the schedule are Scranton, Nanticoke Area, Delaware Valley, Hazleton Area, Dallas, Valley West, Wallenpaupack, Williamsport and Berwick. “To me, I don’t think it really has sunk in yet,” Labatch said. “You look at the calendar, and you are just dealing with the everyday stuff. We just want to enjoy the moments we have right now.”

morning of the first game,” Labatch said. “The cheerleaders and the junior high team are involved. The last seven or eight years we have done a spaghetti dinner the night before our first scrimmage.” However, the most emotional tradition for the Mohawks, one that dates back close to 70 years, is the final 50 yards. The seniors line up at the 50-yard line and run the final 50 for the last time as a Mohawk. “All the seniors line up, and we invite the parents down to the field,” Labatch said. “We announce the history of all the seniors. We will acknowledge everybody this year, but will talk about the history of the seniors as they run the last 50.” Coughlin also has its share of traditions. “We have a lot of traditions,” Cinti said. “Senior Night is always a big one for us. I think it is nice to keep in house what we do. The kids who have gone through the program know the tradi- Contact the writer: tions we have. I don’t think that is for sbennett@citizensvoice.com; anybody else who has not gone through 570-821-2062; @CVSteveBennett

MEYERS VS. COUGHLIN 1931: Meyers 18, Coughlin 0 1932: Meyers 6, Coughlin 0 1933: Coughlin 19, Meyers 0 1934: Coughlin 19, Meyers 0 1935: Meyers 13, Coughlin 0 1936: Meyers 12, Coughlin 0 1937: Coughlin 7, Meyers 6 1938: Coughlin 21, Meyers 0 1939: Coughlin 20, Meyers 0 1940: Meyers 12, Coughlin 0 1941: Coughlin 7, Meyers 0 1942: Meyers 14, Coughlin 6 1943: Meyers 13, Coughlin 0 1944: Meyers 19, Coughlin 6 1945: Meyers 6, Coughlin 6 1946: Meyers 12, Coughlin 0 1947: Coughlin 14, Meyers 0 1948: Coughlin 19, Meyers 12 1949: Meyers 7, Coughlin 0 1950: Meyers 8, Coughlin 0 1951: Meyers 13, Coughlin 6 1952: Coughlin 13, Meyers 0 1953: Meyers 19, Coughlin 0 1954: Meyers 13, Coughlin 2 1955: Meyers 20, Coughlin 0 1956: Coughlin 35, Meyers 14 1957: Coughlin 19, Meyers 12 1958: Coughlin 18, Meyers 7 1959: Meyers 26, Coughlin 6 1960: Meyers 12, Coughlin 6 1961: Meyers 26, Coughlin 12 1962: Meyers 28, Coughlin 0 1963: Meyers 13, Coughlin 7 1964: Meyers 25, Coughlin 7 1965: Meyers 18, Coughlin 6 1966: Coughlin 28, Meyers 0 1967: Coughlin 32, Meyers 6 1968: Meyers 34, Coughlin 7 1969: Coughlin 34, Meyers 18 1970: Coughlin 29, Meyers 8 1971: Coughlin 21, Meyers 8 1972: Meyers 13, Coughlin 0 1973: Meyers 29, Coughlin 19 1974: Meyers 43, Coughlin 0 1975: Meyers 18, Coughlin 13 1976: Meyers 27, Coughlin 13 1977: Coughlin 13, Meyers 12 1978: Coughlin 16, Meyers 13 1979: Coughlin 48, Meyers 6 1980: Coughlin 34, Meyers 6 1981: Coughlin 9, Meyers 0 1982: Coughlin 27, Meyers 0 1983: Coughlin 23, Meyers 14 1984: Meyers 28, Coughlin 6 1985: Coughlin 41, Meyers 6 1986: Meyers 21, Coughlin 13 1987: Meyers 34, Coughlin 26 1988: Coughlin 14, Meyers 6 2004: Meyers 24, Coughlin 0 2005: Coughlin 21, Meyers 14 2006: Coughlin 19, Meyers 14 2007: Coughlin 25, Meyers 6 2008: Coughlin 37, Meyers 0 2009: Coughlin 24, Meyers 3 2016: Coughlin 40, Meyers 0 2017: Coughlin 35, Meyers 7 GAR vs. COUGHLIN 1925: Coughlin JV 46, GAR 0 1931: GAR 7, Coughlin 0 1932: Coughlin 7, GAR 0 1933: Coughlin 25, GAR 0 1934: Coughlin 19, GAR 0 1935: GAR 6, Coughlin 0 1936: Coughlin 14, GAR 7 1937: GAR 12, Coughlin 0 1938: Coughlin 45, GAR 0 1939: Coughlin 21, GAR 6 1940: GAR 7, Coughlin 6 1941: GAR 7, Coughlin 6 1942: Coughlin 15, GAR 0 1943: Coughlin 14, GAR 6 1944: GAR 7, Coughlin 6 1945: GAR 11, Coughlin 7 1946: GAR 13, Coughlin 0 1947: Coughlin 12, GAR 0 1948: Coughlin 7, GAR 6 1949: GAR 26, Coughlin 21 1950: Coughlin 19, GAR 6 1951: Coughlin 6, GAR 6 1952: GAR 24, Coughlin 6 1953: Coughlin 20, GAR 7 1954: GAR 20, Coughlin 7 1955: GAR 26, Coughlin 6 1956: Coughlin 26, GAR 6 1957: Coughlin 20, GAR 0 1958: Coughlin 6, GAR 0 1959: GAR 25, Coughlin 7 1960: GAR 13, Coughlin 6 1961: GAR 21, Coughlin 7 1962: GAR 31, Coughlin 7 1963: GAR 14, Coughlin 6 1964: Coughlin 9, GAR 6 1965: Coughlin 13, GAR 6 1966: Coughlin 28, GAR 12 1967: Coughlin 34, GAR 14 1968: Coughlin 37, GAR 0 1969: Coughlin 41, GAR 0 1970: Coughlin 48, GAR 0 1971: Coughlin 45, GAR 8 1972: GAR 29, Coughlin 0 1973: GAR 34, Coughlin 13

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1974: GAR 15, Coughlin 0 1975: GAR 9, Coughlin 0 1976: GAR 35, Coughlin 12 1977: Coughlin 19, GAR 0 1978: GAR 14, Coughlin 7 1979: Coughlin 17, GAR 0 1980: GAR 14, Coughlin 6 1981: Coughlin 29, GAR 0 1982: GAR 14, Coughlin 0 1983: Coughlin 15, GAR 12 1984: Coughlin 20, GAR 0 1985: Coughlin 20, GAR 0 1986: Coughlin 25, GAR 13 1987: GAR 31, Coughlin 16 1988: Coughlin 21, GAR 7 1990: Coughlin 34, GAR 6 1991: Coughlin 41, GAR 14 2004: Coughlin 20, GAR 0 2005: Coughlin 28, GAR 20 2006: GAR 27, Coughlin 20 2007: Coughlin 35, GAR 15 2008: Coughlin 23, GAR 7 2009: Coughlin 13, GAR 3 MEYERS vs. GAR 1931: GAR 6, Meyers 0 1932: Meyers 6, GAR 0 1933: Meyers 14, GAR 6 1934: Meyers 13, GAR 0 1935: Meyers 19, GAR 0 1936: GAR 18, Meyers 0 1937: Meyers 6, GAR 0 1938: Meyers 13, GAR 0 1939: Meyers 6, GAR 6 1940: GAR 13, Meyers 0 1941: Meyers 7, GAR 3 1942: Meyers 7, GAR 0 1943: Meyers 34, GAR 0 1944: Meyers 12, GAR 7 1945: Meyers 6, GAR 4 1946: Meyers 26, GAR 6 1947: Meyers 13, GAR 7 1948: GAR 32, Meyers 6 1949: GAR 19, Meyers 13 1950: Meyers 19, GAR 6 1951: GAR 25, Meyers 13 1952: GAR 19, Meyers 6 1953: GAR 21, Meyers 6 1954: GAR 20, Meyers 0 1955: GAR 6, Meyers 2 1956: GAR 13, Meyers 12 1957: GAR 7, Meyers 6 1958: GAR 31, Meyers 7 1959: Meyers 14, GAR 7 1960: Meyers 6, GAR 0 1961: Meyers 20, GAR 0 1962: Meyers 32, GAR 14 1963: GAR 13, Meyers 0 1964: Meyers 27, GAR 14 1965: GAR 7, Meyers 6 1966: GAR 7, Meyers 0 1967: GAR 14, Meyers 6 1968: Meyers 28, GAR 6 1969: Meyers 23, GAR 0 1970: Meyers 40, GAR 0 1971: No game, blizzard 1972: GAR 14, Meyers 0 1973: Meyers 33, GAR 0 1974: Meyers 66, GAR 6 1975: Meyers 25, GAR 13 1976: GAR 26, Meyers 0 1977: Meyers 35, GAR 14 1978: GAR 32, Meyers 28 1979: GAR 7, Meyers 6 1980: Meyers 21, GAR 20 1981: Meyers 17, GAR 6 1982: GAR 9, Meyers 6 1983: Meyers 22, GAR 0 1984: Meyers 15, GAR 7 1985: Meyers 27, GAR 21 1986: GAR 20, Meyers 6 1987: Meyers 38, GAR 18 1988: GAR 17, Meyers 0 1989: GAR 28, Meyers 6 1990: Meyers 14, GAR 12 1991: Meyers 33, GAR 6 1992: Meyers 38, GAR 14 1993: Meyers 8, GAR 0 1994: GAR 49, Meyers 15 1995: GAR 38, Meyers 6 1996: Meyers 34, GAR 21 1997: GAR 34, Meyers 6 1998: GAR 35, Meyers 14 1999: GAR 21, Meyers 0 2000: GAR 33, Meyers 7 2001: Meyers 33, GAR 14 2002: Meyers 42, GAR 14 2003: Meyers 54, GAR 30 2004: Meyers 36, GAR 19 2005: Meyers 21, GAR 19 2006: Meyers 34, GAR 33 2007: GAR 3, Meyers 0 2008: GAR 48, Meyers 0 2009: GAR 42, Meyers 21 2010: GAR 28, Meyers 6 2011: GAR 38, Meyers 6 2012: GAR 50, Meyers 12 2013: GAR 21, Meyers 20 2014: GAR 46, Meyers 19 2015: Meyers 28, GAR 6 2016: GAR 50, Meyers 7 2017: Meyers 26, GAR 19, OT

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