Citation
The story of the United States of America

Material Information

Title:
The story of the United States of America told for young people
Creator:
Brooks, Elbridge Streeter, 1846-1902
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
D. Lothrop Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
246 p. incl. illus., pl., port., front. : ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Juvenile literature -- United States ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Elbridge S. Brooks.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026609649 ( ALEPH )
14030284 ( OCLC )
ALG3149 ( NOTIS )
02019234 ( LCCN )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

E20080515_AAAADO.xml

00006.txt

00006.pdf

00027.pdf

00027.txt

00237.pdf

00237.txt

00028.pdf

00028.txt

00199.txt

00199.pdf

00130_pdf.txt

UF00081050_00001.txt

00206.txt

00206.pdf

00057.pdf

00057.txt

00026.txt

00026.pdf

00080.pdf

00080.txt

00002_pdf.txt

00047.txt

00047.pdf

00022_pdf.txt

00210_pdf.txt

00152_pdf.txt

00159.pdf

00159.txt

00070_pdf.txt

00023_pdf.txt

00058.txt

00058.pdf

00066_pdf.txt

00050.pdf

00050.txt

00196.pdf

00196.txt

00212_pdf.txt

00224_pdf.txt

00046.pdf

00046.txt

00209.pdf

00209.txt

00079.pdf

00079.txt

00105.txt

00105.pdf

00060.txt

00060.pdf

00054.txt

00054.pdf

00092.txt

00092.pdf

00136_pdf.txt

00020_pdf.txt

00194_pdf.txt

00181_pdf.txt

00111.pdf

00111.txt

00233.txt

00233.pdf

00252.pdf

00252.txt

00234.pdf

00234.txt

00143.pdf

00143.txt

00019.pdf

00019.txt

00025_pdf.txt

00054_pdf.txt

00071.pdf

00071.txt

00192.pdf

00192.txt

00103.pdf

00103.txt

00101.pdf

00101.txt

00051.txt

00051.pdf

00075.pdf

00075.txt

00177.txt

00177.pdf

00025.pdf

00025.txt

00231.txt

00231.pdf

00141.pdf

00141.txt

00055.txt

00055.pdf

00244_pdf.txt

00151_pdf.txt

00061.txt

00061.pdf

00153.txt

00153.pdf

00013_pdf.txt

00162.txt

00162.pdf

00137.txt

00137.pdf

00009_pdf.txt

00131_pdf.txt

00205.txt

00205.pdf

00253.txt

00253.pdf

00194.pdf

00194.txt

00158.pdf

00158.txt

00193_pdf.txt

00172.pdf

00172.txt

00039.pdf

00039.txt

00183.txt

00183.pdf

00067.txt

00067.pdf

00142.txt

00142.pdf

00181.txt

00181.pdf

00037.txt

00037.pdf

00086.pdf

00086.txt

00001.pdf

00001.txt

00201.pdf

00201.txt

00155_pdf.txt

00019_pdf.txt

00017.pdf

00017.txt

00034_pdf.txt

00033.txt

00033.pdf

00095.pdf

00095.txt

00215.txt

00215.pdf

00073_pdf.txt

00210.pdf

00210.txt

00100.txt

00100.pdf

00224.txt

00224.pdf

00026_pdf.txt

00120.pdf

00120.txt

00044.pdf

00044.txt

00096.txt

00096.pdf

00049_pdf.txt

00077_pdf.txt

00015_pdf.txt

00200_pdf.txt

00145.txt

00145.pdf

00008_pdf.txt

00254.pdf

00254.txt

00171.pdf

00171.txt

00116_pdf.txt

00232.pdf

00232.txt

00261.pdf

00261.txt

00184_pdf.txt

00216.pdf

00216.txt

00037_pdf.txt

00023.pdf

00023.txt

00108.txt

00108.pdf

00220.pdf

00220.txt

00139.pdf

00139.txt

00174.txt

00174.pdf

00008.pdf

00008.txt

00156_pdf.txt

00208.pdf

00208.txt

00160_pdf.txt

00011_pdf.txt

00077.pdf

00077.txt

00062.txt

00062.pdf

00180_pdf.txt

00214.pdf

00214.txt

00002.txt

00002.pdf

00038_pdf.txt

00251_pdf.txt

00112.txt

00112.pdf

00146.txt

00146.pdf

00069_pdf.txt

00154_pdf.txt

00243.txt

00243.pdf

00186_pdf.txt

00038.pdf

00038.txt

00076.txt

00076.pdf

00189_pdf.txt

00046_pdf.txt

00105_pdf.txt

00235_pdf.txt

00148.txt

00148.pdf

00218.pdf

00218.txt

00080_pdf.txt

00182.txt

00182.pdf

00147_pdf.txt

00095_pdf.txt

00112_pdf.txt

00164_pdf.txt

00087.txt

00087.pdf

00161_pdf.txt

00085.pdf

00085.txt

00070.pdf

00070.txt

00066.txt

00066.pdf

00175.pdf

00175.txt

00169_pdf.txt

00186.txt

00186.pdf

00261_pdf.txt

00073.txt

00073.pdf

00135.pdf

00135.txt

00030.pdf

00030.txt

00096_pdf.txt

00098_pdf.txt

00150_pdf.txt

00011.pdf

00011.txt

00131.pdf

00131.txt

00088_pdf.txt

00128_pdf.txt

00048_pdf.txt

00082.pdf

00082.txt

00176.pdf

00176.txt

00084.pdf

00084.txt

00027_pdf.txt

00007.txt

00007.pdf

00173.pdf

00173.txt

00127.txt

00127.pdf

00174_pdf.txt

00235.txt

00235.pdf

00063.txt

00063.pdf

00207_pdf.txt

00213_pdf.txt

00059_pdf.txt

00198.pdf

00198.txt

00114.txt

00114.pdf

00221.txt

00221.pdf

00091.txt

00091.pdf

00198_pdf.txt

00059.txt

00059.pdf

00223.txt

00223.pdf

00122.pdf

00122.txt

00154.pdf

00154.txt

00236.pdf

00236.txt

00136.txt

00136.pdf

00110.pdf

00110.txt

00259.txt

00259.pdf

00218_pdf.txt

00200.pdf

00200.txt

00121.pdf

00121.txt

00129_pdf.txt

00150.txt

00150.pdf

00140_pdf.txt

00103_pdf.txt

00063_pdf.txt

00251.pdf

00251.txt

00238_pdf.txt

00042.txt

00042.pdf

00246_pdf.txt

00244.pdf

00244.txt

00167_pdf.txt

00044_pdf.txt

00012.txt

00012.pdf

00053_pdf.txt

00156.txt

00156.pdf

00250.pdf

00250.txt

00125.txt

00125.pdf

00050_pdf.txt

00120_pdf.txt

00167.txt

00167.pdf

00108_pdf.txt

00056.pdf

00056.txt

00226.pdf

00226.txt

00024_pdf.txt

00219.pdf

00219.txt

00177_pdf.txt

00163.txt

00163.pdf

00188.pdf

00188.txt

00031_pdf.txt

00117.pdf

00117.txt

00133.txt

00133.pdf

00072.txt

00072.pdf

00144.pdf

00144.txt

00081.txt

00081.pdf

00053.pdf

00053.txt

00041_pdf.txt

00020.txt

00020.pdf

00183_pdf.txt

00234_pdf.txt

00187_pdf.txt

00082_pdf.txt

00083.pdf

00083.txt

00040_pdf.txt

00213.txt

00213.pdf

00246.pdf

00246.txt

00088.pdf

00088.txt

00219_pdf.txt

00179.txt

00179.pdf

00021_pdf.txt

00018.pdf

00018.txt

00193.txt

00193.pdf

00225.pdf

00225.txt

00076_pdf.txt

00074_pdf.txt

00118_pdf.txt

00151.txt

00151.pdf

00166.pdf

00166.txt

00229_pdf.txt

00075_pdf.txt

00238.txt

00238.pdf

00190.txt

00190.pdf

00160.txt

00160.pdf

00206_pdf.txt

00034.txt

00034.pdf

00137_pdf.txt

00106_pdf.txt

00052_pdf.txt

00042_pdf.txt

00157.txt

00157.pdf

00074.pdf

00074.txt

00121_pdf.txt

00024.txt

00024.pdf

00190_pdf.txt

00259_pdf.txt

00031.pdf

00031.txt

00093.txt

00093.pdf

00129.pdf

00129.txt

00252_pdf.txt

00126_pdf.txt

00204.pdf

00204.txt

00201_pdf.txt

00247.txt

00247.pdf

00152.txt

00152.pdf

00115.pdf

00115.txt

00184.txt

00184.pdf

00022.txt

00022.pdf

00119.txt

00119.pdf

00033_pdf.txt

00189.txt

00189.pdf

00168.txt

00168.pdf

00248.txt

00248.pdf

00207.txt

00207.pdf

00007_pdf.txt

00147.pdf

00147.txt

00057_pdf.txt

00217_pdf.txt

00203.txt

00203.pdf

00064_pdf.txt

00126.txt

00126.pdf

00199_pdf.txt

00099.pdf

00099.txt

00165_pdf.txt

00191.txt

00191.pdf

00081_pdf.txt

00170.txt

00170.pdf

00146_pdf.txt

00069.pdf

00069.txt

00032_pdf.txt

00169.txt

00169.pdf

00134.pdf

00134.txt

00032.txt

00032.pdf

00084_pdf.txt

00068.pdf

00068.txt

00138.txt

00138.pdf

00140.pdf

00140.txt

00195_pdf.txt

00049.pdf

00049.txt

00229.pdf

00229.txt

00153_pdf.txt

00036.pdf

00036.txt

00243_pdf.txt

00100_pdf.txt

00241.txt

00241.pdf

00098.pdf

00098.txt

00211.pdf

00211.txt

00107.txt

00107.pdf

00102_pdf.txt

00173_pdf.txt

00217.txt

00217.pdf

00175_pdf.txt

00065.pdf

00065.txt

00128.txt

00128.pdf

00223_pdf.txt

00196_pdf.txt

00212.txt

00212.pdf

00106.pdf

00106.txt

00064.txt

00064.pdf

00124_pdf.txt

00113.pdf

00113.txt

00260_pdf.txt

00248_pdf.txt

00056_pdf.txt

00125_pdf.txt

00035.txt

00035.pdf

00176_pdf.txt

E20080515_AAAADO_xml.txt

00202_pdf.txt

00039_pdf.txt

00017_pdf.txt

00192_pdf.txt

00036_pdf.txt

00250_pdf.txt

00090.txt

00090.pdf

00009.pdf

00009.txt

00171_pdf.txt

00099_pdf.txt

00240_pdf.txt

00093_pdf.txt

00001_pdf.txt

00041.pdf

00041.txt

00222.txt

00222.pdf

00115_pdf.txt

00116.txt

00116.pdf

00191_pdf.txt

00062_pdf.txt

00185.pdf

00185.txt

00118.txt

00118.pdf

00043_pdf.txt

00109_pdf.txt

00061_pdf.txt

00249.pdf

00249.txt

00242.pdf

00242.txt

00045_pdf.txt

00132.pdf

00132.txt

00260.pdf

00260.txt

00197.txt

00197.pdf

00085_pdf.txt

00124.pdf

00124.txt

00178.txt

00178.pdf

00097.pdf

00097.txt

00114_pdf.txt

00097_pdf.txt

00052.pdf

00052.txt

00168_pdf.txt

00104.pdf

00104.txt

00211_pdf.txt

00195.txt

00195.pdf

00241_pdf.txt

00094.pdf

00094.txt

00227.txt

00227.pdf

00230.pdf

00230.txt

00155.pdf

00155.txt

00086_pdf.txt

00091_pdf.txt

00101_pdf.txt

00104_pdf.txt

00048.pdf

00048.txt

00079_pdf.txt

00159_pdf.txt

00157_pdf.txt

00015.pdf

00015.txt

00245.txt

00245.pdf

00239.txt

00239.pdf

00123.pdf

00123.txt

00071_pdf.txt

00145_pdf.txt

00040.pdf

00040.txt

00122_pdf.txt

00187.txt

00187.pdf

00139_pdf.txt

00216_pdf.txt

00047_pdf.txt

00240.txt

00240.pdf

00107_pdf.txt

00068_pdf.txt

00102.pdf

00102.txt

00231_pdf.txt

00215_pdf.txt

00029.txt

00029.pdf

00247_pdf.txt

00110_pdf.txt

00087_pdf.txt

00163_pdf.txt

00253_pdf.txt

00164.pdf

00164.txt

00119_pdf.txt

00178_pdf.txt

00065_pdf.txt

00134_pdf.txt

00132_pdf.txt

00161.pdf

00161.txt

00203_pdf.txt

00233_pdf.txt

00043.pdf

00043.txt

00078.txt

00078.pdf

00227_pdf.txt

00230_pdf.txt

00144_pdf.txt

00149.txt

00149.pdf

00220_pdf.txt

00228_pdf.txt

00021.txt

00021.pdf

00166_pdf.txt

00072_pdf.txt

00236_pdf.txt

00239_pdf.txt

00242_pdf.txt

00149_pdf.txt

00013.pdf

00013.txt

00089.pdf

00089.txt

00030_pdf.txt

00012_pdf.txt

00226_pdf.txt

00090_pdf.txt

00214_pdf.txt

00130.pdf

00130.txt

00228.txt

00228.pdf

00222_pdf.txt

00109.txt

00109.pdf

00165.pdf

00165.txt

00018_pdf.txt

00092_pdf.txt

00067_pdf.txt

00138_pdf.txt

00180.txt

00180.pdf

00209_pdf.txt

00135_pdf.txt

00078_pdf.txt

00185_pdf.txt

00249_pdf.txt

00029_pdf.txt

00254_pdf.txt

00123_pdf.txt

00014.txt

00014.pdf

00162_pdf.txt

00083_pdf.txt

00113_pdf.txt

00232_pdf.txt

00182_pdf.txt

00141_pdf.txt

00111_pdf.txt

00170_pdf.txt

00142_pdf.txt

00208_pdf.txt

00245_pdf.txt

00237_pdf.txt

00133_pdf.txt

00045.txt

00045.pdf

00006_pdf.txt

00094_pdf.txt

00014_pdf.txt

00202.pdf

00202.txt

00060_pdf.txt

00172_pdf.txt

00051_pdf.txt

00205_pdf.txt

00148_pdf.txt

00117_pdf.txt

00143_pdf.txt

00028_pdf.txt

00197_pdf.txt

00221_pdf.txt

00188_pdf.txt

00035_pdf.txt

00055_pdf.txt

00127_pdf.txt

00058_pdf.txt

00089_pdf.txt

00158_pdf.txt

00204_pdf.txt

00179_pdf.txt


Full Text









paso I ooo |
fesencit &
branectl

a



Bilesniccs)





Library

win

3
os
A
o
&







THE MINUTE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION. See page 95.

“< We determine to die or be free.”



THE STORY OF
Ve UND Sik is

OR AMERICA

IWOILIO. ROI. WAOWING JAS OALIS,

BY
DILIBROEIS, S. BROOKS

AUTHOR OF
THE STORY OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN, THE STORY OF THE AMERICAN SAILOR,

THE STORY OF THE AMERICAN SOLDIER, HISTORIC BOYS, HISTORIC
GIRLS, IN LETSLER'S TIMES, ETC., ETC

FULLY ILLUSTRATED

BOSTON
1) LOWER Ow! COW PAN 7

WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD



CopyricuHr, 1891,
’ BY

D. LorHrop CoMPaNY. -



PREFACE.

Tue story of the United. States of America has already been told and re-told
for young Americans by competent writers, and yet there is room for another
re-telling. To avoid as far as possible the dreary array of dates and the dull
succession of events that may make up the history but do not tell the story —to
awaken an interest in motives as well as persons, in principles rather than in
battles, in the patriotism and manliness that make a people rather than in the
simply personal qualities that make the leader or the individual, is the aim of the
writer of this latest “Story.” The future of the Republic depends on the up-
bringing of the boys and girls of to-day. Any new light on the doings of the
boys and girls of America’s past when they grew to manhood and womanhood
should be of service to the boys and girls of America’s to-day and to-morrow.
The hope that this volume may help as such a light has inspired its author to
-write as concisely and as simply as he is able the story of the great Republic’s
origin, development and growth from the far-off days of Columbus the discoverer
to the nobler times of Washington the defender and Lincoln the savior of
America’s liberties.

Boston, August, 1891. JB, ish, 18%,



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD

CHAPTER II.
COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL

CHAPTER III.
THE NAMING OF AMERICA .

CHAPTER IV.
SPAIN AND HER RIVALS

CHAPTER V.
HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD :

CHAPTER VI.
THE FIRST COLONISTS

CHAPTER VII,
HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

CHAPTER VIII.
FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN

CHAPTER IX.
WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY

CHAPTER X.
‘(THE LAST STRAW”

CHAPTER XI.
THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM

CHAPTER XII.
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

9)

26

29)

37

47

56

64

74

84

93

Ioo



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XIII.
THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION .

CHAPTER XIV.
STARTING OUT IN LIFE
CHAPTER XV.

“THE AMERICANS”

CHAPTER XVI.
UNSETTLED DAYS

CHAPTER XVII.
A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE.

CHAPTER XVIII.

STATE-MAKING

CHAPTER XIX.
CITIZENS AND PARTIES

CHAPTER XX.
CHANGING DAYS .

CHAPTER XXI.
THE SHADOW OF DISCORD

CHAPTER XXII.
FOR UNION.

CHAPTER XXIII.

A FIGHT FOR LIFE

CHAPTER XXIV.

A REUNITED NATION

CHAPTER XXV.
AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS

CHAPTER XXVI.

GROWING INTO GREATNESS .

109

119

130

141

161

170

189

202

‘231

239



List Ol WULUSTRATIONS.

The Minute Men of the Revolution Frontis.

Christopher’‘Columbus .

A dream of Cathay : :

The Laurentian Rocks of the Adiron-
dack region

“When monstrous-toed birds waded in
the Charles” .

An early American

The red Americans : :

A war chief of the Mound Builders

The “ canoes with wings ”

The landing of Columbus

The young Columbus

Amerigo Vespucci .

De Soto. 5

In sight of Mexico.

A Conquistadore

Coronado’s march .

Sir Francis Drake .

Sir Walter Raleigh

“ Elbowing off”

James I.

Queen Elizabeth

Disputing for possession

Captain John Smith

Powhatan

Prince Charles :

William Penn, the Younger .

A palisaded fort

Suspicious of Indians :

Dutch windmill in old New York .

10

10

II

13
14
15
18
19
20
21
28
30
31

33
35
36
38
39
40
41
43
44
45
45
48

49°
50 !





Settlers from Holland approaching New
Amsterdam

Cavalier and Puritan

La Salle :

Longing for the old home

An old landmark

Going to school in 1700.

The whirring spinning-wheel .

Stopping the post-rider .

In the chimney-corner

The clearing .

On the watch . :

“T would rather be carried out dead!”
said Stuyvesant

Champlain and the Iroquois .

In treaty with the Troquois

“A witch”

A fight with pirates

New York in 1690 .

One of King James’ advisers .

In the cabin of the Mayflower

One of the villagers

A lesson in liberty .

King James II.

In Leisler’s times . :

The people and the Royal governor

A smuggler

Guarding the port .

The right of search

The hated stamps . : 3

Preparing for “ homespun ” clothes

69



LIST OF

Unwelcome lodgers A

A weak-kneed patriot and her sly cup of
tea . :

Samuel Adams

Paul Revere’s ride .

The bridge at Concord :

The British are coming!

“Tt rained rebels”

Ethan Allen .

“ The rebels are Cae Bunker Hill”

General George Washington .

A “Continental”.

One of the French soldiers

Anthony Wayne

John Paul Jones . ei

French’s statue of the Minute Man

Dr. Benjamin Franklin . : 3

John Adams prophesying “the glorious
Fourth”.

The Liberty Bell

In Marion’s camp .

The Boston Boys and General Can

Threats of resistance to taxation

Inkstand used in signing the Constitution

Alexander Hamilton

George Washington , ,

The inauguration of President Wash-
ington 4

George Rogers Clarke

“ Borrowing fire”

“ King Cotton ”

The stage coach

Martha Washington

in old days

Daniel Boone 5 é :

The new home in the Ohio country
Washington’s home at Mount Vernon .
Training recruits for war with France
John Adams .

Thomas Jefferson . z E
Washington’s tomb at Mount Vernon .

ILLUSTRATIONS.

go

g2
93

94-

96
97
a)
IOL
102
105
106
106
107
108
109
110

112



The sale of Louisiana

The falling flag

James Madison ss a

Tecumseh, chief of the Shawnees .

The battle of Tippecanoe

Andrew Jackson

The ruined White House

Keeping the old flag afloat

Jackson’s sharpshooters at New Orleans

Ambushed in the Indian country .

The Conastoga wagon

The mail boat on the Ohio

An old-time Louisiana sugar mill .

James Monroe

Ashland, the home of eee Clay.

Discussing the tariff in 1828 .

A Western flat-boat

John Quincy Adams

De Witt Clinton : : ,

The railway coach of our grandfathers .

When every man was his own cobbler .

Washington Irving

James Fenimore Cooper

Daniel Webster

The traveling schoolmaster

Andrew Jackson

Martin Van Buren.

William Henry Harrison

John Tyler :

Anti-renters, disguised as Indians, am-
bushing the sheriff .

James K. Polk

At Buena Vista

Zachary Taylor

Millard Fillmore

Franklin Pierce

James Buchanan . 3 : 7

Dinah Morris’s certificate of freedom

Among the sugar cane . .

Great seal of the “ Confederacy” .

147
150
1S
153
154
155
156
157
159
160
162
163.
166
168
170
173
174

IOI
193
195
197
198
199
200
203
205
207



LIST OF

Abraham Lincoln .

Seal of the United States

Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor
A Louisiana tiger .

In the enlistment office .

Charge of the Union troops at Coe
The turret of the Monitor
Working for the soldiers °

The birthplace of Abraham Lincoln
Home again .

Andrew Johnson i
The Capitol of the United States .
Ulysses Simpson Grant . s
Old French market, New Orleans .

ILLUSTRATIONS.

Rutherford Birchard Hayes .

The Art Gallery
Machinery Hall

Sitka, the capital of Alaska
“ The new way to India”
At the cotton loom
Ralph Waldo Emerson .
William H. Prescott
Henry W. Longfellow .
Peter Cooper .

James A. Garfield .
Chester A. Arthur.
Grover Cleveland .
Benjamin Harrison



THE STORY OF THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA



CHAPTER I.
THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD.

,;jANY hundreds of years ago there lived in ancient Greece
a certain wise man whose name was Pythagoras. As a
boy he had been brought up beside the blue Augean Sea.
He learned to observe carefully. He became a traveler
uu and a teacher and from the closest study of all the things
on him —the earth and sky, the sun and stars, the rise a
fall of tides, the changes of the seasons and all the every-day
happenings of this wonderful world of ours—he announced as
his belief a theory that men called ridiculous but which, to-day,
every boy and girl beginning the study of geography accepts with-
out question. “The earth,” said Pythagoras to his pupils, “is
spherical and inhabited all over.”

That was fully twenty-five hundred years ago and yet,
after nearly two thousand years had passed, a certain
Italian sailor whose name was Christopher Columbus and
who believed as did the old Grecian scholar, made the
same statement before a council of the most learned men
of Spain and was laughed to scorn. “This Italian is
crazy,” they said. ‘ Why, if the earth is round the péople

9







10 THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD.

on the other side would be walking about with their heels above
their heads; all the trees would grow upside down and the ships

must sail up hill. It is absurd.
All the world knows that the
earth is flat.”

But this Italian sailor was per-
sistent; better still, he was pa-
tient. His life had been full of
adventure. From his boyhood
he had been a sailor and a sol-
dier, a fighter and a traveler in
many lands and upon many seas.
He loved the study of geogra-
phy; he was an expert map-
drawer; he had noticed much
and thought more. Believing in
the theory of Pythagoras, famil-
iar to Italian scholars, that this
earth was a globe, he also be-
lieved that by sailing westward
he could at last reach India —

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS. or Cathay, as all the East was

called.

For in those days, four hundred years ago, Eastern Asia was
a new land to Western Europe. It was supposed to be the home
of wealth and luxury. From it came the gold
and spices and all the rare things that Europe
most desired but which were only to be pro-
cured by long and dangerous journeys overland.
To the man who would find a sea-way to India
great honors and greater riches were sure to
come. So all adventurous minds were bent upon
discovering a new way to the Hast.







A DREAM OF CATHAY.





THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLDs F 11

Christopher Columbus solved the problem. The surest and safest
way to the Hast, he said, is to sail west. This really sounded so
ridiculous that, as we have seen, men called him crazy and for a
long time would have nothing to do with him or his schemes. But



THE LAURENTIAN ROCKS OF THE ADIRONDACK REGION.

he persisted; he gained friends; he talked so confidently of success,
so eloquently of spreading the knowledge of the Christian religion
among the heathen folk of Asia, so attractively of getting, from
these same heathen folk, their trade, their gold and their spices
that at last the king and queen of Spain were won over to his side,





12 THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD.

and on the third of August, 1492, with three ships and one hundred:
and twenty men, Christopher Columbus set sail from the port of
Palos in southwestern Spain and steered straight out into what
people called the dreadful Sea of Darkness in search of a new way
to India across the western waters. But. though Columbus was
right in his theories and though, by traveling westward he could
at last reach India and the Hast something that he knew nothing ~
of lay in his path to stop his sailing westward. What was it?

Upon the western half of the earth’s surface, stretching its ten
thousand miles of length almost from pole to pole, lay a mighty .
continent — twin countries, each three thousand miles wide and |
joined by a narrow strip of land. Known now to us as North and
South America this western continent contains three tenths of all’
the dry land on the surface of the glebe. It is nearly fifteen
million square miles in extent, is four times as large as Europe,
five times the size of Australia, one third larger than Africa and ~
not quite as vast as Asia. And this was-what stopped the way as
Columbus sailed westward to the East. —

But though it was a new and all unknown land to the great

navigator it is the oldest land in the world. The region from the
Adirondack forests northward, to and beyond the St. Lawrence
River, and known as the Laurentian rocks, is said by those students
of the rocks, the geologists, to have been the very first land that
showed itself above the receding waters that once covered the
whole globe. And all along the hills and valleys of North Am-
erica to the south as far as the Alleghanies and the Ohio the great
ice-sheet that once overspread the earth and that was driven by —
the advancing heat nearer and nearer to the North pole, uncovered
a land so early in the history of this western world that it was old
when Europe and Asia were new.

This old, old land, however, is commonly Priled the New World.
That is because it was new to the Europeans four hundred years
ago. But long before their day there had been people ‘living



THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD. 13.

within what is now the United States. Away back in what is
known to geologists as the “pleistocene period’’—that is the
“most new” or “deposit”? age — when the ice was slipping north-
ward and dirt was being deposited on the bare rocks; when the
verdure and vegetation that make hillside and valley so beautiful
to-day were just beginning to tinge the earth with green; when
the great hairy elephant bathed in the Hudson and the woolly



“WHEN MONSTROUS-TOED BIRDS WADED IN THE CHARLES.”

rhinoceros wallowed in the prairie lakes; when the dagge:r-toothed

tiger prowled through the forests of Pennsylvania and the giant
sloth browsed on the tree tops from Maine to Georgia; when the
curved-tusked mastodon ranged through the Carolinas and mon-
strous-toed birds waded in the Charles—there appeared, also, by
lake-side, river and seashore a naked, low-browed, uncouth race of
savages, chipping the flint stones of the Trenton gravel banks into
knives and spear heads and disputing with the great birds and
beasts whose trails and tracks they crossed for the very caves and
holes in which they lived. These were the first Americans.

Z









AN EARLY AMERICAN.







i4 THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD,

The more people mix with each other, you know, the more —
friendly they become. In savage lands, to-day, tribes that are
furious fighters against hostile tribes are linked together by some
bond of Peay, ties and held by some sort of internal government.
So it was with the early Americans. As soon as they had risen
above the first brutal desire for eating and sleeping, they learned
the difference between fighting for food and fighting for power;
they saw that the skins of the animals they killed could be wrapped
about them for shelter and that a sharpened stone was a better
weapon than one that was simply flung at their .
enemy or their game. From fighting with the
beasts and with each other they began to band
together for protection; then, those who lived
in the more favored portions of the land grew
a little more mindful of one another's wants;
they made of themselves little communities in
which fishing and hunting were the chief pur-
‘suits, but where those who had the time and
inclination began to fashion things of stone or
clay to meet their needs. Bowls and mortars,

- knives and arrow-heads were followed in time by bracelets and

bands, vases and pipe-bowls. Still they progressed. The com-
munities became tribes; some of them began to build houses, to
make cloth, to do something more than simply to eat and nae: and
sleep.

To-day all over the middle Portion of the United States, from
New York to Missouri, there are found great heaps of earth which
wise men who have studied them say are the remains of the towns ,
and villages, the forts and temples, the homes and trading-places of
the most civilized portion of the American people of two or three
thousand years ago, and known for want of a better name under —
the term “ mound-builders.” In the far Western plains and river -
courses, in Arizona and New Mexico and along the banks of the.

















“
4
+ a zs
THE RED AMERICANS.
. “ The men did the hunting, fishing and fighting.” |








THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD. 17

mighty Colorado there exist remains of great houses covering large
sections or perched away up in the crevices of mighty cliffs. These
were occupied in the early days by races now called, for con-
venience, the pueblo or house-builders and the cliff-dwellers.

All these home-building people were, however, of the same race
as the fierce and homeless savages who still hunted and slaughtered
— in the forests of the East or on the prairies of the West. All were

Americans coming from the same “parent stock.” Some of them,
being brighter, more ambitious or more helpful than others, simply

made the most of their opportunities and grew, even, into a rude
kind of civilization.

But while these advanced, the ober stood still. Here in the
old American home-land was fought the fight that all the world
has known — the conflict between ignorance and intelligence. The
good and the bad, the workers and the drones, the wise ones and
the wild ones here struggled for the mastery, a certain attempt at
civilization which some had made went down in blood and conquest
and so, gradually, out of the strife came those red-men of America
that our ancestors, the discoverers and colonists from across the
sea, found and fought with four centuries ago.

Hunters require vast tracts of land to support them in anything
approaching comfort; wars and tribal hostilities prevent rapid
growth and there were, probably, never more than five or six
hundred thousand of the red-men of North America living within
the territory now occupied by the United States. They were of all
classes, ranging from the lowest depths of savageness to the higher
forms of barbarism; some were wild and some were wise; some
were brutes and some were statesmen; some were as low in the
social scale as the tramps and roughs of to-day; some as high (from
the red-man’s standpoint) as are your own fathers and mothers seen
from your standpoint to-day.

The half-million red-men who Ren and occupied our United
States four hundred years ago, though scattered over a vast area,







18 THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD.

speaking different languages and varying, according to location,
in customs, costume, manners, laws and life, were still brothers,
springing from the same original family and having, in whatever -
section of the land they lived, certain things alike; they all had
the same straight, black hair; they all used in their talk the same
sort of many-syllabled words —“ bunch words” as they are called ;
and they were all what we know as communists— that is, they hele
their land, their homes and their prop-
erty in common.
A red American’s. village was like
one large family. All its life, all its in-
~ terests and all its desires being shared
jointly by all its inmates. Just as if
to-day, the people of Natick, or Catskill,
or Zanesville or Pasadena should agree
to live together in one big house with
little compartments for each family, eat-
ing together from the same soup-kettle
and dividing all they raised and all they
found equally between all the inmates
of the one big house. The men did the ©
hunting and fishing and fighting; the women attended to the home-
work and the field labor. The boys and girls learned early to do
their share and in the home the woman of the house was supreme.
Even the greatest war-chief when once within his house dared not
_ disobey the women of his house.

The red-men had but a dim idea of God and heaven. They
were superstitious and full of fancies and imaginings. They wor-
shiped the winds, the thunder and the sun, and were terribly
afraid of whatever they could not understand. They had good
spirits and bad—those that helped them in seed time and harvest.
in woodcraft and the chase, and those, also, that baffled and annoyed
them when arrows failed to strike, traps to catch or crops to grow. .







COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL. 19

In other words, the red-men of North America were but as little
children who have not yet learned and cannot, therefore, under-
stand the reasons and the causes of the daily happenings that make
up life.

CHAPTER II.
COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL.

N a beautiful October morning in the year 1492, as one of
the red Americans belonging to the island tribes that
then lived on what we know as the Bahama group,
southeast of the Florida coast, parted the heavy foliage
that ran almost down to the sea on his island home of

Cee he saw a sight that very nearly took his breath away.
_ Just what it was he eeala not at first make
out, but he thought either that three terrible
sea-monsters had come up from the water to
destroy his land and people or that three great
canoes with wings had dropped from the sky
bringing, perhaps, to the folks of Guanahani
some marvelous message from the spirits of
the air of whom they stood in so much awe.
Gazing upon the startling vision until he
had recovered from his first surprise he
wheeled about and dashed into his village to
arouse his friends and neighbors. His loud
calls quickly summoned them and out from the
forest and through the hastily parted foliage
they rushed to the water’s edge. But as they THE ‘‘ CANOES WITH WINGS.”













20 - COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL.

gained the low and level beach. they too stood mute with terror
and surprise. For, from each of the monster canoes, other canoes
put off. In them were strange beings clothed in glittering metal
or gaily colored robes. Their faces. were pale in color; their hair
was curly and sunny in hue. And in the foremost canoe grasping
in one hand a long pole from which streamed a gorgeous: banner
and with the other outstretched as if in greeting stood a figure
upon whom the Americans looked with wonder, reverence and
awe. It was a tall and commanding figure, noble in aspect and
brilliant in costume and as the islanders marked the marvelous
face te. form of this scarlet-clad leader they bent in reverence
_ and cried aloud “ Turey ; turey ;
they are turey!” (Heaven-sent.)
On came the canoes filled with a
glittermg company and gay with
fluttering flags. But as the first
boat grounded on the beach and
the tall chief in scarlet, his gray
head yet uncovered, the flaming
banner still clasped in his hand,
leaped into the water followed
by his men the terrified natives
thought the ne of the air were come to take vengeance upon
them and, turning, they fled to the security of thicket and tree-
trunk. But led back by curiosity they looked again upon these
strange new-comers, and behold! they were all kneeling, bare-
headed, upon the sand, kissing the earth and lifting their eyes
toward the skies.
Then the scarlet-mantled leader: rising ion the ground, planted
the great standard in the sand and drawing a long and shining
sword he spoke loud and solemn words in a language the wonder-
ing islanders could not understand, while those marvelous figures
in glittering metal and gleaming cloth knelt about him as if in





THE LANDING OF COLUMBUS.















tadd |











quae 7.
v as any

Ll aut
Wer is ts quill
yn Auer ecto eaten

|
ates



THE YOUNG COLUMBUS,

‘Tt was the realization of a life-long dream, first dimly conceived by him in his
boyhood days at Genoa.”

1







womans









COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL. 23

worship. They kissed their chieftain’s hands, they embraced his
feet and raised such loud and joyous shouts that the simple
islanders puzzled yet over-awed supposed all they saw to be signs
. of the devoutest adoration. “ Turey; turey!” they cried again.
“He is heaven-sent.” And then they, too, prostrated themselves
in adoration. 7, :

Who were these pale-faced visitors who had come in such a
startling way across the eastern sea? Not for years could the red
Americans into whose lands they came understand who they were
or why they had visited them, although they learned, all too soon,
that there was little about the new comers that was godlike or
heavenly. The pale-faced strangers deceived and ill-treated the
simple natives from the first and for four hundred years the red-
men of America have known little but bad faith and ill-treatment
‘at the hands of the white.

~ But we who have heard the story again and again know who
were these white visitors to Guanahani and from whence they
came. For the leader of that brilliant throng that knelt in thank-
fulness upon the Bahama sand—this chieftain, whose followers
clustered about him and raised applauding shouts while he took
possession of the new-found land in the name and by the authority
of Ferdinand and Isabella, king and queen of Spain — this scarlet-
mantled captain. whom the wondering natives worshiped as a
god, was that Christopher Columbus, the wool-comber’s son, the
enthusiast whom men had laughed at as a madman and a “crank,”
the patient, persistent Italian adventurer who was now because of
his great discovery owner of one tenth part of all the riches he
should find, Lord Admiral of all the waters into which he should
- sail and viceroy of all the lands of this New Spain upon whose
sunny shores he had set foot. “I have found Cathay,” he cried.

It was a glorious ending to long years of toil and struggle.
It was the realization of a life-long dream, first dimly conceived by
him in his boyhood days at Genoa. With firm and unwavering





24 COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL,

faith: Columbus had overcome all odds. He had been despised
and ridiculed, threatened and cast aside; he had gone from court
to court in Europe vainly seeking aid for his enterprise ; and when,
at last, this was cautiously given, he had braved the terrors of an
unknown sea with three crazy little vessels and an unwilling com-
pany of a hundred and twenty men. For days and days he had
sailed westward seeing nothing, finding nothing, while his men
sneered- and grumbled and plainly showed that, if they dared,
they would gladly have flung their captain overboard and turned
about for home. At last signs of land began to appear — vagrant
seaweed and floating drift wood, land birds blown off the shore
and warm breezes that almost smelled of field and forest. And
then, one day, at midnight the admiral saw a moving light that
_ told of life near by and finally in the early morning the cry of
Land! from the watchful lookout, Rodrigo de Triana, a sailor on
board the Nina, told that the end of the long waiting at last had
come and that Cathay was found.

It was on the morning of Friday the twelfth of October, 1492,
that Columbus landed on the island of Guanahani and solemnly
named the island “San Salvador.” The rich vegetation, the dark-
_ skinned natives, the rude but glittering ornaments in their ears

and on their arms alike strengthened his belief that his plans were
all successful and that he had found the land of gold and spices he
had sailed away to seek. He had promised to find the. Indies and
because by sailing westward he had come upon what he supposed
to be certain’ rich islands off the India coast these islands were
called and have ever since been known as the West Indies, while
the red natives who inhabited both the islands and the vast conti-
nent beyond have ever since been called by the name the Spanish
discoverers gave them — Indians. oe

It was all a mistake. Columbus had sailed westward to find -
‘India and had found a new world instead, a world that was to prove

of greater value to mankind than ever India would or could. But





_ gaily colored birds, and other trophies from the new-found

COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL. mi 25

to the day of his death Columbus believed he had found the land
he sought for. “Ihave gone to the Indies from Spain by travers-
ing the ocean westwardly,’ were almost his last words. And
although he made four voyages across the Atlantic, each time dis-

covering new lands and seeing new people, he still believed that

he. was only touching new and hitherto unknown islands off the
eastern coast of Asia.

And so for a while all the world believed. No conqueror ever
received a more glorious reception on his home-coming than did
Columbus, the admiral. He entered the city of Barcelona, where
the king and queen waited to receive him, in a sort of triumphal
procession. Flags streamed and trumpets blew; great crowds
came out to meet him or lined the ways and shouted their
welcome and enthusiasm as he rode along. Captive Indians,

land were displayed in the procession and in a richly deco-
rated pavilion, surrounded by their glittering court, King
Ferdinand and Isabella the queen received the admiral, bid-
ding him sit beside them and tell his wonderful story.
Honors and privileges-were conferred upon him. He was
called Don, he rode at the king’s bridle and was served and saluted



as a grandee of Spain.

Columbus, as has been said, made four voyages to America. But
after the second voyage men began to understand that he had
failed to find India. The riches and trade that he promised did not
come to Spain and many an adventurer who had risked all for the
greed of gold and the return he hoped to make became a beggar
through failure and hated the great admiral through whom he
expected to win mighty riches. Enemies were raised up against
him; he was sent back from his third voyage a prisoner in disgrace
and chains, and from his fourth voyage he came home to die.

But neither failure nor disgrace could take away the glory from

what he had accomplished. Gradually men learned to understand











26 THE NAMING OF AMERICA.

the greatness of his achievement, the virtue of his marvelous
perseverance, the strength and nobility of his character. After his
death the people of Spain discovered that he had opened for them
the way to riches and honor; by the wealth of “the Indies” that
Columbus brought to their feet their struggling land was made one
of the most powerful nations of the earth; and though some people
have said that Columbus did not discover America, but that French
fishermen or Norwegian pirates were the real discoverers, we all —
know that, until Columbus sailed across the sea, America was un-
known to Europe and that, for all practical purposes, his faith and
his alone gave to the restless people of Europe a new world.

America was better than Cathay, for it has proved the home of
eae hope and progress.



CHAPTER IIL.

THE NAMING OF AMERICA.

| discovered a new world. He thought he had merely
touched some of the great islands off the eastern coast of
Asia. Even when, in the month of August, 1498, he first
_}| saw the mainland of America, at the mouth of the river .
Orinoco, he did not imagine that he had found a new continent, but
believed that he had discovered that fabled river of the East into
which, so men said, flowed the four great rivers of the world — the
Ganges, the Tigris, the Euphrates and the Nile.





ts
-~l

THE NAMING OF AMERICA.

But his success set other men to thinking, and after his wonder-
ful voyage in 1492 many expeditions were sent westward for pur-
poses of discovery and exploration. After he had found “ Cathay”
every man, he declared, wanted to become a
discoverer. There is an old saying you may
have heard that tells us “nothing succeeds
like success.” And the success of Columbus
sent many adventurers sailing westward.
They, too, wished to share in the great
riches that were to be found in “the lands
where the spices grow,’ and they believed
they could do this quite as well as the great
admiral. Once at a dinner given to Columbus a certain envious:
Spaniard declared that he was tired of hearing the admiral praised
so highly for what any one else could have done. ‘“ Why,” said
he, “if the admiral had not discovered the Indies, do you think
there are not other men in Spain who might have done this?”
Columbus made no reply to the jealous Don, but took an egg from
its dish. “Can any of you stand this egg on end?” he asked.
One after another of the company tried it and failed, whereupon
the admiral struck it smartly on the table and stood it upright on
its broken part. “Any of you can do it now,” he said, “and any
of you can find the Indies, now that I have shown you
the way.”

So every great king in Europe desired to possess new
principalities beyond the sea. Spain, Portugal, France,
England alike sent out voyages of discovery westward —
“trying to set the egg on end.”

Of all these discoverers two other Italians, following
where Columbus had led, are worthy of special note —
John Cabot, sent out by King Henry the Seventh of England in
1497, and Amerigo or Alberigo Vespucci, who is said to have sailed
westward with a Spanish expedition in the same year. Both of











28 THE NAMING OF AMERICA.

these men, it is asserted, saw the mainland of America before
Columbus did, and England founded her claims to possession in
North America and fought many bloody wars to maintain them .
because John Cabot in 1497 “first made the American continent”
and set up the flag of England on a Canadian headland. In that
same year of 1497 Cabot sailed along the North American coast.
from the St. Lawrence to the Hudson; and Vespucci, although this
is doubted by many, sailed in the same year along the southern
coast from lords, to North Caro-
lina. In 1499 Vespucci really did
touch the South American coast,
and-in 1503 he built the first fort
on the mainland near the present
city of Rio de Janeiro.

Both these Italian navigators
thought at first, as did Colman)
that they had found the direct

way to the Indies, and each one
earnestly declared himself to have
been the first to discover the main-
land. At any rate Vespucci could
talk and write the best and he had
many friends among the scholars
of his day. When, therefore, it
really dawned upon men that the
land across the seas to which the genius of Columbus had led them
was not India or “ Cathay” but a new continent, then it was that
the mar who had the most to say about it obtained the greatest
glory — that of giving it a name.

Wise men as have studied the matter deeply are Pe puz-
zled just how to decide whether the continent of America took its
name from Amerigo Vespucci or whether Vespucci took his name
from America. Those who hold to the first quote from a very old

AMERIGO VESPUCCI.
















SPAIN AND HER RIVALS. 29
book that says “a-fourth part of the world, since Amerigo found it,
we may call Amerige or America;” those who incline to the other
opinion claim that the name America came from an old Indian
word Maraca-pan or Amarca, a South American country and tribe ;
Vespucci, they say, used this native word to designate the new
land, and upon its adoption by map-makers deliberately changed
his former name of Alberigo or Albericus’ Vespucci to Amerigo or
Americus.

But whichever of these two opinions is correct, the Italian astron-
omer and ship chandler Vespucci received the honor and glory that
Columbus should have received or that Cabot might justly have
claimed, and the great continent upon which we live has for nearly
four hundred years borne the name that he or his admirers gave to
it— America.



CHAPTER IV.

SPAIN AND HER RIVALS.

FTER the year 1500 ships and explorers followed each
‘other westward in rapid succession. Spain, as she had
started the enterprise, still held the lead-and secured most
of the glory and the reward. France sought a footing on
sf ie\ the northern shores, England awoké slowly to the value
of the Western world, but for nearly fifty years Spain stood alone
in the field of American discovery and conquest.

And Spain’s hand was heavy. The nation was greedy for gold;
America was thought to be a land of gold and every exertion was















300 3 SPAIN AND HER RIVALS.

made to obtain great stores of the precious metal. For this the

ships sailed westward while the “ gentlemen-adventurers” thronged
their decks; for this they coasted up and down the land, killing the
trusting natives without pity, or turning
them into slaves to help on their greedy

Which way does the treasure lie? and the
new comers could scarcely wait but would
rush where even the slenderest eee
pointed with the ery, “ Gold, gold!” upon
their lips.



But this restless hunt for gold gave the

knowledge of new lands to the world. In. 1500, Captain Cabral
the Portuguese navigator discovered the shores of Brazil; that

same year, Nousende of miles to the north, the ie sailor

Gaspar Cortereal landed: upon Labrador ; in 1508 Vincent Pinzon
entered the Rio de La Plata and the Spanish gold- -hunters find-
ing the Indians not hardy enough for work in the mines sent over
ican negroes to take their places, and thus introduced into
America the curse of negro slavery; in 1511 Diego
Velasquez, with three hundred men, conquered the
island of Cuba; in 1512 John Ponce de Leon, seek-
ing for a magic fountain that, it was said, would
make him young again, discovered Florida but not
the magic spring; in 1518 Vasco Nunez de Balboa,.
-still looking for the coveted gold, crossed the Isth-
mus of Darien and discovered the Pacific Ocean; in
1519 Hernando Cortés with five hundred and fifty
men sailed to the conquest of Mexico and completed
his bloody work in less than two years; in 1519

Francisco de Garay explored the Gulf of Mexico; in 1520 Lucas de |

Ayllon. explored the Carolina coast; in 1522 errands Magellan
sailed around the world; ‘in 1524 the Italian captain Verrazano

search. The first question on landing was: |




DE SOTO.





,

|
|







oi etal 5 iF ala nea







CORONADO’S MARCH.
“ He set out from Mexico to find a wonderful land of gold known as the ‘ Seven Cities of Cibola.”














SPAIN AND HER RIVALS. 33

sailed with a French expedition into Narragansett Bay and New
York harbor; in 1531 the cruel Pizarro with scarce a thousand men—
overthrew the Inca civilization of Peru and conquered all that coast
for Spain; in 1535 Jacques Cartier, a French navigator, explored the
Gulf of St. Lawrence and set up the arms of France on the banks
of the great river of that name; in 1535 the Spanish captain
Mendoza with two thousand men conquered all the great silver
country about the Rio de la Plata; in 1537 Cortés, sending an
expedition north- _.. ward along the Pacific coast, dis-
coveredtheregion #/ called California; in 1539 Fernando

De Soto with ee a gallant army, landed in Florida for
the conquest Ae, of all that country, and marched
oe eee | ie westward to his death; in 1541

Chile was conquered by Spanish

troops and Orellana the advent-

urer made the descent of the
Amazon from its source to its
mouth; in 1543 De Soto’s broken
expedition came sadly back, a sorry
fe remnant only, leaving its leader dead
“beneath the waters of the great river he
had discovered — the mighty Mississippi.

It is a long and adventurous record, in which
Spain bears almost all the glory, is it not? But
so for fifty years ‘did Spanish ships and Spanish
IN SIGHT OF MEXICO. soldiers “ the Conquistadores” or conquerors, as

they were called, sail and march hither and

thither, exploring and conquering, making a few settlements at im-

portant points from which they might send home the riches they

had collected, getting themselves hated by the red men whom

they tortured and enslaved, and growing each year more and more

greedy for the gold they never seemed able to get enough of.
Whoever is greedy is certain to be disliked, for he who tries to



















840 SPAIN AND HER RIVALS.

appropriate everything generally finds that other people object to
such an appropriation. Four hundred years ago the Pope of Rome
was believed to be the head of the Christian world. To him kings
and princes gave obedience and his word was law. When Portugal
— by reason of her discoveries in Africa and Asia —and Spain, be-
cause of what Columbus had found across the western seas, appealed
to Rome for authority to possess the lands, the Pope drew a line on
the map and said: “ All discoveries west of this line shall belong to
Spain; all east of it shall belong to
Portugal.”
But there were other nations that
objected to such a division. England,
as we have seen, claimed the right to
possess America because of Cabot’s dis- .
covery in 1497, and France whose
fishermen had for years sailed westward
to the shallow places or “banks” off
Newfoundland where codfish were to be
caught, laid equal claim to the Ameri-
can shores. For years they did not.
openly dispute with Spain, for the ships
and explorers of that nation kept to
the south in their search for gold, while France kept to the north.
Verrazano, in May, 1524, had landed near Portsmouth, N. H., and
in 1537 Captain Jacques Cartier sailed up the St. Lawrence River
as far as Montreal. Other French ships followed, and though Spain
grumbled loudly and threatened all sorts of harsh things to France
for thus sailing into “her territories,’ for a while nothing’ was
done because Spain still held that the most valuable part of America
was to the south where the gold mines lay.
But now England awoke to the fact that Spain’s greediness must
be stopped, and that some of the good things that were being found
in America ought really to come to her. The king of Buglond

























SPAIN AND HER RIVALS. 35

quarrelled with the Pope of Rome, and denying the right of the
Pope to give away the new world to Spain, King Henry the Eighth
and his daughter the famous Queen Elizabeth began to send their
ships and fighting-men into the very regions that Spain had held
so long—the West Indies and South American waters. Captain
William Hawkins, his son, Captain John Hawkins, and the brave
Sir Francis Drake were the most celebrated of these early English
sea-captains who dared the might of Spain. They worried the
Spaniards terribly; they stormed their forts, captured their ships
and seized their stores of goods and merchandise, and by their
daring and their audacity so enraged the Spaniards, that for over a
hundred years the waters all about the West India Islands and the
~ lands which were known as the Spanish Main, were the scene of
bloody battles and cruel revenges. These old English-
men were brave men though they were cruel fighters,
as indeed were all men in those bloody times. Captain
John Hawkins kept his ships together by these excel-
lent directions: “Serve God daily ; love one another ;
preserve your victuals; beware of fire; and keep good
company.” And Sir Francis Drake, who was the first
of Englishmen to discover the Pacific Ocean, and who in
1578 made a famous voyage around the world, was so
feared by the Spaniards against whom he fought con-
tinually, that they called him “the English dragon.”
Other noted Englishmen who made themselves famous in Ameri-
, can discovery were Martin Frobisher who tried to find a way around
America by sailing to the north; Sir Humphrey Gilbert who twice
tried to make a settlement in North America and the story of
whose shipwreck in the Swallow has been told in a beautiful poem
by Longfellow ; Captain John Davis, whom you know in geography
as the brave mariner for whom Davis’ Straits were named; and Sir
Walter Raleigh who gave the knowledge of tobacco to the world
and made the first English settlement in North America in 1587.



SIR FRANCIS DRAKK.











36 SPAIN AND HER RIVALS.

But, before Raleigh, settlements had already been made in what
is now the region known as the United States. John Ribault and
René de Laudonniere, French Protestants both, in the years 1562
and 1564 settled French colonies in Florida only to be horribly
killed by the Spaniards who claimed the sole right of occupation of
that beautiful summer land. In 1565 the Spaniards founded St.
_ Augustine and in 1570 tried
to make a settlement on the
Potomac River, but failed. ‘The
Spaniards even penetrated into
the country as far north as Cen- |
tral New York, but all their
colonies north of Florida were ©
failures.. In 1540 a Spanish»
captain named Coronado, set’
out from: Mexico to find a won-
derful land of gold known as
‘the “Seven Cities of Cibola.”
He led a most remarkable march
across the western territory of
the United States almost as far
north as the present city of
Omaha. But he failed. to find
the seven fairy cities he sought
or even the gold he hoped to
bring away; though, had he but
known it, his march across New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado was
over more gold than he ever dreamed of — but it was sunk deep
down in mines beneath the earth.

So, all through the sixteenth century, from 1500 to 1600, wént on
the fight between Spain and France and England for the possession
of the western world. Except in the far south, in Mexico and the
West Indies, in Brazil and Peru, few settlements were made. It



SIR WALTER RALEIGH.







HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD. 37
was simply a gold-hunt for a hundred years. At length Europeans
began to understand that the riches of the New World were in its
splendid climate and its fertile soil, and learned to know that future
success was to be found only by those who made homes within its
borders. Then it was that the gold-hunt ceased and the explorers

~were followed by the colonizers.



CHAPTER V.

HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.

74 HAVE seen boys and girls — have not you? — who, when
| all had equal chances, would rush to the best strawberry-
patch, or the fullest blackberry-bush, or the best place for
a sight of some passing Dice and ery out, “ Ah-ha!
See it’s mine. . I got here first!” Such adisplay of selfishness
is een to make their companions angry, especially if the finders
refuse to share their good fortune.

Well —there was a certain wise old poet (Dryden, his name was)

who after studying the ways of the world declared that



’ “ Men are but children of a larger growth,”







38 HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.

and the settlement of America is good proof of this. For each nation
asit found a footing in the new world cried out to the rest of Europe,
just like selfish children: “It’s mine. I got here first!”

And it does seem as though for fully a hundred and fifty years —
from 1600 to 1750 —the European settlers in North America spent

05 a good portion of their time in
trying to push one another off
the little spots of earth on which
they stood, shoving and elbowing

each other and growling out:.

“Get off; this is my ground!”
or: “Get off, yourself; I’ve as
much right here as you!” .

The Spaniards pushed away the
French and the English elbowed
off the Dutch and the Dutch
crowded owt the Swedes until at
last, with a grand shove, the
English pushed off Spaniards,
Dutchmen, Frenchmen and all,
occupying the whole of North
America from the St. Lawrence
River to the Gulf of Mexico.

At first the colonies that set-
tled in America were started for
money-inaking purposes. Those
who founded them came for pur-
poses of trade or because they hoped to make a living in the new
world more easily than they could at home. Strange stories were
told of the riches that were to be found in America. “Gold,” so
one man said it had been told him, “is more plentiful there than
copper. The pots and pans of the folks there are pure gold, and as
for rubies and diamonds they go forth on holidays and pick them



‘SELBOWING OFF.”







HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD. 39

up on the seashore to hang on their children’s coats and stick in
their children’s caps.”

So the lazy people who wished to get rich at once without hard
work, sailed over to America only to be terribly
disappointed. But with all these money-seeking

adventurers went also many hard-working and
many good and kind people who really desired
homes in the new world or hoped to be able to
help the “red salvages,” as they called the In-
dians. Brave preachers or missionaries of the

Roman Catholic Church went ahead even of the

' French explorers and settlers; they carried the
irceiedae of the Christian religion to the wild Indians of Canada,
who never could seem to understand what the good missionaries
sought to teazh them and, too often, thinking chet because the
“black robes” came from hostile tribes they must be enemies, tor-
tured and killed them. To the.English colonies, also, came men
and women who. had a deeper purpose than simply to make a living.
They came: because they found it so hard to agree upon religious
matters with those in authority at home, and because they hoped
in a new land to be able to live together in peace and with the
right to worship God as they pleased.

- All this. was in the early years of 1600. There had been settle-
ments formed already within the limits of what is now the
United States, but they were not permanent.

In 1565 the Spaniards had founded the present city of St.
Augustine in Florida, making it thus the oldest town in the
United States, but this place while in Spanish possession had Mee
no association with any of the other North American settle- Phe
ments and can scarcely be considered as belonging to them.

In 1584 Sir Walter Raleigh had attempted to plant an English
settlement on Roanoke Island on the North Carolina coast, but the

houses and colonists he left there had disappeared forever when













40 HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.





help came over the seas to them, and to this day no one knows
what ever became of “ the lost colony.”
In 1606, however, ‘the attention of some of the Toe men or capi-
talists of England was directed toward the importance of America as —
affording a fine chance for busi-
ness investment, and in’ that
year two wealthy corporations
were formed for the purpose
of colonizing the New World.
‘These corporations were called
the London. Company and the
Plymouth Company. To these — a) Gk
‘Companies King James of Eng-
land granted the right to trade _
and colonize in the land along
the Atlantic Coast from Halifax :
to Cape Fear. Of this vast ter- =
_vitory the Plymouth Company |
was to control the northern half —
and the London Company the
southern.
No sooner were these Com:
panies formed than they - set
/ about carrying out their plans
Gunn Me nnes for trade and settlement. On —
the first of- January, 1607, an
expedition consisting of' three ships and over one hundred colonists
sailed from England, sent out by the London Company to settle the
lands, where Sir Walter Raleigh had lost his colony and which he
had named Virginia, i in honor of the famous Queen Elizabeth, who
because she never- married was known as “the Virgin Queen.”
They landed at Jamestown in Virginia.
The most prominent man in this company of adventurers was

















‘“* This is my ground.”

DISPUTING FOR POSSESSION.










HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD. 43

Captain John Smith. His life is one exciting story. A rover and
a fighter from his boyhood, he had been in many lands and had
had many surprising adventures.
His life in Virginia was no less

remarkable. .When provisions

failed and disaster and death

threatened the colonists, Smith

by his wise and energetic meas-

ures found them relief although

many of them were so jealous

of his superior ability, that they

sought to drive him away. But,

notwithstanding their envy, he

worked with hand and brain to
make the settlement at James-
town asuccess. He made friends
with the Indians; he procured
from them food for the succor
of his starving comrades, and, at
the risk of his own life, again
and again carried the struggling
colony through the dark days of
its beginnings. But he did brag
terribly.

The Indians of Virginia were’
at first friendly to the settlers.
But they soon learned to dis-
trust and dislike them, and but
for the watchfulness of Captain
John Smith and the good-will of
a little Indian girl whose name
was Ma-ta-oka, sometimes called Pocahontas, the settlement at,
‘Jamestown would soon have been utterly destroyed. Pocahontas,









































































































































































































































hefe are the Lines that hew th Face hut tho a
ee thy Gace wh Gloty, brighter ia
; Lhe Fatre-Difcourries and Fowle- Overthrowes'
OF Salvagesmuch Civilized by “the.
Boft fhew tly Spiritand to ig Glory (Wyak
‘"So,thou are B ra/%e. without; but Galde Within

ese. sit Brave ooo. fofe Smiths eAées to bearc)

é Hf he Le arse Steele ont wesrere
seyas th Uetsas,

ABE refs















a ES SRS SAR nei wae Natt Te ay ag



i
i
i
| :
a
ra
nS
‘ 1.
Bo
Ro











44 HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.

who was the daughter of the Indian chief Powhatan, proved her-
self in many ways the friend of the white people, and it is sad to
think that after her friend Captain Smith had left the colony, the
settlers repaid her kindness by trying to kidnap the Indian girl so

as to force food and corn from.



























Ciao CL aglow emilee: nee»

atiiian Erryperour of Artanerg hemnich



her father. Powhatan the chief,
was very angry, and threatened
to destroy the colony, ‘but just
then acertain English gentleman
whose name was Rolfe, fell in
‘love with Pocahontas and mar-
ried her, and, at her request,
Powhatan made a lasting peace
with the white men. It is said
that two presidents of the United
States, William Henry Harrison
and his grandson Benjamin Har-
rison, are descended from this
Indian girl who married the
‘Englishman. ee
Captain John Smith was so
deeply interested in America that
= he wrote and talked about it a
See great deal. He made a map of
eee fentied i Me On ‘th ann.» what he called New England, and
the young English prince Charles
(afterwards the king who lost his head) dotted it all over with make-
believe towns to which he gave the names of well-known towns in
England. Captain Smith told another English captain whose name
was Henry Hudson, some of his ideas, and in 1609 Captain Hudson,
sailing in the service of Holland, remembered some of Captain
Smith’s words and hunted up and explored the beautiful river that
now bears his name— Hudson River. At the mouth of this river















PRINCE CHARLES.

HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD. 45

in 1614 the Dutch, as the people of Holland are called, made a
settlement which they named New Amsterdam. The colonists

great city of New York.

coast and that of other explorers
who had sailed from Maine to Long Island
Sound, turned the attention of settlers in
that direction, but the first real settlement

‘was made in 1620 by a body of English

exiles known to us as “the Pilgrims.”

Driven first to Holland by religious perse-

cution, they sailed from Delft Haven in
the Mayflower under arrangements with
the London or Virginia Company, as it was
sometimes called, intending to settle some-
where near the Hudson River. By some

mistake they did not reach Virginia but

striking to the northward, landed first at
Cape Cod and, afterward — on the twenty-

-second of December in the year 1620,

.

stepped ashore on the gray bowlder fa-
mous as Plymouth Rock, on the Massa-
chusetts coast, and there, in the bleak
winter of 1620-21, founded a sorry little
settlement that was the beginning of New

_ England. :
Within the next fifty years other settlements were made along



_were sent out by a rich corporation in Holland called the’
- Dutch West India Company, formed like the London and
Plymouth Companies for the purpose of trade. They were
sent.to the Hudson River country to purchase furs from
the Indians. This little fur post was the beginning of the

Captain Smith’s favorable report: of the New England



WILLIAM PENN THE YOUNGER.

the Atlantic coast by emigrants from Europe— most of them from









ea

PEER NLT NEE aL RGAE NN BT OR

RES Ne agi ae

a ee ee Ee ee eae Eee NT INN,





SE eT EITS LAGE SPREE NL MTEIIET IR PRINT OS

OEM sy Me yet ee? he aS ee BPM a EAM ee et gee ee te Oe

46 | HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.

England — who desired to build for themselves homes in the New |
World. In 1623 Captain John Mason made two settlements on the
Piscataqua River in New Hampshire —one at Dover and one at —
Portsmouth. In 1634 certain English Roman Catholics. seeking
relief from persecution, settled on the Potomac River in Maryland.
In 1635 people from the Plymouth Colony settled at the mouth of
the Connecticut River, and in 1636 Roger Williams, a good but out-
spoken man who could not agree on matters of religion with his
Massachusetts brethren, was driven from the colony and with some
of his followers founded Providence in Rhode Island. In 1638 a
company of emigrants from Sweden settled on the shores of Dela-
ware Bav ; in 1640 certain Virginia colonists who could not agree
on religious matters with their neighbors, set up for themselves at
Albemarle in North Carolina; in 1670 William Sayle brought .a
company of English settlers across the sea and founded Charleston
in South Carolina; in 1664 a settlement was made at a place called
Elizabeth in New Jersey; im 1682 William Penn the younger, a
famous English Quaker, with one hundred of his associates settled
in Pennsylvania where now stands the great city of Philadelphia ;
and, years after, in 1730, the English soldier General Oglethorpe
with one hundred and twenty colonists, settled in Georgia on the
site of the present city of Savannah.

These thirteen settlements along the Atlantic coast were the be-
ginnings of the United States of America. As you see they were
for the most part made by people who were not satisfied because
things at home did not suit them; and they were, in most cases,
backed by the capital of rich men who saw in the new land an
opportunity to make money and, at the same time, help the poor.
or the persecuted folks who were anxious to escape from their
home troubles.

They occupied but a narrow strip on the ragged sea-border of a.
vast and unexplored continent; their beginnings were full of dis-
appointment and disaster; their future was uncertain and yet these





THE FIRST COLONISTS. AT

thirteen struggling settlements were in time to be reckoned by
_England as among the most important and at the same time the
most troublesome of all her possessions in foreign lands.

hg
CHAPTER VI.

THE FIRST COLONISTS.

HEN we remember how many kinds of people go off to set-
i tle in new countries and the reasons that draw them there,
| we shall not be at all surprised to learn that the settlers
along the Atlantic border of North America two hundred
— and fifty years ago, did not have the easiest sort of life or
the ree of times as they tried to make homes for themselves
in the midst of all that wilderness. Even though we try to do so,
we can scarcely picture to ourselves the three thousand miles of
coast line from Maine to Georgia as it looked in those early days.
For, try as we may, we shall not be able to think of it other than as
it exists to-day —cleared of its woodland, studded with
noble cities and alive with a crowding and busy throng of
men and women, boys and girls. Then, in all New Eng-
land, the forests ran down to the sea; behind the white
sands of the New Jersey and Carolina beaches, the land
was dark with monstrous pines, while over all the land
prowled the wolf and the bear, the buffalo and the elk,
and all manner of wild wood beasts that we can now only
find in menageries, if at all. Not a horse or a cow lived
in all North America; those now here are descendants of
the stock brought over by the European settlers.











48 THE FIRST COLONISTS.

Here and there, throughout the land, were scattered Indian vil-
lages in which lived a people that no white man dared to trust, be- -
cause no white man could understand their manner of thought and
life, while roving bands in the hunting and fishing season came into
the settlements to exchange their peltry for the wonderful labor-
saving tools the white man had brought with him, or to pry about
and make husband and housewife suspicious and uncomfortable.

All about the little settlements rose the uncleared forests in whose
depths and shadows lurked they knew not what dangers. The
woodman’s axe had made but small openings as yet, and near at
hand stood wooden block-house, clumsy fort or picketed palisades as
the sole protection against lurking Indians or the still more savage
foemen of France or Spain.

Neither store nor shop, wareroom nor manufactory were to Ms

{Hs
aT lhe Ml
ee oe ao Ae
w Vs oe ing |
CT ae hace _,

(Oe









Mb "&.

ii rel

My Np Nl
4 Ugur “REIT a)

WG ‘

found when food ran short or household stuffs were needed, and all
who lacked must go without or starve until such time as the supply
ship, braving storm and wreck, came sailing over-sea.
- But, more than. all this, the greatest danger to the struggling
settlements lay in ihe colonies an cmecioes Here were people of




_ A PALISADED FORT.





| THE FIRST COLONISTS. 49

all sorts and conditions — the poor and the proud, the sick and the
well, the good and the bad, the weak and the strong, the wise and
the foolish, the worker and the drone, the dissatisfied and the indif- |
ferent, the over-particular and the careless, every class and every
kind of men, women and children whom poverty, discontent, poli-
tics, persecution, restlessness,
greed, love and ambition had sent
across the sea to struggle in a new
world for the homes or the ad-
vantages they had lost in the land
of their birth. Quarreling and
jealousies over rights and_privi-
leges; privation and distress from
lack of sufficient food or proper
home surroundings ;. disease, sick-
ness and death —all these sprung
up in or visited each little settle-
ment, cutting down its numbers,
stirring up discontent and strife
or hindering its growth when
most it needed gentle influences,
sturdy workers and healthy and
honest lives.

And yet in spite of all draw-
backs the settlement slowly grew.
Along that narrow strip of land between the mountains and the sea, ,
from Maine to Georgia, were planted in the years between 1620
and 1700 the seeds from which has sprung a mighty nation of free-
men. Before 1620, twelve hundred and sixty-one persons had been
sent to the various “plantations” of the Virginia Company; by
1634 the Massachusetts colonists had grown to between three and
four thousand in number, distributed in sixteen towns. There were
frequent disputes at first as to the ownership of the land and just



SUSPICIOUS OF INDIANS.





50 THE FIRST COLONISTS.

what the different companies or proprietors had the ability to
promise or the right to give away, but these gradually grew less,”
until at length the only bar to the complete English possession of
the Atlantic coast from Pemaquid to Charleston, was the little
Dutch settlement at the. mouth of the Hudson River. 22
Three hundred years ago there were two questions that more
than any other pomplene people. These were: where and how to
live and where and how to go to church.
The Old World was so full of struggle be-
tween kings and princes, lords and ladies,
as to just who had the strongest arm and

ple who were not of high rank were
looked upon as fit only to fight for this
side or for that. Their trade or occupa-.
tion was interfered with and following
this or that party might make a man a
pauper in a day or cost him his life on the
battle-field or his head on the scaffold.
When, therefore, the settlement.of a- new
land far away from all this strife and risk,
offered opportunity for whosoever had
pluck enough or ambition enough to try
DULG WINDMILLS IN OED New vous 10P fortume im fresh fields: these who loved
money, those who loved ease, those who
loved freedom and those who loved life, hastened to make the
most of the opportunity and sailed to the Virginia Plantations, or
the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam at the mouth of the Hud-
son. Trade in tobacco and trade in furs speedily made both these
sections centers of business, and the Virginia planters and the New
Netherland “ factors” built up a steadily growing trade with line
home markets in England and Holland.
The question as to where and how to go to church was equally



















just who should be the ruler, that the peo









SETTLERS FROM HOLLAND APPROACHING NEW AMSTERDAM,

ae






THE FIRST COLONISTS. 53

important. When Martin Luther in Germany and King Henry the
Eighth in England broke away from -the Roman Catholic Church,
men began to think for themselves more and more, and new sects
and new opinions sprung up in the churches. This led to what is
called freedom of thought, but it led also to discussions, quarreling,
persecution and death. People who held certain religious opinions



CAVALIER AND PURITAN.

were very firm in their new faith ; the people who believed other-
wise were equally firm, and so it came to pass that they could not
live together in peace and charity. Upon this those who were of
the weaker or persecuted party looked abroad for some place where
they could live as they chose, going to the church of their choice
and mingling with those who believed as they did. These too







54 THE FIRST COLONISTS.

hailed America as the place they sought, and thus was Massachu-
setts settled by the Pilgrims and the Puritans, Maryland by the
Roman Catholics, Virginia by the Episcopalians and Pennsylvania
by the Quakers.

But even in the new land all was not peace. For the colonists
had not brought across the sea that brotherly kindness that is
called the spirit of toleration. That was to be gained only as the
outgrowth of American life and American freedom. So, from
Maine to Georgia the different church sects were jealous of one
another; they argued and quarreled, refused to live together in
unity and showed the self-same spirit of intolerance and the same
inclination toward persecution that they had fled from in England,
France or Holland.

But in spite of religious aerenees and political jealousies, of
opposition to trade and neglect by those at home who had promised »
them support and succor, the thirteen colonies on the Atlantic bor-
der slowly extended their clearings and enlarged their numbers. .

The date of the first permanent settlements along the seaboard
— not counting the Spanish at St. Augustine — were the French at
Port Royal in Nova Scotia in 1605, the English at Jamestown in
Virginia in 1607, the French at Quebec in Canada in 1608, the
Dutch at New Amsterdam (afterward New York) in 1613 Se the
English at Plymouth in Massachusetts in 1620.

The French settlement of Canada does not properly fall within
our plan of this story any more than does the Spanish settlement of
Mexico, for neither Canada ner Mexico have yet become parts of
the United States, but the enterprise and energy with which the:
priests and soldiers, the lords and ladies, the traders and peasants of
France sought to found a vast colony among the lakes, the rivers
and the forests of the North, are worthy of remembrance. Here
Cartier had made discoveries; here Champlain, bravest and most un-
tiring of Frenchmen, rightly named “ the Father of New France,”
had founded and fought; here Marquette the missionary and La

1





THE FIRST COL ONISTS, 55

Salle the trader lived and labored, and, becoming pioneers, pushed
westward, discovering the Ohio and the Mississippi Rivers and, by
right of this discovery, establishing the claim of France to all the
wide western country beyond oo Alleghanies. But all this vast
section, as we shall see, from Gana to Louisiana, was finally
secured from France by the power of England or the wisdom of
the United States.

The beginnings of -home-life in the New World which we have
already noticed as the “first permanent settlements,” soon led to
other attempts at colonization. The founding
of Jamestown in Virginia in 1607 was followed
by that. of Henrico and Bermuda in 1611 and
of other “ plantation” settlements in 1616. In
New England the struggling Plymouth colony
of 1620 was followed by the settlements at
Little Harbor (or Portsmouth) in New Hamp-
shire in 1623, at Pemaquid near the mouth of
' the Kennebec River in Maine in 1625, at Salem
in Massachusetts in 1628, at Boston in 1630,
at Providence in Rhode Island in 1636, and at
Hartford and New Haven in Connecticut in
1635 and 1638. The Dutch settlements at
New Amsterdam (New York) and at Renselaerswyck (Albany) in
1623 and at the Wallabout (Brooklyn) were the principal centers
of Dutch. life, while at Philadelphia in 1682, at Port Royal and
_ Charleston in South Carolina in 1670 and 1680 the Europeans broke
ground for homes in a new and untried land. From these as cen-
ters other towns were started and in 1700 the population of the
Atlantic coast settlements extending from Pemaquid in Maine to
Port Royal in South Carolina had reached upwards of two hundred
thousand. During all these early years the colonists had but little
- in common ; their life and labor were largely confined to the places
in which they had come to make their homes, and a journey from





56 HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

New York to Boston was almost as uncommon as is to-day a trip to
Central Africa or a voyage to the Friendly Isles.

Their forms of government, too, for these first years were differ-
ent. One by one, however, the colonies were taken out of the
hands of the Companies and Lord Proprietors by whom they had
originally been planted and were made royal provinces of England ;
and, in 1700, the word of the King of England was law ea
all the thirteen colonies of the English Crown.

CHAPTER VIL. —
HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

HERE are few boys and girls to-day, however tenderly
brought up, who do not enjoy getting away from their
comfortable homes for a few days in the summer and.
“roughing it” in some. out-of-the-way “camp” by river,
<3 lake or sea. But, after a while, this summer “ roughing”

grows disagreeable and the longing comes for the nice things and

modern conveniences of home.
Life in the thirteen colonies in America ae hundred. and

_ fifty years ago was the hardest kind of “roughing it.”. Con-

veniences there were none, and even necessities were few. Many

of the new settlers could not stand. the life. Some returned across
the sea to the homes they had left; some, unable to endure the
privations they had to undergo, sickened and died in their new
homes; but those who did survive or who could stand the home-
‘sickness, the dangers and the diseases which all alike must face and










HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS. o7

share, toughened under hardship, grew strong and sturdy and self-
reliant, and became the ancestors of that hardy race which has built
up into prosperity these United States of ours.

As you have learned from the previous chapter,,the early colonists,
alone and in a strange land, had to depend upon themselves for.
almost every thing they needed to support life or give them the few



LONGING FOR THE OLD: HOME. .

.

necessities and fewer comforts they must have. The ground had to
be cleared of its forests, broken and ploughed and prepared for grain
and grass, for vegetables and fruits. Many a time did those first *
comers suffer for food. The “starving time” of 1610 in Virginia,
‘and the famine of 1623 in the Plymouth colony, were hardships that







58 HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

very nearly destroyed the feeble settlements; often the people of
Plymouth in those first days had nothing but clams to eat and water
to drink. And yet one of their faithful ministers, Elder Brewster,
could in the midst of such a terrible lack of food thank God: that
“they were permitted to suck of the abundance of the seas and of
the treasures hid in the sand.” Was not that an heroic patience ?
The first houses were the roughest of shelters — holes dug in the
ground and hastily roofed over; then, flimsy bark huts or rudely-
made log cabins; houses of hewed logs or of planks, hand-split or
hand-sawed from selected forest logs. Finally, as wealthier people
came to the settlements more substantial houses of wood or stone
were built. Sometimes, the “finishing touches,” the doors and win-
dows, even the very bricks themselves of which the gable
ends of the houses were built, were brought across the sea
ANS from England or Holland
for the adornment of these
more pretentious houses.
Certain .of these old land-
marks may now and then
‘be found to-day, standing,
still strong, though gray and
weather-beaten. [recall one
such in which I have spent many a happy hour, a mile or so back
from the Hudson River, just across the New Jersey line — its ends.
built of little Dutch bricks brought across from Holland, its quaint
and startling mantel of pictured tiles descriptive of Old Testament
history, its floor of still solid hand-hewed planks, its massive rafters
dark with smoke and age, and over the Dutch half-door the date of
building set in burned brick in the front of field stone. And in the

‘AN OLD LANDMARK.

old Jackson house at Andover, in Massachusetts, the chimney was so
huge that two or three mischievous fellows, fastening a rope about

one of their number, lowered him down the chimney until he

_ reached the spot where hung a “fine fat turkey set aside for the





GOING TO SCHOOL IN 1700.








HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS. G1

wedding dinner of Master Jackson’s daughter.” Then thief and
booty were alike pulled up the chimney, and of-the wedding turkey
a stolen feast was made. ;

Within the house the rooms were few, but the kitchen, with its
huge fireplace, supplied with seats and settles, was at once kitchen,
dining and living room; it was the center of the home life; its
rough but strong home-made furniture, its wooden table-dishes and
clumsy “ kitchen-things ” would be deemed by us of to-day as suited
only to the hardest kind of “roughing it.” There were, of course,
finer houses built as the years went by and the people prospered,
but even the finest mansions had but few of what we now call con-
veniences— few indeed of what we hold as necessities—and even the
most highly-favored children of those early days endured privations

that the boys and girls of our day would grumble at as unbearable.

Porridge for breakfast, mush or hasty pudding for supper, with a ~
dinner of vegetables and but little meat at any time were the daily
meals of our ancestors. Life in all the colonies was rough and
simple, and though we of to-day who expect so much would find in
it much to complain. of, it does not seem to have been altogether
uncomfortable as the settlements grew and the fields became more

productive, the crops more plentiful and the larder more bountifully
supplied. Except in the cities— such as Boston, New York and
Philadelphia, where English manners and English fashions gradually
crept into the wealthier families— the wardrobes of parents and
children were scanty and plain. They were usually of homespun
stuff, for the whirring spinning-wheel was the best-used belonging
of every household. Leather breeches and homespun jackets were
worn by father and son, but on Sunday or at times of festivity and
holiday, there was a display of lace ruffles and silver buckles and a
certain amount of style and finery. The windmills ground the corn
that the fertile farms produced; the post-rider galloped from town
_ to town with news or messages; the roads were poor; the streets in
the few towns were poorly paved and illy lighted; the field work



62 HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

was the great thing to be done, and strict attendance at church on
Sunday with two-hour sermons to occupy the time was the main
privilege of young and old. - Schools were
rare and never long-continuing. In the
South little was done toward the general
education of the children, and many of the
boys and girls in the early days grew to
manhood and womanhood unable to write
their names. But as time went on more
attention, in the Northern colonies, was
devoted to the children’s schooling. The
instruction given was slight,
and “ book-learning ” was con-
fined to a study of the cate-
chism and of “ the
three R’s” (“ reading, ’ritin’, and ’rithme-
tic”), while the ferule and the birch rod_
played an important part in the school-
master’s duties. ;

There were few wagons for hauling stuff
or carriages for riding. Pack horses were
the only expresses on land; boats and small
coasting schooners — ketches and snows, as
they were called — carried the heavier
freights and merchandise along the coast
or up and down the rivers.

Indian corn in the North and tobacco in
the South were the principal things raised
and cultivated. Farming tools and utensils
were clumsy and unhandy as compared with
those of to-day, and it was a long time be-
fore the new farm lands were cleared of stumps and rocks. Many ~
of the New England settlers were fishermen, and as the years went






THE WHIRRING SPINNING-WHEEL.

STOPPING THE POST-RIDER.









HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS. 63

on they built many vessels for use in the ocean fisheries. Ship-
building, in fact, soon grew to be an important industry along the
Atlantic coast, and only six years after the settlement of New
Amsterdam (New York), a “mighty ship” of eight hundred tons
was built and christened the “ Nieuw Netherlands ;” but it proved
so big and cost so much that it
well-nigh ruined the enterprising
Dutchmen who built it and not for
two hundred years after was so great
a vessel attempted in America.

Where there was so much work |
to be done and so few ways of mak-
ing it easy there was not much time |
for rest or sport. People went to
bed early so as to be up early in the
morning; but the men and boys
when they could find the time en-
joyed themselves hunting and fish-
‘ing, while many of them grew to be
hunters by occupation. Deer and
wild turkeys were plenty in the
woods; wild geese and fish swarmed
in lake and river; foxes and wolves,
- bears and panthers were sometimes
far too plenty for the farmer’s comfort and a constant war was kept
up against them with trap and gun and fire.

Life: was rougher and harder then than now and the boys and
_ girls were not allowed to be wasteful of time or food or clothes.
The beadle and the tithing-man, the town-crier and the rattle-watch
made things unpleasant for mischievous young people, and there
- was little of that freedom of association between parents and chil-
dren that is one of the pleasantest features of the home and family
life of to-day. In every village, North and South alike, the stocks





IN THE CHIMNEY-CORNER.







. 64 FOES WITHOUT AND. WITHIN.

and pillory, the eee post and ducking-stool stood in plain view
as a warning to all offenders, and as a result people were hardened
to the sight of punishment and boys and girls would even stand by’
and make sport while some poor law-breaker was held hand and
foot in the pillory or some scolding 1 woman was doused and drenched
on the ducking stool. ;

Yes, it was a hard life, judged by our standards, when every one.
had to “rough it” in those early colonial days. But though we
may not feel that the “ good old times” we read about could really
have been so very enjoyable, after all, as we understand “good
times,” we do know that to the struggles and trials, the privations
and efforts, the labors and results of two hundred and fifty years ago
are due the pluck and perseverance, thé strength and glory that
made America “ the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

EEL 20 — ip ——— eran

CHAPTER VIIL.
FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN,

F unploughed land and unfelled forests had been the only.
obstacles with which the early colonists had to contend, if
wolf and bear and panther had been the only living ene-_
mies against which they had to struggle, then would the |

g niente of America have been as easy a task as is

. to- -day the starting of new towns in Dakota or Washington, or the

cultivation of the reclaimed lands of Arizona and Idaho. But every .

step of the path toward prosperity had almost to be fought for

against foes without and foes within.









FOES WITHOUT AND WI THIN.



65

The dread of Indian attack was an ever-present terror, and for
this no one was to blame save ‘the white men themsely es. From

THE CLEARING.

the very first day of discovery the red men and the
white had failed to understand one another. Had
Spaniard and Englishmen but met the Indians
in the spirit of friendship, of justice and of
helpfulness much blood and sorrow might have
been avoided. But from the very first the In-
dians learned to distrust the Europeans. The

white man’s greed for gold and for land made
him careless of the red man’s rights and more brutal even than

the wild natives of the American forests;

it made him mean and

base and cruel and quickly turned the wonder and reverence of

the Indian to hatred and the desire for revenge.

When the Frenchmen came a-second time to Florida they found
the pillar which they had set up to display the arms of France
garlanded with flowers and made an object of Indian reverence ;
when the Pilgrims huddled, half-famished, upon the Plymouth shore

Samoset the Abneki walked in among
them with his greeting “Welcome, Eng-
lishmen!” and found for them food and
friends; when Maqua-comen, chief of the
-Paw-tux-ents, helped the Maryland colo-
nists of 1634 to found a home he said: “I
love the English so well, that if they
should go about to kill me, if I had so
much breath as to speak I would command
my people not to revenge my death, for I
know that they would do no such a thing
except it were through my own fault.”
But this early loving-kindness was short-



ON THE WATCH.

lived. The red and white races could not mingle peaceably when
the white man wanted all that he could get and the red man loved,







66 FOES WITH OUT AND WITHIN.

so strongly, the land of his fathers. From Maine to Florida the
war-whoop took the place of welcome and the deadly arrow quickly.
followed the gift of corn and fruit. Block-house and palisaded
fort alike became the object of Indian attack and of stubborn
defense, and the hardy troopers and “train-band men” of the







““} WOULD RATHER BE CARRIED OUT DUAD!” SAID STUYVESANT.

4

colonies repaid the horrors of Indian ambush and massacre with
the equal horrors of burning wigwams, the hunt with bloodhounds
and the relentless slaughter of chieftain, squaw and child.

Added to the terror of Indian hostilities was the dread. of “ for-
eign” invasion. With France and Spain alike claiming the right of
occupation, the English colonists could never rest in peace, while,
for the same reason, the Dutch settlements in the New Netherlands
(a section extending from the Connecticut to the Mohawk and from
Lake George to Delaware Bay) were in constant fear of attack by
England. For the New Netherlands this came at last. When in
1664 an English fleet sailed through the Narrows and dropped











FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN. 67
anchor before the little fort at New Amsterdam, the stout and stern
Dutch governor Stuyvesant had no choice but to surrender to a
superior force. “I would rather be carried out dead!” he cried
passionately when he saw his duty. But resistance was useless.
New Amsterdam lowered the flag of Holland; the English colors
waved above its ramparts and the New Netherlands became “the
Province of New York.”

Every war in Europe had its effect in America. The quarrels of
the kings were fought out in the forests and on the shores of the
New World and the wiser treatment of the Indians by the French-
men of Canada always gave
to France the terrible ad-
vantage of Indian allies.

The only exception to this
was the steadfast friendship
toward the English of the
powerful Indian republic
known as the Iroquois, or
“Five Nations” of Central
New York. : Their real In-
dian name was Ho-de-no-sau-
nee or “people of the long
house,” so called because of
the great buildings in which
they lived. The French cap-
tain and explorer Champlain,
had foolishly quarreled with
them in the early days of
European occupation, and these warlike tribes had never forgiven
France, but remained such firm friends, first of the Dutch and then
of the English occupants of New York State, that they were for
years the strongest bar against the French conquest and occupation
of England’s colonies.



CHAMPLAIN AND THE IROQUOIS.





:

|
Eo
A
5
Re
a
:



68 FOHS WITHOUT AND WITHIN.

In the Old World across the séa France and England had always
quarreled, ever since they had become France and England; in
America they quarreled just the same. France said that by the
right of discovery all the land between the Alleghanies and the
Rocky Mountains belonged to her; England asserted that the land
she had taken on the Atlantic seaboard extended westward to the
Pacific and belonged to her. So they quarreled about the land.
Then France was Roman Catholic while England was Protestant,
and in those days Catholic and Protestant, were bitter enemies. So
they quarreled about religion. But, most of all, France wanted to
control the fisheries of the American coast; so did England. France
was determined to “monopolize” (as we say now) the fur-trade of
North America; so was England. So they quarreled about trade.
And when men quarrel with one another over land, religion and

trade, it becomes a pretty serious matter in which neither side will

give in until one or the other is defeated for good and all.

This struggle with France really extended from the first capture

of Quebec by the English on the nineteenth of July, 1629, to its
final capture on the thirteenth of September, 1759 — a period of one
hundred and thirty years. The treaty of peace between France
and England, signed in 1763, gave to England all the French pos- .
sessions in America east of the Mississippi River, and the bloody
quarrel as to who owned the land came to an end.

The most famous of the Indian wars of colonial times were what
are known as the Pequot War of 1637 and King Philip’s War in
1675. They were dreadful times of massacre and blood and held all
New England in terror. But the colonists finally prevailed. The
Pequot War was brought to a close by the terrible assault. on the
village of Sassacus, the Pequot chief, by Captain John Mason and his
men; King Philip’s War was ended by the fearless methods of Cap-
tain Benjamin Church, a famous Indian fighter, and the treacherous
murder of the chieftain Metacomet, whom the white men called
“King Philip.”





AU

tj
iL
i

oe

ee pl

Oe

Ray

IROQUOIS,



IN TREATY WITH THE











FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN. 71



The dates to be especially remembered in the wars with France
are the burning of Schenectady in the province of New York by the
French and Indians in 1690, the capture of Port Royal in Nova
Scotia by the English in 1710, the capture of the great fortress of
Louisburg on Cape Breton Island in 1745, General Braddock’s de-
feat by the French and Indians on July 9, 1755, the surrender of
Fort William Henry to the French on August 9, 1758, the capture
of Fort Duquesne by the English on November 25, 1758, and the
decisive battle on the Plains of Abraham in 1759 in which both the
rival generals, Montcalm the Frenchman and Wolfe the English- .
man, were killed and the victory for England closed the hundred
years of war.

_ Distressing to the colonists as must have been these foes without,
even more disheartening must have been the foes within. For
troubles in the home are the hardest of all to bear. And almost
from the first days of settlement, such troubles had to be faced. As
we have seen, all sorts of people came over the sea to America,
expecting to be at once successful or rich or at the head of affairs;
disappointed ambition or unsuccessful endeavors made them cross
and jealous and angry with those who fared better than themselves
and those who were the most discontented, because of their own
shortcomings, were always ready to stir up trouble. Then there
were the questions of ownership and the disputes between colonies
as to how far their limits of possession reached ; and, quite as hotly
~ contested as any, were the religious quarrels in which the most
earnest and most conscientious were also the most bigoted and vin-
dictive, answering questions with persecution and arguments with
banishment. Thus was Roger Williams, who differed with the min-
isters of Boston, driven out in 1635, but, undismayed, settled in the
Rhode Island wilderness and founded the city of Providence; thus
was Mrs. Anne Hutchinson, the earliest of women reformers, also
driven out from Boston to meet her death from Indian arrows in
_the dreadful New York massacre of 1643. Thus were over-zealous





72 FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN.

Quakers whipped “at the cart’s tail” by the. Dutch rulers of New
Amsterdam and hanged on Boston Common by the Puritan rulers
of Massachusetts Bay; from this cause the “ Papists” as the Roman
Catholics were called, were imprisoned in New York; the Baptists —
were mobbed in Virginia; Puritans and Papists came to open
warfare in Maryland, and “Dissenters” and “ Churchmen” broke
into fierce conflict in the Carolinas.

From all this you can see that people in those old
days were not as high-minded, as open-hearted, as
liberal or as “ kindly-affectioned one to another”
as the Bible has it—as are people to-day. Hduca-
tion, freedom and union have made us brothers at
last. And, when people are bigoted and narrow-
minded, they are apt to be superstitious and cruel.
Our ancestors of two centuries ago were full of the ~
oddest imaginations as to good and bad luck; their
fathers had been so before them. They especially
feared the influence of witches. If anything went
wrong an evil spirit, they -said, had “bewitched”
things and at once they hunted about, not to see
why things went.wrong, but what witch had made
them go wrong.

Now so many things went wrong in the early
colonial days, that the poor settlers begun to think
the witches had followed them across the sea, and
when one or two of their ministers — in whom they
had perfect confidence —said that this was so, of
course everybody believed it and the hunt for the
witches began. It was a dreadful time. In almost all the colonies
innocent people were persecuted or put to death under the supposi- —
tion that they were witches and had worked their evil “spells”
upon other people, or upon cattle, crops and homes. But, harshest:
of all, was the time in New England when, from 1688 to 1692,

“A WITCH.”





HOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN. 73

the famous “Salem witchcraft” persecution terrified all the peo-
ple and led to some dreadful tragedies. Twenty persons were put
to death as “witches” in Salem before the end came, and the
' people slowly recovered from what was a disease of the mind
almost as universal as was “the grip” in 1890.

And: besides all these troubles of mind and body that faced our
forefathers, were others equally hard
to bear. Pirates infested the coast,
robbing and killing, making travel
by sea unsafe and business ventures
risky, while —so.it was asserted —
men of wealth and prominence

among the colonists were partners
in piracy with such freebooters as
Bonnet and Worley in the Carolinas,
Teach or “Blackbeard”.in Philadel-
phia and Captain Kidd in New York.
Debts and taxes oppressed the colo-
nists as the cost of Indian wars and
the exactions of the home government ; while, as cruel as anything
in the eyes of a people who were learning to live alone in a great
land, the tyrannical measures of their English rulers, who deprived
them of the rights already granted them by charter and sought to |
make them simply money-getters for England, wrought them to the
highest: pitch of indignation and set them to thinking seriously as
to some means of relief.

But hard knocks and rough ways, often, we say, “make a
man” of the young. fellow rie has to undergo them. And so it
proved with the thirteen colonies of England in North America.
The struggle with foes without and foes within made them at last
strong, determined, self-reliant and self-helpful. Bigotry and per-
secution, jealousy and selfishness in time gave way to the more
neighborly feelings that the necessity for mutual protection and



A FIGHT WITH PIRATES.





74 - WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

the growth of mutual desires create, the wisdom of a union of in-.
terests became more apparent and year by year the colonies came
nearer and nearer together in hopes, in aspiration and in action.

=
CHAPTER IX.

WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

gjT is the restless people who hee pushed the world along.
Od i every one had been satisfied with his lot or had been
willing to put up with things as they were no progress
would have been possible. Some one must “start things.”

wet And, to do this, he who tries to'“start things” must be
co with his surroundings or his prospects; he must be
indignant over oppression or injustice or indifference (for not to
take care of people is sometimes fully as bad as to bully and distress
them); he must be ambitious to advance himself or his fellow men
and determined to better things if he possibly can. . ©

There were numbers of such people who came over to America;
there were still more born and brought up here amid all the
influences toward liberty of thought and action that a new land
creates. They and their fathers had left a world where titles were
esteemed of more worth than character and where there was, as
yet, too little belief im the truth that an Hnglieh poe’ Oh our day
has put into verse:



“ Howe’er it be, it seems to me,
"Tis only noble to be good.

Kind hearts are more than coronets,
And simple faith than Norman blood.”







WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY. 15

When boys get away from home and men from the restraints of
government they are very apt to want to strike out for themselves
and they object more than ever
to any attempt of the far-away
“powers that be” to tell them
what they must do amid their
new surroundings or how they
must do it. So, at an early day,
men in America began to think
about freedom and to plan for a

nobler living than was possible in

the land they had left. behind. For, when active, earnest people
are really thrown upon their own resources they are bound to think
and act for themselves.

One of the first of such acts was the Virginia Charter of 1618 —
“the beginning of free government in America.” This charter
‘was a paper secured by the Virginia colonists giving them the privi-
lege of dividing the lands they had come to settle into farms which

_each man could own and work for himself. It also gave them a
voice in making their own laws and permitted them to say
who should speak for, or represent them in the “ General
Assembly” of the colony. To us who have never known
anything different this does not seem like a great conces-
sion; but it was in those days, when no man was really
free. And King James, like the crabbed old tyrant he
was, was very angry at what he called the presumption
of the people. So in 1624, with the help and at the sug-
gestion of some of his very wise but very stupid advisers,

_ he took away all these rights and made the colony a kingly

“province.” But the ideas of personal liberty that the 0N® 0" KING Jamus’

: . ss 5 ADVISERS.
wise framers of the Virginia Charter had put into that
early paper lived and became, in later years, the basis for the
Constitution and the Government of the United States of America.



NEW YORK IN 1690.









76 WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

The next step toward liberty was a remarkable paper or “ com-
pact” drawn up and signed in the cabin of the Mayflower by the
Plymouth colonists who, because of their wanderings, have been
called “the Pilgrims.” We call it remarkable because it was a
bold thing .to ay in those days when the people had so o little to say
about their own governing.

As the little vessel lay tossing off Cape Cod on the eleventh of



IN THE CABIN OF THE MAYFLOWER.

November, 1620, the forty-one men who represented the ‘different
families united in the enterprise of colonization, set their signatures
to the following compact which is said to have been “the first in-
strument of civil government ever subscribed to as the act of the







WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY. 17

whole people.” Here it is for you to study out in all its curious
old-time wording, spelling and capitals:

“ In y*? Name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwriten,
the loyall subjects of our dread soveraigne Lord, King James, by y°
Grace of God, of Great Britaine, France & Ireland King, Defender
of y® Faith, etc. Having undertaken, for y* Glorie of God, and ad-
vancemente of y* Christian Faith and Honour of our King and coun-
trie, a Voyage to plant y° first Colonie in y° Northerne part of
Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly and mutually in y° Pres-
ence of God, and of one another, Covenant & Combine ourselves
togeather into a Civill body Politick, for our better Ordering &
Preservation & Furtherance of y°® ends aforesaid; and by Vertue
hearof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equall lawes,
ordinances, Acts, Constitutions & Offices, from Time to Time, as
shall be thought most meete & convenient for y® generall good of
y* Colonie, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
In witnes whereof we have hereunder subscribed our Names at Cap.
Codd.y* 11 of November, in y* year of y* Raigne of our Soveraigne
Lord King James, of England, France & Ireland y* eighteenth, and
of Scotland y° fiftie fourth, ano: Dom. 1620.”

Nineteen years later —on the fourteenth of January, 1639 — the
“freemen” of the three river towns of Connecticut (Windsor, Hart-
ford and Wethersfield) met at Hartford and drew up what is said to
be the first written constitution in the world. This paper did not
recognize the right of any king or parliament to direct the actions
of the people of Connecticut, but held all persons who were allowed
-a share in the affairs of the colony to be freemen. Under the arti-
cles of this constitution the people of Connecticut lived for nearly
two hundred years.

The forms of government gradually adopted by the several col-
onies taught men to stand alone and think for themselves. In
Virginia, as we have seen, it was a “General Assembly,” or “House



78 - WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

of Burgesses,” as it was more frequently called, elected by the
people. In New England it was what is known as a “township”
government in which the people of the various towns taxed and
governed themselves upon a basis settled once a year by the grown
men of the colonies in a coming together called the “ town-meeting.”
The town-meeting also elected to office the men who were to manage
public affairs during the year. In South Carolina a popular election
in the several “ parishes” or church divisions
of the colony selected the minister and ves-
trymen of the church and the representatives
to the colonial assembly. In Maryland and
Delaware the people of the different sections,
or “hundreds” as they were called — (from -
the old Roman word for a brotherhood, curia,
whence came century, hundred) assembled in
“hundred-meetings,”’ enacted by-laws, levied
taxes, appointed committees and helped to
govern themselves. In Pennsylvania the
officers of each local division or “county”
were elected by the people. In New York |

Wai the old system of village assemblies estab-
Sh PE lished by the early Dutch settlers was con-

"tinued by their English successors ; this, by

direct vote of the people in a sort of town-
meeting, selected the governing body of the town for the coming
year.

So, you see, the colonists almost from the start learned to govern
themselves and were taught the lesson of freedom. But, above the
people, as the direct representative of the English king, stood the
Royal Governor. He was generally a favorite or “ pet” of the king;
he was as arule good for nothing as a man and worse as a governor;
and he was sent over to keep the people “up to the mark” in the
service of a king three thousand miles away. The king and his







ONE OF TIE VILLAGERS.





A LESSON IN LIBERTY.

&¢ They began to think and talk and act.”































a

WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY. 81

governor were certain to have ideas and methods altogether differ-
ent from those held by the people, who knew their own needs and
were not slow to speak up for them. The Royal Governor was, in
the opinion of the colonists, forever interfering in matters which he
could not understand and in which they were deeply interested.
There was, therefore, a continual quarrel going on between the gov-
ernor appointed by the king and the people he had been sent over
the sea to govern.

This quarrel dated from the early years of colonization, and some-
times led to popular uprisings, to blows and blood. When royal
commissioners were dispatched to Virginia in 1624 to take away
the liberties granted by the “charter,” the “Burgesses” boldly
withstood them, and, when the commissioners bribed the clerk of
the Burgesses to give up the records, the tempted clerk was put
into the pillory by his associates and had
his ear cut off. In 1638, and again in 1645,
William Clayborne in Maryland headed an
armed protest against Governor Calvert and
Lord Baltimore ; in 1676 the plucky Vir-
ginia colonist, Nathaniel Bacon, stood out
boldly against the obstinate and tyrannical
Governor Berkeley, and, in what is known as
“‘ Bacon’s Rebellion,” forced the governor
to terms, but died before victory was fully
attained, the first popular leader in America.
In North Carolina, in 1678, John Culpepper
headed arising against the high-handed rep-
resentative of the absent Royal Governor, who denied the people’s
“free right of election;” in 1688 the enraged colonists of the Caro-
linas rose against their governor, Seth Sothel, took away his author-
ity and banished him for a year. In 1687 and 1689 the colonists
in Massachusetts and New York broke into open revolt against the
tyranny of the king’s representatives, imprisoning Governor Andros



KING JAMES II. *



82 WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

in Massachusetts and frightening away the lieutenant-governor
Nicholson in New York. For, at that time, a revolution in England ©
drove from the throne the despised King James (for whom, when
- he was Duke of York, the city and province of New York bad been
named) and so mixed up matters in the colonies that it was hard to.
tell just who had the right to act. Then the people resolved to act —
for themselves. In Massachusetts, after putting the Royal Governor,
Andros, in prison, the people set up a government of their own.
Connecticut saved her much-prized “charter” from seizure by the
king’s men by blowing out the
lights just as it was to be taken
away, and hiding it in a tree;
that tree stood as an honored
relic for nearly two hundred
years afterward and was always
known as “the Charter Oak.” In
New York, the people, left with-
out a governor, proclaimed their
right to rule themselves and ap-
pointed a patriotic citizen, named
Jacob Leisler, to act as temporary governor. One of the earliest of
American patriots, Jacob Leisler ruled with vigor as the “people’s
governor.” He summoned a popular convention, arranged the first
mayoralty election by the people, made the first step toward union
by attempting a continental congress, and tried to make a bold
strike at the power of France by an invasion of Canada. But he
was disliked by the few “aristocratic” leaders of New York affairs,
because he would not do as they wished but preferred to act for the
whole people; they combined against him, and when the new gov-
ernor appointed by the king arrived Leisler was arrested, impris-
—oned and hanged for treason—“the first martyr of American. -
independence.”

After this, things went “from bad to worse,” so far as the relations



IN LEISLER’S TIMES.



WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

io A)
ve

between the people and the royal governors were concerned. There
were grumblings in every colony; there were open outbreaks in
some, and active opposition in all. The governors themselves had
anything but a pleasant time. As the years went on the colonists
grew more and more emphatic in their demand for personal liberty.



THE PEOPLE AND THE ROYAL GOVERNOR.

They saw that the land they lived in was destined to increase in
importance, population and riches, but they knew that unless they
had their “say” this growth would be slow or without direct benefit
to them. Their English rulers granted them few rights and looked
down upon them as if they were inferiors. The Americans were



am et i oR wrote





ERTL AL LENE PIE TEN OI



84 “THE LAST STRAW.”

not allowed to manufacture anything for their own use or for sale
in England; the farmers were compelled to send their crops to Eng-
land and purchase what they needed in English markets only.

It is no wonder then that the people grew restless, that they —
began to think and talk and act, and that at last they came to the
conclusion that if the King of England denied them the right of liv-
ing honest, honorable, hard-working and upright lives as loyal colo-
nists of England in the land they had settled and cultivated, it was
high time for them to deny the right of the King of England to
have anything whatever to say as to their affairs.

Just then the King of England of that day (whose name and title
were George the Third, and who was a particularly obstinate and
unaccommodating ruler) gave his consent to certain measures that
roused the people of the thirteen colonies to the greatest indignation;
they led to results, too, that were as unforeseen to the Americans
as they were surprising to the pig-headed - King George of England,
three thousand miles away.

CHAPTER X.
“THE LAST STRAW.”

Uz|ATIONS as well as boys and men are often all too ready to
“0 play the bully. In 1760 the population of Great Britain
was fully nine millions; the population of Great Britain’s
thirteen colonies in Ameri¢a was less than two millions.
It is very easy for nine millions to say to two millions,

“ You shall!” or “You shall not!” And they did say it. People

in England talked of the people in America as “ our subjects.” Of
course the Americans did not like this; they felt that they were





“THE LAST STRAW.” — 85

quite as good and certainly as wide awake as their relatives across

the sea.



A SMUGGLER.

And they said so, too.
Then the merchants of England felt that they owned
the colonies. The people of America, as we have seen,
could neither buy nor sell except through English
traders; they could neither receive nor send away goods
except in English vessels; and the right of trade which
had been allowed them with certain French and Spanish
colonies in and about the West India Islands was threat-
ened with withdrawal. The English manufacturers and
traders held, in fact, what we callin these days a monop-
oly of the American trade, and, caring only for what



money they could make, were unwilling to allow the colonists any

chance whatever for profit or trade.

_ This selfish spirit naturally made the Americans very angry. As_
a result certain of the colonists said that if England would not allow
them to trade where they pleased they would do it on the sly — even

though it was against the law. This
was called smuggling, and England tried
to punish the sailors and merchants who
brought into America, unlawfully, the
goods they had purchased from people
with whom they were not allowed to
trade. But America’s coast-line was full
of little creeks and bays into which
the smugglers could sail without being
caught and this “ illicit trade,” as it was
called, rapidly increased and became very
profitable.

In 1759 the long struggle between
France and England in America was



GUARDING THE PORT.

brought to an end by the defeat of the French general Mont-
calm on the Plains of Abraham, and the surrender of Quebec in



86 “THE LAST STRAW.”

Canada. The cost of this long-continued strife was frightful. Eng-

lish tax-payers held that as these wars had been for the defense and
benefit of the American colonies, America. should pay the bill — or
at least a certain proportion of it—and also the cost of governing
and defending the colonies in the future. But the Americans did
not think this was just. The wars with France, they said, had been
for the benefit and glory of England. The American colonies were
not allowed the right to choose or have any
one to speak for them in the English Par-
liament, saying who should govern them or
how they should be governed. “If we can
be represented in the English Parliament,”

they said, “we are willing to be taxed for
our support, but we do not propose to pay
for what we do not get.”

The British lawmakers, however, were de-
termined. They: would not yield to the
desires of the colonists; they made new.
rules as to the commerce and shipping of
the colonies that were harsher than the
former ones; these were called the Naviga-
tion Acts. Then they ordered that the Cus-
tom House officers in America should have
the right to enter any house at any time
to search for smuggled goods, and, if. need be, to call: upon the
soldiers for help. This order was called the Writ of Assistance. .
Then how angry the colonists were! For they were English-

men in nature and ancestry and they held to the truth of the old
English declaration, that an Englishman’s house is his castle,*
‘into which no one but himself or his family has the right to
enter uninvited. .









THE RIGHT OF SEARCH.

* This was the decision of a famous English justice, Sir Edward Coke, who, in 1660, said: “The house of every
one is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defense against injury and violence as for his repose.”







“THE LAST STRAW.” 87

So when the English authorities attempted to enforce these Writs
of Assistance there was a great uproar! The colonists had grumbled
and protested at the other burdens laid upon them, but for the Eng-
lish king to claim the right of invading the home was going too far.
They resisted the Writ; and James Otis, a brilliant Boston lawyer
whose duty it was as one of the lawyers for the Government to de-
fend the service of one of these writs, resigned his office and spoke
in bold and fiery words against the new injustice. “To my dying
day,” he declared in this memorable speech, “ will I oppose, with all
the power and faculties God has given me, all such instruments
of slavery on the one hand and villainy on the other.” It was
the first outspoken word for liberty, and roused the people to
enthusiasm.

And yet, angered though they were at England’s tyranny, the
colonists hesitated to act. England was the mother country and
resistance was rebellion. They were not yet ready to go so far.
They felt that all they should do was—as
the old saying runs—to “grin and bear
it.” But they really could not “grin” over
tyranny and they soon determined not to
bear it.

For, one day came the climax. It is the
last straw in the overburdening load, you
know, that breaks the camel’s back. And
in the year 1765, on the eighth of March, King George and his
councilors tried to put the last straw on the overloaded back of
the colonial camel. On that day the English Parliament passed
the measure now famous in history as the Stamp Act.

' This celebrated act was but one among a number of measures
adopted by Parliament for taxing the American colonies, but it was
particularly objectionable. It required that all newspapers, almanacs,
marriage certificates, pamphlets and legal documents of every
description should be upon stamped paper or have pasted upon them



THE HATED STAMPS.



88 aa “THE LAST STRAW.” |
stamps furnished by the English Government and purchased from
the agents appointed to sell them in the colonies. It was consid-
ered as the “entering wedge”’ for other tyrannical acts. “If the
king can tax our trade,” the colonists said, “why not our lands?”
And from Maine to Georgia the cry arose, “No taxation without
representation.” People do not object to pay taxes when they
themselves order the taxes and are benefited by the money that
comes from such taxation; but to be taxed without a word to say in
the matter and to be forced to pay, no matter how objectionable the
method and manner of collection, makes people angry. And so the
people of America broke out into loud and rebellious words. James
Otis in Massachusetts and Patrick Henry in Virginia, and other
speakers of prominence and influence aroused their hearers to a
pitch of enthusiasm ; local rivalries were forgotten in the general
indignation ; the demand for a union of the colonies in opposition
to the tyranny of England was universal; acts of violence and
insubordination against the stamp agents and the English gover-
nors and officials were committed in every colony; patriotic asso-
ciations called the “Sons of Liberty” were formed; and on the
seventh. of October, 1765, a Colonial Congress, consisting of dele-
gates from nine of the thirteen colonies, assembled at New York
and adopted three protests against taxation—one of these they
called a “Declaration of Rights,” one “An address.to the King,”
and one a “ Memorial to Parliament.”

This wide-spread opposition on the part of the colonies, the
refusal of the Americans to buy or to use the stamps, their agree-
ment with one another not to import, buy, use or wear any article
of English manufacture until the Stamp Act was “ repealed ” — that
is, declared by the English Parliament to be io longer in force —
exerted so great an influence in England, especially upon the mer-
chants who saw that this stand of the Americans would cause them
to lose both trade and money, that in 1766 after much debate and
many bitter words, the English Parliament repealed the Stamp Act.

if



“THE LAST STRAW.” 89

The result was received by the colonists with the greatest joy ;
but when they learned that, in place of the Stamp Act other meas-
ures had been adopted for raising money from the colonies by
taxation, without granting them representation or securing their



PREPARING FOR ‘‘ HOMESPUN” CLOTHES.

consent, the people again -protested. Thereupon the English
government sent soldiers across the sea to see that the tax laws
were enforced and ordered that the people should pay for the board



'

90 «THE LAST STRAW.”

and lodging of the soldiers who were sent over to force them into
submission.

This was too much. New York refused to provide for the soldiers
sent to that province and Parliament, as a punishment, took away
the colony’s right to hold its own legislature. Massachusetts
urged the colonies to call another congress for self-preservation and
Parliament ordered Massachusetts to recall its action. When the



UNWELCOME LODGERS.

colony refused its legislature was dissolved and four regiments of
soldiers were sent to Boston to keep the town in order.

This was in 1768. From this time on things grew worse and
worse. The people hated the soldiers as the representatives of
England’s tyranny. The soldiers already treated the people as
rebels. From words they came to blows. On the eighteenth of



“TH LAST STRAW.” 91

January, 1770, the citizens of New York made the first stand against

‘the king’s troops in a street fight known as the “ Battle of Golden
Hill” and on the fifth of March, in the same year, an unexpected
fight in King Street, Boston, developed into the bloody brawl that
has since been called “ the Boston Massacre.”

Everybody was aroused. It looked very much as if war was at
hand. But Parliament, fearing that it had perhaps gone too far,
took off all the taxes save one — that on tea.

But this was adding insult to injury. The American colonies -
were not making their firm stand to save money but to gain their
rights. It did not matter what was taxed or how much it was taxed.
What they resisted was any tax without the right of representation.
They refused to buy tea. They refused even to drink it; they
‘drank, instead, tea made from sage or raspberry-leaves, or other
American plants. New York and Philadelphia sent back the tea-
ships unloaded. Charleston stored the tea in damp cellars and.
spoiled it. In Boston the British men-of-war blocked the way and.
refused to let the tea-ships out of the harbor. A great public meet-
ing in the Old South Church requested the Governor to let the tea-
ships go back and, when he refused, fifty men disguised as Indians
rushed to Griffin’s Wharf, boarded the tea-ships and smashed and
flung overboard three hundred and forty-two chests of tea. This
occurred on the night of the sixteenth of December, 1778, and has
ever since been known as the “ Boston Tea Party.”

Enraged at this open defiance Parliament ordered the port of
Boston closed — that is, said that no ships could go in or out — and
the business of the town was well-nigh ruined. This was called the
Boston Port Bill. The other colonies stood up for Boston; they
sent it aid and supplies and cheering words and, one after another,
the thirteen colonies agreed to neither buy nor sell to England (to

“boycott” it, in fact, as we say to-day) and to join in a general
congress.
This congress of the thirteen colonies — since known as the First





92 “THE LAST STRAW.”

Continental Congress—assembled at Carpenter’s Hall in Philadelphia
on the fifth of September, 1774, and petitioned the king and Parlia-
ment of England to restore the rights they had withdrawn. But it
was of no use. King and parliament were stubborn: .

“ The war is inevitable, and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it



















































A WEAK-KNEED PATRIOT AND HER SLY CUP OF TEA.

come!” cried Patrick Henry in Virginia in that famous speech which
every American- boy, and, I hope, every American girl knows by
heart. ‘The war was inevitable. It had come at last.









THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM.

CHAPTER XI.

THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM.

93

, [EBELLION is the open or armed resistance to lawful au-
’ | thority. When that resistance is successful it is Revolu-
tion. You see, now, why we call our war for independence
the American Revolution. It was a successful rebellion
against English authority, and completely changed — or

“ yevolutionized”” — the government of the people of America.
There were many dark and bitter days before the rebellion became
a revolution, but the story of the struggle is full of interest. You
have already seen how the trouble grew, as, passing from objection
to protest and from protest to insubordination, it developed at last

into open defiance, resistance and war.

When Samuel Adams of Boston (the “ prophet of independence”

as he has been called) declared in the Old South
Church “this meeting can do nothing more to save
the country” and cheered on the make-believe In-
dians to the “Boston Tea Party,” the American
Revolution began. From Maine to Georgia people
began to talk of war, and when the English Par-
liament rejected the proposals of the Continental
Congress of 1774, the spirit of rebellion was ready
to burst into a flame.

It takes but a spark to set the tinder ablaze, and
the spark came at last. The cabinet of King
George declared as “traitors and rebels” all who



SAMUEL ADAMS.

were disloyal to the king; war-ships and soldiers were dispatched
to Boston which was declared to be “the hot bed of rebellion ;”





94 THH FIRST BLOW POR FREEDOM.

and the Royal Governor, General Gage, was ordered to seize or
destroy all munitions of war held by the colonists and to fire upon
the people should he deem it necessary. :

Acting under these orders General Gage seized the arms and
powder stored in the old powder house on Quarry Hill (in the pres-
ent city of Somerville) three miles
from Boston and took secret meas-
ures to seize the stores at Salem and
at Concord.

Now as these stores and munitions
of war were the property of the.
province of Massachusetts it was held
that the king had no right to take
them and after the seizure at Somer-
ville the provincial congress — as the
“rebel” legislature of the province
called itseli—determined to save
these stores for its own need. A
mob of indignant: patriots frightened
away the small force sent to Salem
and some one* told the Americans ‘of the secret designs upon the
stores at Concord and the two signal lanterns hung in the belfry
of the Old North Church of Boston gave warning of the plans of
the British.

Then it was that Paul Revere made his famous night ride ian
Boston to Concord to arouse the farmers against the British designs.
Of course you all know Mr. Longfellow’s splendid poem “ Paul
Revere’s Ride,” telling how this brave “scout of liberty” spread
the news. Just read it again, right here, to refresh your memory
and then you will understand how excited the people were and how
the “minute men” from all the country round caught up their



PAUL REVERE’S RIDE

* It is said that this “ some one” was no less a person than Mrs. Gage, the wife of the Royal Governor. She
was an American woman and said to be “ triendly to liberty:”





THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM. 9

or

arms and hurried to the highway that led from Boston to Concord.
These “minute men” were colonial militia men pledged to be in
readiness for any call to arms, and prepared to march when the
warning came — “at a minute’s notice.” They came; and on Lex-
‘ington Common and by the North Bridge at Concord they struck
the first blow for liberty.

“You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars tired and fled;

How the farmers gave them ball for ball

From behind each fence and farm-yard wall,
Chasing the red-coats down the lane,

Then crossing the fields to emerge again

Under the trees at the turn of the road,

And only pausing to fire and load.”

Eight hundred “red-coats,” as the British soldiers were called,
marched from Boston on the eighteenth of April, 1775. When
they reached Lexington Common half an hour before sunrise on the
nineteenth of April between sixty and seventy minute men were
drawn up “just north of the meeting-house” to
resist their advance.

“ Disperse, ye villains! ye rebels, disperse! lay
down your arms! Why don’t you lay down your
arms and disperse?” called out Major Pitcairn, the
leader of the British advance.

The minute men of Lexington were sixty against
eight hundred. But they were not there to disperse. “Too few
to resist, too brave to fly,” as Mr. Bancroft says of them, they
simply stood their ground. .

“Fire!” shouted Pitcairn, and under the deadly discharge of —

British muskets seven of the “rebels” fell dead and nine were
wounded. Then the British marched on to Concord.

But their leader Colonel Smith saw that the country was roused
and that he should have to fight his way back. He sent at once to

~





96 THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM.

Boston for reinforcements and nearly two thirds of all the “red-
coats” in the town were hurried off to the help of their comrades.

Meanwhile these comrades had marched on to Concord. There
they found but few of the “stores” they had been sent to destroy.
Two cannons were spiked in the tavern yard; sixty barrels of flour
were broken in pieces; five hundred pounds of ball were thrown
into the mill pond; the liberty pole was cut down and some private
houses were broken into. That was all. A hundred or more sol-
diers were sent to guard the North Bridge across the Concord River
and, while there, the minute men of Acton, led on by the school-.
master, marched down the hill to
the bridge. The British soldiers,
seeing the colonists coming on, be-
gan to tear up the planks of the
bridge ; the Americans broke into
a run; the British fired and the
schoolmaster fell dead. Then
Major Buttrick of Concord cried
out, “Fire, fellow soldiers!” and
“Fire, fire, fire!’ echoed his men.
They fired ; two of the British fell ;
the rest turning ran toward the
main body of the “invaders” and
the minute men held the bridge.

That was the battle of Concord!
For the first time the long-suffer-
ing American colonists had turned upon their tormentors and there,
by the flowing Concord River, as Mr. Emerson says, they

zr



THE BRIDGE AT CONCORD.

“ Fired the shot heard round the world.”

Colonel Smith and his eight hundred red-coats turned toward
home. From every point the minute men hurried to the highway











THE BRITISH ARE COMING! ;

“ The whole country round was now fully roused. Minute men came from every direction.”



Full Text











paso I ooo |
fesencit &
branectl

a



Bilesniccs)


Library

win

3
os
A
o
&




THE MINUTE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION. See page 95.

“< We determine to die or be free.”
THE STORY OF
Ve UND Sik is

OR AMERICA

IWOILIO. ROI. WAOWING JAS OALIS,

BY
DILIBROEIS, S. BROOKS

AUTHOR OF
THE STORY OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN, THE STORY OF THE AMERICAN SAILOR,

THE STORY OF THE AMERICAN SOLDIER, HISTORIC BOYS, HISTORIC
GIRLS, IN LETSLER'S TIMES, ETC., ETC

FULLY ILLUSTRATED

BOSTON
1) LOWER Ow! COW PAN 7

WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD
CopyricuHr, 1891,
’ BY

D. LorHrop CoMPaNY. -
PREFACE.

Tue story of the United. States of America has already been told and re-told
for young Americans by competent writers, and yet there is room for another
re-telling. To avoid as far as possible the dreary array of dates and the dull
succession of events that may make up the history but do not tell the story —to
awaken an interest in motives as well as persons, in principles rather than in
battles, in the patriotism and manliness that make a people rather than in the
simply personal qualities that make the leader or the individual, is the aim of the
writer of this latest “Story.” The future of the Republic depends on the up-
bringing of the boys and girls of to-day. Any new light on the doings of the
boys and girls of America’s past when they grew to manhood and womanhood
should be of service to the boys and girls of America’s to-day and to-morrow.
The hope that this volume may help as such a light has inspired its author to
-write as concisely and as simply as he is able the story of the great Republic’s
origin, development and growth from the far-off days of Columbus the discoverer
to the nobler times of Washington the defender and Lincoln the savior of
America’s liberties.

Boston, August, 1891. JB, ish, 18%,
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD

CHAPTER II.
COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL

CHAPTER III.
THE NAMING OF AMERICA .

CHAPTER IV.
SPAIN AND HER RIVALS

CHAPTER V.
HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD :

CHAPTER VI.
THE FIRST COLONISTS

CHAPTER VII,
HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

CHAPTER VIII.
FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN

CHAPTER IX.
WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY

CHAPTER X.
‘(THE LAST STRAW”

CHAPTER XI.
THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM

CHAPTER XII.
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

9)

26

29)

37

47

56

64

74

84

93

Ioo
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XIII.
THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION .

CHAPTER XIV.
STARTING OUT IN LIFE
CHAPTER XV.

“THE AMERICANS”

CHAPTER XVI.
UNSETTLED DAYS

CHAPTER XVII.
A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE.

CHAPTER XVIII.

STATE-MAKING

CHAPTER XIX.
CITIZENS AND PARTIES

CHAPTER XX.
CHANGING DAYS .

CHAPTER XXI.
THE SHADOW OF DISCORD

CHAPTER XXII.
FOR UNION.

CHAPTER XXIII.

A FIGHT FOR LIFE

CHAPTER XXIV.

A REUNITED NATION

CHAPTER XXV.
AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS

CHAPTER XXVI.

GROWING INTO GREATNESS .

109

119

130

141

161

170

189

202

‘231

239
List Ol WULUSTRATIONS.

The Minute Men of the Revolution Frontis.

Christopher’‘Columbus .

A dream of Cathay : :

The Laurentian Rocks of the Adiron-
dack region

“When monstrous-toed birds waded in
the Charles” .

An early American

The red Americans : :

A war chief of the Mound Builders

The “ canoes with wings ”

The landing of Columbus

The young Columbus

Amerigo Vespucci .

De Soto. 5

In sight of Mexico.

A Conquistadore

Coronado’s march .

Sir Francis Drake .

Sir Walter Raleigh

“ Elbowing off”

James I.

Queen Elizabeth

Disputing for possession

Captain John Smith

Powhatan

Prince Charles :

William Penn, the Younger .

A palisaded fort

Suspicious of Indians :

Dutch windmill in old New York .

10

10

II

13
14
15
18
19
20
21
28
30
31

33
35
36
38
39
40
41
43
44
45
45
48

49°
50 !





Settlers from Holland approaching New
Amsterdam

Cavalier and Puritan

La Salle :

Longing for the old home

An old landmark

Going to school in 1700.

The whirring spinning-wheel .

Stopping the post-rider .

In the chimney-corner

The clearing .

On the watch . :

“T would rather be carried out dead!”
said Stuyvesant

Champlain and the Iroquois .

In treaty with the Troquois

“A witch”

A fight with pirates

New York in 1690 .

One of King James’ advisers .

In the cabin of the Mayflower

One of the villagers

A lesson in liberty .

King James II.

In Leisler’s times . :

The people and the Royal governor

A smuggler

Guarding the port .

The right of search

The hated stamps . : 3

Preparing for “ homespun ” clothes

69
LIST OF

Unwelcome lodgers A

A weak-kneed patriot and her sly cup of
tea . :

Samuel Adams

Paul Revere’s ride .

The bridge at Concord :

The British are coming!

“Tt rained rebels”

Ethan Allen .

“ The rebels are Cae Bunker Hill”

General George Washington .

A “Continental”.

One of the French soldiers

Anthony Wayne

John Paul Jones . ei

French’s statue of the Minute Man

Dr. Benjamin Franklin . : 3

John Adams prophesying “the glorious
Fourth”.

The Liberty Bell

In Marion’s camp .

The Boston Boys and General Can

Threats of resistance to taxation

Inkstand used in signing the Constitution

Alexander Hamilton

George Washington , ,

The inauguration of President Wash-
ington 4

George Rogers Clarke

“ Borrowing fire”

“ King Cotton ”

The stage coach

Martha Washington

in old days

Daniel Boone 5 é :

The new home in the Ohio country
Washington’s home at Mount Vernon .
Training recruits for war with France
John Adams .

Thomas Jefferson . z E
Washington’s tomb at Mount Vernon .

ILLUSTRATIONS.

go

g2
93

94-

96
97
a)
IOL
102
105
106
106
107
108
109
110

112



The sale of Louisiana

The falling flag

James Madison ss a

Tecumseh, chief of the Shawnees .

The battle of Tippecanoe

Andrew Jackson

The ruined White House

Keeping the old flag afloat

Jackson’s sharpshooters at New Orleans

Ambushed in the Indian country .

The Conastoga wagon

The mail boat on the Ohio

An old-time Louisiana sugar mill .

James Monroe

Ashland, the home of eee Clay.

Discussing the tariff in 1828 .

A Western flat-boat

John Quincy Adams

De Witt Clinton : : ,

The railway coach of our grandfathers .

When every man was his own cobbler .

Washington Irving

James Fenimore Cooper

Daniel Webster

The traveling schoolmaster

Andrew Jackson

Martin Van Buren.

William Henry Harrison

John Tyler :

Anti-renters, disguised as Indians, am-
bushing the sheriff .

James K. Polk

At Buena Vista

Zachary Taylor

Millard Fillmore

Franklin Pierce

James Buchanan . 3 : 7

Dinah Morris’s certificate of freedom

Among the sugar cane . .

Great seal of the “ Confederacy” .

147
150
1S
153
154
155
156
157
159
160
162
163.
166
168
170
173
174

IOI
193
195
197
198
199
200
203
205
207
LIST OF

Abraham Lincoln .

Seal of the United States

Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor
A Louisiana tiger .

In the enlistment office .

Charge of the Union troops at Coe
The turret of the Monitor
Working for the soldiers °

The birthplace of Abraham Lincoln
Home again .

Andrew Johnson i
The Capitol of the United States .
Ulysses Simpson Grant . s
Old French market, New Orleans .

ILLUSTRATIONS.

Rutherford Birchard Hayes .

The Art Gallery
Machinery Hall

Sitka, the capital of Alaska
“ The new way to India”
At the cotton loom
Ralph Waldo Emerson .
William H. Prescott
Henry W. Longfellow .
Peter Cooper .

James A. Garfield .
Chester A. Arthur.
Grover Cleveland .
Benjamin Harrison
THE STORY OF THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA



CHAPTER I.
THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD.

,;jANY hundreds of years ago there lived in ancient Greece
a certain wise man whose name was Pythagoras. As a
boy he had been brought up beside the blue Augean Sea.
He learned to observe carefully. He became a traveler
uu and a teacher and from the closest study of all the things
on him —the earth and sky, the sun and stars, the rise a
fall of tides, the changes of the seasons and all the every-day
happenings of this wonderful world of ours—he announced as
his belief a theory that men called ridiculous but which, to-day,
every boy and girl beginning the study of geography accepts with-
out question. “The earth,” said Pythagoras to his pupils, “is
spherical and inhabited all over.”

That was fully twenty-five hundred years ago and yet,
after nearly two thousand years had passed, a certain
Italian sailor whose name was Christopher Columbus and
who believed as did the old Grecian scholar, made the
same statement before a council of the most learned men
of Spain and was laughed to scorn. “This Italian is
crazy,” they said. ‘ Why, if the earth is round the péople

9




10 THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD.

on the other side would be walking about with their heels above
their heads; all the trees would grow upside down and the ships

must sail up hill. It is absurd.
All the world knows that the
earth is flat.”

But this Italian sailor was per-
sistent; better still, he was pa-
tient. His life had been full of
adventure. From his boyhood
he had been a sailor and a sol-
dier, a fighter and a traveler in
many lands and upon many seas.
He loved the study of geogra-
phy; he was an expert map-
drawer; he had noticed much
and thought more. Believing in
the theory of Pythagoras, famil-
iar to Italian scholars, that this
earth was a globe, he also be-
lieved that by sailing westward
he could at last reach India —

CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS. or Cathay, as all the East was

called.

For in those days, four hundred years ago, Eastern Asia was
a new land to Western Europe. It was supposed to be the home
of wealth and luxury. From it came the gold
and spices and all the rare things that Europe
most desired but which were only to be pro-
cured by long and dangerous journeys overland.
To the man who would find a sea-way to India
great honors and greater riches were sure to
come. So all adventurous minds were bent upon
discovering a new way to the Hast.







A DREAM OF CATHAY.


THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLDs F 11

Christopher Columbus solved the problem. The surest and safest
way to the Hast, he said, is to sail west. This really sounded so
ridiculous that, as we have seen, men called him crazy and for a
long time would have nothing to do with him or his schemes. But



THE LAURENTIAN ROCKS OF THE ADIRONDACK REGION.

he persisted; he gained friends; he talked so confidently of success,
so eloquently of spreading the knowledge of the Christian religion
among the heathen folk of Asia, so attractively of getting, from
these same heathen folk, their trade, their gold and their spices
that at last the king and queen of Spain were won over to his side,


12 THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD.

and on the third of August, 1492, with three ships and one hundred:
and twenty men, Christopher Columbus set sail from the port of
Palos in southwestern Spain and steered straight out into what
people called the dreadful Sea of Darkness in search of a new way
to India across the western waters. But. though Columbus was
right in his theories and though, by traveling westward he could
at last reach India and the Hast something that he knew nothing ~
of lay in his path to stop his sailing westward. What was it?

Upon the western half of the earth’s surface, stretching its ten
thousand miles of length almost from pole to pole, lay a mighty .
continent — twin countries, each three thousand miles wide and |
joined by a narrow strip of land. Known now to us as North and
South America this western continent contains three tenths of all’
the dry land on the surface of the glebe. It is nearly fifteen
million square miles in extent, is four times as large as Europe,
five times the size of Australia, one third larger than Africa and ~
not quite as vast as Asia. And this was-what stopped the way as
Columbus sailed westward to the East. —

But though it was a new and all unknown land to the great

navigator it is the oldest land in the world. The region from the
Adirondack forests northward, to and beyond the St. Lawrence
River, and known as the Laurentian rocks, is said by those students
of the rocks, the geologists, to have been the very first land that
showed itself above the receding waters that once covered the
whole globe. And all along the hills and valleys of North Am-
erica to the south as far as the Alleghanies and the Ohio the great
ice-sheet that once overspread the earth and that was driven by —
the advancing heat nearer and nearer to the North pole, uncovered
a land so early in the history of this western world that it was old
when Europe and Asia were new.

This old, old land, however, is commonly Priled the New World.
That is because it was new to the Europeans four hundred years
ago. But long before their day there had been people ‘living
THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD. 13.

within what is now the United States. Away back in what is
known to geologists as the “pleistocene period’’—that is the
“most new” or “deposit”? age — when the ice was slipping north-
ward and dirt was being deposited on the bare rocks; when the
verdure and vegetation that make hillside and valley so beautiful
to-day were just beginning to tinge the earth with green; when
the great hairy elephant bathed in the Hudson and the woolly



“WHEN MONSTROUS-TOED BIRDS WADED IN THE CHARLES.”

rhinoceros wallowed in the prairie lakes; when the dagge:r-toothed

tiger prowled through the forests of Pennsylvania and the giant
sloth browsed on the tree tops from Maine to Georgia; when the
curved-tusked mastodon ranged through the Carolinas and mon-
strous-toed birds waded in the Charles—there appeared, also, by
lake-side, river and seashore a naked, low-browed, uncouth race of
savages, chipping the flint stones of the Trenton gravel banks into
knives and spear heads and disputing with the great birds and
beasts whose trails and tracks they crossed for the very caves and
holes in which they lived. These were the first Americans.

Z






AN EARLY AMERICAN.







i4 THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD,

The more people mix with each other, you know, the more —
friendly they become. In savage lands, to-day, tribes that are
furious fighters against hostile tribes are linked together by some
bond of Peay, ties and held by some sort of internal government.
So it was with the early Americans. As soon as they had risen
above the first brutal desire for eating and sleeping, they learned
the difference between fighting for food and fighting for power;
they saw that the skins of the animals they killed could be wrapped
about them for shelter and that a sharpened stone was a better
weapon than one that was simply flung at their .
enemy or their game. From fighting with the
beasts and with each other they began to band
together for protection; then, those who lived
in the more favored portions of the land grew
a little more mindful of one another's wants;
they made of themselves little communities in
which fishing and hunting were the chief pur-
‘suits, but where those who had the time and
inclination began to fashion things of stone or
clay to meet their needs. Bowls and mortars,

- knives and arrow-heads were followed in time by bracelets and

bands, vases and pipe-bowls. Still they progressed. The com-
munities became tribes; some of them began to build houses, to
make cloth, to do something more than simply to eat and nae: and
sleep.

To-day all over the middle Portion of the United States, from
New York to Missouri, there are found great heaps of earth which
wise men who have studied them say are the remains of the towns ,
and villages, the forts and temples, the homes and trading-places of
the most civilized portion of the American people of two or three
thousand years ago, and known for want of a better name under —
the term “ mound-builders.” In the far Western plains and river -
courses, in Arizona and New Mexico and along the banks of the.














“
4
+ a zs
THE RED AMERICANS.
. “ The men did the hunting, fishing and fighting.” |


THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD. 17

mighty Colorado there exist remains of great houses covering large
sections or perched away up in the crevices of mighty cliffs. These
were occupied in the early days by races now called, for con-
venience, the pueblo or house-builders and the cliff-dwellers.

All these home-building people were, however, of the same race
as the fierce and homeless savages who still hunted and slaughtered
— in the forests of the East or on the prairies of the West. All were

Americans coming from the same “parent stock.” Some of them,
being brighter, more ambitious or more helpful than others, simply

made the most of their opportunities and grew, even, into a rude
kind of civilization.

But while these advanced, the ober stood still. Here in the
old American home-land was fought the fight that all the world
has known — the conflict between ignorance and intelligence. The
good and the bad, the workers and the drones, the wise ones and
the wild ones here struggled for the mastery, a certain attempt at
civilization which some had made went down in blood and conquest
and so, gradually, out of the strife came those red-men of America
that our ancestors, the discoverers and colonists from across the
sea, found and fought with four centuries ago.

Hunters require vast tracts of land to support them in anything
approaching comfort; wars and tribal hostilities prevent rapid
growth and there were, probably, never more than five or six
hundred thousand of the red-men of North America living within
the territory now occupied by the United States. They were of all
classes, ranging from the lowest depths of savageness to the higher
forms of barbarism; some were wild and some were wise; some
were brutes and some were statesmen; some were as low in the
social scale as the tramps and roughs of to-day; some as high (from
the red-man’s standpoint) as are your own fathers and mothers seen
from your standpoint to-day.

The half-million red-men who Ren and occupied our United
States four hundred years ago, though scattered over a vast area,




18 THE NEW WORLD THAT WAS OLD.

speaking different languages and varying, according to location,
in customs, costume, manners, laws and life, were still brothers,
springing from the same original family and having, in whatever -
section of the land they lived, certain things alike; they all had
the same straight, black hair; they all used in their talk the same
sort of many-syllabled words —“ bunch words” as they are called ;
and they were all what we know as communists— that is, they hele
their land, their homes and their prop-
erty in common.
A red American’s. village was like
one large family. All its life, all its in-
~ terests and all its desires being shared
jointly by all its inmates. Just as if
to-day, the people of Natick, or Catskill,
or Zanesville or Pasadena should agree
to live together in one big house with
little compartments for each family, eat-
ing together from the same soup-kettle
and dividing all they raised and all they
found equally between all the inmates
of the one big house. The men did the ©
hunting and fishing and fighting; the women attended to the home-
work and the field labor. The boys and girls learned early to do
their share and in the home the woman of the house was supreme.
Even the greatest war-chief when once within his house dared not
_ disobey the women of his house.

The red-men had but a dim idea of God and heaven. They
were superstitious and full of fancies and imaginings. They wor-
shiped the winds, the thunder and the sun, and were terribly
afraid of whatever they could not understand. They had good
spirits and bad—those that helped them in seed time and harvest.
in woodcraft and the chase, and those, also, that baffled and annoyed
them when arrows failed to strike, traps to catch or crops to grow. .




COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL. 19

In other words, the red-men of North America were but as little
children who have not yet learned and cannot, therefore, under-
stand the reasons and the causes of the daily happenings that make
up life.

CHAPTER II.
COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL.

N a beautiful October morning in the year 1492, as one of
the red Americans belonging to the island tribes that
then lived on what we know as the Bahama group,
southeast of the Florida coast, parted the heavy foliage
that ran almost down to the sea on his island home of

Cee he saw a sight that very nearly took his breath away.
_ Just what it was he eeala not at first make
out, but he thought either that three terrible
sea-monsters had come up from the water to
destroy his land and people or that three great
canoes with wings had dropped from the sky
bringing, perhaps, to the folks of Guanahani
some marvelous message from the spirits of
the air of whom they stood in so much awe.
Gazing upon the startling vision until he
had recovered from his first surprise he
wheeled about and dashed into his village to
arouse his friends and neighbors. His loud
calls quickly summoned them and out from the
forest and through the hastily parted foliage
they rushed to the water’s edge. But as they THE ‘‘ CANOES WITH WINGS.”










20 - COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL.

gained the low and level beach. they too stood mute with terror
and surprise. For, from each of the monster canoes, other canoes
put off. In them were strange beings clothed in glittering metal
or gaily colored robes. Their faces. were pale in color; their hair
was curly and sunny in hue. And in the foremost canoe grasping
in one hand a long pole from which streamed a gorgeous: banner
and with the other outstretched as if in greeting stood a figure
upon whom the Americans looked with wonder, reverence and
awe. It was a tall and commanding figure, noble in aspect and
brilliant in costume and as the islanders marked the marvelous
face te. form of this scarlet-clad leader they bent in reverence
_ and cried aloud “ Turey ; turey ;
they are turey!” (Heaven-sent.)
On came the canoes filled with a
glittermg company and gay with
fluttering flags. But as the first
boat grounded on the beach and
the tall chief in scarlet, his gray
head yet uncovered, the flaming
banner still clasped in his hand,
leaped into the water followed
by his men the terrified natives
thought the ne of the air were come to take vengeance upon
them and, turning, they fled to the security of thicket and tree-
trunk. But led back by curiosity they looked again upon these
strange new-comers, and behold! they were all kneeling, bare-
headed, upon the sand, kissing the earth and lifting their eyes
toward the skies.
Then the scarlet-mantled leader: rising ion the ground, planted
the great standard in the sand and drawing a long and shining
sword he spoke loud and solemn words in a language the wonder-
ing islanders could not understand, while those marvelous figures
in glittering metal and gleaming cloth knelt about him as if in





THE LANDING OF COLUMBUS.












tadd |











quae 7.
v as any

Ll aut
Wer is ts quill
yn Auer ecto eaten

|
ates



THE YOUNG COLUMBUS,

‘Tt was the realization of a life-long dream, first dimly conceived by him in his
boyhood days at Genoa.”

1




womans






COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL. 23

worship. They kissed their chieftain’s hands, they embraced his
feet and raised such loud and joyous shouts that the simple
islanders puzzled yet over-awed supposed all they saw to be signs
. of the devoutest adoration. “ Turey; turey!” they cried again.
“He is heaven-sent.” And then they, too, prostrated themselves
in adoration. 7, :

Who were these pale-faced visitors who had come in such a
startling way across the eastern sea? Not for years could the red
Americans into whose lands they came understand who they were
or why they had visited them, although they learned, all too soon,
that there was little about the new comers that was godlike or
heavenly. The pale-faced strangers deceived and ill-treated the
simple natives from the first and for four hundred years the red-
men of America have known little but bad faith and ill-treatment
‘at the hands of the white.

~ But we who have heard the story again and again know who
were these white visitors to Guanahani and from whence they
came. For the leader of that brilliant throng that knelt in thank-
fulness upon the Bahama sand—this chieftain, whose followers
clustered about him and raised applauding shouts while he took
possession of the new-found land in the name and by the authority
of Ferdinand and Isabella, king and queen of Spain — this scarlet-
mantled captain. whom the wondering natives worshiped as a
god, was that Christopher Columbus, the wool-comber’s son, the
enthusiast whom men had laughed at as a madman and a “crank,”
the patient, persistent Italian adventurer who was now because of
his great discovery owner of one tenth part of all the riches he
should find, Lord Admiral of all the waters into which he should
- sail and viceroy of all the lands of this New Spain upon whose
sunny shores he had set foot. “I have found Cathay,” he cried.

It was a glorious ending to long years of toil and struggle.
It was the realization of a life-long dream, first dimly conceived by
him in his boyhood days at Genoa. With firm and unwavering


24 COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL,

faith: Columbus had overcome all odds. He had been despised
and ridiculed, threatened and cast aside; he had gone from court
to court in Europe vainly seeking aid for his enterprise ; and when,
at last, this was cautiously given, he had braved the terrors of an
unknown sea with three crazy little vessels and an unwilling com-
pany of a hundred and twenty men. For days and days he had
sailed westward seeing nothing, finding nothing, while his men
sneered- and grumbled and plainly showed that, if they dared,
they would gladly have flung their captain overboard and turned
about for home. At last signs of land began to appear — vagrant
seaweed and floating drift wood, land birds blown off the shore
and warm breezes that almost smelled of field and forest. And
then, one day, at midnight the admiral saw a moving light that
_ told of life near by and finally in the early morning the cry of
Land! from the watchful lookout, Rodrigo de Triana, a sailor on
board the Nina, told that the end of the long waiting at last had
come and that Cathay was found.

It was on the morning of Friday the twelfth of October, 1492,
that Columbus landed on the island of Guanahani and solemnly
named the island “San Salvador.” The rich vegetation, the dark-
_ skinned natives, the rude but glittering ornaments in their ears

and on their arms alike strengthened his belief that his plans were
all successful and that he had found the land of gold and spices he
had sailed away to seek. He had promised to find the. Indies and
because by sailing westward he had come upon what he supposed
to be certain’ rich islands off the India coast these islands were
called and have ever since been known as the West Indies, while
the red natives who inhabited both the islands and the vast conti-
nent beyond have ever since been called by the name the Spanish
discoverers gave them — Indians. oe

It was all a mistake. Columbus had sailed westward to find -
‘India and had found a new world instead, a world that was to prove

of greater value to mankind than ever India would or could. But


_ gaily colored birds, and other trophies from the new-found

COLUMBUS THE ADMIRAL. mi 25

to the day of his death Columbus believed he had found the land
he sought for. “Ihave gone to the Indies from Spain by travers-
ing the ocean westwardly,’ were almost his last words. And
although he made four voyages across the Atlantic, each time dis-

covering new lands and seeing new people, he still believed that

he. was only touching new and hitherto unknown islands off the
eastern coast of Asia.

And so for a while all the world believed. No conqueror ever
received a more glorious reception on his home-coming than did
Columbus, the admiral. He entered the city of Barcelona, where
the king and queen waited to receive him, in a sort of triumphal
procession. Flags streamed and trumpets blew; great crowds
came out to meet him or lined the ways and shouted their
welcome and enthusiasm as he rode along. Captive Indians,

land were displayed in the procession and in a richly deco-
rated pavilion, surrounded by their glittering court, King
Ferdinand and Isabella the queen received the admiral, bid-
ding him sit beside them and tell his wonderful story.
Honors and privileges-were conferred upon him. He was
called Don, he rode at the king’s bridle and was served and saluted



as a grandee of Spain.

Columbus, as has been said, made four voyages to America. But
after the second voyage men began to understand that he had
failed to find India. The riches and trade that he promised did not
come to Spain and many an adventurer who had risked all for the
greed of gold and the return he hoped to make became a beggar
through failure and hated the great admiral through whom he
expected to win mighty riches. Enemies were raised up against
him; he was sent back from his third voyage a prisoner in disgrace
and chains, and from his fourth voyage he came home to die.

But neither failure nor disgrace could take away the glory from

what he had accomplished. Gradually men learned to understand








26 THE NAMING OF AMERICA.

the greatness of his achievement, the virtue of his marvelous
perseverance, the strength and nobility of his character. After his
death the people of Spain discovered that he had opened for them
the way to riches and honor; by the wealth of “the Indies” that
Columbus brought to their feet their struggling land was made one
of the most powerful nations of the earth; and though some people
have said that Columbus did not discover America, but that French
fishermen or Norwegian pirates were the real discoverers, we all —
know that, until Columbus sailed across the sea, America was un-
known to Europe and that, for all practical purposes, his faith and
his alone gave to the restless people of Europe a new world.

America was better than Cathay, for it has proved the home of
eae hope and progress.



CHAPTER IIL.

THE NAMING OF AMERICA.

| discovered a new world. He thought he had merely
touched some of the great islands off the eastern coast of
Asia. Even when, in the month of August, 1498, he first
_}| saw the mainland of America, at the mouth of the river .
Orinoco, he did not imagine that he had found a new continent, but
believed that he had discovered that fabled river of the East into
which, so men said, flowed the four great rivers of the world — the
Ganges, the Tigris, the Euphrates and the Nile.


ts
-~l

THE NAMING OF AMERICA.

But his success set other men to thinking, and after his wonder-
ful voyage in 1492 many expeditions were sent westward for pur-
poses of discovery and exploration. After he had found “ Cathay”
every man, he declared, wanted to become a
discoverer. There is an old saying you may
have heard that tells us “nothing succeeds
like success.” And the success of Columbus
sent many adventurers sailing westward.
They, too, wished to share in the great
riches that were to be found in “the lands
where the spices grow,’ and they believed
they could do this quite as well as the great
admiral. Once at a dinner given to Columbus a certain envious:
Spaniard declared that he was tired of hearing the admiral praised
so highly for what any one else could have done. ‘“ Why,” said
he, “if the admiral had not discovered the Indies, do you think
there are not other men in Spain who might have done this?”
Columbus made no reply to the jealous Don, but took an egg from
its dish. “Can any of you stand this egg on end?” he asked.
One after another of the company tried it and failed, whereupon
the admiral struck it smartly on the table and stood it upright on
its broken part. “Any of you can do it now,” he said, “and any
of you can find the Indies, now that I have shown you
the way.”

So every great king in Europe desired to possess new
principalities beyond the sea. Spain, Portugal, France,
England alike sent out voyages of discovery westward —
“trying to set the egg on end.”

Of all these discoverers two other Italians, following
where Columbus had led, are worthy of special note —
John Cabot, sent out by King Henry the Seventh of England in
1497, and Amerigo or Alberigo Vespucci, who is said to have sailed
westward with a Spanish expedition in the same year. Both of








28 THE NAMING OF AMERICA.

these men, it is asserted, saw the mainland of America before
Columbus did, and England founded her claims to possession in
North America and fought many bloody wars to maintain them .
because John Cabot in 1497 “first made the American continent”
and set up the flag of England on a Canadian headland. In that
same year of 1497 Cabot sailed along the North American coast.
from the St. Lawrence to the Hudson; and Vespucci, although this
is doubted by many, sailed in the same year along the southern
coast from lords, to North Caro-
lina. In 1499 Vespucci really did
touch the South American coast,
and-in 1503 he built the first fort
on the mainland near the present
city of Rio de Janeiro.

Both these Italian navigators
thought at first, as did Colman)
that they had found the direct

way to the Indies, and each one
earnestly declared himself to have
been the first to discover the main-
land. At any rate Vespucci could
talk and write the best and he had
many friends among the scholars
of his day. When, therefore, it
really dawned upon men that the
land across the seas to which the genius of Columbus had led them
was not India or “ Cathay” but a new continent, then it was that
the mar who had the most to say about it obtained the greatest
glory — that of giving it a name.

Wise men as have studied the matter deeply are Pe puz-
zled just how to decide whether the continent of America took its
name from Amerigo Vespucci or whether Vespucci took his name
from America. Those who hold to the first quote from a very old

AMERIGO VESPUCCI.













SPAIN AND HER RIVALS. 29
book that says “a-fourth part of the world, since Amerigo found it,
we may call Amerige or America;” those who incline to the other
opinion claim that the name America came from an old Indian
word Maraca-pan or Amarca, a South American country and tribe ;
Vespucci, they say, used this native word to designate the new
land, and upon its adoption by map-makers deliberately changed
his former name of Alberigo or Albericus’ Vespucci to Amerigo or
Americus.

But whichever of these two opinions is correct, the Italian astron-
omer and ship chandler Vespucci received the honor and glory that
Columbus should have received or that Cabot might justly have
claimed, and the great continent upon which we live has for nearly
four hundred years borne the name that he or his admirers gave to
it— America.



CHAPTER IV.

SPAIN AND HER RIVALS.

FTER the year 1500 ships and explorers followed each
‘other westward in rapid succession. Spain, as she had
started the enterprise, still held the lead-and secured most
of the glory and the reward. France sought a footing on
sf ie\ the northern shores, England awoké slowly to the value
of the Western world, but for nearly fifty years Spain stood alone
in the field of American discovery and conquest.

And Spain’s hand was heavy. The nation was greedy for gold;
America was thought to be a land of gold and every exertion was












300 3 SPAIN AND HER RIVALS.

made to obtain great stores of the precious metal. For this the

ships sailed westward while the “ gentlemen-adventurers” thronged
their decks; for this they coasted up and down the land, killing the
trusting natives without pity, or turning
them into slaves to help on their greedy

Which way does the treasure lie? and the
new comers could scarcely wait but would
rush where even the slenderest eee
pointed with the ery, “ Gold, gold!” upon
their lips.



But this restless hunt for gold gave the

knowledge of new lands to the world. In. 1500, Captain Cabral
the Portuguese navigator discovered the shores of Brazil; that

same year, Nousende of miles to the north, the ie sailor

Gaspar Cortereal landed: upon Labrador ; in 1508 Vincent Pinzon
entered the Rio de La Plata and the Spanish gold- -hunters find-
ing the Indians not hardy enough for work in the mines sent over
ican negroes to take their places, and thus introduced into
America the curse of negro slavery; in 1511 Diego
Velasquez, with three hundred men, conquered the
island of Cuba; in 1512 John Ponce de Leon, seek-
ing for a magic fountain that, it was said, would
make him young again, discovered Florida but not
the magic spring; in 1518 Vasco Nunez de Balboa,.
-still looking for the coveted gold, crossed the Isth-
mus of Darien and discovered the Pacific Ocean; in
1519 Hernando Cortés with five hundred and fifty
men sailed to the conquest of Mexico and completed
his bloody work in less than two years; in 1519

Francisco de Garay explored the Gulf of Mexico; in 1520 Lucas de |

Ayllon. explored the Carolina coast; in 1522 errands Magellan
sailed around the world; ‘in 1524 the Italian captain Verrazano

search. The first question on landing was: |




DE SOTO.





,

|
|




oi etal 5 iF ala nea







CORONADO’S MARCH.
“ He set out from Mexico to find a wonderful land of gold known as the ‘ Seven Cities of Cibola.”








SPAIN AND HER RIVALS. 33

sailed with a French expedition into Narragansett Bay and New
York harbor; in 1531 the cruel Pizarro with scarce a thousand men—
overthrew the Inca civilization of Peru and conquered all that coast
for Spain; in 1535 Jacques Cartier, a French navigator, explored the
Gulf of St. Lawrence and set up the arms of France on the banks
of the great river of that name; in 1535 the Spanish captain
Mendoza with two thousand men conquered all the great silver
country about the Rio de la Plata; in 1537 Cortés, sending an
expedition north- _.. ward along the Pacific coast, dis-
coveredtheregion #/ called California; in 1539 Fernando

De Soto with ee a gallant army, landed in Florida for
the conquest Ae, of all that country, and marched
oe eee | ie westward to his death; in 1541

Chile was conquered by Spanish

troops and Orellana the advent-

urer made the descent of the
Amazon from its source to its
mouth; in 1543 De Soto’s broken
expedition came sadly back, a sorry
fe remnant only, leaving its leader dead
“beneath the waters of the great river he
had discovered — the mighty Mississippi.

It is a long and adventurous record, in which
Spain bears almost all the glory, is it not? But
so for fifty years ‘did Spanish ships and Spanish
IN SIGHT OF MEXICO. soldiers “ the Conquistadores” or conquerors, as

they were called, sail and march hither and

thither, exploring and conquering, making a few settlements at im-

portant points from which they might send home the riches they

had collected, getting themselves hated by the red men whom

they tortured and enslaved, and growing each year more and more

greedy for the gold they never seemed able to get enough of.
Whoever is greedy is certain to be disliked, for he who tries to
















840 SPAIN AND HER RIVALS.

appropriate everything generally finds that other people object to
such an appropriation. Four hundred years ago the Pope of Rome
was believed to be the head of the Christian world. To him kings
and princes gave obedience and his word was law. When Portugal
— by reason of her discoveries in Africa and Asia —and Spain, be-
cause of what Columbus had found across the western seas, appealed
to Rome for authority to possess the lands, the Pope drew a line on
the map and said: “ All discoveries west of this line shall belong to
Spain; all east of it shall belong to
Portugal.”
But there were other nations that
objected to such a division. England,
as we have seen, claimed the right to
possess America because of Cabot’s dis- .
covery in 1497, and France whose
fishermen had for years sailed westward
to the shallow places or “banks” off
Newfoundland where codfish were to be
caught, laid equal claim to the Ameri-
can shores. For years they did not.
openly dispute with Spain, for the ships
and explorers of that nation kept to
the south in their search for gold, while France kept to the north.
Verrazano, in May, 1524, had landed near Portsmouth, N. H., and
in 1537 Captain Jacques Cartier sailed up the St. Lawrence River
as far as Montreal. Other French ships followed, and though Spain
grumbled loudly and threatened all sorts of harsh things to France
for thus sailing into “her territories,’ for a while nothing’ was
done because Spain still held that the most valuable part of America
was to the south where the gold mines lay.
But now England awoke to the fact that Spain’s greediness must
be stopped, and that some of the good things that were being found
in America ought really to come to her. The king of Buglond






















SPAIN AND HER RIVALS. 35

quarrelled with the Pope of Rome, and denying the right of the
Pope to give away the new world to Spain, King Henry the Eighth
and his daughter the famous Queen Elizabeth began to send their
ships and fighting-men into the very regions that Spain had held
so long—the West Indies and South American waters. Captain
William Hawkins, his son, Captain John Hawkins, and the brave
Sir Francis Drake were the most celebrated of these early English
sea-captains who dared the might of Spain. They worried the
Spaniards terribly; they stormed their forts, captured their ships
and seized their stores of goods and merchandise, and by their
daring and their audacity so enraged the Spaniards, that for over a
hundred years the waters all about the West India Islands and the
~ lands which were known as the Spanish Main, were the scene of
bloody battles and cruel revenges. These old English-
men were brave men though they were cruel fighters,
as indeed were all men in those bloody times. Captain
John Hawkins kept his ships together by these excel-
lent directions: “Serve God daily ; love one another ;
preserve your victuals; beware of fire; and keep good
company.” And Sir Francis Drake, who was the first
of Englishmen to discover the Pacific Ocean, and who in
1578 made a famous voyage around the world, was so
feared by the Spaniards against whom he fought con-
tinually, that they called him “the English dragon.”
Other noted Englishmen who made themselves famous in Ameri-
, can discovery were Martin Frobisher who tried to find a way around
America by sailing to the north; Sir Humphrey Gilbert who twice
tried to make a settlement in North America and the story of
whose shipwreck in the Swallow has been told in a beautiful poem
by Longfellow ; Captain John Davis, whom you know in geography
as the brave mariner for whom Davis’ Straits were named; and Sir
Walter Raleigh who gave the knowledge of tobacco to the world
and made the first English settlement in North America in 1587.



SIR FRANCIS DRAKK.








36 SPAIN AND HER RIVALS.

But, before Raleigh, settlements had already been made in what
is now the region known as the United States. John Ribault and
René de Laudonniere, French Protestants both, in the years 1562
and 1564 settled French colonies in Florida only to be horribly
killed by the Spaniards who claimed the sole right of occupation of
that beautiful summer land. In 1565 the Spaniards founded St.
_ Augustine and in 1570 tried
to make a settlement on the
Potomac River, but failed. ‘The
Spaniards even penetrated into
the country as far north as Cen- |
tral New York, but all their
colonies north of Florida were ©
failures.. In 1540 a Spanish»
captain named Coronado, set’
out from: Mexico to find a won-
derful land of gold known as
‘the “Seven Cities of Cibola.”
He led a most remarkable march
across the western territory of
the United States almost as far
north as the present city of
Omaha. But he failed. to find
the seven fairy cities he sought
or even the gold he hoped to
bring away; though, had he but
known it, his march across New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado was
over more gold than he ever dreamed of — but it was sunk deep
down in mines beneath the earth.

So, all through the sixteenth century, from 1500 to 1600, wént on
the fight between Spain and France and England for the possession
of the western world. Except in the far south, in Mexico and the
West Indies, in Brazil and Peru, few settlements were made. It



SIR WALTER RALEIGH.




HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD. 37
was simply a gold-hunt for a hundred years. At length Europeans
began to understand that the riches of the New World were in its
splendid climate and its fertile soil, and learned to know that future
success was to be found only by those who made homes within its
borders. Then it was that the gold-hunt ceased and the explorers

~were followed by the colonizers.



CHAPTER V.

HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.

74 HAVE seen boys and girls — have not you? — who, when
| all had equal chances, would rush to the best strawberry-
patch, or the fullest blackberry-bush, or the best place for
a sight of some passing Dice and ery out, “ Ah-ha!
See it’s mine. . I got here first!” Such adisplay of selfishness
is een to make their companions angry, especially if the finders
refuse to share their good fortune.

Well —there was a certain wise old poet (Dryden, his name was)

who after studying the ways of the world declared that



’ “ Men are but children of a larger growth,”




38 HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.

and the settlement of America is good proof of this. For each nation
asit found a footing in the new world cried out to the rest of Europe,
just like selfish children: “It’s mine. I got here first!”

And it does seem as though for fully a hundred and fifty years —
from 1600 to 1750 —the European settlers in North America spent

05 a good portion of their time in
trying to push one another off
the little spots of earth on which
they stood, shoving and elbowing

each other and growling out:.

“Get off; this is my ground!”
or: “Get off, yourself; I’ve as
much right here as you!” .

The Spaniards pushed away the
French and the English elbowed
off the Dutch and the Dutch
crowded owt the Swedes until at
last, with a grand shove, the
English pushed off Spaniards,
Dutchmen, Frenchmen and all,
occupying the whole of North
America from the St. Lawrence
River to the Gulf of Mexico.

At first the colonies that set-
tled in America were started for
money-inaking purposes. Those
who founded them came for pur-
poses of trade or because they hoped to make a living in the new
world more easily than they could at home. Strange stories were
told of the riches that were to be found in America. “Gold,” so
one man said it had been told him, “is more plentiful there than
copper. The pots and pans of the folks there are pure gold, and as
for rubies and diamonds they go forth on holidays and pick them



‘SELBOWING OFF.”




HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD. 39

up on the seashore to hang on their children’s coats and stick in
their children’s caps.”

So the lazy people who wished to get rich at once without hard
work, sailed over to America only to be terribly
disappointed. But with all these money-seeking

adventurers went also many hard-working and
many good and kind people who really desired
homes in the new world or hoped to be able to
help the “red salvages,” as they called the In-
dians. Brave preachers or missionaries of the

Roman Catholic Church went ahead even of the

' French explorers and settlers; they carried the
irceiedae of the Christian religion to the wild Indians of Canada,
who never could seem to understand what the good missionaries
sought to teazh them and, too often, thinking chet because the
“black robes” came from hostile tribes they must be enemies, tor-
tured and killed them. To the.English colonies, also, came men
and women who. had a deeper purpose than simply to make a living.
They came: because they found it so hard to agree upon religious
matters with those in authority at home, and because they hoped
in a new land to be able to live together in peace and with the
right to worship God as they pleased.

- All this. was in the early years of 1600. There had been settle-
ments formed already within the limits of what is now the
United States, but they were not permanent.

In 1565 the Spaniards had founded the present city of St.
Augustine in Florida, making it thus the oldest town in the
United States, but this place while in Spanish possession had Mee
no association with any of the other North American settle- Phe
ments and can scarcely be considered as belonging to them.

In 1584 Sir Walter Raleigh had attempted to plant an English
settlement on Roanoke Island on the North Carolina coast, but the

houses and colonists he left there had disappeared forever when










40 HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.





help came over the seas to them, and to this day no one knows
what ever became of “ the lost colony.”
In 1606, however, ‘the attention of some of the Toe men or capi-
talists of England was directed toward the importance of America as —
affording a fine chance for busi-
ness investment, and in’ that
year two wealthy corporations
were formed for the purpose
of colonizing the New World.
‘These corporations were called
the London. Company and the
Plymouth Company. To these — a) Gk
‘Companies King James of Eng-
land granted the right to trade _
and colonize in the land along
the Atlantic Coast from Halifax :
to Cape Fear. Of this vast ter- =
_vitory the Plymouth Company |
was to control the northern half —
and the London Company the
southern.
No sooner were these Com:
panies formed than they - set
/ about carrying out their plans
Gunn Me nnes for trade and settlement. On —
the first of- January, 1607, an
expedition consisting of' three ships and over one hundred colonists
sailed from England, sent out by the London Company to settle the
lands, where Sir Walter Raleigh had lost his colony and which he
had named Virginia, i in honor of the famous Queen Elizabeth, who
because she never- married was known as “the Virgin Queen.”
They landed at Jamestown in Virginia.
The most prominent man in this company of adventurers was














‘“* This is my ground.”

DISPUTING FOR POSSESSION.




HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD. 43

Captain John Smith. His life is one exciting story. A rover and
a fighter from his boyhood, he had been in many lands and had
had many surprising adventures.
His life in Virginia was no less

remarkable. .When provisions

failed and disaster and death

threatened the colonists, Smith

by his wise and energetic meas-

ures found them relief although

many of them were so jealous

of his superior ability, that they

sought to drive him away. But,

notwithstanding their envy, he

worked with hand and brain to
make the settlement at James-
town asuccess. He made friends
with the Indians; he procured
from them food for the succor
of his starving comrades, and, at
the risk of his own life, again
and again carried the struggling
colony through the dark days of
its beginnings. But he did brag
terribly.

The Indians of Virginia were’
at first friendly to the settlers.
But they soon learned to dis-
trust and dislike them, and but
for the watchfulness of Captain
John Smith and the good-will of
a little Indian girl whose name
was Ma-ta-oka, sometimes called Pocahontas, the settlement at,
‘Jamestown would soon have been utterly destroyed. Pocahontas,









































































































































































































































hefe are the Lines that hew th Face hut tho a
ee thy Gace wh Gloty, brighter ia
; Lhe Fatre-Difcourries and Fowle- Overthrowes'
OF Salvagesmuch Civilized by “the.
Boft fhew tly Spiritand to ig Glory (Wyak
‘"So,thou are B ra/%e. without; but Galde Within

ese. sit Brave ooo. fofe Smiths eAées to bearc)

é Hf he Le arse Steele ont wesrere
seyas th Uetsas,

ABE refs















a ES SRS SAR nei wae Natt Te ay ag



i
i
i
| :
a
ra
nS
‘ 1.
Bo
Ro








44 HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.

who was the daughter of the Indian chief Powhatan, proved her-
self in many ways the friend of the white people, and it is sad to
think that after her friend Captain Smith had left the colony, the
settlers repaid her kindness by trying to kidnap the Indian girl so

as to force food and corn from.



























Ciao CL aglow emilee: nee»

atiiian Erryperour of Artanerg hemnich



her father. Powhatan the chief,
was very angry, and threatened
to destroy the colony, ‘but just
then acertain English gentleman
whose name was Rolfe, fell in
‘love with Pocahontas and mar-
ried her, and, at her request,
Powhatan made a lasting peace
with the white men. It is said
that two presidents of the United
States, William Henry Harrison
and his grandson Benjamin Har-
rison, are descended from this
Indian girl who married the
‘Englishman. ee
Captain John Smith was so
deeply interested in America that
= he wrote and talked about it a
See great deal. He made a map of
eee fentied i Me On ‘th ann.» what he called New England, and
the young English prince Charles
(afterwards the king who lost his head) dotted it all over with make-
believe towns to which he gave the names of well-known towns in
England. Captain Smith told another English captain whose name
was Henry Hudson, some of his ideas, and in 1609 Captain Hudson,
sailing in the service of Holland, remembered some of Captain
Smith’s words and hunted up and explored the beautiful river that
now bears his name— Hudson River. At the mouth of this river












PRINCE CHARLES.

HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD. 45

in 1614 the Dutch, as the people of Holland are called, made a
settlement which they named New Amsterdam. The colonists

great city of New York.

coast and that of other explorers
who had sailed from Maine to Long Island
Sound, turned the attention of settlers in
that direction, but the first real settlement

‘was made in 1620 by a body of English

exiles known to us as “the Pilgrims.”

Driven first to Holland by religious perse-

cution, they sailed from Delft Haven in
the Mayflower under arrangements with
the London or Virginia Company, as it was
sometimes called, intending to settle some-
where near the Hudson River. By some

mistake they did not reach Virginia but

striking to the northward, landed first at
Cape Cod and, afterward — on the twenty-

-second of December in the year 1620,

.

stepped ashore on the gray bowlder fa-
mous as Plymouth Rock, on the Massa-
chusetts coast, and there, in the bleak
winter of 1620-21, founded a sorry little
settlement that was the beginning of New

_ England. :
Within the next fifty years other settlements were made along



_were sent out by a rich corporation in Holland called the’
- Dutch West India Company, formed like the London and
Plymouth Companies for the purpose of trade. They were
sent.to the Hudson River country to purchase furs from
the Indians. This little fur post was the beginning of the

Captain Smith’s favorable report: of the New England



WILLIAM PENN THE YOUNGER.

the Atlantic coast by emigrants from Europe— most of them from






ea

PEER NLT NEE aL RGAE NN BT OR

RES Ne agi ae

a ee ee Ee ee eae Eee NT INN,





SE eT EITS LAGE SPREE NL MTEIIET IR PRINT OS

OEM sy Me yet ee? he aS ee BPM a EAM ee et gee ee te Oe

46 | HOMES IN THE NEW WORLD.

England — who desired to build for themselves homes in the New |
World. In 1623 Captain John Mason made two settlements on the
Piscataqua River in New Hampshire —one at Dover and one at —
Portsmouth. In 1634 certain English Roman Catholics. seeking
relief from persecution, settled on the Potomac River in Maryland.
In 1635 people from the Plymouth Colony settled at the mouth of
the Connecticut River, and in 1636 Roger Williams, a good but out-
spoken man who could not agree on matters of religion with his
Massachusetts brethren, was driven from the colony and with some
of his followers founded Providence in Rhode Island. In 1638 a
company of emigrants from Sweden settled on the shores of Dela-
ware Bav ; in 1640 certain Virginia colonists who could not agree
on religious matters with their neighbors, set up for themselves at
Albemarle in North Carolina; in 1670 William Sayle brought .a
company of English settlers across the sea and founded Charleston
in South Carolina; in 1664 a settlement was made at a place called
Elizabeth in New Jersey; im 1682 William Penn the younger, a
famous English Quaker, with one hundred of his associates settled
in Pennsylvania where now stands the great city of Philadelphia ;
and, years after, in 1730, the English soldier General Oglethorpe
with one hundred and twenty colonists, settled in Georgia on the
site of the present city of Savannah.

These thirteen settlements along the Atlantic coast were the be-
ginnings of the United States of America. As you see they were
for the most part made by people who were not satisfied because
things at home did not suit them; and they were, in most cases,
backed by the capital of rich men who saw in the new land an
opportunity to make money and, at the same time, help the poor.
or the persecuted folks who were anxious to escape from their
home troubles.

They occupied but a narrow strip on the ragged sea-border of a.
vast and unexplored continent; their beginnings were full of dis-
appointment and disaster; their future was uncertain and yet these


THE FIRST COLONISTS. AT

thirteen struggling settlements were in time to be reckoned by
_England as among the most important and at the same time the
most troublesome of all her possessions in foreign lands.

hg
CHAPTER VI.

THE FIRST COLONISTS.

HEN we remember how many kinds of people go off to set-
i tle in new countries and the reasons that draw them there,
| we shall not be at all surprised to learn that the settlers
along the Atlantic border of North America two hundred
— and fifty years ago, did not have the easiest sort of life or
the ree of times as they tried to make homes for themselves
in the midst of all that wilderness. Even though we try to do so,
we can scarcely picture to ourselves the three thousand miles of
coast line from Maine to Georgia as it looked in those early days.
For, try as we may, we shall not be able to think of it other than as
it exists to-day —cleared of its woodland, studded with
noble cities and alive with a crowding and busy throng of
men and women, boys and girls. Then, in all New Eng-
land, the forests ran down to the sea; behind the white
sands of the New Jersey and Carolina beaches, the land
was dark with monstrous pines, while over all the land
prowled the wolf and the bear, the buffalo and the elk,
and all manner of wild wood beasts that we can now only
find in menageries, if at all. Not a horse or a cow lived
in all North America; those now here are descendants of
the stock brought over by the European settlers.








48 THE FIRST COLONISTS.

Here and there, throughout the land, were scattered Indian vil-
lages in which lived a people that no white man dared to trust, be- -
cause no white man could understand their manner of thought and
life, while roving bands in the hunting and fishing season came into
the settlements to exchange their peltry for the wonderful labor-
saving tools the white man had brought with him, or to pry about
and make husband and housewife suspicious and uncomfortable.

All about the little settlements rose the uncleared forests in whose
depths and shadows lurked they knew not what dangers. The
woodman’s axe had made but small openings as yet, and near at
hand stood wooden block-house, clumsy fort or picketed palisades as
the sole protection against lurking Indians or the still more savage
foemen of France or Spain.

Neither store nor shop, wareroom nor manufactory were to Ms

{Hs
aT lhe Ml
ee oe ao Ae
w Vs oe ing |
CT ae hace _,

(Oe









Mb "&.

ii rel

My Np Nl
4 Ugur “REIT a)

WG ‘

found when food ran short or household stuffs were needed, and all
who lacked must go without or starve until such time as the supply
ship, braving storm and wreck, came sailing over-sea.
- But, more than. all this, the greatest danger to the struggling
settlements lay in ihe colonies an cmecioes Here were people of




_ A PALISADED FORT.


| THE FIRST COLONISTS. 49

all sorts and conditions — the poor and the proud, the sick and the
well, the good and the bad, the weak and the strong, the wise and
the foolish, the worker and the drone, the dissatisfied and the indif- |
ferent, the over-particular and the careless, every class and every
kind of men, women and children whom poverty, discontent, poli-
tics, persecution, restlessness,
greed, love and ambition had sent
across the sea to struggle in a new
world for the homes or the ad-
vantages they had lost in the land
of their birth. Quarreling and
jealousies over rights and_privi-
leges; privation and distress from
lack of sufficient food or proper
home surroundings ;. disease, sick-
ness and death —all these sprung
up in or visited each little settle-
ment, cutting down its numbers,
stirring up discontent and strife
or hindering its growth when
most it needed gentle influences,
sturdy workers and healthy and
honest lives.

And yet in spite of all draw-
backs the settlement slowly grew.
Along that narrow strip of land between the mountains and the sea, ,
from Maine to Georgia, were planted in the years between 1620
and 1700 the seeds from which has sprung a mighty nation of free-
men. Before 1620, twelve hundred and sixty-one persons had been
sent to the various “plantations” of the Virginia Company; by
1634 the Massachusetts colonists had grown to between three and
four thousand in number, distributed in sixteen towns. There were
frequent disputes at first as to the ownership of the land and just



SUSPICIOUS OF INDIANS.


50 THE FIRST COLONISTS.

what the different companies or proprietors had the ability to
promise or the right to give away, but these gradually grew less,”
until at length the only bar to the complete English possession of
the Atlantic coast from Pemaquid to Charleston, was the little
Dutch settlement at the. mouth of the Hudson River. 22
Three hundred years ago there were two questions that more
than any other pomplene people. These were: where and how to
live and where and how to go to church.
The Old World was so full of struggle be-
tween kings and princes, lords and ladies,
as to just who had the strongest arm and

ple who were not of high rank were
looked upon as fit only to fight for this
side or for that. Their trade or occupa-.
tion was interfered with and following
this or that party might make a man a
pauper in a day or cost him his life on the
battle-field or his head on the scaffold.
When, therefore, the settlement.of a- new
land far away from all this strife and risk,
offered opportunity for whosoever had
pluck enough or ambition enough to try
DULG WINDMILLS IN OED New vous 10P fortume im fresh fields: these who loved
money, those who loved ease, those who
loved freedom and those who loved life, hastened to make the
most of the opportunity and sailed to the Virginia Plantations, or
the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam at the mouth of the Hud-
son. Trade in tobacco and trade in furs speedily made both these
sections centers of business, and the Virginia planters and the New
Netherland “ factors” built up a steadily growing trade with line
home markets in England and Holland.
The question as to where and how to go to church was equally



















just who should be the ruler, that the peo






SETTLERS FROM HOLLAND APPROACHING NEW AMSTERDAM,

ae
THE FIRST COLONISTS. 53

important. When Martin Luther in Germany and King Henry the
Eighth in England broke away from -the Roman Catholic Church,
men began to think for themselves more and more, and new sects
and new opinions sprung up in the churches. This led to what is
called freedom of thought, but it led also to discussions, quarreling,
persecution and death. People who held certain religious opinions



CAVALIER AND PURITAN.

were very firm in their new faith ; the people who believed other-
wise were equally firm, and so it came to pass that they could not
live together in peace and charity. Upon this those who were of
the weaker or persecuted party looked abroad for some place where
they could live as they chose, going to the church of their choice
and mingling with those who believed as they did. These too




54 THE FIRST COLONISTS.

hailed America as the place they sought, and thus was Massachu-
setts settled by the Pilgrims and the Puritans, Maryland by the
Roman Catholics, Virginia by the Episcopalians and Pennsylvania
by the Quakers.

But even in the new land all was not peace. For the colonists
had not brought across the sea that brotherly kindness that is
called the spirit of toleration. That was to be gained only as the
outgrowth of American life and American freedom. So, from
Maine to Georgia the different church sects were jealous of one
another; they argued and quarreled, refused to live together in
unity and showed the self-same spirit of intolerance and the same
inclination toward persecution that they had fled from in England,
France or Holland.

But in spite of religious aerenees and political jealousies, of
opposition to trade and neglect by those at home who had promised »
them support and succor, the thirteen colonies on the Atlantic bor-
der slowly extended their clearings and enlarged their numbers. .

The date of the first permanent settlements along the seaboard
— not counting the Spanish at St. Augustine — were the French at
Port Royal in Nova Scotia in 1605, the English at Jamestown in
Virginia in 1607, the French at Quebec in Canada in 1608, the
Dutch at New Amsterdam (afterward New York) in 1613 Se the
English at Plymouth in Massachusetts in 1620.

The French settlement of Canada does not properly fall within
our plan of this story any more than does the Spanish settlement of
Mexico, for neither Canada ner Mexico have yet become parts of
the United States, but the enterprise and energy with which the:
priests and soldiers, the lords and ladies, the traders and peasants of
France sought to found a vast colony among the lakes, the rivers
and the forests of the North, are worthy of remembrance. Here
Cartier had made discoveries; here Champlain, bravest and most un-
tiring of Frenchmen, rightly named “ the Father of New France,”
had founded and fought; here Marquette the missionary and La

1


THE FIRST COL ONISTS, 55

Salle the trader lived and labored, and, becoming pioneers, pushed
westward, discovering the Ohio and the Mississippi Rivers and, by
right of this discovery, establishing the claim of France to all the
wide western country beyond oo Alleghanies. But all this vast
section, as we shall see, from Gana to Louisiana, was finally
secured from France by the power of England or the wisdom of
the United States.

The beginnings of -home-life in the New World which we have
already noticed as the “first permanent settlements,” soon led to
other attempts at colonization. The founding
of Jamestown in Virginia in 1607 was followed
by that. of Henrico and Bermuda in 1611 and
of other “ plantation” settlements in 1616. In
New England the struggling Plymouth colony
of 1620 was followed by the settlements at
Little Harbor (or Portsmouth) in New Hamp-
shire in 1623, at Pemaquid near the mouth of
' the Kennebec River in Maine in 1625, at Salem
in Massachusetts in 1628, at Boston in 1630,
at Providence in Rhode Island in 1636, and at
Hartford and New Haven in Connecticut in
1635 and 1638. The Dutch settlements at
New Amsterdam (New York) and at Renselaerswyck (Albany) in
1623 and at the Wallabout (Brooklyn) were the principal centers
of Dutch. life, while at Philadelphia in 1682, at Port Royal and
_ Charleston in South Carolina in 1670 and 1680 the Europeans broke
ground for homes in a new and untried land. From these as cen-
ters other towns were started and in 1700 the population of the
Atlantic coast settlements extending from Pemaquid in Maine to
Port Royal in South Carolina had reached upwards of two hundred
thousand. During all these early years the colonists had but little
- in common ; their life and labor were largely confined to the places
in which they had come to make their homes, and a journey from


56 HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

New York to Boston was almost as uncommon as is to-day a trip to
Central Africa or a voyage to the Friendly Isles.

Their forms of government, too, for these first years were differ-
ent. One by one, however, the colonies were taken out of the
hands of the Companies and Lord Proprietors by whom they had
originally been planted and were made royal provinces of England ;
and, in 1700, the word of the King of England was law ea
all the thirteen colonies of the English Crown.

CHAPTER VIL. —
HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

HERE are few boys and girls to-day, however tenderly
brought up, who do not enjoy getting away from their
comfortable homes for a few days in the summer and.
“roughing it” in some. out-of-the-way “camp” by river,
<3 lake or sea. But, after a while, this summer “ roughing”

grows disagreeable and the longing comes for the nice things and

modern conveniences of home.
Life in the thirteen colonies in America ae hundred. and

_ fifty years ago was the hardest kind of “roughing it.”. Con-

veniences there were none, and even necessities were few. Many

of the new settlers could not stand. the life. Some returned across
the sea to the homes they had left; some, unable to endure the
privations they had to undergo, sickened and died in their new
homes; but those who did survive or who could stand the home-
‘sickness, the dangers and the diseases which all alike must face and







HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS. o7

share, toughened under hardship, grew strong and sturdy and self-
reliant, and became the ancestors of that hardy race which has built
up into prosperity these United States of ours.

As you have learned from the previous chapter,,the early colonists,
alone and in a strange land, had to depend upon themselves for.
almost every thing they needed to support life or give them the few



LONGING FOR THE OLD: HOME. .

.

necessities and fewer comforts they must have. The ground had to
be cleared of its forests, broken and ploughed and prepared for grain
and grass, for vegetables and fruits. Many a time did those first *
comers suffer for food. The “starving time” of 1610 in Virginia,
‘and the famine of 1623 in the Plymouth colony, were hardships that




58 HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

very nearly destroyed the feeble settlements; often the people of
Plymouth in those first days had nothing but clams to eat and water
to drink. And yet one of their faithful ministers, Elder Brewster,
could in the midst of such a terrible lack of food thank God: that
“they were permitted to suck of the abundance of the seas and of
the treasures hid in the sand.” Was not that an heroic patience ?
The first houses were the roughest of shelters — holes dug in the
ground and hastily roofed over; then, flimsy bark huts or rudely-
made log cabins; houses of hewed logs or of planks, hand-split or
hand-sawed from selected forest logs. Finally, as wealthier people
came to the settlements more substantial houses of wood or stone
were built. Sometimes, the “finishing touches,” the doors and win-
dows, even the very bricks themselves of which the gable
ends of the houses were built, were brought across the sea
ANS from England or Holland
for the adornment of these
more pretentious houses.
Certain .of these old land-
marks may now and then
‘be found to-day, standing,
still strong, though gray and
weather-beaten. [recall one
such in which I have spent many a happy hour, a mile or so back
from the Hudson River, just across the New Jersey line — its ends.
built of little Dutch bricks brought across from Holland, its quaint
and startling mantel of pictured tiles descriptive of Old Testament
history, its floor of still solid hand-hewed planks, its massive rafters
dark with smoke and age, and over the Dutch half-door the date of
building set in burned brick in the front of field stone. And in the

‘AN OLD LANDMARK.

old Jackson house at Andover, in Massachusetts, the chimney was so
huge that two or three mischievous fellows, fastening a rope about

one of their number, lowered him down the chimney until he

_ reached the spot where hung a “fine fat turkey set aside for the


GOING TO SCHOOL IN 1700.


HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS. G1

wedding dinner of Master Jackson’s daughter.” Then thief and
booty were alike pulled up the chimney, and of-the wedding turkey
a stolen feast was made. ;

Within the house the rooms were few, but the kitchen, with its
huge fireplace, supplied with seats and settles, was at once kitchen,
dining and living room; it was the center of the home life; its
rough but strong home-made furniture, its wooden table-dishes and
clumsy “ kitchen-things ” would be deemed by us of to-day as suited
only to the hardest kind of “roughing it.” There were, of course,
finer houses built as the years went by and the people prospered,
but even the finest mansions had but few of what we now call con-
veniences— few indeed of what we hold as necessities—and even the
most highly-favored children of those early days endured privations

that the boys and girls of our day would grumble at as unbearable.

Porridge for breakfast, mush or hasty pudding for supper, with a ~
dinner of vegetables and but little meat at any time were the daily
meals of our ancestors. Life in all the colonies was rough and
simple, and though we of to-day who expect so much would find in
it much to complain. of, it does not seem to have been altogether
uncomfortable as the settlements grew and the fields became more

productive, the crops more plentiful and the larder more bountifully
supplied. Except in the cities— such as Boston, New York and
Philadelphia, where English manners and English fashions gradually
crept into the wealthier families— the wardrobes of parents and
children were scanty and plain. They were usually of homespun
stuff, for the whirring spinning-wheel was the best-used belonging
of every household. Leather breeches and homespun jackets were
worn by father and son, but on Sunday or at times of festivity and
holiday, there was a display of lace ruffles and silver buckles and a
certain amount of style and finery. The windmills ground the corn
that the fertile farms produced; the post-rider galloped from town
_ to town with news or messages; the roads were poor; the streets in
the few towns were poorly paved and illy lighted; the field work
62 HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS.

was the great thing to be done, and strict attendance at church on
Sunday with two-hour sermons to occupy the time was the main
privilege of young and old. - Schools were
rare and never long-continuing. In the
South little was done toward the general
education of the children, and many of the
boys and girls in the early days grew to
manhood and womanhood unable to write
their names. But as time went on more
attention, in the Northern colonies, was
devoted to the children’s schooling. The
instruction given was slight,
and “ book-learning ” was con-
fined to a study of the cate-
chism and of “ the
three R’s” (“ reading, ’ritin’, and ’rithme-
tic”), while the ferule and the birch rod_
played an important part in the school-
master’s duties. ;

There were few wagons for hauling stuff
or carriages for riding. Pack horses were
the only expresses on land; boats and small
coasting schooners — ketches and snows, as
they were called — carried the heavier
freights and merchandise along the coast
or up and down the rivers.

Indian corn in the North and tobacco in
the South were the principal things raised
and cultivated. Farming tools and utensils
were clumsy and unhandy as compared with
those of to-day, and it was a long time be-
fore the new farm lands were cleared of stumps and rocks. Many ~
of the New England settlers were fishermen, and as the years went






THE WHIRRING SPINNING-WHEEL.

STOPPING THE POST-RIDER.






HOW THEY LIVED IN COLONIAL DAYS. 63

on they built many vessels for use in the ocean fisheries. Ship-
building, in fact, soon grew to be an important industry along the
Atlantic coast, and only six years after the settlement of New
Amsterdam (New York), a “mighty ship” of eight hundred tons
was built and christened the “ Nieuw Netherlands ;” but it proved
so big and cost so much that it
well-nigh ruined the enterprising
Dutchmen who built it and not for
two hundred years after was so great
a vessel attempted in America.

Where there was so much work |
to be done and so few ways of mak-
ing it easy there was not much time |
for rest or sport. People went to
bed early so as to be up early in the
morning; but the men and boys
when they could find the time en-
joyed themselves hunting and fish-
‘ing, while many of them grew to be
hunters by occupation. Deer and
wild turkeys were plenty in the
woods; wild geese and fish swarmed
in lake and river; foxes and wolves,
- bears and panthers were sometimes
far too plenty for the farmer’s comfort and a constant war was kept
up against them with trap and gun and fire.

Life: was rougher and harder then than now and the boys and
_ girls were not allowed to be wasteful of time or food or clothes.
The beadle and the tithing-man, the town-crier and the rattle-watch
made things unpleasant for mischievous young people, and there
- was little of that freedom of association between parents and chil-
dren that is one of the pleasantest features of the home and family
life of to-day. In every village, North and South alike, the stocks





IN THE CHIMNEY-CORNER.




. 64 FOES WITHOUT AND. WITHIN.

and pillory, the eee post and ducking-stool stood in plain view
as a warning to all offenders, and as a result people were hardened
to the sight of punishment and boys and girls would even stand by’
and make sport while some poor law-breaker was held hand and
foot in the pillory or some scolding 1 woman was doused and drenched
on the ducking stool. ;

Yes, it was a hard life, judged by our standards, when every one.
had to “rough it” in those early colonial days. But though we
may not feel that the “ good old times” we read about could really
have been so very enjoyable, after all, as we understand “good
times,” we do know that to the struggles and trials, the privations
and efforts, the labors and results of two hundred and fifty years ago
are due the pluck and perseverance, thé strength and glory that
made America “ the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

EEL 20 — ip ——— eran

CHAPTER VIIL.
FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN,

F unploughed land and unfelled forests had been the only.
obstacles with which the early colonists had to contend, if
wolf and bear and panther had been the only living ene-_
mies against which they had to struggle, then would the |

g niente of America have been as easy a task as is

. to- -day the starting of new towns in Dakota or Washington, or the

cultivation of the reclaimed lands of Arizona and Idaho. But every .

step of the path toward prosperity had almost to be fought for

against foes without and foes within.






FOES WITHOUT AND WI THIN.



65

The dread of Indian attack was an ever-present terror, and for
this no one was to blame save ‘the white men themsely es. From

THE CLEARING.

the very first day of discovery the red men and the
white had failed to understand one another. Had
Spaniard and Englishmen but met the Indians
in the spirit of friendship, of justice and of
helpfulness much blood and sorrow might have
been avoided. But from the very first the In-
dians learned to distrust the Europeans. The

white man’s greed for gold and for land made
him careless of the red man’s rights and more brutal even than

the wild natives of the American forests;

it made him mean and

base and cruel and quickly turned the wonder and reverence of

the Indian to hatred and the desire for revenge.

When the Frenchmen came a-second time to Florida they found
the pillar which they had set up to display the arms of France
garlanded with flowers and made an object of Indian reverence ;
when the Pilgrims huddled, half-famished, upon the Plymouth shore

Samoset the Abneki walked in among
them with his greeting “Welcome, Eng-
lishmen!” and found for them food and
friends; when Maqua-comen, chief of the
-Paw-tux-ents, helped the Maryland colo-
nists of 1634 to found a home he said: “I
love the English so well, that if they
should go about to kill me, if I had so
much breath as to speak I would command
my people not to revenge my death, for I
know that they would do no such a thing
except it were through my own fault.”
But this early loving-kindness was short-



ON THE WATCH.

lived. The red and white races could not mingle peaceably when
the white man wanted all that he could get and the red man loved,




66 FOES WITH OUT AND WITHIN.

so strongly, the land of his fathers. From Maine to Florida the
war-whoop took the place of welcome and the deadly arrow quickly.
followed the gift of corn and fruit. Block-house and palisaded
fort alike became the object of Indian attack and of stubborn
defense, and the hardy troopers and “train-band men” of the







““} WOULD RATHER BE CARRIED OUT DUAD!” SAID STUYVESANT.

4

colonies repaid the horrors of Indian ambush and massacre with
the equal horrors of burning wigwams, the hunt with bloodhounds
and the relentless slaughter of chieftain, squaw and child.

Added to the terror of Indian hostilities was the dread. of “ for-
eign” invasion. With France and Spain alike claiming the right of
occupation, the English colonists could never rest in peace, while,
for the same reason, the Dutch settlements in the New Netherlands
(a section extending from the Connecticut to the Mohawk and from
Lake George to Delaware Bay) were in constant fear of attack by
England. For the New Netherlands this came at last. When in
1664 an English fleet sailed through the Narrows and dropped








FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN. 67
anchor before the little fort at New Amsterdam, the stout and stern
Dutch governor Stuyvesant had no choice but to surrender to a
superior force. “I would rather be carried out dead!” he cried
passionately when he saw his duty. But resistance was useless.
New Amsterdam lowered the flag of Holland; the English colors
waved above its ramparts and the New Netherlands became “the
Province of New York.”

Every war in Europe had its effect in America. The quarrels of
the kings were fought out in the forests and on the shores of the
New World and the wiser treatment of the Indians by the French-
men of Canada always gave
to France the terrible ad-
vantage of Indian allies.

The only exception to this
was the steadfast friendship
toward the English of the
powerful Indian republic
known as the Iroquois, or
“Five Nations” of Central
New York. : Their real In-
dian name was Ho-de-no-sau-
nee or “people of the long
house,” so called because of
the great buildings in which
they lived. The French cap-
tain and explorer Champlain,
had foolishly quarreled with
them in the early days of
European occupation, and these warlike tribes had never forgiven
France, but remained such firm friends, first of the Dutch and then
of the English occupants of New York State, that they were for
years the strongest bar against the French conquest and occupation
of England’s colonies.



CHAMPLAIN AND THE IROQUOIS.


:

|
Eo
A
5
Re
a
:



68 FOHS WITHOUT AND WITHIN.

In the Old World across the séa France and England had always
quarreled, ever since they had become France and England; in
America they quarreled just the same. France said that by the
right of discovery all the land between the Alleghanies and the
Rocky Mountains belonged to her; England asserted that the land
she had taken on the Atlantic seaboard extended westward to the
Pacific and belonged to her. So they quarreled about the land.
Then France was Roman Catholic while England was Protestant,
and in those days Catholic and Protestant, were bitter enemies. So
they quarreled about religion. But, most of all, France wanted to
control the fisheries of the American coast; so did England. France
was determined to “monopolize” (as we say now) the fur-trade of
North America; so was England. So they quarreled about trade.
And when men quarrel with one another over land, religion and

trade, it becomes a pretty serious matter in which neither side will

give in until one or the other is defeated for good and all.

This struggle with France really extended from the first capture

of Quebec by the English on the nineteenth of July, 1629, to its
final capture on the thirteenth of September, 1759 — a period of one
hundred and thirty years. The treaty of peace between France
and England, signed in 1763, gave to England all the French pos- .
sessions in America east of the Mississippi River, and the bloody
quarrel as to who owned the land came to an end.

The most famous of the Indian wars of colonial times were what
are known as the Pequot War of 1637 and King Philip’s War in
1675. They were dreadful times of massacre and blood and held all
New England in terror. But the colonists finally prevailed. The
Pequot War was brought to a close by the terrible assault. on the
village of Sassacus, the Pequot chief, by Captain John Mason and his
men; King Philip’s War was ended by the fearless methods of Cap-
tain Benjamin Church, a famous Indian fighter, and the treacherous
murder of the chieftain Metacomet, whom the white men called
“King Philip.”


AU

tj
iL
i

oe

ee pl

Oe

Ray

IROQUOIS,



IN TREATY WITH THE





FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN. 71



The dates to be especially remembered in the wars with France
are the burning of Schenectady in the province of New York by the
French and Indians in 1690, the capture of Port Royal in Nova
Scotia by the English in 1710, the capture of the great fortress of
Louisburg on Cape Breton Island in 1745, General Braddock’s de-
feat by the French and Indians on July 9, 1755, the surrender of
Fort William Henry to the French on August 9, 1758, the capture
of Fort Duquesne by the English on November 25, 1758, and the
decisive battle on the Plains of Abraham in 1759 in which both the
rival generals, Montcalm the Frenchman and Wolfe the English- .
man, were killed and the victory for England closed the hundred
years of war.

_ Distressing to the colonists as must have been these foes without,
even more disheartening must have been the foes within. For
troubles in the home are the hardest of all to bear. And almost
from the first days of settlement, such troubles had to be faced. As
we have seen, all sorts of people came over the sea to America,
expecting to be at once successful or rich or at the head of affairs;
disappointed ambition or unsuccessful endeavors made them cross
and jealous and angry with those who fared better than themselves
and those who were the most discontented, because of their own
shortcomings, were always ready to stir up trouble. Then there
were the questions of ownership and the disputes between colonies
as to how far their limits of possession reached ; and, quite as hotly
~ contested as any, were the religious quarrels in which the most
earnest and most conscientious were also the most bigoted and vin-
dictive, answering questions with persecution and arguments with
banishment. Thus was Roger Williams, who differed with the min-
isters of Boston, driven out in 1635, but, undismayed, settled in the
Rhode Island wilderness and founded the city of Providence; thus
was Mrs. Anne Hutchinson, the earliest of women reformers, also
driven out from Boston to meet her death from Indian arrows in
_the dreadful New York massacre of 1643. Thus were over-zealous


72 FOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN.

Quakers whipped “at the cart’s tail” by the. Dutch rulers of New
Amsterdam and hanged on Boston Common by the Puritan rulers
of Massachusetts Bay; from this cause the “ Papists” as the Roman
Catholics were called, were imprisoned in New York; the Baptists —
were mobbed in Virginia; Puritans and Papists came to open
warfare in Maryland, and “Dissenters” and “ Churchmen” broke
into fierce conflict in the Carolinas.

From all this you can see that people in those old
days were not as high-minded, as open-hearted, as
liberal or as “ kindly-affectioned one to another”
as the Bible has it—as are people to-day. Hduca-
tion, freedom and union have made us brothers at
last. And, when people are bigoted and narrow-
minded, they are apt to be superstitious and cruel.
Our ancestors of two centuries ago were full of the ~
oddest imaginations as to good and bad luck; their
fathers had been so before them. They especially
feared the influence of witches. If anything went
wrong an evil spirit, they -said, had “bewitched”
things and at once they hunted about, not to see
why things went.wrong, but what witch had made
them go wrong.

Now so many things went wrong in the early
colonial days, that the poor settlers begun to think
the witches had followed them across the sea, and
when one or two of their ministers — in whom they
had perfect confidence —said that this was so, of
course everybody believed it and the hunt for the
witches began. It was a dreadful time. In almost all the colonies
innocent people were persecuted or put to death under the supposi- —
tion that they were witches and had worked their evil “spells”
upon other people, or upon cattle, crops and homes. But, harshest:
of all, was the time in New England when, from 1688 to 1692,

“A WITCH.”


HOES WITHOUT AND WITHIN. 73

the famous “Salem witchcraft” persecution terrified all the peo-
ple and led to some dreadful tragedies. Twenty persons were put
to death as “witches” in Salem before the end came, and the
' people slowly recovered from what was a disease of the mind
almost as universal as was “the grip” in 1890.

And: besides all these troubles of mind and body that faced our
forefathers, were others equally hard
to bear. Pirates infested the coast,
robbing and killing, making travel
by sea unsafe and business ventures
risky, while —so.it was asserted —
men of wealth and prominence

among the colonists were partners
in piracy with such freebooters as
Bonnet and Worley in the Carolinas,
Teach or “Blackbeard”.in Philadel-
phia and Captain Kidd in New York.
Debts and taxes oppressed the colo-
nists as the cost of Indian wars and
the exactions of the home government ; while, as cruel as anything
in the eyes of a people who were learning to live alone in a great
land, the tyrannical measures of their English rulers, who deprived
them of the rights already granted them by charter and sought to |
make them simply money-getters for England, wrought them to the
highest: pitch of indignation and set them to thinking seriously as
to some means of relief.

But hard knocks and rough ways, often, we say, “make a
man” of the young. fellow rie has to undergo them. And so it
proved with the thirteen colonies of England in North America.
The struggle with foes without and foes within made them at last
strong, determined, self-reliant and self-helpful. Bigotry and per-
secution, jealousy and selfishness in time gave way to the more
neighborly feelings that the necessity for mutual protection and



A FIGHT WITH PIRATES.


74 - WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

the growth of mutual desires create, the wisdom of a union of in-.
terests became more apparent and year by year the colonies came
nearer and nearer together in hopes, in aspiration and in action.

=
CHAPTER IX.

WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

gjT is the restless people who hee pushed the world along.
Od i every one had been satisfied with his lot or had been
willing to put up with things as they were no progress
would have been possible. Some one must “start things.”

wet And, to do this, he who tries to'“start things” must be
co with his surroundings or his prospects; he must be
indignant over oppression or injustice or indifference (for not to
take care of people is sometimes fully as bad as to bully and distress
them); he must be ambitious to advance himself or his fellow men
and determined to better things if he possibly can. . ©

There were numbers of such people who came over to America;
there were still more born and brought up here amid all the
influences toward liberty of thought and action that a new land
creates. They and their fathers had left a world where titles were
esteemed of more worth than character and where there was, as
yet, too little belief im the truth that an Hnglieh poe’ Oh our day
has put into verse:



“ Howe’er it be, it seems to me,
"Tis only noble to be good.

Kind hearts are more than coronets,
And simple faith than Norman blood.”




WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY. 15

When boys get away from home and men from the restraints of
government they are very apt to want to strike out for themselves
and they object more than ever
to any attempt of the far-away
“powers that be” to tell them
what they must do amid their
new surroundings or how they
must do it. So, at an early day,
men in America began to think
about freedom and to plan for a

nobler living than was possible in

the land they had left. behind. For, when active, earnest people
are really thrown upon their own resources they are bound to think
and act for themselves.

One of the first of such acts was the Virginia Charter of 1618 —
“the beginning of free government in America.” This charter
‘was a paper secured by the Virginia colonists giving them the privi-
lege of dividing the lands they had come to settle into farms which

_each man could own and work for himself. It also gave them a
voice in making their own laws and permitted them to say
who should speak for, or represent them in the “ General
Assembly” of the colony. To us who have never known
anything different this does not seem like a great conces-
sion; but it was in those days, when no man was really
free. And King James, like the crabbed old tyrant he
was, was very angry at what he called the presumption
of the people. So in 1624, with the help and at the sug-
gestion of some of his very wise but very stupid advisers,

_ he took away all these rights and made the colony a kingly

“province.” But the ideas of personal liberty that the 0N® 0" KING Jamus’

: . ss 5 ADVISERS.
wise framers of the Virginia Charter had put into that
early paper lived and became, in later years, the basis for the
Constitution and the Government of the United States of America.



NEW YORK IN 1690.






76 WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

The next step toward liberty was a remarkable paper or “ com-
pact” drawn up and signed in the cabin of the Mayflower by the
Plymouth colonists who, because of their wanderings, have been
called “the Pilgrims.” We call it remarkable because it was a
bold thing .to ay in those days when the people had so o little to say
about their own governing.

As the little vessel lay tossing off Cape Cod on the eleventh of



IN THE CABIN OF THE MAYFLOWER.

November, 1620, the forty-one men who represented the ‘different
families united in the enterprise of colonization, set their signatures
to the following compact which is said to have been “the first in-
strument of civil government ever subscribed to as the act of the




WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY. 17

whole people.” Here it is for you to study out in all its curious
old-time wording, spelling and capitals:

“ In y*? Name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwriten,
the loyall subjects of our dread soveraigne Lord, King James, by y°
Grace of God, of Great Britaine, France & Ireland King, Defender
of y® Faith, etc. Having undertaken, for y* Glorie of God, and ad-
vancemente of y* Christian Faith and Honour of our King and coun-
trie, a Voyage to plant y° first Colonie in y° Northerne part of
Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly and mutually in y° Pres-
ence of God, and of one another, Covenant & Combine ourselves
togeather into a Civill body Politick, for our better Ordering &
Preservation & Furtherance of y°® ends aforesaid; and by Vertue
hearof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equall lawes,
ordinances, Acts, Constitutions & Offices, from Time to Time, as
shall be thought most meete & convenient for y® generall good of
y* Colonie, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
In witnes whereof we have hereunder subscribed our Names at Cap.
Codd.y* 11 of November, in y* year of y* Raigne of our Soveraigne
Lord King James, of England, France & Ireland y* eighteenth, and
of Scotland y° fiftie fourth, ano: Dom. 1620.”

Nineteen years later —on the fourteenth of January, 1639 — the
“freemen” of the three river towns of Connecticut (Windsor, Hart-
ford and Wethersfield) met at Hartford and drew up what is said to
be the first written constitution in the world. This paper did not
recognize the right of any king or parliament to direct the actions
of the people of Connecticut, but held all persons who were allowed
-a share in the affairs of the colony to be freemen. Under the arti-
cles of this constitution the people of Connecticut lived for nearly
two hundred years.

The forms of government gradually adopted by the several col-
onies taught men to stand alone and think for themselves. In
Virginia, as we have seen, it was a “General Assembly,” or “House
78 - WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

of Burgesses,” as it was more frequently called, elected by the
people. In New England it was what is known as a “township”
government in which the people of the various towns taxed and
governed themselves upon a basis settled once a year by the grown
men of the colonies in a coming together called the “ town-meeting.”
The town-meeting also elected to office the men who were to manage
public affairs during the year. In South Carolina a popular election
in the several “ parishes” or church divisions
of the colony selected the minister and ves-
trymen of the church and the representatives
to the colonial assembly. In Maryland and
Delaware the people of the different sections,
or “hundreds” as they were called — (from -
the old Roman word for a brotherhood, curia,
whence came century, hundred) assembled in
“hundred-meetings,”’ enacted by-laws, levied
taxes, appointed committees and helped to
govern themselves. In Pennsylvania the
officers of each local division or “county”
were elected by the people. In New York |

Wai the old system of village assemblies estab-
Sh PE lished by the early Dutch settlers was con-

"tinued by their English successors ; this, by

direct vote of the people in a sort of town-
meeting, selected the governing body of the town for the coming
year.

So, you see, the colonists almost from the start learned to govern
themselves and were taught the lesson of freedom. But, above the
people, as the direct representative of the English king, stood the
Royal Governor. He was generally a favorite or “ pet” of the king;
he was as arule good for nothing as a man and worse as a governor;
and he was sent over to keep the people “up to the mark” in the
service of a king three thousand miles away. The king and his







ONE OF TIE VILLAGERS.


A LESSON IN LIBERTY.

&¢ They began to think and talk and act.”

























a

WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY. 81

governor were certain to have ideas and methods altogether differ-
ent from those held by the people, who knew their own needs and
were not slow to speak up for them. The Royal Governor was, in
the opinion of the colonists, forever interfering in matters which he
could not understand and in which they were deeply interested.
There was, therefore, a continual quarrel going on between the gov-
ernor appointed by the king and the people he had been sent over
the sea to govern.

This quarrel dated from the early years of colonization, and some-
times led to popular uprisings, to blows and blood. When royal
commissioners were dispatched to Virginia in 1624 to take away
the liberties granted by the “charter,” the “Burgesses” boldly
withstood them, and, when the commissioners bribed the clerk of
the Burgesses to give up the records, the tempted clerk was put
into the pillory by his associates and had
his ear cut off. In 1638, and again in 1645,
William Clayborne in Maryland headed an
armed protest against Governor Calvert and
Lord Baltimore ; in 1676 the plucky Vir-
ginia colonist, Nathaniel Bacon, stood out
boldly against the obstinate and tyrannical
Governor Berkeley, and, in what is known as
“‘ Bacon’s Rebellion,” forced the governor
to terms, but died before victory was fully
attained, the first popular leader in America.
In North Carolina, in 1678, John Culpepper
headed arising against the high-handed rep-
resentative of the absent Royal Governor, who denied the people’s
“free right of election;” in 1688 the enraged colonists of the Caro-
linas rose against their governor, Seth Sothel, took away his author-
ity and banished him for a year. In 1687 and 1689 the colonists
in Massachusetts and New York broke into open revolt against the
tyranny of the king’s representatives, imprisoning Governor Andros



KING JAMES II. *
82 WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

in Massachusetts and frightening away the lieutenant-governor
Nicholson in New York. For, at that time, a revolution in England ©
drove from the throne the despised King James (for whom, when
- he was Duke of York, the city and province of New York bad been
named) and so mixed up matters in the colonies that it was hard to.
tell just who had the right to act. Then the people resolved to act —
for themselves. In Massachusetts, after putting the Royal Governor,
Andros, in prison, the people set up a government of their own.
Connecticut saved her much-prized “charter” from seizure by the
king’s men by blowing out the
lights just as it was to be taken
away, and hiding it in a tree;
that tree stood as an honored
relic for nearly two hundred
years afterward and was always
known as “the Charter Oak.” In
New York, the people, left with-
out a governor, proclaimed their
right to rule themselves and ap-
pointed a patriotic citizen, named
Jacob Leisler, to act as temporary governor. One of the earliest of
American patriots, Jacob Leisler ruled with vigor as the “people’s
governor.” He summoned a popular convention, arranged the first
mayoralty election by the people, made the first step toward union
by attempting a continental congress, and tried to make a bold
strike at the power of France by an invasion of Canada. But he
was disliked by the few “aristocratic” leaders of New York affairs,
because he would not do as they wished but preferred to act for the
whole people; they combined against him, and when the new gov-
ernor appointed by the king arrived Leisler was arrested, impris-
—oned and hanged for treason—“the first martyr of American. -
independence.”

After this, things went “from bad to worse,” so far as the relations



IN LEISLER’S TIMES.
WORKING TOWARD LIBERTY.

io A)
ve

between the people and the royal governors were concerned. There
were grumblings in every colony; there were open outbreaks in
some, and active opposition in all. The governors themselves had
anything but a pleasant time. As the years went on the colonists
grew more and more emphatic in their demand for personal liberty.



THE PEOPLE AND THE ROYAL GOVERNOR.

They saw that the land they lived in was destined to increase in
importance, population and riches, but they knew that unless they
had their “say” this growth would be slow or without direct benefit
to them. Their English rulers granted them few rights and looked
down upon them as if they were inferiors. The Americans were
am et i oR wrote





ERTL AL LENE PIE TEN OI



84 “THE LAST STRAW.”

not allowed to manufacture anything for their own use or for sale
in England; the farmers were compelled to send their crops to Eng-
land and purchase what they needed in English markets only.

It is no wonder then that the people grew restless, that they —
began to think and talk and act, and that at last they came to the
conclusion that if the King of England denied them the right of liv-
ing honest, honorable, hard-working and upright lives as loyal colo-
nists of England in the land they had settled and cultivated, it was
high time for them to deny the right of the King of England to
have anything whatever to say as to their affairs.

Just then the King of England of that day (whose name and title
were George the Third, and who was a particularly obstinate and
unaccommodating ruler) gave his consent to certain measures that
roused the people of the thirteen colonies to the greatest indignation;
they led to results, too, that were as unforeseen to the Americans
as they were surprising to the pig-headed - King George of England,
three thousand miles away.

CHAPTER X.
“THE LAST STRAW.”

Uz|ATIONS as well as boys and men are often all too ready to
“0 play the bully. In 1760 the population of Great Britain
was fully nine millions; the population of Great Britain’s
thirteen colonies in Ameri¢a was less than two millions.
It is very easy for nine millions to say to two millions,

“ You shall!” or “You shall not!” And they did say it. People

in England talked of the people in America as “ our subjects.” Of
course the Americans did not like this; they felt that they were


“THE LAST STRAW.” — 85

quite as good and certainly as wide awake as their relatives across

the sea.



A SMUGGLER.

And they said so, too.
Then the merchants of England felt that they owned
the colonies. The people of America, as we have seen,
could neither buy nor sell except through English
traders; they could neither receive nor send away goods
except in English vessels; and the right of trade which
had been allowed them with certain French and Spanish
colonies in and about the West India Islands was threat-
ened with withdrawal. The English manufacturers and
traders held, in fact, what we callin these days a monop-
oly of the American trade, and, caring only for what



money they could make, were unwilling to allow the colonists any

chance whatever for profit or trade.

_ This selfish spirit naturally made the Americans very angry. As_
a result certain of the colonists said that if England would not allow
them to trade where they pleased they would do it on the sly — even

though it was against the law. This
was called smuggling, and England tried
to punish the sailors and merchants who
brought into America, unlawfully, the
goods they had purchased from people
with whom they were not allowed to
trade. But America’s coast-line was full
of little creeks and bays into which
the smugglers could sail without being
caught and this “ illicit trade,” as it was
called, rapidly increased and became very
profitable.

In 1759 the long struggle between
France and England in America was



GUARDING THE PORT.

brought to an end by the defeat of the French general Mont-
calm on the Plains of Abraham, and the surrender of Quebec in
86 “THE LAST STRAW.”

Canada. The cost of this long-continued strife was frightful. Eng-

lish tax-payers held that as these wars had been for the defense and
benefit of the American colonies, America. should pay the bill — or
at least a certain proportion of it—and also the cost of governing
and defending the colonies in the future. But the Americans did
not think this was just. The wars with France, they said, had been
for the benefit and glory of England. The American colonies were
not allowed the right to choose or have any
one to speak for them in the English Par-
liament, saying who should govern them or
how they should be governed. “If we can
be represented in the English Parliament,”

they said, “we are willing to be taxed for
our support, but we do not propose to pay
for what we do not get.”

The British lawmakers, however, were de-
termined. They: would not yield to the
desires of the colonists; they made new.
rules as to the commerce and shipping of
the colonies that were harsher than the
former ones; these were called the Naviga-
tion Acts. Then they ordered that the Cus-
tom House officers in America should have
the right to enter any house at any time
to search for smuggled goods, and, if. need be, to call: upon the
soldiers for help. This order was called the Writ of Assistance. .
Then how angry the colonists were! For they were English-

men in nature and ancestry and they held to the truth of the old
English declaration, that an Englishman’s house is his castle,*
‘into which no one but himself or his family has the right to
enter uninvited. .









THE RIGHT OF SEARCH.

* This was the decision of a famous English justice, Sir Edward Coke, who, in 1660, said: “The house of every
one is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defense against injury and violence as for his repose.”




“THE LAST STRAW.” 87

So when the English authorities attempted to enforce these Writs
of Assistance there was a great uproar! The colonists had grumbled
and protested at the other burdens laid upon them, but for the Eng-
lish king to claim the right of invading the home was going too far.
They resisted the Writ; and James Otis, a brilliant Boston lawyer
whose duty it was as one of the lawyers for the Government to de-
fend the service of one of these writs, resigned his office and spoke
in bold and fiery words against the new injustice. “To my dying
day,” he declared in this memorable speech, “ will I oppose, with all
the power and faculties God has given me, all such instruments
of slavery on the one hand and villainy on the other.” It was
the first outspoken word for liberty, and roused the people to
enthusiasm.

And yet, angered though they were at England’s tyranny, the
colonists hesitated to act. England was the mother country and
resistance was rebellion. They were not yet ready to go so far.
They felt that all they should do was—as
the old saying runs—to “grin and bear
it.” But they really could not “grin” over
tyranny and they soon determined not to
bear it.

For, one day came the climax. It is the
last straw in the overburdening load, you
know, that breaks the camel’s back. And
in the year 1765, on the eighth of March, King George and his
councilors tried to put the last straw on the overloaded back of
the colonial camel. On that day the English Parliament passed
the measure now famous in history as the Stamp Act.

' This celebrated act was but one among a number of measures
adopted by Parliament for taxing the American colonies, but it was
particularly objectionable. It required that all newspapers, almanacs,
marriage certificates, pamphlets and legal documents of every
description should be upon stamped paper or have pasted upon them



THE HATED STAMPS.
88 aa “THE LAST STRAW.” |
stamps furnished by the English Government and purchased from
the agents appointed to sell them in the colonies. It was consid-
ered as the “entering wedge”’ for other tyrannical acts. “If the
king can tax our trade,” the colonists said, “why not our lands?”
And from Maine to Georgia the cry arose, “No taxation without
representation.” People do not object to pay taxes when they
themselves order the taxes and are benefited by the money that
comes from such taxation; but to be taxed without a word to say in
the matter and to be forced to pay, no matter how objectionable the
method and manner of collection, makes people angry. And so the
people of America broke out into loud and rebellious words. James
Otis in Massachusetts and Patrick Henry in Virginia, and other
speakers of prominence and influence aroused their hearers to a
pitch of enthusiasm ; local rivalries were forgotten in the general
indignation ; the demand for a union of the colonies in opposition
to the tyranny of England was universal; acts of violence and
insubordination against the stamp agents and the English gover-
nors and officials were committed in every colony; patriotic asso-
ciations called the “Sons of Liberty” were formed; and on the
seventh. of October, 1765, a Colonial Congress, consisting of dele-
gates from nine of the thirteen colonies, assembled at New York
and adopted three protests against taxation—one of these they
called a “Declaration of Rights,” one “An address.to the King,”
and one a “ Memorial to Parliament.”

This wide-spread opposition on the part of the colonies, the
refusal of the Americans to buy or to use the stamps, their agree-
ment with one another not to import, buy, use or wear any article
of English manufacture until the Stamp Act was “ repealed ” — that
is, declared by the English Parliament to be io longer in force —
exerted so great an influence in England, especially upon the mer-
chants who saw that this stand of the Americans would cause them
to lose both trade and money, that in 1766 after much debate and
many bitter words, the English Parliament repealed the Stamp Act.

if
“THE LAST STRAW.” 89

The result was received by the colonists with the greatest joy ;
but when they learned that, in place of the Stamp Act other meas-
ures had been adopted for raising money from the colonies by
taxation, without granting them representation or securing their



PREPARING FOR ‘‘ HOMESPUN” CLOTHES.

consent, the people again -protested. Thereupon the English
government sent soldiers across the sea to see that the tax laws
were enforced and ordered that the people should pay for the board
'

90 «THE LAST STRAW.”

and lodging of the soldiers who were sent over to force them into
submission.

This was too much. New York refused to provide for the soldiers
sent to that province and Parliament, as a punishment, took away
the colony’s right to hold its own legislature. Massachusetts
urged the colonies to call another congress for self-preservation and
Parliament ordered Massachusetts to recall its action. When the



UNWELCOME LODGERS.

colony refused its legislature was dissolved and four regiments of
soldiers were sent to Boston to keep the town in order.

This was in 1768. From this time on things grew worse and
worse. The people hated the soldiers as the representatives of
England’s tyranny. The soldiers already treated the people as
rebels. From words they came to blows. On the eighteenth of
“TH LAST STRAW.” 91

January, 1770, the citizens of New York made the first stand against

‘the king’s troops in a street fight known as the “ Battle of Golden
Hill” and on the fifth of March, in the same year, an unexpected
fight in King Street, Boston, developed into the bloody brawl that
has since been called “ the Boston Massacre.”

Everybody was aroused. It looked very much as if war was at
hand. But Parliament, fearing that it had perhaps gone too far,
took off all the taxes save one — that on tea.

But this was adding insult to injury. The American colonies -
were not making their firm stand to save money but to gain their
rights. It did not matter what was taxed or how much it was taxed.
What they resisted was any tax without the right of representation.
They refused to buy tea. They refused even to drink it; they
‘drank, instead, tea made from sage or raspberry-leaves, or other
American plants. New York and Philadelphia sent back the tea-
ships unloaded. Charleston stored the tea in damp cellars and.
spoiled it. In Boston the British men-of-war blocked the way and.
refused to let the tea-ships out of the harbor. A great public meet-
ing in the Old South Church requested the Governor to let the tea-
ships go back and, when he refused, fifty men disguised as Indians
rushed to Griffin’s Wharf, boarded the tea-ships and smashed and
flung overboard three hundred and forty-two chests of tea. This
occurred on the night of the sixteenth of December, 1778, and has
ever since been known as the “ Boston Tea Party.”

Enraged at this open defiance Parliament ordered the port of
Boston closed — that is, said that no ships could go in or out — and
the business of the town was well-nigh ruined. This was called the
Boston Port Bill. The other colonies stood up for Boston; they
sent it aid and supplies and cheering words and, one after another,
the thirteen colonies agreed to neither buy nor sell to England (to

“boycott” it, in fact, as we say to-day) and to join in a general
congress.
This congress of the thirteen colonies — since known as the First


92 “THE LAST STRAW.”

Continental Congress—assembled at Carpenter’s Hall in Philadelphia
on the fifth of September, 1774, and petitioned the king and Parlia-
ment of England to restore the rights they had withdrawn. But it
was of no use. King and parliament were stubborn: .

“ The war is inevitable, and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it



















































A WEAK-KNEED PATRIOT AND HER SLY CUP OF TEA.

come!” cried Patrick Henry in Virginia in that famous speech which
every American- boy, and, I hope, every American girl knows by
heart. ‘The war was inevitable. It had come at last.






THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM.

CHAPTER XI.

THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM.

93

, [EBELLION is the open or armed resistance to lawful au-
’ | thority. When that resistance is successful it is Revolu-
tion. You see, now, why we call our war for independence
the American Revolution. It was a successful rebellion
against English authority, and completely changed — or

“ yevolutionized”” — the government of the people of America.
There were many dark and bitter days before the rebellion became
a revolution, but the story of the struggle is full of interest. You
have already seen how the trouble grew, as, passing from objection
to protest and from protest to insubordination, it developed at last

into open defiance, resistance and war.

When Samuel Adams of Boston (the “ prophet of independence”

as he has been called) declared in the Old South
Church “this meeting can do nothing more to save
the country” and cheered on the make-believe In-
dians to the “Boston Tea Party,” the American
Revolution began. From Maine to Georgia people
began to talk of war, and when the English Par-
liament rejected the proposals of the Continental
Congress of 1774, the spirit of rebellion was ready
to burst into a flame.

It takes but a spark to set the tinder ablaze, and
the spark came at last. The cabinet of King
George declared as “traitors and rebels” all who



SAMUEL ADAMS.

were disloyal to the king; war-ships and soldiers were dispatched
to Boston which was declared to be “the hot bed of rebellion ;”


94 THH FIRST BLOW POR FREEDOM.

and the Royal Governor, General Gage, was ordered to seize or
destroy all munitions of war held by the colonists and to fire upon
the people should he deem it necessary. :

Acting under these orders General Gage seized the arms and
powder stored in the old powder house on Quarry Hill (in the pres-
ent city of Somerville) three miles
from Boston and took secret meas-
ures to seize the stores at Salem and
at Concord.

Now as these stores and munitions
of war were the property of the.
province of Massachusetts it was held
that the king had no right to take
them and after the seizure at Somer-
ville the provincial congress — as the
“rebel” legislature of the province
called itseli—determined to save
these stores for its own need. A
mob of indignant: patriots frightened
away the small force sent to Salem
and some one* told the Americans ‘of the secret designs upon the
stores at Concord and the two signal lanterns hung in the belfry
of the Old North Church of Boston gave warning of the plans of
the British.

Then it was that Paul Revere made his famous night ride ian
Boston to Concord to arouse the farmers against the British designs.
Of course you all know Mr. Longfellow’s splendid poem “ Paul
Revere’s Ride,” telling how this brave “scout of liberty” spread
the news. Just read it again, right here, to refresh your memory
and then you will understand how excited the people were and how
the “minute men” from all the country round caught up their



PAUL REVERE’S RIDE

* It is said that this “ some one” was no less a person than Mrs. Gage, the wife of the Royal Governor. She
was an American woman and said to be “ triendly to liberty:”


THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM. 9

or

arms and hurried to the highway that led from Boston to Concord.
These “minute men” were colonial militia men pledged to be in
readiness for any call to arms, and prepared to march when the
warning came — “at a minute’s notice.” They came; and on Lex-
‘ington Common and by the North Bridge at Concord they struck
the first blow for liberty.

“You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars tired and fled;

How the farmers gave them ball for ball

From behind each fence and farm-yard wall,
Chasing the red-coats down the lane,

Then crossing the fields to emerge again

Under the trees at the turn of the road,

And only pausing to fire and load.”

Eight hundred “red-coats,” as the British soldiers were called,
marched from Boston on the eighteenth of April, 1775. When
they reached Lexington Common half an hour before sunrise on the
nineteenth of April between sixty and seventy minute men were
drawn up “just north of the meeting-house” to
resist their advance.

“ Disperse, ye villains! ye rebels, disperse! lay
down your arms! Why don’t you lay down your
arms and disperse?” called out Major Pitcairn, the
leader of the British advance.

The minute men of Lexington were sixty against
eight hundred. But they were not there to disperse. “Too few
to resist, too brave to fly,” as Mr. Bancroft says of them, they
simply stood their ground. .

“Fire!” shouted Pitcairn, and under the deadly discharge of —

British muskets seven of the “rebels” fell dead and nine were
wounded. Then the British marched on to Concord.

But their leader Colonel Smith saw that the country was roused
and that he should have to fight his way back. He sent at once to

~


96 THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM.

Boston for reinforcements and nearly two thirds of all the “red-
coats” in the town were hurried off to the help of their comrades.

Meanwhile these comrades had marched on to Concord. There
they found but few of the “stores” they had been sent to destroy.
Two cannons were spiked in the tavern yard; sixty barrels of flour
were broken in pieces; five hundred pounds of ball were thrown
into the mill pond; the liberty pole was cut down and some private
houses were broken into. That was all. A hundred or more sol-
diers were sent to guard the North Bridge across the Concord River
and, while there, the minute men of Acton, led on by the school-.
master, marched down the hill to
the bridge. The British soldiers,
seeing the colonists coming on, be-
gan to tear up the planks of the
bridge ; the Americans broke into
a run; the British fired and the
schoolmaster fell dead. Then
Major Buttrick of Concord cried
out, “Fire, fellow soldiers!” and
“Fire, fire, fire!’ echoed his men.
They fired ; two of the British fell ;
the rest turning ran toward the
main body of the “invaders” and
the minute men held the bridge.

That was the battle of Concord!
For the first time the long-suffer-
ing American colonists had turned upon their tormentors and there,
by the flowing Concord River, as Mr. Emerson says, they

zr



THE BRIDGE AT CONCORD.

“ Fired the shot heard round the world.”

Colonel Smith and his eight hundred red-coats turned toward
home. From every point the minute men hurried to the highway








THE BRITISH ARE COMING! ;

“ The whole country round was now fully roused. Minute men came from every direction.”


THE FIRST BLOW FOR FREEDOM. 99

' to “chase them back.” At Lexington, nearly worn out, they met

Lord Percy’s reinforcement, twelve hundred strong. He and his
men had marched from Boston to the tune of “ Yankee Doodle” in
contempt of the colonists. But they soon “changed their tune,”
and when they turned for home ,
the march back to Boston was but
a sorry race for life.

The whole country round was
now fully roused. Minute men
came from every direction. Lin-
ing the highway they fired “from
fence and farm-yard wall,’ while
the very clouds, so the bewildered
British declared, “seemed to rain
rebels.” Back hurried the red-
coats defeated, dispirited, beset.
Like bull-dogs the aroused farmers
with flint-lock musket and old “king’s arm” followed up the re-
treat, barking and biting to the last, until, just after sunset, the
straggling red-coats escaped across Charlestown Neck and were safe
beneath the protecting batteries of Boston town.

It had been a dreadful day for them. Two hundred and seventy-
three men were either killed, wounded or missing; of the Ameri-
cans eighty-eight had been killed or wounded. But, greater than
the loss in men had been the fatal mistake of the troops of the king.
The war had come at last; they were the aggressors; they, too,
had been the chief sufferers. All hope of avoiding a bloody quar-
rel was now past. The news of the “Battle of Lexington,” as it
has ever since been called, spread like a prairie fire. From all
New England militia and minute men hastened to the aid of their
countrymen. The people rose in war, and before the first of May,
1775, the king’s soldiers were securely shut up in Boston by an
army of nearly twenty thousand “ rebels.”



“TT RAINED REBELS.”


100 . THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

The first blow for liberty had been a decisive one. “We determine
to die or be free,” the Massachusetts Congress wrote, after the day
of Lexington, to the people of England. And when swift riders
carried the news of the fight north, west and south, the patriot col-
onists from the Green Mountains to the Carolina rivers and the _
Kentucky borders sprang to arms and echoed the stern words of
Massachusetts: “ We determine to die or be free.”

CHAPTER XII.
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

HE colonists could now take no backward step. And there
seemed to be nodesireto. They were in earnest and they
acted as if they were. The news of the fight at Concord

yj; and Lexington roused the patriots in other parts of the

ses4 land. People began to talk of separation from England ;
ie began to plan for independence.

And yet the leaders moved cautiously. They did not know their
own strength; they only knew that the people seemed determined
not to be bullied by England. So they summoned another Congress
to determine on peace or war.

It would be an unequal contest. On one side was England with all
the power and all the advantage of a trained and unconquered
army; on the other was a handful’ of feeble settlements, without
army, money, standing or preparation for war, strung along an un-
defended stretch of broken coast line, the deep sea to the east and
to the west only the trackless forests and hordes of hostile Indians.

But men will dare to do much in defense of their rights. Lex-'
ington strengthened their arm. Following fast upon the battle of


THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. lol
Lexington came the bold move by which on the tenth of May, 1775,
Ethan Allen and his one hundred Green Mountain Boys captured
the British post of Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain, demand-
ing the surrender of the fortress “in the name of the Great Jehovah
and the Continental Congress;” and from that day the war fever
grew greatly.

Around the beleaguered British in Boston lay the patriot army,
really without a leader, but determined to hold the regulars at bay
or drive them into the sea. Reinforce-
ments came to the army of the king and
now, twelve thousand strong, its officers
and sympathizers (called “ tories”) de-
clared that the rebels were but a pack of
blusterers and would not fight.

Would they not? This question was
speedily answered. On the morning of
the seventeenth of June, 1775, the British
generals finding that the “ Yankee
Doodles” were fortifying one of the
Charlestown hills, sent three thousand
red-coats across the Mystic with orders
to drive off the rebels. They did, but at Bice -
what a cost. Three times they charged
up the hill to where Colonel Beet ee
and his thousand men awaited the attack. :
Twice were they sent reeling down the slope, baffled by the deadly
fire of the Americans. With the third volley the ammunition of
the Americans gave out and the British troops finally carried the
hill after a stubborn hand-to-hand fight. The Battle of Bunker
Hill was won. But ten hundred and fifty-four in killed and
wounded was the cost to the British of that doubtful victory, and it
proved to all the world that the Americans would fight. From that
_ day the British troops never cared to storm a “rebel” earthwork.






102 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

All that the Americans now needed was a leader. And he was
speedily forthcoming. The North had opened the Revolution; the
South should give it a leader. On the very day of the Battle of
Bunker Hill — the seventeenth of June, 1775 — the Second Conti-































































































































































































































‘*THE REBELS ARE FORTIFYING BUNKER HILL.”

nental Congress, in session at Philadelphia, voted to raise and equip
an army of twenty thousand men, and elected Colonel George
Washington of Virginia as “ generalissimo” or commander-in-chief.

In all the land no better choice could have been found. George
Washington had been trained from early youth to leadership and
direction. He was as strong of character as he was noble of soul ;
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. . 108

he was patient, persistent, fair-minded, generous and brave; his
strength of will was inspiring, his power of self-control remarkable,
and he was absolutely truthful. He was a natural leader. As a
boy he was captain of the company of small Virginians he. drilled
and marshaled. At sixteen he was a surveyor and “roughed it”
in the Indian country ; at twenty he was a major in the king’s ser-
vice; at twenty-five he was commander-in-chief of the Virginia
forces. It was he who fired the first shot in the French wars of
1754, led the attack at Great Meadows, and by his valor, alone,
saved the terrible defeat of the English general Braddock from be-
coming a massacre. He knew the weakness as well as the strength,
the endurance as well as the independence of the colonial soldier,
and no man was better suited to lead the troops of revolution to
victory, to guide them in skillful retreat or to, save them from the
disgrace of surrender. Other generals in the Revolutionary army
were as brave, others as self-sacrificing, others as skillful as he, but
_not one combined all the excellencies that go toward making a
great soldier except George Washington. His record as a leader
alike in victory and defeat, was such that students of the art of war
accord to General Washington the rank of a “ great commander.”
On the third of July, 1775, Washington assumed command of the
_American army drawn up to receive him on the Commons of Cam-
bridge, and his headquarters were in the old Craigie House, still
standing, and equally cherished by all Americans as the military
home of Washington the soldier, and the peaceful home of Long-
fellow the poet. He declined to receive any pay for his services,
went at once to work to organize his army of fourteen thousand un-
disciplined militia men and kept General Gage and his red-coats so
tightly locked up in Boston town, that they were at last forced to
run away from the city by sea. This they did on the seventeenth
g@ of March, 1776. Washington and the victorious Continental troops
marched into the city and Boston’s long slavery was over.
On the first of January, 1776, the new flag of the Revolution was
104 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

raised over the American camp on Prospect Hill; and on the fourth
of July, 1776, the Continental Congress assembled in Independence
Hall in the city of Philadelphia declared the thirteen United Col-
onies to be “free and independent States” — that they were “ ab-
solved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all politi-
cal connection between them and the State of Great Britain is and
ought to be totally dissolved.” This was the immortal “ Declaration
of Independence,” and ever since that memorable act the fourth of
July has been celebrated as the birthday of the United States of
America. ;

But to declare a thing is not always to doit. The Declaration
was but the first step toward independence. Much was to be at-
tempted, much suffered, much lost and won before the United States
were really free and independent. For nearly seven years, from the
nineteenth of April, 1775, to the nineteenth of October, 1781 —
from the first blood at Lexington to the last blood at Yorktown —
did the unequal conflict rage before the King of England, his coun-
cilors and his people would acknowledge themselves beaten by
the spirit of liberty that had grown up across.the sea. Then at last
they reluctantly gave in. A treaty of peace with the new “nation”
was signed at Paris on the third of September, 1783, and on the

twenty-fifth of November following, the British soldiers evacuated
the city of New York and Liberty triumphed.

It had been a stubborn fight between determined men. When
once the war was really entered upon and the evacuation of Boston
showed the King of England and his advisers that it was to be
fought in earnest, the British leaders sought by every means to
secure success. They sent large armies to America, swelling their
ranks by hiring for money thousands of European troops called
Hessians; they tried in every way to frighten and overawe the
steadfast “ rebels,” and gave honors and reward to those Americans
who remained loyal to the king and who were called “tories.”
They sought to occupy the chief centers of population North and
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 105

South and to achieve the conquest of the country from these points.
_ But all to no purpose. With a less number of troops, poorly armed,
poorly fed and scantily clothed, and with all the chances of war

pn
=

As.

@ ee
LT ! ! il

=

aS

i
aM



GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON.

against him, General Washington so planned and fought that, inch
by inch, he won the disputed territory from the over-confident
red-coats, and brought victory at last to the Continental forces.
106 - PHE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

After its beginning at Boston, the Revolutionary War may be di-
vided into three periods of fighting: the struggle for the Hudson,
the struggle for the Delaware and the struggle for the
Carolinas.

Defeated at the Battle of Long Island, Washing-
ton retreated through New Jersey and won the battle
of Trenton; defeated at Germantown he retreated
into the gloom of that sorry winter of Valley Forge,
coming out in the spring to fight and win the Battle
of Monmouth. He drove the British from Boston; he |
forced them from Philadelphia; his planning relieved '
Charleston and the Carolinas, and finally brought
about the British surrender at Yorktown. It was
Washington’s persistent refusal to stay beaten but to
come up again and again to what seemed a useless
fight that drew to his side the gallant young French-
man the Marquis de Lafayette, and won for the new
United States the alliance and aid of France. On the
thirteenth of January, 1778, a treaty of alliance with
France was signed, and from that date the success
of the revolt was never doubtful.

The dark days of the war were the defeats at Quebec, where the
gallant Montgomery was slain while storming the British citadel ;
at Long Island and White Plains, where the raw troops
of Washington were no match for the British regu-
lars; at Brandywine and Germantown which lost
Philadelphia to the Americans; and at Charleston
and Camden which for a time “ wiped out” the south-
ern army of the patriots. Darker still were the
dreary days at Valley Forge when all seemed lost
indeed; the hateful treason of Benedict Arnold, one
of Washington’s trusted generals, and the days, when by the sel-
fish combination of enemies in the army and in the Congress (in



A ‘* CONTINENTAL.”




THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 107

what is known as “the Conway Cabal’’), General Washington
was very nearly forced from his position as commander of the
American army.

But the bright days are what we most thankfully remember;

they were what gave strength to American endeavor and made for
the cause of liberty friends across the sea. As Lexington and Con-
cord and Bunker Hill are names to be forever cherished so, too, are
the names of Trenton where through icy perils the patriots pushed
on to victory; of Princeton which saved New Jersey; of Saratoga
which saw the surrender of the pompous and boast-
ful British general Burgoyne who had declared that
with ten thousand men he would “promenade
through America;” of Stony Point where, borne
on the shoulders of his men, the wounded leader,
dear to all Americans as “Mad Anthony Wayne,”
charged into the British fort and won it at the point
of the bayonet; of Fort Sullivan in Charleston Har-
bor where the brave General Moultrie “held the
fort,” and Sergeant Jasper, in the face of the enemy,
rescued the fallen flag and hoisted it again over the
battered ramparts; -and, last of all, of Yorktown
where on the nineteenth of October, 1781, Cornwallis and the
British army surrendered as prisoners of war to Washington the
- American and the Frenchman Rochambeau.

And in this record of the fight for liberty we must not forget the
struggle on the sea. The American colonies had no navy, but they
had many plucky sailors and men who loved salt water. Karly in
the struggle privateers were sent out—that is, small vessels fitted
out by private persons but authorized by the Congress to annoy
and capture British ships and supplies. Soon the privateers were
followed by men-of-war and the names of Captains Biddle. and
Manly, Mugford and Read, Weeks and Conyngham and Whipple
are worthy to stand in memory beside the heroes of Lexington and



ANTHONY WAYNH.


108 . oo ERLE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

Bunker Hill, of Stony Point and. Valley Forge. But, chief: of all
the Revolutionary sea-fighters, is John Paul Jones, the captain of
the Bonhomme Richard and conqueror of the British man-of-war
Serapis. Lashed together, the two ships waged a fearful struggle.
for hours ; when the British captain thought the “Yankee pirate”
was conquered he shouted across to him: “The
Richard ahoy! Have you struck your colors?” and
back came the valiant answer of the plucky “ Yankee
pirate,” “I have not yet begun to fight.” Then
he really did begin and did not stop until the Serapis
struck her colors.

~The American Revolution was a Ps iBNOEn and
gallant fight against tyranny; it was the answer
of those who would be free men to those who sought
to keep them slaves. From it we may all, young and
old alike, learn why we should persevere if we feel
that we are right even when the times seem darkest
and things are going wrong; and, more than all, by it we are
taught that whatever is worth having is worth striving for.
“Liberty could not have come to America without the struggle and
blood of our forefathers; and their endeavors and their sacrifices
preached the noblest of sermons and showed to a watching world
the real worth of liberty.



JOHN PAUL JONES.




THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION. x,

gee

CHAPTER XIII.

THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION.



1u9

HEN you watch a base-ball game what is it that interests
| you most through it all— the players or the result of their
| play? Do you not soon forget this or that boy in whose
good work you place so much confidence and think more
! of the score that is being made or wonder whether the great

playing of your favorite nine is really going to give them the vic-
tory? Itisso in life. Acts are more than actors; principles are
more then men. What a city, a State or a nation is striving for is
of more importance than the leaders in the struggle or the great

men whose names we reverence and applaud.

And yet we are all hero-worshipers and love to linger
over the names and deeds of those who have contrib-
uted to the success of great principles, the results of
noble deeds. For this reason it is well for us, at this
point, to look over the years of struggle that led the
thirteen English Colonies of North America “through
night to light”? and laid the foundation of the United
States of America.

They were of three classes: the agitators, the organ-
izers, the fighters. The. agitators, or those who pre-
pared the minds of the people for the struggle, began
their work years and years before Lexington or the
Declaration of Independence were thought of. These
were the men who saw that kingly power and the peo-



FRENCH’S STATUE OF
THE MINUTE MAN.

ple’s will would not work together and who resisted, by word or
deed, the attempts of king or governor to cut away the rights of the
110 THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION.

people. Such men were Nathaniel Bacon, and John Culpepper and
Jacob Leisler, whose “ rebellions” have been referred to in earlier
chapters; such, too, were John Wise, the minister of Ipswich in
Massachusetts who, a hundred years before the Revolution, boldly
preached against “taxation without representation”; and Peter
Zenger, the New York printer, who in his newspaper, in 1733,
boldly stood out against king and governor; and Andrew Hamilton,
the Philadelphia lawyer who, defending Zenger, spoke so eloquently
for what we now call “the liberty of the.
press,” that the printer was acquitted and
the governor dared not again accuse him.
These are but a few among the “fore-
runners of freedom” whose names should
be held in remembrance; to them, and to
others like them who left their mark upon
our colonial history, was due much of that
manly and outspoken desire to be self-
supporting that led to the later struggle
for independence — a desire founded upon
that noble utterance which is believed to
have been made by Dr. Benjamin Frank-
lin: “Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to
God.”





DR. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, Of this remarkable man Americans have

ever been proud. And well they may be.
Benjamin Franklin was a poor Boston boy, born in 1706, who
educated himself, learned the printer’s trade and, when seventeen
years old, went to Philadelphia where he gradually rose to posi-
tion, influence and fame. An editor, an author, a philosopher,
an inventor, a statesman and a patriot, Franklin made the title of
“an American” known and honored in Europe, and, by his wisdom,
his eloquence and his influence, stood foremost among those, great
men of the Revolution to whom we give the name of the organ-


THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION. lil >

izers. Largely through his exertions was the king of England
brought to repeal the hated “Stamp Act;” he was one of the com-
mittee to draft the Declaration of Independence; he was sent as
Ambassador to France and gained the French aid that helped the
Revolution to final success; he was one of the makers of the treaty
of peace with England and one of the framers of the Constitution
of the United States. The young “ tramp-printer,’ who in 1723
entered Philadelphia, poor, friendless, hungry and hopeful, died in
that city in 1790 at the age of eighty-four, its most honored citizen
and the one American who, to-day, shares in all the world the glory
and renown of Washington.

Washington and Franklin have, indeed, been the two names that
from the days of Revolution, have been associated as the greatest
leaders in that historic struggle. But even Franklin’s fame halts
far beneath that of George Washington. In the minds of men as
well as of boys the successful fighter is a much greater hero than
the agitator or the organizer. We like to see a man who never
knows when he is whipped; who has what we call “grit;” who
accepts defeat without a murmur, but rather as a spur to new
effort. But Washington had far more than this. He was as strong
of character as he was of arm; as noble of soul as he was firm of
purpose. His abilities as a soldier were equalled by his qualities as
a statesman; and from the day when, beneath the historic elm on
Cambridge Common, he took command of the Continental army to:
the day when he rode into New York at the heels of the last depart-
ing British regiment, he never faltered in his fidelity to the cause
of freedom, or lost faith in its final and complete success.

But though the names of Washington and Franklin lead all others
in the story of the Men of the Revolution there are those linked
with them to whom equal honor and equal praise are due. On this
roll we read the name of James Otis, who made the first eloquent
appeal for liberty and was branded by the king’s men as “ the great.
incendiary of New England ;” Samuel Adams — called “ the last of
112 THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION.

the Puritans,’ —who, poor but incorruptible, “aimed steadily at
the good of his country and the best interests of mankind” and did
more than any one else to “ put the revolution in motion; ”’ Patrick
Henry, the “man of the people,” whose fiery eloquence and daunt-
less courage roused Virginia to stand side by side with Massachusetts









































































































JOHN ADAMS PROPHESYING ‘‘ THE GLORIOUS FOURTH.” *

in the struggle for freedom: “T know not what course others may
take,” he cried, “but as for me, give me liberty or give me death;”’
John Adams, wise, far-seeing, statesmanlike, the inspirer of our
“Fourth of July” celebrations, who, years before the Revolution,

* “Tt will be celebrated by succeeding generations,” said John Adams, “ from one end of the continent to the
other, as the great anniversary festival.”
THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION. 113

believed in the great mission of America and in the early days
of the struggle, replied to a friend who warned him against brav-
ing the power of England: “swim or sink, live or die, survive
or perish with my country is my unalterable determination ;” John
Hancock, President of the Continental Congress, proscribed as a
traitor by George the Third — dignified, impartial, quick in action,
determined in purpose, who urged the people of Boston, “ Not only
pray, but act; if necessary fight and even die for the prosperity
of our Jerusalem,” and who, when he put his bold signature to the
Declaration of Independence, said, laughingly: “There; John Bull
can read my name without spectacles. Now let him double the
price on my head, for this is my defiance ;” Christopher Gadsden,
the boldest in denouncing British oppression, the first to speak for
American independence, ‘whose unselfish love of country,” says
Mr. Bancroft, “was a constant encouragement to his countrymen
never to yield;” Thomas Jefferson, the greatest Democrat, the
sworn foe to aristocracy and kingly power, the author of the Dec-
laration of Independence, and through that immortal paper, “ the
beginner of a new age of the world;” John Jay, a statesman and a
patriot of elevated motives, and the purest character who, before
the struggle begun, took a bold stand for America’s rights and
wrote in his address to the British people: “ Know, then, that we
consider ourselves, and do insist that we are and ought to be,
as free as our fellow-subjects in Great Britain and that no power
on earth has a right to take our property from us without our
consent;” Roger Sherman, a farmer and a shoemaker, a jurist
and a statesman, signer of the Declaration and “one of the great.
men of his time,’ who set the bells of New Haven a-ringing as’
he declared that “the parliament of Great Britain can rightfully -
make laws for America in no case whatever ;” Robert Morris, the
“moneyed man” and financier of the Revolution, who, in 1777,
declared that Washington was “the greatest man on earth,’ and
who, through faith in Washington’s ability as well as in the cause
14 THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION.

of freedom, when hope was lowest and American credit was dead,
pledged his. own fortune and, on the promise of his own name,
borrowed the money to carry on the war; Richard Henry Lee,
who, quickly repenting his application for the post of collector
under the hated Stamp Act, became instead that Act’s most vehe-
ment foeman, introduced into the Continental Congress the first reso-
lution looking toward independence, and wrote in the address to
the British people : “On the sword,
therefore, we are compelled to
rely for protection. Of this at
least we are assured, that our
struggle will be glorious, our suc-
cess certain; since even in death
we shall find that freedom which
in life you forbid us to enjoy;”
Henry Laurens, the incorruptible,
in whose Charleston office boys
were trained to habits of honesty,
integrity and industry in business,
and who, kept a strict prisoner in
the Tower of London, resisted all
attempts. of the British govern-
ment to shake his fortitude or
purchase his patriotism ; and, not
to extend the list, Peyton Ran-
dolph, who, though afters conceal for the king, when he “ saw
the right,” resigned his office and its rewards and stood out oe
for justice, for resistance and for independence.

These were among the leaders in council and congress. And in
the field were others equally worthy remembrance — Joseph War-
ren, “who fell at Bunker Hill,” and who, though president of the
Provincial Congress of Massachusetts, refused the command of its
army of minute men and continentals at that famous battle, pre-



THE LIBERTY BELL.
(Now in Independence Hall, Tote psa)



et ae

oa ys SBN MAREN S CAMP.

209

“¢ Francis Marion called by the bafiled British the ‘ Swamp Fox.

THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION. 117

ferring to serve as a volunteer and saying to one who warned him
to be cautious: “I know that I may fall, but where is the man who
does not think it glorious and delightful to die for his country?”
Richard Montgomery, the intrepid leader of a forlorn hope, but for
whose death in the very front of his assaulting line, the “rebel de-
feat” at Quebec might have proved an important victory; Nathan
Hale, the “martyr,” young, brilliant, enthusiastic, who, condemned
to die as a spy by his British captors, only regretted that he had
but one life to lose for his country; Alexander Hamilton, the boy
- captain, the friend and aide-de-camp of Washington, the fiery young
advocate of liberty, who replied to the taunt of the tories that the
colonists would soon quarrel and disagree: “I please myself with
the flattering prospect that they will, ere long, unite in one indis-
soluble chain ;”’ Nathaniel Greene, “the victorious,” who saved the
South by his able generalship and crippled his own estate to feed
and clothe his soldiers ; Francis Marion, the borderer, called by the
baffled British “the Swamp Fox,’ whose name is revered by all
Americans as that of “one of the purest men, the truest patriot,
and the most adroit general that American history can boast;”
Philip Schuyler, the general who could be true even under unjust
suspicion, the real conqueror of Burgoyne, the unselfish soldier of
whom Daniel Webster declared that he stood scarcely below Wash-
ington in the services he rendered his country.

But where can we stop? The list of American heroes in camp
and council is long enough to fill a volume, while those who fought
in the ranks and those who suffered for the cause at home — un-
known heroes whose glorious deeds have never been recorded —
could their names but be collected, would make a roll of heroism,
limited only by the number of American patriots. For all were
heroes then. Though some at times were timid and some at times
lost faith; though traitors like Benedict Arnold and jealous sell-
seekers like Charles Lee well-nigh wrecked the cause of liberty and
made the heart of its great leader to bleed and smart; though sec-
118 THE MEN OF THE REVOLUTION.

tions at times were “mad” with sections and men “put out” with
men, so that the progress of revolution was almost stopped by jeal-
ousies and disputes ; though money ran low and credit gave out and
suffering and privation led to weakness and to loss; though defeat
dulled the zeal of patriots and the cruelties of war tried the courage
of the bravest; yet still, through it all, the spirit of persevering



THE BOSTON BOYS AND GENERAL GAGE.

patriotism swayed alike the men and the women, the boys and the
girls of the Revolution. The indignation that led the Boston boys
to protest to General Gage against the petty tyranny of his soldiers
who had trampled down their cherished “slides” was the same
spirit that animated their fathers to fight against British tyranny
even to the bitter end and that brought in at last that success that
STARTING OUT IN LIFE. 119

so many had prayed for, so many had worked for, so many had
fought for, through seven long years of struggle and disaster, of
defeat and loss, of hope and faith and a glorious persistence.

SS SS So ;

CHAPTER XIV.
STARTING OUT IN LIFE.

IHMEN any prize is won, when any desired end is reached,
} when any thing that one has hoped, or worked, or fought.
| for is at last obtained, the world, looking on, asks concern-
ing him who has secured the prize: “ What will he do
— withit?” From the boy in Franklin’s wise old story who
“naid too dear for his whistle”? to the young man who has reached
his “ freedom,” the girl who has received her diploma, the man or
woman who has attained fame or wealth or position —the same
question applies to all: “ What will he do with it?”

The thirteen revolted colonies, assuming the sounding title of
“The United States of America” had won independence. What
would they do with it? There were plenty to ask the question.
The world looked on to scorn, to criticise, to sneer; for liberty was
not yet accepted as the birthright of every man, and king-cursed
Europe had but little faith in the success of the republic-experiment
across the western sea.

And, in fact, many in the seve fang itself doubted and
hesitated, beset with gloomy fears. There was talk of giving up
the idea of a republic and establishing a monarchy; there was even
a foolish movement started (at which none was angrier than the
great patriot himself) to proclaim Washington as king and for a


120 STARTING OUT IN LIFE.

time people were “all at sea” just what to do with the liberty they
had secured. Sacer

During the Revolution the colonies— or States as they were now
called — had been held together in some sort of government by the
Continental Congress and the paper its members had drawn up,
called the “ Articles of Confederation.” But this was really ac-



THREATS OF RESISTANCE TO TAXATION.

cepted as a government only because of the desperate needs of war.
The Continental Congress merely governed by general consent; it
had no authority to govern. It agreed, in 1778, upon certain rights
and powers which were called the “Articles of Confederation”
and which stated that the thirteen united colonies, thereafter to
be known as the United States of America, did by these articles
“enter into a firm league of friendship with each other for their
common defense, the security of their liberties and their mutual
and general welfare.”

This was well enough for a time of war. But it was not govern-
ment. And now peace had come. Many clear-headed men in


STARTING OUT IN LIFE. 121

America speedily saw that neither the Continental Congress nor its
Articles of Confederation were of any further use. Liberty had
been won, but it was liberty without union. The country was
weak and exhausted from the wounds of war; prosperity that the
people had looked for as one of the first results of freedom did not
come; the States, relieved from the strain of war, began to quarrel
with one another over boundaries and trade; the talk of taxation
led to angry threats of resistance; bloodshed was feared and State
after State threatened unless this or that was done to “secede” from
“the confederation.” Congress had no authority; people obeyed
or disobeyed its commands as they saw fit; the State governments
had more real power than had the congress, and young Alexander
Hamilton perplexed by the way things looked said sadly: “A na-
tion without a national government is an awful spectacle.”

And it was from such men as this young Alexander Hamilton
that relief at last came. From the very first he had seen that
only in union was there strength. Before
the close of the Revolution, in the year
1780, he had written to his friend the con-
gressman James Duane: “We must have
a vigorous confederation if we mean to
succeed in the contest and be happy
thereafter.” And in that very letter this
remarkable young man of twenty-three
outlined many of the provisions that, later,
found a place in the Constitution of the ne
United States. INKS anton THE

For this is what came in due time—a
paper drawn up and signed by the representatives of the people
and accepted by each and all of the several States, by the agree- :
ments in which the United States of America were to be guided and
governed. This is known as the Constitution of the United States.

It was adopted in the year 1787, at a meeting together in the city


122 _ STARTING OUT IN LIFE.

of Philadelphia of forty-five delegates from the thirteen States
of the new union and which is known in history as the Federal
Convention of 1787. :

This Federal Convention of 1787 has been rightly dalled « “one of
the most remarkable deliberative bodies known to history.” George |
- Washington was its presiding officer. Among its members were#
such men as Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, James Madi-
son, Robert Morris, Wiliam Livingston, Rufus King, Roger Sher-
man and others whose love for liberty was great, whose foresight
was clear and whose chief desire was to present to their fellow-
citizens a document that should enable them to live together in peace
and unity. From the fourteenth of May to the seventeenth of Sep-
tember, 1787, the Convention discussed, debated, modified, amended
and resolved. Then the great paper, duly signed, was presented ‘to
the people as the best their representatives could do. A year of
discussion succeeded; one by one the thirteen States said “all
right” — that is, accepted or ratified the document; and on the thir-
teenth of September, 1788, the Constitution of the United States of
America was officially declared to be “ the law of the land.”

Let us remember these few “personalities” of the Constitution.
Alexander Hamilton originated it; Gouveneur. Morris planned its
construction ; James Madison put it into shape; George Washing-
ton was its first signer; Benjamin Franklin was its oldest signer,
at the age of eighty-one; Nicholas Gilman was its youngest signer,
at the age of twenty-five.

By the Constitution the name of the government created “ for
and by the people” was the “ United States of America.” It pro-
vided for a general government whose authority was to be supreme
on all matters of national interest and union; this was to be divided
into three departments: the legislative, the executive, the judiciary.
The legislative department, called the congress, was to make the
laws; the executive department, consisting of the President of the
United States and the officers selected by him, was to carry out and

7






































































HAMILTON.
uf the

DER

EXAN

AL
of

”

S.

Stute

ed

it

Un

ton ¢

tut

ti

e Const

th

er

“ The fath

STARTING OUT IN LIFE. 125

enforce the laws; the judiciary department, or law courts of the
United States, was to decide all questions or disputes that might
arise concerning the laws. To the Constitution as “the law of the
land,” the national government, the State governments and they
people were to give entire obedience.

The Legislative Department, which was to make the laws, was to
consist of two branches, the Senate and the House of Representa-
tives. Each State, no matter how large or how small it might be,
was to have two men in the senate, their “Senators;”’ the members
of the House of Representatives were to be chosen by the States ac-
cording to their population, so that the larger States had, of course,
more men in the House of Representatives than the smaller States
could have. These two Houses together comprised the Congress of
the United States and were to levy taxes, borrow money, coin
money, regulate commerce, establish post-offices, declare war, raise
and maintain armies and navies, while the States could only levy
taxes, borrow money and employ soldiers for their own State uses.
A majority of votes in each House of Congress was necessary to
pass a law; and treaties made by the President must be approved
by the Senate.

The Executive Department, which was to enforce the laws, was
to be in the hands of a President, chosen every four years by repre-
sentatives of the people known as electors. The president was to
be commander-in-chief of the army and navy and to appoint the
public officers to whom the details of carrying out the laws of
Congress were to be given. If he did wrong he could be accused
or “impeached” by the House of Representatives and tried by the
- Senate and in case of his removal, resignation or death his “ sub-
stitute” or Vice-President was to take his place. The only other
duty of the Vice-President was to preside over the meetings of the
Senate.

The Judiciary Department which was to “interpret” the laws
was to consist of a supreme court and certain district courts. The
126 STARTING OUT IN LIFE.

judges were to be appointed by the President and to hold office for
life. The “head judge” was to be called the Chief Justice of the
United States.

So, by vote of the people of the thirteen United States, the Con-
stitution became the law of the land. But the discussion of its pro-
visions by the people led to a difference of opinion as to its real
value, and this discussion resulted in a division into two parties.
One of these parties believed that the Constitution could not be
bettered and that the new Federal government was exactly the
thing needed; this party called itself the Federalists and enthu-
siastically supported the new constitution. The other party be-
lieved that more power should be allowed to the States; they feared
that too much power given to Congress might lead to a monarchy
or a tyranny of some sort, and they declared that so strong a cen-
tral power took away from the people the privilege of celf-govern-
ment; this party was called the Anti-Federalists.

But the majority of the people accepted and resolved to live up
to the new constitution. Washington and Franklin, to whom the
people looked with the greatest respect and confidence, supported
it heartily and were among the chiefs of the Federalists. When,
however, the office of president was to be filled one man alone
was the choice of the people, and when the sixty-nine electors
sent in their votes for president the sixty-nine ballots were all for
George Washington of Virginia. John Adams of Massachusetts
was elected vice-president. The city of New York was selected as —
the capital of the United States, and on the fourth of March, 1789,
on the balcony of Federal Hall (now the site of the Sub-Treasury in
Wall Street) in the city of New York, George Washington took the
oath to support the Constitution as the supreme law of the land; and
amid the shouts and flag-waving and booming of cannon that fol-
lowed: the proclamation of Chancellor Livingstone who had admin-
istered the oath: “ Long live George Washington, President of the
United States!” the man who had led the armies of his land to vic-


First president of the United States.

STARTING OUT IN LIFE. 129

tory and guided its wisdom in determining upon its form of govern-
ment now began his career as the official head of the new nation —
the President of the United States.
President Washington selected as his chief advisers and assistants
Thomas Jefferson as secretary of state, Alexander Hamilton as



































































































































THE INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT WASHINGTON.

secretary of the treasury, Henry Knox as secretary of war, and
Edmund Randolph as attorney-general. These men were to help
him in the conduct of affairs that came within his duties as the
chief executive officer of the new nation. Congress assembled in
the Federal Building, with Vice-President John Adams of Massachu-
130 “THE AMERICANS.”

setts as the presiding officer or “ president-” of the Senate, and
F. A. Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania as the presiding officer or
“Speaker” of the House of Representatives; the “machinery of
government” was put in motion and the new nation started out,
to try the experiment — deemed so doubtful by all the world —
of government by the people.

For one hundred and seventy years had the American people
been preparing for this very experiment. It had been a long and
hard schooling. They had secured their liberty; and now this was
what they were going to try to do with it: to govern themselves —
or, in the words of the constitution which they had just adopted :
“ We, the People of the United States, in order to form a more per-
fect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide
for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure
the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain ~
and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

CHAPTER XV.
“THE AMERICANS.”

HE new republic of the United States of America started
out in life.as a nation in 1789, with a population of nearly
four millions (the actual figures of the first census in
1790, were 3,929,214). Of these four millions Virginia
claimed the most and led the order of the States as num-
ber one with a population of 747,610; Pennsylvania was number
two with a population of 434,373; North Carolina number three
with a population of 393,751; and, following after, as fourth in order


“THE AMERICANS.” 131

came Massachusetts with 378,787; New York as fifth with 340,120 ;
Maryland sixth with 319,728; South Carolina seventh with 249,073 ;
Connecticut eighth with 237,496; New Jersey ninth with 184,139, ;
New Hampshire tenth with 141,885; Maine eleventh with 96,540;
Vermont twelfth with 85,425; Georgia thirteenth with 82,548,
Kentucky fourteenth with 73,677; Rhode Island fifteenth with
68,825; Delaware sixteenth with 59,096 and Tennessee seventeenth

with 35,691. Of these, at that time, four were
not yet admitted as States: Maine was a part of
the State of Massachusetts, Vermont was a part
of New York, Kentucky of Virginia and Ten-
nessee of the Carolinas. Already emigrants were
crossing the Alleghanies and peopling the West-
ern wilderness as Kentucky, Tennessee and the
lands about the Ohio were called. Indeed, dur-
ing the Revolution, a brave American borderer,
named General George Rogers Clarke, had capt-
ured from the British the distant outposts in the
territory of the Illinois, along the Mississippi River, and had thus
established a footing for American frontiersmen and given the
United States a claim to the territory north of the Ohio River
when the treaty of peace was signed.

But nearly all of the four millions of Americans above classified
were settled along the Atlantic coast line. The western wilderness
_had, as yet, too many terrors. The sea was their main highway ;
the sailing-packets their principal means of travel. Lumbering
stages did, indeed, run between the leading cities, but it took quite
as many days by land as by water, for roads were bad, bridges few
and ferries clumsy and dangerous.

Philadelphia was the chief town of the United States. It had in
1790, a population of 42,520, while New York had but 33,131, Bos-
ton but 18,038 and there was no Chicago at all! Trade with the a
interior was by six-horse wagons, by pack-horse or flat-boat; whet .



GEORGE ROGERS CLARKE.
132 “THE AMERICANS.”

little mails there were could be carried by the post-riders ; news-
papers were few and dull; schools were poor in instruction and
cruel in discipline; tallow candles, grease “dips” or pitch pine
were the only lights; wood was the only fuel; coal and stoves were
unknown ; farming was rough and far from thorough and fully one
seventh of the four million Americans were negro slaves.

The buying and selling of black people for use in the farm labor
and housework of America dated from the days of the Spanish con-
quistadores who, as early as 1508, when they found that the con-
quered Indians could not stand the killing work forced upon them
by their cruel task-masters, brought into the
Spanish Main negroes from Africa to take
their places. In 1619 a Dutch captain vent-
ured with a cargo of nineteen African slaves
to Virginia; and from their sale to the
planters along the James River dates the
two hundred and fifty years of negro slavery
in North America. At the close of the
Revolution slavery existed in all the States,
though Massachusetts had already declared
it illegal. It was not, however, suited to the
peculiar climate of the Northern common-
wealths whose methods of farming were
widely different from those employed in the
rice and tobacco plantations of the South.
So it came about that nearly seven eighths
of all the slaves in the United States were
in Maryland, Virginia and North and South Carolina which were
also, as we have seen, the richest and most populous of the thirteen
States. New York owned the largest number of any Northern State
— fully twenty thousand. But, even then, clear-headed and right-
minded men saw the evil of slavery and warned their countrymen
of the risks of continuing it. The founders of the government —





BORROWING FIRE IN OLD DAYS.
“THE AMERICANS.” 133

Washington and Franklin, Jefferson, Madison, Jay and Hamilton
—opposed the degrading system as unsuited to a land of liberty,
and earnestly desired its abolition. But in 1793 a Connecticut man
who was teaching school in
Georgia, Eli Whitney by name,
invented a machine for clean-
ing cotton. This was called
the cotton-gin. With it a
slave who, before that time,
could not clean over five
pounds of cotton a day, could
easily clean a thousand pounds
a day. At once the cultiva-
tion of cotton became the
chief industry of the South;
the value of slave labor was
greatly increased; the warn-
ings of the fathers of the re-
public were disregarded and
the fight for the keeping up
and extension of the hateful
system continued for nearly
seventy ‘years.

With only sailing vessels or
horses as means of communi-
cation between the different
sections, travel was not very
general and visiting was not
greatly indulged in. Neighborhoods kept to themselves, for when
it took six days to go from Boston to New York and three from
New York to Philadelphia the roads were never crowded. | Presi-
dent Washington rode in his private coach all the way from Mount
Vernon to New York to be inaugurated, and the journey occupied



“KING COTTON.”

°
134 “THE AMERICANS.”

seven days, so filled was it with receptions, greetings, processions
and enthusiasm. .

The adoption of the Constitution and the inauguration of the
new government made men and women intensely American. They



THE STAGE COACH. =

remembered that in the early days of opposition to Great Britain
they had been able to do without the manufactures of the mother
country and they saw no reason why they should not now depend
upon American productions, and develop home resources.
“THE AMERICANS.” 135

So, all over the land the people combined to use as far as possible
American materials only. Rich and poor alike wore plain clothes
of strong home stuff; the ladies met in “spinning-bees” where
each one tried to out-do the other in the work accomplished ; !
«American broadcloth” became the fashion; and both President
Washington and Vice-President Adams took the oath of office
dressed from head to foot in home-spun garments “whose material
was the product of American soil.”

The Revolution, however, had not altogether destroyed that very
objectionable feeling of “I am better than you,” that royalty and
aristocracy are responsible for and that is so hard for people to get
rid of. The Declaration of Independence had told the world that.

“all men are created free and equal,” but for many
people, even in free America, it was hard to admit
the equality. So, in the little cities and in the
neighborhood centers of the United States there
existed for years that unwise feeling of superiority
that we call aristocracy, due to the wealth or posi-
tion of certain favored families. Even when Wash-
ington was to be inaugurated the Congress was
perplexed what title to give him. Some, with the
remembrance of the old titles of royalty still in
mind wished to address him as “ High Mightiness ;”’
some wished to speak of him as “His Highness the |v euxoron, wre
President of the United States of America and OF THE PRESIDENT.
Protector of their Liberty;” “Your Grace” and

“His Excellency,” were both proposed; but good common “sense

won the day and it was resolved that the address should be simply

“the President of the United States.” And “To the President”

or “By the President” have been the address and signature
pertaining to the office to this day.

But though aristocratic and high-flown manners and feelings '
found place in certain sections, oa though the dear and noble-




136 “THE AMERICANS.”

minded wife of the President was ridiculously styled by many
“Lady Washington,” while men and women aped the display and
costume and fashionable follies of the rotten old courts and king-
doms across the sea, the great mass of the Americans were plain,
sensible, hard-working men and women, who laughed at all such
pretended “style” and farmed and fished and bought and sold in
the proud knowledge that all men were equal before the law as well
as in the sight of the good God who had created them.

More and more, as population increased, the
young men of the homes by the sea went west
to seek their fortune and to occupy new lands
in the far-off Indian country, where for years
the forests and valleys of Kentucky and Ten-
nessee and the Ohio region had been first the
hunting ground and then the homes of hardy
frontiersmen and hopeful settlers. The Indians
who had hunted and fought in this fertile
section for generations, fiercely resisted the
coming of the white man; but it was to no
purpose. In spite of arrow and tomahawk and scalping-knife such
mighty hunters as Daniel Boone cleared the pathway in what was
called “the dark and bloody ground,” for settlement and civiliza-
tion; population increased; and, in 1792, Kentucky was admitted
into the union of States, while Tennessee followed in 1796. To
the northeast Vermont, which after years of dispute as to whether
it belonged to New Hampshire or New York had set up for itself
during the Revolution, was in 1791 admitted into the Union as the
fourteenth State. .

By the treaty of Paris, which established peace between the
United States and Great Britain after the Revolutionary War, the
boundaries of the United States were acknowledged to be Canada
on the north, the Mississippi River on the west, and Florida (ex-
tending in a narrow strip to the Mississippi) on the south. The




































THE NEW HOME IN THE OHIO COUNTRY.

“Tt was fertile, fair and every way attractive.”

“THE AMERICANS.” 139

vast territory extending from the Ohio River to the Great Lakes
was called the Northwest Territory and into this section settlers
speedily found their way. It was fertile, fair and every way attract-
ive, and promised a better outlook for pleasant homes and produc-
tive farming than did the rocky shores and sterile hill-slopes of New
England. As colonists, the people of America had experienced such
bitter days with England that when their own people went west to
settle in the new fends beyond the Ohio they dealt with them justly
and kindly, and the “Ordinance of 1787” which provided for the
government of the Northwest Territory was one of the broadest
and most generous agreements known to history. Daniel Webster
sud of it: “We are accustomed to praise the lawgivers of an-
tiquity ; we help to perpetuate the fame of Solon and Lycurgus; but
I doubt whether one single law of any lawgiver, ancient or modern,
has produced effects of more distinct, marked and lasting character
than the ordinance of 1787.” By this “ordinance” slavery was
forbidden ; the inhabitants were assured religious freedom, trial by
jury and equal rights; conmon schools were to be supported and,
as soon as the population was large enough, five new States were
to be formed from the territory admitted to the Union and were to
be governed by the people themselves. This ordinance and this
territory developed in time into the great and prosperous States of
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin.

So, with the new life and the mighty inspiration that liberty and
the privilege of self-government brought, the new American re-
public started toward progress. All was not smooth at first. There
were disputes, between sections and jealousies between law-makers ;
there were struggles for place and power; there were protests
against what some deemed the “tyranny of the majority;” the
debts incurred by the years of war were heavy and needed to be
met by that very taxation that so many Americans had learned to
detest and, from this last cause, two “ rebellions” sprung —Shay’s
insurrection in Massachusetts in 1786, and the whiskey insurrection
140 “THE AMERICANS.”

in Pennsylvania in 1794, both of which needed to be put down by
force of arms. The exciting days of the French Revolution in 1789,
when, profiting by the example of America, the French people
threw off the yoke of the kings (in a much more bloody and brutal
fashion, however, than it was done in America), very nearly dragged
the American republic into war; but Washington's firm hand on the
helm guided the ship of state safely through the troubled waters of
a dangerous sympathy. The wars on the frontier into which the
settlement of the Ohio country provoked the Indians, begun, in
1790, in defeat under General St. Clair, ended, in 1794, in victory
under General Wayne. These secured from the red owners the
rights to possession forever in the present State of Ohio. Further
rights in the Northwest, and the settlement of disputed questions as
to who had the “say” on the northern border, were secured by a
new treaty with England, concluded by John Jay in 1795.

In spite, however, of debt and jealousies and questions of rights
and privileges, in spite of angry uprisings, misunderstandings and
rumors of war, the new nation speedily began to prosper and under
the two terms which George Washington served as president, bore
itself with dignity and showed the world its ability to live in good
order and to maintain a successful government. Europe still looked ;
on doubtfully, pointing to the terrible times in France as one of
the first fruits of American independence and prophesying similar
anarchy and final downfall for America. But, unmoved by this, the
United States held on the course resolved upon ; commerce increased ;
the money of the United States, first coined in 1793, was placed in
circulation ; enterprising sea-captains displayed the American flag
in foreign waters, and in 1790 carried it around the world on the
good ship Columbia of Boston ; turn-pike roads were built; canals
were dug; colleges were founded. Thus American enterprise was
born; and, as the stormy seventeenth century drew to its close, the
United States of America began to challenge the attention and
admiration of the world.


TINSETTLED DAYS. 141

CHAPTER XVI.

UNSETTLED DAYS.

N 1796 George Washington declined to serve as president
for a third term of four years. Issuing a remarkable
“ Farewell Address to the American Peopie,” he retired to
private life and settled down to enjoy the rest he had
earned after forty-five years of public service. The home

in which he lived and died, at Mount Vernon on the Potomac River,
has continued to this day an honored place of pilgrimage for all

Americans.

Upon the retirement of Washington people realized that some
other man must be found to serve as president and they at once
began to say what they wanted done and who they wished to do
it. Discussion ran hot and high; the Federalists took as their can-

didate for president, Washington’s
vice- president, John Adams of
Massachusetts; the anti-Federal-
ists supported Washington’s first
Secretary of State, Thomas Jeffer-
son of Virginia. Adams was elected
and, under the law as it then ex-
isted, Jefferson, the defeated candi-
date for president, became vice-
president.

Even before this was concluded
the country was plunged into dis-



WASHINGTON’S HOME AT MOUNT VERNON.

putes with France. Washington had kept America from making
promises to France, and the revolutionists then in power in that
142 UNSETTLED DAYS.

disturbed land declared that, if the United States desired peace with
France, peace must be paid for. So they set to work to annoy their
old ally. The American minister was driven from the country ;
American commerce was damaged by unjust laws; American ships
and cargoes were preyed upon; and American envoys, when sent

across the sea to protest, were told they must pay or suffer. But

Americans had proved that they were able to defy injustice.
‘Millions for defense, but not one cent for tribute,” was the



TRAINING RECRUITS FOR WAR WITH FRANCK.

famous answer they made in reply to the French demands, and
at once they prepared for war.
Washington came from his quiet home at Mount Vernon to once
UNSETTLED DAYS. 143



JOHN ADAMS.

Second president of the United States.

again take his place at the head of the army; the black cockade,
worn as the symbol of patriotism, was seen in every hat; old Con-
tinental uniforms that had seen service in the Revolution were
hunted out of chest and closet; and, on many a village common,
the raw recruits, in all sorts of funny costumes, drilled and marched
and “trained” with all the fervor and enthusiasm of the old fight-
144 UNSETTLED DAYS.

ing days of “twenty years ago.” The navy was increased, and
several sea-fights had taken place — notably one off the Island of
St. Kitt’s where Commodore Truxton in the war-ship Constellation
‘ought and captured the French frigate L’Insurgente; the song
“ Hail, Columbia!” was upon every one’s lips and then, even before
war had been declared, Napoleon Bonaparte, who had put himself
at the head of French affairs, made peace with the United States
in 1799, and the war cloud passed over.

Whenever there is danger of war people become greatly excited
and sometimes do very foolish things. And so it happened that,
when war with France seemed probable, the law-makers assembled
in Congress, of whom the majority belonged to the Federalist party,
passed certain laws that proved to be both stupid and hurtful to the
best interests of the country. They feared “foreign influence” and
they wished to show the world the “ power” of the United States ;
so they made a law by which the president could arrest and exile
any foreigner or “alien” who was thought to be dangerous. This
was called the “Alien Law.” Another measure punished any
person who dared say a word in public against the government ;
this was called the “Sedition Law.” At once the opponents of
the Federalists who called themselves Republicans cried out “ For
shame!” The Alien Law, they said, took away the right to a trial
by jury; the Sedition Law wasablow atfree speech. The American
people had learned to value these rights for which they had fought
too highly to permit them to be abused. Popular opinion sided
with the Republicans, and at the Presidential election of 1800, amid
great excitement, President John Adams and the Federalists were
defeated.

But the success of the Republican ticket gave Thomas Jefferson
and Aaron Burr an equal number of votes. The Constitution
declared that the person receiving the highest number of votes
should be president, and the one receiving the next highest number
should be vice-president. So here was a problem: which should be
UNSETTLED DAYS. 145

the president, Jefferson or Burr? The decision was referred to the
House of Representatives and, there also, it resulted in a “ tie-vote.”
There was a great deal of delay and much angry talk, but finally
‘the struggle came to an end and Jefferson was chosen president
with Burr as vice-president.

But this showed one weak spot in the Constitution; it would not
do to have such a struggle repeated and the Constitution was
changed or “amended,” so far as
to direct the presidential electors
to vote for but one man for presi-
dent and to make a separate bal-
lot for the vice-president. And
this method has continued to
this day.

In December, 1799, George
Washington died. The news
came like a shock to the whole
country; the world mourned a
great man gone; England low-
ered her flag to half-mast; France
draped in black her standards
and her flags and America, from
north to south,.sorrowed for the
loss of her greatest and wisest THOMAS JEFTERSON.
man. Firm, prudent, sagacious, DE Tee TE
just, courageous, patient, true and good, this illustrious man is now
revered by all Americans as truly the “ father of his country ”; his
birthday is a national festival ; his memory is dear to all, and now,
almost a century after his death, there is not an American but
repeats with deepest faith the eulogy pronounced upon George
Washington by John Marshall when making before the Congress
public announcement of this good man’s death: “First in war,
first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”


146 UNSETTLED DAYS.

Washington’s greatest monument is the memory of his spotless
name; butas a noble monument, also, may be regarded “ the Federal
City,” which, selected by him, was built upon land given to the
general government by the States of Maryland and Virginia, and
set apart as the District of Columbia. After his death the new city
received the name of Washington and was made the capital of the
United States.

In 1800 the government was removed there; President Jeffer-
son was there inaugurated; and to-day the straggling forest settle-
ment of 1800 has developed into one of the most beautiful of
cities, one of the most imposing of capitals.

Thomas Jefferson, as has been said, was the greatest of Democrats.
The success of his party was the success of new men and new
manners. The old colonial ideas that birth and blood were meant
to lead were done away with, even as the wigs and cues, the short
clothes and buckles, the
frills and patches and pow-
der of the eighteenth cen-
tury gave place to modern
manners and a less theat-
rical dress. The nine-
teenth century meant pro-
gress and, even from its
earliest years, progress
was the order of the day.
Profiting by the wars by
which Europe was almost
torn asunder, America’s
commerce grew to great
proportions; her debts were speedily settled, her ships were seen
in every quarter of the globe, and her territory was very largely
increased.

In 1803 Napoleon seeing that the American possessions of France -





WASHINGTON’S TOMB AT MOUNT VERNON.


NA.

Jifteen m

SALE OF LOUISIA

THE

dollars.”

f

illions 0

y for

ritor

the vast ter

Napoleon sold

be

UNSETTLED DAYS. 149

would be in danger from the hostile arms of England, sold to the
United States ion fifteen millions of dollars, the vast territory lying
between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains and known
as Louisiana. This more than doubled the possessions of the United
States, and from this land purchase of 1803 have since been made
the States of Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska,
North and South Dakota, Montana and the Indian Territory. It
also included goodly portions of the present States of Minnesota,
Colorado and Wyoming.

The new republic was fast growing into a successful and ambi-
tious young giant, but, like many ambitious young men, it boasted and
assumed too much and frequently got into trouble. Fired by the
success of the Louisiana purchase in 1803, it stretched out toward the
Pacific and, by virtue of an exploring expedition conducted into the far
northwestern region by Lewis and Clarke in 1804, it laid claim to
what was known as the Oregon country —a claim that was disputed
by England for nearly forty years.

In 1800 the population of the United States had increased to
5,308,483 ; in 1810 it had grown to 7,239,881. Discovery and in-
vention, though weak and unsatisfactory, were just beginning to
open people’s eyes, and were giving a new push to American enter-
prise. Robert Fulton invented the steamboat in 1807, and by his
success made the great rivers of the United States more valuable
than ever before as highways for commerce. Coal was discovered
in Pennsylvania, but no one knew just how to use it to advantage.
Dissatisfied people were beginning to find fault with their circum-
stances and their surroundings, and no less a personage than the
vice-president of the United States, Aaron Burr, smarting under
what he considered ill-treatment by the Government and having
wickedly killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel, hatched up a treason-
able scheme to found a government of his own in the new western
country, but was arrested, tried, acquitted, disgraced and forgotten.
The people of the United States might be uneasy and ambitious, but
150 UNSETTLED DAYS.

they were loyal to the government they had set up, and such schemes
of treason as was this of Burr found neither favor nor support
among them.

But in Europe things were becoming worse and worse, as
Napoleon Bonaparte, declaring himself emperor of France, found
himself at war with the world. France with the most powerful
army in the world, and England with the most formidable navy,
made things decidedly unpleasant for each other and the rest of the
world. . England declared a blockade of all European ports against
France — that is, refused to allow the vessels of any nation to enter
the harbors of France or her allies; France retaliated by forbidding
all vessels to sail into English harbors. As American ships at that
time did most of the carrying trade these decrees of France and

England most deeply affected American
commerce. Congress would, had it
dared, have gone to war to redress this
outrage; it had in 1801 declared war
against the Mohammedan pirates of the
Barbary states in North Africa, and had
punished them severely in what has been
known as the War with Tripoli; but to
fight Tripoli and to fight Great Britain
were quite different affairs and the
United States could not hope to beat







fi ue Great Britain on the seas. So, instead,
wa Congress tried to punish both the great

powers by refusing to trade with them
and passed in 1807 a measure known
as the “Hmbargo Act,” which forbade
the sailing of American vessels to any foreign port. But this was
almost suicide. American ships lay rotting at their docks; Ameri-
can commerce was very nearly destroyed; New York and New
England protested loudly and some particularly unpatriotic people

THE FALLING FLAG.
War with Tripoli.
x

UNSETTLED DAYS. 151

in the Eastern States, when they saw their business ruined and
their commerce dead began to talk, very forcibly, of “seceding”

from the Union.

The Embargo Act proved so unpopular and hurtful that Congress

soon repealed it and in
1809 passed, in its place,
what was known as the
“ Non - Intercourse Act.”
This permitted American
vessels to trade with all

countries except France

and England. But it was
too late to save the lost
popularity of President
Jefferson. He had served
two terms as president, but
the Embargo Act was the
means of defeating his. re-
nomination and his party
(which was now often called
the Democratic party) was
obliged in 1808 to take
another man as candidate.
This was James Madison
of Virginia, who had been
a member of the historic
Continental Congress and
had served as Secretary of
State under Jefferson.









































JAMES MADISON.

Fourth president of the United States.

The Non-Intercourse Act was repealed in 1810 and the new admin-
istration of President Madison found itself face to face with a prob-
lem that must be solved at once if prosperity was to be regained for
those sections of the country which had been the principal sufferers








































































152 | . A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE.

under the unfortunate Embargo Act. The old tyrants across the
sea were bent on “crowding” the new nation beyond the limit of
patience. The “young giant” must prepare to stand his ground
and either fight or fall.

os SO

CHAPTER XVII.
'A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD “FOE.

-]T is very hard to forget. When you have been wronged
or worried by any of your companions you may learn to
| forgive them, but the memory of the wrong that has been

Ld) Sone you lasts a long time. nn

ee) It a so with the United States and England. The
bitterness of the strife that brought on the Revolution, the ill-feeling
that accompanied those seven years of war continued as unpleasant
memories long after the treaty of peace was signed. And the boast-
ing about success assumed by Americans was as distasteful to
Englishmen as was English contempt of America exasperating to
Americans. ti)

When in 1809 the “Non-Intercourse Act” was repealed the
Congress of the United States said to France and Great Britain:
“Tf one of you will recall the laws you have made that are so hard —
on American commerce, we will trade with you only and will ‘boy-.
cott’ the other nation.” To which Napoleon at once responded:
“All right; Iwill.’ He didn’t, but he said he would, and on the
strength of his false promise the United States at once cut off its
trade with England, and began to boast about it, too. For, you see,
the old hatred still lived.




A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE. 153

Great Britain, confident of her strength upon the seas, treated
America with more contempt than ever. She claimed the right to
‘search American ships and take out any sailors that might seem to
be of English or Irish birth. Of course the British searchers were
not over-scrupulous and many American citizens were seized as
British sailors, and forced to serve in English war-ships. British
men-of-war sailed up and down the American coast, attacking and
capturing American merchant
vessels, while, in the West,
agents of the British govern-
ment stirred up the Indians to
hostility against American set-
tlers, furnished them arms and
ammunition,and backing up the
Indian leader Tecumseh, chief
- of the Shawnees, brought about
at last in 1811 an Indian war.
This war was, however, speed-
ily ended by General William
Henry Harrison, the governor
of Indiana Territory, who,
marching against Tecumseh,
utterly defeated the Indians at
the. famous battle of Tippe-
canoe.

All these signs of English
hostility and hatred had their TECUMSEN, CHIEF OF THE SHAWNEES.
effect at last upon America.

Instead of calmly talking nee over and trying to arrange the
difficulty America “got mad” with England. All talk of peace
ceased. Patience was exhausted, self-respect could not longer sub-
mit, the old “spirit of 76” was renewed, and though New England
objected to the war as. unwise and wrong, popular opinion forced


154 A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE.

Congress into action and on the eighteenth of June, 1812, President
Madison formally declared war against Great Britain.

The country was altogether unprepared for such a conflict.
England had a thousand war-ships; the United States had but



THE BATTLE OF TIPPECANOE.

twelve; England’s army was a victorious force of disciplined soldiers ;
America had no army; the country was poor; the president had
been forced into war contrary to hisown judgment ; the generals in
command of the raw and undisciplined soldiers were veterans “ left
over” from the Revolution. too old to be of real service and Great
A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE. 155

Britain felt that it would be but an easy task to whip the young
nation that thirty years before had caused her so much shame.

From first to last the land battles of the War of 1812 were a
series of defeats, brightened by only a few victories. The soldiers
had no confidence in their generals, until generals had really been
made by the bitter experience of defeat. For the most part it was
a “leaderless war.” The names of Winfield Scott and Andrew
Jackson, with perhaps that of William Henry Harrison, are almost
the only ones that come down to us as those of
successful leaders. fi

The war was mismanaged from the start. Many
of the people were opposed to it; the Government
_ was absolutely incapable of directing it; the troops
lacked discipline; the generals knew nothing of
how to handle or how to lead: their men; the
Canadian frontier, then almost a wilderness, was
foolishly crossed and recrossed for the impossible
invasion of Canada; posts that should have been
held at all hazards were surrendered or abandoned,
and important centers that should have been de-

fended were left at the mercy of the enemy. Thus was Detroit on —

the northwestern border surrendered by General Hull and all the
territory beyond the Ohio country. lost to the Americans; the
territory of Maine was seized and held by the British; and in
August, 1814, five thousand British soldiers marched through Vir-
ginia and Maryland, drove the militia before them again and again,
entered Washington from which the inefficient government had
fled, burned the Capitol, the White House (as the home of the presi-
dent was called) and most of the public buildings, and then sailed
to attack the city of Baltimore. . With the exception of such
engagements as the Battle of the Thames and of Chippewa Plains
and the wonderful victory at New Orleans—a needless battle
fought after peace had been agreed upon — the history of the land




156 A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE.

battles of the War of 1812 is, as Mr. Roosevelt says, “not cheerful
reading for an American.”

One result, however, these unsuccessful battles had. Even out of
defeat they brought discipline. They made fighters out of the raw
recruits, and, as one historian tells us, “two years of warfare gave

us soldiers who could stand against the best men of Britain.”
But it was a schooling dearly bought. The grapple on land with
which the old foemen again tried their strength was dreary and dis-
heartening enough in its results to the Americans; dissatisfaction at
the conduct of the war became so-strong in certain sections that the
opponents of the government met in convention at Hartford in 1814,
and threatened to set up a separate government for New England
which, so it was claimed, the government had left to take care of it-
self; the treasury was bankrupt; the leaders were incompetent; and,
after the burning of Washington, the situation appeared so oe
that the English | lookers-on exultantly declared that “the ill-organ-.
ized association is on the eve of dissolution and the world is speedily
to be delivered of the mischievous example of the existence of a

government founded on demo-
- eratic rebellion.” |

But ‘all this while the unexpect-
ed was happening. The Ameri-
can navy from which nothing had
been anticipated, and which, at the
opening of the war, it was proposed
to keep in port to save it from

destruction by the EP iabIS British fleets of war, took up the
challenge that England had so contemptuously flung at America,
sailed boldly out against the stoutest and most invincible British
war-ships, swelled its force by swift-sailing privateers, and showed
so much pluck and courage that it succeeded in doing more damage
to British shipping and commerce than any nation had ever accom-
plished. Out of eighteen lake and ocean duels the American men-



THE RUINED WHITE HOUSE.
A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE. 157

of-war won fifteen. The deeds of Hull and Macdonough, of Lawrence
and Perry, of Decatur and Biddle and Bainbridge, ‘of Warrington,
Stewart and Porter, of Jones and Burrows and Reid — American
captains all— very nearly cause us to forget the defeats and discour-
agements of the war on land and make us agree with Mr. Roosevelt
when he says “it must be but a poor-
spirited American whose veins do not tin-
gle with pride when he reads of the cruises
and fights of the sea-captains and their
grim prowess, which kept the old Yankee
flag floating over the waters of the Atlantic
for three years, in the teeth of the mighti-
est naval power the world has ever seen.”
Most wars are like boyish quarrels —
altogether unnecessary and easily to be
avoided if but the quarrelers will soften
their hearts instead of doubling up their
fists. But when bullying or stupidity bring
on either a quarrel or a war then resistance
is right and valor is manliness. “Beware,”

says Sh akespeare, - KEEPING THE OLD LAG AFLOAT.

‘¢Of entrance to a quarrel; but, being in,
Bear it that the opposéd may beware of thee.”

The War of 1812 was an unnecessary quarrel. Had England been
less insolent and America better guided, the war could easily have
been avoided ; or had there entered into the early dispute the more
friendly spirit of what we to-day call “arbitration” no shot from
fort or ship need have been fired. But the war did come ; and, as
we look back upon it, we are proud to know that American pluck
and bravery carried the struggle through, despite poor leadership
on the land and heavier force on the water. “Don’t give up the
ship,” cried the brave Captain Lawrence as he fell on the blood-



i oeenien
158 A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE.

stained deck of the Chesapeake. That appeal was the battle cry
throughout the war; with it nailed to the mast of Commodore
Perry’s flag-ship in the famous Battle of Lake Erie, the blue jack-
ets stuck to its commands so well that Perry broke the British line,
captured the whole fleet, and sent off his famous ee of
victory: “ We have met the enemy, and they are ours.’

The war began with the disgraceful surrender of Detroit; it closed
with the marvelous victory at New Orleans. There, on ‘the eighth
of January, 1815, Sir Edward Pakenham with twelve thousand
British regulars—men who -had met and conquered the veteran
troops of Napoleon—assaulted the hastily-constructed earthworks
behind which General Jackson with six thousand undisciplined sol-
diers awaited the attack. Within half an hour the whole British
army was in full retreat, beaten back by Jackson’s stubborn resist-
ance. Pakenham and more than twenty-five hundred of his men
were killed; the Americans lost but eight killed and thirteen
wounded. «Few victories in history,” says Mr. Johnson, “have
been so complete; and this one enabled the United States to forget

many of the early failures.”

It was a victory of leadership. The war at last had developed
one great general— Andrew Jackson of Tennessee who, says Mr.
Roosevelt, “with his cool head and quick eye, his stout heart and
strong hand, stands out in history as the ablest general the United
States produced from the outbreak of the Revolution Soe to the
beginning of the great Rebellion.”

Had there been known such a thing as an ocean telegraph this
battle need not have been fought, for a treaty of peace had been
signed at Ghent in Belgium on the twenty-fourth of December,
1814. Peace was joyfully welcomed. It was greatly needed. Busi-
ness was at a standstill; commerce was nearly destroyed; money ~
was scarce, and distress and poverty were felt in every section.
The war had cost the country nearly eighty millions of dollars, and
people were weary of the struggle.
A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE. 159

But it had settled several things which, though not mentioned in
the treaty of peace, were most important to America. The victory
of General Harrison at the River Thames, closed the long struggle

- for possession in the west, for there the frontiersmen of the Ohio



JACKSON’S SHARPSHOOTERS AT NEW ORLEANS.

broke down the barrier to settlement that Indians, Frenchmen and
Britishers had sought to maintain, and settled it forever that the ,
west was to be American. The long series of ocean victories proved
the power of America on the sea, and never again did Great Britain

\


o sas We ae er ds on



160 A WRESTLE WITH THE OLD FOE.

attempt to enforce that insolent “right of search” that had been
one of the causes of the Revolution, and brought on the War of
1812.

In spite of the dissatisfaction at the course of the government
and its weakness in the hour of danger the Democratic-Republican
party, while the war was be-
ing waged, was strong enough
to re-elect Madison as presi-
dent in 1813. In fact’ the
old Federalist party that had
started the government in
1789, came to an end during
the war-time. The younger
men of the country who hotly
‘supported the war with Eng-
land, had no ‘patience with















if WY

a
yy) Wy
lif ae

Nie ss fe _a party that opposed it; the
WY vas Bye ie Hi Hartford Convention of 1814 -
ey oo lf





Hh) that talked so foolishly of
al separation from the Union,
was largely the work of Fed-
? eralists and was their last act.
AMBUSHED IN THE INDIAN COUNTRY. : For peace and the Ameri-
can victories showed the real
strength of the United States, and its citizens had no use for a
party that seemed to be only the party of submission and grum-
bling. The Hartford Convention and Jackson’s victory gave the
death biow to the Federalist party, and with the close of the war
but one remained —and to this day this has been known as the
Democratic Party.

es
STATE-MAKING. 161

CHAPTER XVIII.
STATE-MAKING.

y(HE first suit of clothes is speedily outgrown. Legs
lengthen ; arms stretch out; and tucks must either be let
down, pieces added or new suits cut and made if the grow-
ing girl or boy is to be considered as properly clothed.
J They must have more growing room.

The first suit of the United States made of thirteen well-matched
pieces, was speedily outgrown. Even before the Revolution the
first feelers had been stretched out toward the distant west, and’
when peace was declared, such statesmen as Thomas Jefferson began
to cut and carve the western territory obtained from England, so as
to make at least seventeen States. Mr. Jefferson had even selected
names for his new States that were to spring up in prairieland.
They were a combination of Latin, Greek and American-Indian
names, and odd enough they sound to us. Here are ten of them
as they were proposed to Congress: Sylvania, Cherronesus, Michi-
gania, Assenisipi, Metropotamia, Illinoia, Saratoga, Washington,
Polypotamia, and Pelisipia. But neither the divisions nor the
names of the suggested new States found favor with the Congress ;
- while the code of laws that was proposed for their government
was also rejected, though it contained two provisions that were
indicative of the principles of so strong a Democrat as Jefferson :
one was the abolition of slavery after 1800; the other, that no one
holding an hereditary title should be admitted to citizenship.

We have already seen that soon after the Revolution three new
States were added to the original thirteen, namely: Vermont in
1791, Kentucky in 1792 and Tennessee in 1796. These were the



s
162 _ STATE-MAKING.

result of a settlement of the disputes as to boundaries and owner-
ship of land between New Hampshire and New York, Massachusetts,
Connecticut, Virginia and the two Carolinas. These once adjusted,
and the new States formed, the settlers who, after the Revolution,
with well-loaded pack-horse and clumsy Conastoga wagon, with wives
and children, cattle and scanty household goods and farming imple-
ments, had migrated by thousands into the farther west, soon de-































































































THE CONASTOGA WAGON. -

sired citizenship. The opening up of the Ohio country in 1787, the
purchase of the vast territory of Louisiana from France in 1803,
and Spain’s sale of its territory of Florida in 1819 added an immense
amount of unsettled land to the United States possessions, and emi-
grants from Europe or restless residents of the eastern States were
constantly on the move west. In 1815 General Jackson in a series
of rapid fights defeated the restless Creek Indians in Alabama and |
opened the southwest to American occupation, and the use of steam-






Vi SUS See

PSA RAN





THE MAIL BOAT ON THE OHIO.
“« Before the days of railroads and steamboats.”



STATE-MAKING. 165

boats for navigation and trade on the Mississippi and other western
rivers hastened the growth of western settlement. For Fulton’s in-
vention of the steamboat had — after the first doubts were over —
been quickly made use of by progressive Americans. Before 1812
steamboats were running on the Hudson, the Ohio, the St. Lawrence,
Raritan and Delaware rivers; steam ferry-boats crossed and re-
crossed the East River, between New York and Brooklyn; and in
1816 a steamboat ploughed its way ae the Mississippi and into the
Ohio to Louisville.

The settlers of the west found an easier land to prepare and
cultivate than did their ancestors of two centuries before, but they
had frequent and desperate hostilities with the former Indian owners
of the land (who never could understand that to sell or give a piece
of land deprived them of all rights to such land) and the question

of slavery in the new sections was already causing much ques-
tioning and dispute.

_ The successful close of the War of 1812 brought many new people
across the sea to settle in and become citizens of the growing West- _
ern Republic. The west began to fill up; in the northwestern and
southwestern territories population gradually centered about certain
available points and, out of the territories, a number of States were
formed. Ohio had been admitted to the Union in 1802 and Louisi-
ana in 1812. After the war, others followed. Indiana was admitted
in 1816, Mississippi in 1817, Illinois in 1818 and Alabama in 1819 ;
Maine (outgrowing the care of Massachusetts of which it had been
a part for fully two hundred years) came in as a new State in 1820,
and Missouri was admitted in 1821,

So you see that by the year 1820 all the territory east of the
Mississippi River, except that wild northern lake region now occu-
pied by Michigan and Wisconsin, had been cut up into States. They
had been admitted also alternately — first a northern and then a
southern one, for the question of slavery was from the first a puz-
zling one to settle. Really the United States of America held by
166 STATH-MAKING.

_ the teachings of the Declaration of Independence and did not be-
lieve in slavery. In 1808 the bringing in—or importation — of
negro slaves was forbidden by the United States government ; be-
fore 1820 the keeping of slaves had almost entirely disappeared in
all the States north of Virginia; by the ordinance of 1787 slavery
was forbidden north of the Ohio River. But slave labor was con-
sidered a necessity in the
South; the planters of the
vast fields of cotton, tobacco
and rice, thought they could
not get along unless they had
unpaid labor on their great
plantations; and so, though
disliked by many, slavery at
/ length became what is known
, as “an institution” through-
out the South. The question
of slavery therefore, gradu-
ally grew in importance and
became a national matter.
Congress tried to suit both
sections by keeping the bal-
AN OLD-TIME LOUISIANA SUGAR MILL. ance even and adding a new
State first to the North and

then to the South — first a free State and then a slave State. But
when Missouri came knocking at the door of the Union asking
admission the question as to how it should come in caused a hot
discussion. The section had belonged to the old French territory
of Louisiana, a slave-holding land; the ordinance of 1787 which
prohibited slavery north of the Ohio did not affect it, because the
Ohio did not touch it. But the people of the north argued that
if Missouri came in as a slave State it would open all the territory
west of the Mississippi to slaveholders; the people of the South said


STATE-MAKING. 167

that the Constitution left the slavery question to the States; that
Missouri was a slave section and that Congress had nothing to say
in the matter. So the question grew into a hot and bitter dis-
pute that at one. time even threatened to break up the Union;
but at last each side “gave in” a little; a line was drawn at the
southern boundary of Missouri; it was agreed that Missouri should
be admitted into the Union as a slave State, but that slavery
should be forever prohibited north of that line —the land occu-
pied by the new State of Missouri only excepted. This famous
agreement was known as “the Missouri Compromise,” and, under
it, Missouri was admitted into the Union in 1821 as the twenty-
fourth State.

This season of State-making had almost doubled the original “ old
thirteen ;” it had trebled the population. There were in 1821 fully
ten millions of people in the United States as against the three
millions that brought the land out of successful revolution in 1783.
With the exception of the slavery dispute there was but little to
disturb the peace and prosperity of the land. With the close of the,
War of 1812, business grew brisk again and commerce began to re-
_ vive. The farmers readily “moved” their crops; money became
more plentiful and people speedily forgot the worries of the war-
days and remembered only the glories.

In 1816 President Madison was succeeded by James Monroe, of
Virginia, the nominee of the Republican party. The successful
ending of the war with Great Britain had destroyed the last rem-
-nant of the old Federalist party which had opposed and hindered
the carrying on of the war. In the election of 1816 the Federalist
candidates received but thirty-four of the two hundred and twenty-
one electoral votes ; and in 1820 so satisfied were the people with
President Monroe and his way of “running things,” so contented
were they with the condition of the country, the prospects of
business and the steady progress of national growth and wealth
that this period of American history is often called “the Era of
168 STATE-MAKING.

Good Feeling.” Monroe was re-elected president in 1820 almost
without a dissenting voice. In. fact no opposing candidate was
nominated and when the electoral votes were cast only one was
given against Monroe, this being thrown so that no president



JAMES MONROE.

Fifth president of the United States.

'

save Washington might
ever be said to-have re-
ceived the unanimous vote.

One of the measures that
came out of this “Era
of Good Feeling,” where
every one was proud to be
an American and was anx-
ious to see all America re-
publican was the statement
of what has since been
known as “the Monroe
Doctrine.” The Spanish
colonies in Central and

‘South America, imitating

the United States, had
thrown off the Spanish
yoke and secured their in-
dependence. But it was
feared that some of the
other monarchies of Enu-
rope would either help
Spain to conquer her re-
volted colonies or step in
themselves and possess the

land. Americans could. not submit to such an interference; and,
in 1823, President Monroe in the message to Congress which each
president makes once a year, declared that, while the United
States had no intention of interfering in any European quarrel
STATE-MAKING. 16s

or war, due notice was given that no more European colonies should
be planted in America, and that the United States would not
permit “an attempt by any nation of Europe to reduce an inde-
pendent nation of North or South America to the condition of a
colony.” It is said that this outspoken language (which has ever
since been the firm stand of the United States) was placed in the
president’s message by John Quincy Adams, President Monroe’s
Secretary of State and the next succeeding president of the United
States. :

President James Monroe was the fifth president of the United
States and the fourth Virginian to fill that high office. A soldier of
the Revolution and a member of the Continental Congress, he
was the last of the men of the Revolution ‘to be elected president.
He was the third president to die on the Fourth of July. Two of
those who preceded him, John Adams and Thomas Jetferson, died
within a few hours of each other on the Fourth of July, 1826 — the
fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independ-
ence, on which paper both their names appear. Monroe died on the
Fourth of July, 1831. He was sometimes called the “Last Cocked
Hat,” as he was the last of the Revolutionary Presidents and one
of the last Americans to wear the quaint old cocked hat of that
glorious period.


{70 | CITIZENS AND PARTIES.

CHAPTER XIX.
CITIZENS AND PARTIES.
{HE “Era of Good Feeling” of course could not long con-

tinue. Opposition is really necessary to progress and
growth, as, if we all thought alike, there would be no one






EAMES: Ee to push things ahead. —
Li SSS) So when the time for a new election came around, to-

ward the close of President Monroe’s second term, the era of good
feeling became almost an era of confusion, because people were not |
united as to just who they wished to select as their new president.
Everybody was “Republican,” but their choice was by no means
the same. At last, four candidates were. decided upon. ‘These
were: John Quincy Adams, who had been Monroe’s Secretary of
State, Andrew Jackson, “the 5
hero of New Orleans,” Wil-
liam H. Crawford, who had
been secretary of the treas-
ury, and Henry Clay, the
“great Kentuckian,” speaker
of the House of Representa-
tives. So many candidates,
as elections were then carried
on, split up the electoral vote.
completely; no one candi-
date had a majority — that
is, a large enough proportion
of the entire electoral vote —
and the matter had to go for a peer ieee eae aseerTcr oe




_ CITIZENS AND PARTIES. 171

decision to the House of Representatives. There, only the three
highest names. were voted upon; the friends of Henry Clay cast
their votes for John Quincy Adams and he was, accordingly, de-
clared elected. This confusing election was at that time called
“the scrub-race for the presidency,” and a “ scrub-race,” you know,
is a race between “scrubs” —that is, untrained and unpracticed
horses, boys or men.

There was, of course, a good deal of “ back-talk”’ and hard feel-
ings over so mixed a contest; and, as a result, new parties were
formed. At first they called themselves “ Adams men,” or “ Jack-
son men.” Then the Democrat-Republican party which had started
in Jefferson’s time took to itself the name of the Democratic Party,
by which it has ever since been known, and its opponents called
themselves, first, National-Republicans and afterwards Whigs.

John Quincy Adams was the son of a president — stout old John
Adams, the champion of Revolution and the successor of Washington
as President of the United States. Like his father, John Quincy
Adams was able, honest, uncompromising, independent and firm.
His administration was a success; money was plenty and the people
were prosperous, but the president’s firmness as to his own opinions
and his unwillingness to “give in” to the plans of others made
for him many enemies— especially among politicians, who, as a
rule, are quick haters. So, like his father, he was defeated when
nominated for a second term as president; but, with the good of his
country at heart, he went into congress again as a member of the
House of Representatives from’ Massachusetts and there had a re-
markable career of seventeen years— the stout and merciless op-
ponent of whatever seemed to him unjust, tyrannical or wrong.
He was known both to’ friends and foes as the “Old Man Elo-
~ quent”; of, him it was said that he actually “died in harness,”
for in the Capitol at Washington is still pointed out the spot
where he fell, stricken down by paralysis in February, 1848, while
attending the debates of Congress. And in the Capitol he died
172 CITIZENS AND PARTIES. -

It was during the administration of John Quincy Adams that two
important questions arose, impelling people to much heated and
wordy discussion. These were the Tariff and Internal Improve-
ments. They were what the people of that day called “ burning ques- —
tions” and one of them —the Tariff — has not got through “burn-
ing” yet, in 1891. The tariff — which, by the way, is an old, old
question and comes away back from the Arabic verb @rafa, to
inform — was originally a system of payments demanded by a
government on the goods sent away from or sent into its bor-
ders. In Great Britain and America this system of payments or |
“duties” is demanded only on goods brought in from foreign
countries — “imports,” as they are called. Early in the history
of the United States this question of the tariff led to a differ-
ence of opinion. Some people thought that American industries
would prosper only by “protection” — that is, by placing a high —
tariff or duty on the same things that. came in from other coun-
tries so that Americans could only afford to buy American-made
goods or products. Other people held that this was unjust — that
Americans ought to be allowed to buy the best they can get,
whether it was of American or foreign production and if Ameri-
can manufacturers wished American trade they must simply make
the best goods; these people held that the tariff should affect the
things imported into America only so far as to help raise the money
needed to carry on the government; this is what is still called “a
tariff for revenue only.” High tariff, or protection, was advocated
by presidents Monroe and Adams; the money thus obtained was to
be expended by the government upon making roads and canals and
dredging harbors. This was called Internal Improvements and the
can and internal Dace together, made up what was known _
as the “ American System.”

But many people did not believe in this Heures: the
“ American System,” as it was called: Especially in the South was
it disliked. There the people were farmers and not manufacturers,


CITIZENS AND PARTIES. 178

es
Ae
eee







DISCUSSING THE TARIFF IN 1828.

and they objected to paying high prices on foreign goods simply, so
they claimed, to “protect”? the Northern manufacturer. During
President Adams’ term, in 1828, the tariff was still further increased
and the South declared that this act was contrary to the Constitu-
tion. This question of the tariff really split the old Republican




174 CITIZENS AND PAR Ls

party i in two and was the origin of the later opposing parties — _ the er

Democrats and the Whigs.

The question of Internal Improvements was however settled for-
ever by the coming of the railroad, the telegraph and the other.
‘wonderful things that were speedily to take the place of post roads

and canals; for, being carried on by private enterprise and not by
Government, these new “ improvements ” took away the need of
paying out the Government's money for

such purposes.
For these soroudiaee) were to bring
about immense changes alike in the lives,













































the habits and the characters of the peo-































‘ple.’ Up to 1825 the citizens of the United
States had been satisfied to:live in the ways
of their fathers. They went from place

to place over poor roads, afoot, or on horse-

_. back, in clumsy wagon, iene stage-

coach. or heavy carriage. Goods and
freight passed slowly from city to city

= on sailing vessel, lazy flat-boat or creak-
ing wagon, and one of the chief obstacles
to aie rapid development of the western country was’ to be found
in the length of time, the labor, the risks and. the expense of
getting from one point to another. |
Fulton’s invention and the first steamboats to which it led partly
solved this question, for it made travel. upon ocean, lake and river
quicker and easier. But still it took too much time and trouble to
get from the seashore to the lakes and rivers of the west. Enter-
prise, however, has ever been one of the chief points in the Ameri-
can character, and enterprise soon solved this problem. A public
spirited and popular American statesman, De Witt Clinton, gov-
ernor of New York, advocated, worked for, and finally secured the
construction of a great canal that should join the lakes to the sea.



A WESTERN FLAT~BOAT.


JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.

Sixth president of the United States.


























€
‘






















CITIZENS AND PARTIES. eT

by stretching across New York State from the Hudson River to
Lake Erie. This “big ditch,” as some people called it, was eight
years in building and was opened to the public on the fourth of
November, 1825, when Governor Clinton, having sailed its entire
length from Buffalo to Sandy Hook—a nine days’ trip — poured
into the Atlantic from a gilded keg ie water from Lake Erie
and declared the great canal “ open.” The act was significant.
It marked’a new day of American progress and, by establishing a
direct and easy trade communication with the West, it made New
York the metropolis of America,

About the same time a great “National Road” for inland com-
munication was laid out and constructed. It stretched from Mary-
land to Indiana and was intended for wagon
travel. It was a wise piece of work and would

have been a great and most important one
had not the railroad soon come in to. onan
ae distance and to get the best of time.

_ In 1828 the new parties had their first strong
grapple. Adams was overthrown and Andrew
Jackson of. Tennessee was elected president.
New ideas were taking the place of old ones; il
the approach of a certain overturn in life and iii
manners was “in the air,” and as Mr. Johnston ~
says, “ the government was changed because
the people had changed.” ,

Jackson’s own story was proof of this. He
was what is called a “self-made man.” He was
the first president to come directly from the ranks of “the peo-
ple.” The son of a poor North Carolina borderer, he was born
into the very air of rebellion to tyranny and early imbibed a love
of liberty. The boy of fourteen who dared to refuse to black the
boots of his British captor was the same unyielding patriot who,
behind his crazy earthworks at New Orleans, grimly awaited that



DE WITT CLINTON.

Pr eee eee


178 CITIZENS AND PARTIES.

splendid British advance that he was to crush and hurl back into
defeat, the same loyal American who, when the South Carolina
“nullifiers”” of 1832 threatened insurrection, could burst out hotly:



THE RAILWAY COACH OF OUR GRANDFATHERS.

“By the Eternal! the Union must and shall be preserved. Send
for General Scott!” .
The country was wonderfully prosperous when Jackson came
into office in 1829. The census of 1830 showed a population of
nearly thirteen millions ; Hast and West were alike growing rapidly
in wealth and numbers; manufactures were increasing ; new indus-




CITIZENS AND PARTIES. 179

tries were springing up ; there were eighty-five hundred post-offices
in the country, and the sale of its western lands to the new settlers
brought into the national treasury fully twenty-five millions a dol-
lars a year. ~ -

Before the close of Jackson’s first administration the locomotive
engine of Stephenson had been introduced into America and Yankee
ingenuity was quick to adapt the idea to the needs of the land.
The first passenger train in America was run on the Baltimore and
Ohio railroad in 1830; the first successful American locomotive
was built in 1833; before 1835 nineteen rail-

roads were being built or were in operation, \W hen« ever ye mat

and. before 1837 fifteen “hundred miles of rail- Me J

" way were in use in the land. ' owt

The railroad changed every thing. Quicker
communication meant a busier and more pro-
ductive life for the nation; and this quickly
came. Steamships began to cross and re-cross

the ocean; gas was introduced in cities to take
the place of lamp and candle; the reaping
machine hastened and enlarged farm work ;

coal was used as fuel; the revolving pistol
did away with the old style of fire-arms; fric-
tion matches took the place of. flint and eee

Morse was feeling his way toward the tele-
graph; education, books and newspapers were
increasing and improving everywhere, and the
United States of America seemed on the ee to an unexampled
Prepon




180 CHANGING DAYS.

CHAPTER XX.

CHANGING DAYS.



were coming closer together, as
‘canal and railroad took the place
of stage and saddle; men began
to think, to desire, to invent;
the brain of the Yankee was
now tohelp the arm.
A new era in American think-

ing dates. from “the thirties.”
The contemptuous query of the

famous English critic, Sydney

Smith: “Who ever reads an

American book?” was soon ‘to
be answered: “The world.”
For, following the work of
Irving and Cooper, of Bryant
and Halleck and Drake, of Noah
Webster and Lindley Murray,
of Wilson and Audubon, came,



F President Jackson’s administration was the threshold of
change in American life and manners, politics and popula-
tion, it also led men and women into a broader room for
action and advancement. 'The railroad and the telegraph
were not the only improvements that widened American

influence. The arm of the Yankee had thus far been stout to

chop and hew, to clear and build, to drain and dig; but new

cities were growing; new neighborhoods were forming ; people



WASHINGTON IRVING.


CHANGING DAYS. 181

soon after 1830, the first works of our modern. American writers
—the poems of Whittier, Longfellow and Holmes, the romances
of Hawthorne, the historical work, of Bancroft and Prescott, the
tales and poems of Edgar Allan Poe. Then, too, the greatest of
American orators — Daniel Web- :
‘ster and Henry Clay —were.in
their prime, stirring their fellow-
men by their power and their elo-
quence, while, among lawyers,
the Americans Marshall, Kent
and Story were not surpassed
on either side of the Atlantic.

As men began to think their
consciences were aroused to ques-
tion the worth of everything
that was degrading or hurtful to
their fellowmen. Drunkenness,
common to all America, the
neglect.of convicts in the pris-
ons, and negro slavery, debas-
ing both to master and man,
were attacked by those earnest
men and women that we now mee
‘call “reformers,” but who were. ,
then called “fanatics,” and the J tenimore Coyfas~
way toward real American lib- a
erty was widened by these pioneers of virtue. From that. time,
too (the days of President Jackson), dates the public school —
that system of free education that has been -the uplifting and
’ strengthening of America.

As the railroads ran deeper into the land, settlement reached out
still further into the new sections; the “frontier” shifted almost
with each year,and the pathfinder and the emigrant made more








182 | CHANGING DAYS.”

and-yet more roadways for civilization. In “the thirties” were
incorporated such new cities as Buffalo, Chicago, Cleveland, Colum-
bus, Memphis, Rochester and Toledo — centers of a growing trade
that, before the coming of canal or railroad, had been but frontier
posts, hard to reach and seemingly scarce worth settling. On the
rolling prairie, by the shore of the great lakes or on the banks of
some flowing western river the log cabin of the pioneer and the
rough clearing of the settler showed the beginnings of a new
home; the traveling schoolmaster
carried his knowledge from district
to district; the cross-roads store or
tavern was the meeting place for
discussion, and the exchange of
news and opinions; the circuit-
rider or traveling minister, counted.
his congregation not by numbers
but by miles as, jogging along from -
place to place, he carried in his
saddle-bags his theological library
—his Bible and hymn book, “ Pil-
grim’s Progress” and “ Paradise
Lost” — and stopped to preach, to
talk, to marry or to bury, as his
services were needed; up and down
the, tow path of an Ohio canal
trudged a little fellow who, in after
years, was to be general, college.
professor and president of the
United States; and, typical of Western advance, in 1833 there was
no iene 1839 it was a flourishing town with splendid
steamers running to its docks and with its store of merchandise
going south, west.and north.
The administration of Jackson was an exciting time ; besides the



ANIEL WEBSTER.


CHANGING DAYS. : 183

new movements in thought and life that were making “ the thirties”
a time of changing days, the political questions and official acts,
that came to disturb men’s minds and rouse them to fervid support
or violent. opposition, were many. Jackson was a man of strong
opinions, likes and dislikes ; ; absolutely honest and with an mika
ing will he loved his friends and hated his foes; his administration
was a'strong one and by its firmness made the country respected
abroad; but it was filled with political quarrels and party strifes ;
_ people in office who opposed the president were ruthlessly turned
out to make room for his friends and supporters im a New York
senator, defending the president's system
of removals made the insolent announce- ©
ment that has since grown famous: “ to
the victor belong the spoils.” In the
forty years between Washington and Jack- _
son there had been but seventy-four re-
movals from office; during the first year
of Jackson’s administration two thousand
office holders were “turned out” to make |
room for the president’s “supporters.”

For years the money that belonged to
the United States had been deposited in mae was Goan as the
United States Bank. President Jackson believed that this was not
so beneficial to the people as if the money was scattered around
among the banks in the different States. So he made war on the
United States Bank and finally destroyed it.

Jackson also objected strongly to the “American system,” of
which I told you in the last chapter. The Government, he said,
had no right to tax the people for making roads, digging canals and
dredging descborss So he declared war on “ internal improvements”
and again came out victorious.

_ Jackson, too, believed in the government of the United States.
It was, he claimed, the one authority to which all the States must




slavallin

Schookrnat






184



ANDREW JACKSON.

Seventh president of the United States.

sive obedience. Some of the Southern. leaders, especially John C.
Calhoun of South Carolina, believed that the States were superior to.
the general government and were at liberty to stay in the Union or
go out of it as they chose. He believed, also, that if Congress
made a law that was objectionable to any State, that State had the
right to refuse to obey it; in other words, it could “ nullify” or


CHANGING DAYS. 185

make of no avail an act of Congress. In 1832, South Carolina took —
this step, declaring the tariff law of Congress “ null and void” and
prepared to resist its enforcement. President Jackson acted
-promptly.* He warned South Carolina that she must obey the law ;
he prepared to force the State to submit and he would certainly ~
_ have done so had not South Carolina yielded to the president.

So many stormy scenes must, of course, have made strong friends
and bitter foes for the stern soldier-president — “ Old Hickory,” his
friends loved to call him. When the time for the new election
came, in 1832, party differences ran hot and high; but Jackson was
too firmly fixed in the hearts of the people, who admire pluck and
courage joined to honesty and firmness, and the president received
two hundred and. nineteen out of the two hundred and eighty-eight
electoral votes and entered upon his second term. But, though ae
feated, the anti-Jackson men clung to their principles. They reaied
themselves Whigs, because the Whigs among their English ances-
tors had been those who resisted tyranny oa they held that Presi-
dent Jackson was a tyrant. So the voters of the land were divided
into Jackson men and anti-Jackson men—into Democrats and
Whigs. The Democrats opposed the United States Bank; the
- Whigs desired its re-establishment. The Democrats opposed taxing
the people for “internal improvements;” the Whigs wished the
government to foster these and pay for them by taxation. The
Democrats were believers in the rights of the States; the Whigs
said the General Government should be the supreme power.

When President Jackson’s second term drew to a close he de-
clined ‘a renomination and retired to his Tennessee farm, the only
president, so it has been said, who “went out of. office far more
popular than he was when he entered.” 2

But if he was popular with the masses, he shad bitter enemies.
The Whigs did their best to elect an anti-Jackson man; but their

* President Tackeon was really a believer in the ‘ States- ene 2 theory but he was president of the whole
Union and was brave enough to do his duty as president.
186 CHANGING DAYS.

councils were divided; different leaders among them had their
strong partisans, and in the confusion into which their stubbornness
threw them they made no nomination and President Jackson’s

_ choice, Martin Van Buren of New York, was elected president, re-
ceiving one hundred and seventy electoral votes. .

Piendene Van Buren had been the strong and unfaltering sup-
porter of Jackson, whose Secretary
of State he had been for two years.
But Jackson’s good fortune did not
follow his successor. The prosperity |
of the country had led people into
unsafe and unwise speculations. Out
of the fight which ended in the over-
throw of the United States bank had
come the formation throughout the

~ country of small and unreliable banks
which lent money and issued. their
own bills, and traded in public lands.
When forced to meet the bills they
had issued they had not gold and
silver enough to pay them and, “ fail-
ing,” let the loss fall on the people.
. These irresponsible institutions were
called “wild-cat banks” and their
methods brought much distress on
the country. - Too late for the pub-
lic safety the Government interfered
and only made things worse by refusing to receive the notes of
any banks. Business was thrown into confusion ; prices fell; crops
were poor; workmen lost their places and, in 1837, came the
crash. “The Panic of 1837,” as this time of disaster was called,
affected the whole country; rich men became poor; bank notes
were good for nothing ; distress and ruin threatened many homes ;



MARTIN VAN BUREN.

Eighth president of the United States.






CHANGING DAYS. 187

the United States government itself suffered in revenue; the State
governments that had been drawn into the trouble “repudiated”
—that is, refused to pay — their debts and every thing was in
confusion.
much discussion the trouble

"was ended by the establish-

ment of what are known
as sub-treasuries in which
the money of the govern-
ment has ever since been
kept above the risk of
bank failures. -

A country with the re-
sources and opportunities
of the United States could
not long be set back by
such a disaster as was the
“panic of °37.” Business
’ was conducted upon a safer
basis, people took up the
work again at bench and
_ plough and desk, resolved
- to deal squarely and honest-
ly with one another ‘and
trade soon revived. .

But President Van Bu-
ren was not forgiven the

disaster that was really no_

fault of his. People, how-



WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON.
Ninth president.of the United States.

ever, are apt to blame the man at the helm when he eee goes
toward the rocks and Van Buren, they’ said, was an unsafe pilot.
At all events a change, they declared, would be a good thing,
and so, in 1840, after a campaign that was full of enthusiasm from








188 . CHANGING DAYS.

one end of the land to the other, General William Henry Harri-
son, the “hero of Tippecanoe,” was elected president. It was a
complete overturn in politics. The Democrats were defeated.
The Whigs secured for their candidate two hundred and thirty-
four out of the two hundred and ninety-four electoral votes and, -
amid the most unbounded rejoicings, William Henry Harrison was®
veo ae inaugurated as the ninth president
Kg’; GG :
\\ — \ of ee United mee |
~ e rejoicing, however, was
short lived. Within a month from

~
his inauguration President Harri-
son died suddenly, and, in accord:
ance with the Constitution, the ©
Vice-President, John Tyler of Vir-
_ ginia, succeeded to the vacant
_chair as president.
. The succession . proved disas-
trous to the Whigs. Tyler was
not in sympathy with the party
that had elected him; he had
been nominated “to draw the
Southern vote” and before he had
been long in office he showed that
ace = his sympathies were really against
JOHN TYLER. : es
Tenth Pra of the United States. : the Whigs. : 7
: oe Politics “tumbled” again. Par- .
ties were divided and the very men who in 1840 had gone about
in procession and parade singing out the party chorus:





“ We'll hurl little Van from his station
And elevate Tippecanoe,”

now were sorry enough at what they had done and were hot and
bitter agairist the president they had placed in power. One of their










é THE SHADOW OF DISCORD. 189

party cries had been “ Tippecanoe and Tyler, too!” They had got
“Tyler, too,” now and still they were not happy.

In 1840 the population of the United States had grown to over
seventeen millions. Two new States, Arkansas and Michigan, had
been admitted to the Union and the “old thirteen” were now
twenty-six. A treaty with Great Britain in 1842 pledged each
country to send back for trial any criminal who had escaped from
justice ; it also settled the northern boundary of the United States,
which in 1839 had almost brought on a war between Maine and
New Brunswick. In 1837 Samuel F. B. Morse took out a patent
for his electric telegraph, and in 1844 the first telegraph line was.
' constructed, connecting Baltimore and Washington.

als ——___

CHAPTER XXI.
THE SHADOW OF DISCORD.

HE greatest man of this nineteenth century — Abraham
Lincoln the American — said, years ago: “I believe this
government. cannot endure permanently half slave and
half free.” What had gone before, what followed later,

SA alike were proofs of this. When Pinzon the Spaniard
eect his negro slaves into Cuba in 1508; when the Dutch sea-
captain ran the first cargo of stolen hee) into the James River

_in 1619; when Eli Whitney made cotton the “king” by his dis-
astrous invention of the cotton-gin in 1793; — and when, on the
other hand, the Pilgrims of the Mayflower landed at Plymouth in
1620; when the Declaration of Independence proclaimed the
eee of all men in 1776; when the stream of emigration bore




190 «
the love of liberty into western wilderness and prairie, the causes
that led to what one statesman declared to be “an irrepressible con-
flict” were established.

When two boys who have been companions and Roeareciends
from infancy “get mad” with one another—as boys (and girls,
too), sometimes will— the trouble grows greater as the cause of
the first pout or the first hasty word is dwelt upon and made to
lead to others. It was so with the two sections of the Ametican
Union. Almost from the start they disagreed as to the extension |
of negro slavery; across that imaginary boundary, which the sur-
-veyors appointed by William Penn and Lord Baltimore drew in
1763, and which has ever since been known as “ Mason and Dixon’s
line,” the pout and shrug and hasty word were flung; the question
as to which had the most “right,” which was “sovereign,” the
State or the nation, was argued, discussed and quarreled over ;
minor questions as to just’ what the constitution meant when it said .
this or that, and numerous differences of opinion on matters of na-
tional or sectional importance caused the boy at the south of Mason
and Dixon’s line to say harsh words:to the boy at the north; and
the boy at the north, though too often willing to “give in” if ea
he could keep on unmolested at his work Oi accumulating, some-
times flung back harsh words in reply to the boy at the south; and

so, little by little, the shadow of discord grew broader and Blacker are

and matters slowly ripened for a real “.getting mad * between these |
two close comrades and fast friends.

In 1844 the United States of America were at peace ah the
world; apparently they were at peace among themselves. With
the ercontion of certain local quarrels such as that in regard to
who should vote in the State of Rhode Island (which led to what is —
known as the “ Dorr Rebellion” of 1844) and as to who should pay
rent for the land in New York (which led to “the Anti-rent War”
of 1844) there was nothing to disturb people or lead their thoughts
away from successful farming or manufacturing. or money-getting.




THE SHADOW OF DISCORD. 191

om Cre But in 1844,.Texas asked to come into the United States; and this
brought about a renewal of the angry talk, while the shadow of

discord grew denser. ~
Texas (from the old Indian word tehas or tejas, “ friends”) was a
‘part of old Mexico.’ But when Mexico revolted from Spanish rule:
and set up asa republic, many Americans, who had settled in its



























ANTI-RENTERS, DISGUISED AS INDIANS, AMBUSHING THE SHERIFI.

northern section; were led into disputes with the new republic as to
the ownership of the land; the Mexican government was unjust’ —
and ugly in its decisions; andthe American element in Northern
Mexico forced that section’ into revolt in 1835. Under the lead of
a gallant fighter, known’as: General Sam Houston, the’ Republic of -






- 192 THE SHADOW OF DISCORD.

Texas was proclaimed. The new republic was a vast territory larger
than all of France, and when in 1844 it expressed a desire to join
the great northern republic as one of the United States the Southern
States rejoiced exceedingly, for this would bring on great increase
of power to the slave States; on the other hand the North opposed
such an action both as giving too much power to the slave States
and as a breach of friendship with Mexico, which had not yet ac-
knowledged the independence of Texas.

But the Southern leaders were determined to fave ‘Texas if they
could. The presidential election of 1844 turned on the question of its
annexation; Henry Clay, the Whig candidate for president, was not
sufficiently emphatic in his objection to the “Texas scheme” to
please a certain section of the anti-slavery men at the North who
called themselves the Liberty party; their hostility lost Clay the
State of New York, and the Democratic candidate, James K. Polk,
was elected president by a vote of one hundred and BOER, of the
two hundred and seventy-five electoral votes.

Of course Texas was annexed; and in December, 1845, she was
admitted to the Union. Florida came in just before her, in March, .
1845, and it so happened that the vast southwestern commonwealth
was the last slave State to be admitted to the Union. For from that
day the shadow of discord grew heavier and blacker.
_ President. Polk’s administration witnessed many signs of prog-
ress inthe land. In 1846, Elias Howe invented the sewing-machine ;
in 1847, Richard M. Hoe invented his cylinder printing press; in
1846, Dr. Morton discovered the use of ether, and thus were house-
hold labor, the spreading of news and the bearing of pain made
lighter and easier.

But the administration of President Polk also plunged the country |
into war. It presented also the example of the strong punishing
' the weak — never a pleasant spectacle and one that is apt to lead to
the question with which so many boys are familiar: “Say, why
don’t you take one of your size?” For in May, 1846, the re-








THE SHADOW OF DISCORD, 3 193

public of the United States declared war against the republic of
Mexico..

To be sure Mexico was ugly and quarrelsome. She held a grudge
against the United States for helping and taking Texas; she owed
American citizens money and refused to pay her debts; she growled
in most emphatic Spanish about the boundary lines the United States
demanded ; she threatened all sorts
of things. But it was largely talk.
Mexico had no wish to fight the
‘United States; she was ready to
consider a peaceful settling of the
matter; but, all too hastily, in April,
1846, President Polk ordered General
Zachary. Taylor to take possession of
the disputed strip of land on the
boundary ; there was a meeting be-
tween American and Mexican sol-
diers; shots were fired; men were.

killed, and the war was begun. .
Tt was not difficult at the outset
-to tell what the end would be.
Mexico was torn by quarrels and
- feuds; her soldiers were untrained ;
her war materials poor; her treas-
ury almost empty; her leaders ig-
norant and inefficient. The United _
States troops were well officered and maneuvered, and though the
Mexican soldiers were brave fighters and repeatedly outnumbered
the Americans— sometimes five to one — the superiority of Ameri-
can drill and American leadership always won the day. From first
to last the war was a series of victories and, though we question the
justice of the quarrel and deplore the quite unnecessary fight, we
cannot but swing our caps over the pluck, the persistence and the



JAMES K. POLK.

Eleventh president of the United States.
194 | THE SHADOW OF: DISCORD.

“-yalor of the American soldiers.and their leaders. In a hostile and
unknown land, against the odds of heavier numbers, stubborn resist-
ance, miserable roads, lack of supplies and an unhealthy country, the
American soldiers fought their way to victory and made the names of
Palo Alto and Buena Vista, of Cerro Gordo and Contreras, of Cheru-
busco and Chapultepec glorious in the annals of bravery, while the
names of such generals as Taylor and Kearney, Scott and Worth do
but lead the roll of the daring and heroic men who ped them |
to the end.
ee the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which aut an end to this two
years’ war, the territory of the United States was greatly increased.
' The immense section now occupied by Texas, New Mexico, Arizona,
- Colorado, Utah, Nevada and California, nearly a million square miles
in extent, was added to the republic; fifteen millions of dollars were
paid to Mexico for the territory thus given up; peace was declared
and the victorious Americans returned to their homes in the North.’
But if the war had been an. unjust one on the part of the United
States, it brought about trouble enough in the end and deepened
the shadow of discord into a dense and overhanging cloud. At
once, after the new territory had been secured, the South demanded
that it be made slave soil; the North as strongly objected and de-
manded that slavery should be therein forbidden. Again it looked »
as if the boy at the south and the boy at the north of Mason and
Dixon’s line would come to blows; but they decided finally to leave
the question to those who should settle on the new lands, and thus
an uncertain condition of affairs was brought about. This, because
it was in the hands of those who. hurriedly settled (or “squatted ”),
on the vacant lands, was known as “squatter Sere and the
black looks across the line still continued. .
In 1848, General Zachary Taylor, “the hero of Buena Vista,” was
elected president of the United States. There was a feeling through-
out the country that “old Rough and Ready,” as he was called, had
- not been well-treated by the Government during the war, and the




ee













AT BUENA VISTA.

“ The American soldiers fought their way to victory.”







THE SHADOW OF DISCORD. 197

opponents of the party in power eagerly took him as their candidate.
The result was a victory for the Whigs, but their soldier-president
did not long survive his last victory, for he died after only a year

and four months of office.

succeeded to the vacant
chair and found himself
confronted by important
questions.

In 1846, the long-stand-
ing dispute with England
as to the northern boundary
of the United States ended
in a treaty which gave to
the United States all the

country south of that de-

_gree of latitude marked on
the maps as forty-nine.
The United States held out
some time for possession as
far as fifty-four degrees and
forty minutes north lati-
tude, and some were even
ready to go to war over
it, with their battle-cry
of “Fifty-four Forty or

Fight!” but better councils

prevailed and the’ treaty
of 1844 settled the dispute.
The United States. now

The vice-president, Millard Fillmore,



ZACHARY TAYLOR.

Twelfth president of the United States.

owned the Pacific coast from the head of the Gulf of California to

the shores of Puget Sound.

It was a noble empire, but little was

known of it in the East, save as the land of Indians, fur-traders
and cattle-raisers. But suddenly, in 1849, came the news: “ There




Thirteenth PE CseA EE of the United States.

198 THE SHADOW OF DISCORD.

is gold in California!” The precious metal had been discovered in
the Sacramento River country ; it was said that no such gold mines had
ever before been found and at once there was a great rush to “ the
diggings.” tne news se the “finds ’ proved richer and richer ;
the rush to the Pacific broke into a
regular “gold fever” that attacked
the world; allclasses caughtit; around
“the Horn,” across the isthmus, over
the plains the gold seekers hurried,
and into the old half-Spanish quiet
-of California carne the excitement,
the fever, the haste, the selfishness, .
the greed and the danger that always
accompany the mad race for wealth.
Within two years a hundred thou-
sand people had gone into California ;
“San Francisco grew into a city af
twenty thousand inhabitants and, wher-
ever gold was found, there men risked
all for fortune ; but while some ob-
tained the prize they sought, many
others found only failure, loss, ruin
and death.
But the majority of the gold hunters
of °49, though absorbed in their

MILLARD FILLMORE.

search for neue were still Americans; they soon realized the

need of a strong government and some Higher authority than the
self-appointed “committees” of cabin, camp and settlement. In ©

1849, they set up a state government of their own and asked for

admittance into the Union. Then there was trouble at once. The
constitution of the newly-formed State prohibited slavery; part.of
its territory lay south of the line marked out at the time of the
Missouri. Compromise, and the South demanded that slavery be —
THE SHADOW OF DISCORD. 199

allowed in the new State. Other troubles arose. Texas claimed a
part of New Mexico, which had been ceded to the United States;
the South demanded that its runaway slaves who escaped to the
North should be returned to their masters; the North demanded
that the buying and selling of negro slaves in the capital of the
nation be stopped.

So the shadow was growing denser, when Henry Clay endeavored
to suggest a “compromise” that should “fix things” all right.
This was called the “ Omnibus Bill”
or the “Compromise of 1850,’ be-
cause it undertook to settle all the
disputes, and to hold, as does an omni-
bus, all that can be crowded into it.
By this compromise it was agreed to
admit California into the Union with-.
out slavery; the buying and sell-
ing of slaves were to be prohibited
i. the District. of Columbia, but
slavery itself was not. prohibited
there; ten million dollars were paid
Texas to give up her claim to New
Mexico; in the territories formed of
the new lands slavery was neither
forbidden nor allowed, anda Fugitive
‘Slave Law was passed.

But the “ Compromise of 1850” did
not settle things. There was, es- Sad Cami ae
pecially, a fierce opposition to the Fourteenth president of the United States.
Fugitive Slave Law which made the United States officers slave-
catchers. But when the election of 1852 came around the opposition
. was divided. The Southern Whigs and the Northern Whigs had a
falling out; the Liberty party now calling itself the Free-soil party,
denounced the Fugitive Slave Law; a good many men refused to


200 THE SHADOW OF DISCORD.

vote at all because they did not like any of the things offered
them, and Franklin Pierce, the Democratic candidate, was elected
president with two hundred and fifty-four electoral votes.
Then came four years more of talk and trouble. Anti-slavery
feeling grew in the North; the boastings about the supreme rights
of the States increased in the South. In 1854 the new territories
of Kansas and Nebraska, west of
the Missouri River, were set apart,
and the question of the admission of
slavery therein was left to the de-
cision of the settlers themselves—
a case-of “squatter sovereignty”
again.

When this measure, known, as
the Kansas-Nebraska Bill, was in-
troduced into Congress, there was
a great stir. By the Missouri Com-
promise of 1820 which, you remem-
ber, prohibited slavery north of the

new territories by right were to be
forever “free soil.” But the leaders
of the majority in, Congress, to gain
TRUMAN their purpose, voted to repeal the
Fifteenth president of the United States. Missouri Compromise and to let the
people who entered the new terri-

tory make it slave or free as they preferred.

This led to a terrible time. People poured into the new territo-
ries. The free-state people and the slave-state people alike sought —
to obtain the mastery; there were mobs and fightings and feuds of
the most bitter and bloody kind. But the free-soil people at last
prevailed and in the pete heat of the struggle came the election
of 1856.



southern boundary of Missouri, the -


THE SHADOW OF DISCORD. 201

‘By this time the Whig party was broken in pieces. Out of it

_ came those who opposed the stupid repeal of the Missouri Compro-

mise, who objected to the Fugitive Slave Law and who sided with
the free-state people in the Kansas trouble. These joined with the
Free-soil party and formed what has ever since been known as the
Republican party. They selected as their candidate for president,
Colonel John C. Frémont, “the Pathfinder,” who had blazed a path
across the Rocky Mountains, conquered California and led the way
westward for settlement and civilization. The Democrats nominated
James Buchanan of Pennsylvania who had been President Polk’s
Secretary of State; while a third party, which opposed giving place
or office to foreigners, and which was called the American or “ Know
Nothing” party re-nominated President Fillmore. The struggle
was bitter; but Buchanan was.elected president by one hundred
and seventy-four of the two hundred and ninety-six electoral votes.
Frémont, however, carried nearly all the free States with an electoral
vote of one hundred and fourteen, and when the South saw this
sure and steady growth of anti-slavery feeling, her leaders realized
that their power was slipping away and the shadow of discord, now
grown into the blackest of eS seemed ready to burst upon the
heads of the people.










202 FOR UNION.

CHAPTER XXII.
‘FOR aOR

N 1860, in spite of the increasing danger of their political -
troubles, the United States of America were wonderfully
prosperous. Population had grown to more. than: thirty-
: | one millions; the roll of States now numbered thirty-three -
Z= 7} —Jowa having been admitted to the Union in’1846, Wis-
consin in 1848, California in 1850, Minnesota in 1858 and Oregon
in 1859; there were over thirty thousand miles of railroad in. opera-
tion ‘and thousands. of miles of telegraph; American commerce
occupied the second place in the world; American agriculture stood
first; coal and gold, silver and copper were dis- °
covered in productive mines, and in Penn-
sylvania the finding of petroleum beds in 1859,.
led to almost as much excitement as the dis- _
covery of gold in California ten years before.
The public schools now numbered over a hun-
dred thousand, while four hundred. colleges
cared for the advanced education of the young.
Machinery was finding entrance into almost
every occupation of life, from farming to shoe
making and sugar refining; the cities were
improving alike in: size and in comforts ; the
police and fire departments were organized into
_ almost military discipline; the laying of a tel-
egraph line beneath the-ocean to England was
attempted in 1857, and the United States were believed to be worth
in property and money fully sixteen billions of dollars.



+ ae
FOR UNION. 203

But money is not everything in the upbuilding of a nation.
Principle and character.are of first importance. Beneath all this
prosperity were dissatisfaction and discord. The advance in wealth
and facilities had been confined to the North; in this great pros-
perity the South did not seem to be asharer. A few.wise ones at
the South saw that this condition was due to slavery; but the
people. had not yet learned that slave labor can never build a suc-
cessful State, and they tried all the harder to win in a losing fight.

'



DINAH MORRIS’S CERTIFICATE OF FREEDOM.

In the North since first in 1777, Dinah Morris, the Vermont slave,
was given her “freedom papers,” slavery had dwindled and died
away; in the South it had grown steadily. In the North everybody
had. to work to live; in the South work was considered as “low ;”
and so there came to be, at the South, three classes —the rich
whites, the poor whites and the negro slaves.

The free States were growing in the. North; there was but little
204 _ FOR UNION.

- chance for the introduction of slavery in the new Territories ; the
plan to purchase Cuba had fallen through ; the slave power in Congress
was fast being outnumbered by the free-soil supporters; the three
hundred and fifty thousand slaveholders of the South saw that they
would soon be no match in politics or power for the freeholders of
the North; soon the South must submit to the will of the majority.

Feeling as they did; believing, as they had always been taught to
believe, in the supreme right of the State to say what it wanted and
what it would have; seeing the power slipping away from them and
thinking that without slave labor ruin was certain to come upon them,
it is scarcely to be wondered at that the leaders in the South tried
first to force things in their favor, and, failing in this, threatened to
withdraw from ane Union whenever they saw fit.

For years their hold upon the Government, aided by ite selfish
desire of people in the North to avoid all trouble and annoyance had
given the Southern leaders “the say” in national affairs. It was
these leaders who had brought about the purchase of the vast.
territory of Louisiana in 1803; they had insisted on the slavery .
line in the Missouri Compromise in 1820; they had. demanded the
annexation of Texas in 1845; they had put into effect the cruel
Fugitive Slave Law of 1850; they had forced the unwilling and
fatal “ squatter sovereignty ” clause into the Kansas-Nebraska, bill of
1854; they had attempted to bring about the acquisition of Cuba in
1854; they had forced from the Supreme Court the decision that it
was the duty of Congress to protect slavery in the territories (known
as the “Dred Scott Decision” of 1856); they had sought, as a.
desperate measure of safety, to reintroduce the horrible African
Slave Trade in 1859, and, as a final move, they had asserted in 1860
their determination to leave the Union — to “ secede ” — unless
they obtained their “ rights.”

But the leaders of the North were growing each year more and
more determined. To be sure the people did not pay very much
attention to all this talk; they were too busy about their own


FOR UNION.

bo
&
or

affairs. But those who did look into things declared that it was time
to put an end to Southern presumption. To the Southern leaders
they said: You can regulate the slave question so far as your own
section is concerned, but you must not try to force the North and
West into slavery. You have broken the agreement of 1820,



AMONG THE SUGAR CANE.

known as the Missouri Compromise, but we will make Kansas a
free State in spite of you; you have compelled the courts to say
that Congress must protect slavery in the territories, but this we
will never consent to; you have shown a desire to make slavery
a national anon but that you shall never do; and we warn
you that the Constitution does not admit the right of any State to
206 FOR UNION.

say just what it shall do or how it shall act, and that no State
has a right to leave the Union of its own accord.

The breach was widening. The United States of America were
_ becoming sectional — that is, slavery, believed in by the South, ab-
horred by the North, was setting North and South at enmity. To-
day slavery is dead, and North and South can never again be arrayed
against one another; but in 1860 slavery tinged everything. The
love of it led to the brutal assault upon Senator Charles Sumner of
Massachusetts and beat him from his chair in the Senate in 1856;
the hatred of it led to the armed attack in Virginia in 1859 precipitated
by a free-soil partisan and known as “John Brown’s raid,” and both
the attack on Sumner and the “raid ” of John Brown, though both
were the result of a fiery fanaticism and though neither of them
were due to the plottings of rival parties, were still fastened upon
the sections from which the actors came, and increased the eroniny
anger that was showing itself North and South.

It was in the midst of this growing discord that the presidential
election of 1860 came as, what we call, the climax. The Democratic
party split in two and made separate nominations; the Republican
party raised the cry of “ No extension of slavery!” and by a total
of one hundred and eighty electoral votes carried the day, and
Abraham Lincoln of Illinois was elected president.

The hottest and most determined of the Southern States was
South Carolina. From the days of President Andrew Jackson and
the “ Nullifiers,” it had always maintained its right to leave the
Union, and the election of Lincoln gave it the opportunity it sought.
A Northern president, backed by the Northern people, means the
downfall of the South, said South Carolina. I shallleave the Union,
and you, my comrades of the Cotton States, if you know what is best
for you, will go out too.

The State Converition of South Carolina at once assembled and a
the twentieth of December, 1860, passed an “ ordinance of secession,”
wiped out the act by which the State had so many years before de-
FOR UNION. 207

clared its acceptance of the Constitution of the United States, and —
declared that “the Union now subsisting between South Carolina
and other States, under the name of the United States of America”
was dissolved.

Led on by the bold step of South Carolina the other “ Cotton
States” followed suit, and in January and February, 1861, similar
ordinances of secession were passed by Mississippi, Florida, Alabama,
Georgia, Louisiana and Texas.

Acting quickly, the secession element in the seven rebellious

- States at once proceeded to “ force the issue.”” They sent delegates
to.a general convention held at Montgomery in
Alabama, set up a government under the name

of the Confederate States of America, adopted
a constitution (that was almost exactly the same
as the Constitution of the United States, with
slavery and State sovereignty added), elected
Jefferson Davis as president, established “ depart-
ments” of state, war, the treasury, the navy,
etc., decided upon a great seal and flag (popu-
larly called the “stars and bars,” as against the
“stars and stripes”), and prepared to defend
their action by war if need be. But, they all
declared, that will scarcely be necessary ; the North will not fight.

And, at first, it did look as though the North would not fight.
President Buchanan did nothing ; he said he did not see how he could

§ prevent a State from seceding if it really desired or attempted to ;
the politicians said: O, the trouble will be fixed up with another
compromise ; the chief associates of the president were really in
sympathy with the secessionists, and when Congress adjourned in
March, 1861, no step had been taken to secure the protection or
uphold the dignity of the United States of America.

Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as president of the United
States on the fourth of March, 1861. At once he found himself



GREAT SHAL OF THE ‘ CON-
FEDERACY.”
208 FOR UNION.

face to face with the greatest difficulties. He was the head of a
new party, without experience and without standing. He was con-
fronted by seven States in open rebellion to the constituted authority

of the National Government. The men from whose hands he ©

received ‘the reins of power were hostile to his party and his prin-

ciples and had helped rather than hindered the eftorts of the

.“State’s Rights rebels.” Forts, arsenals, mints, custom houses,
ship yards, naval stores and other public properties of the United
States had been deliberately seized by the States within whose borders
they were located, and transferred to the new “Confederate”
government. The little army of the United States had been
scattered and forced to surrender to the rebels. Officers of the army

and navy, representatives and senators in Congress and officials in —

the service and pay of the United States, declared that they must
“follow their State,” resigned their stations or offices and went to
their homes. In the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina, Fort
Sumter, one of the very few forts still held by the United States
troops, was surrounded and besieged by the South Carolina forces,
and, of the navy of the United States, only two insignificant vessels
were ready for service along the whole Atlantic coast. To such a

pass had Southern scheming and the sympathy or stupidity of the

party in power brought the dignity and the ability of the United
States.

Abraham Lincoln was tracted and far-sighted. He felt that.

the new administration stood on dangerous word ~ One hasty
move, one tyrannical act might turn the tide against the Union —
and with him the preservation of the Union was the leading desire.

His inaugural address, now held by critics to be one of the great-
est state papers in history, while full of the hope of peace, was still
firm and unfaltering in its purpose to maintain the Union; whatever
happened.

“The Union is eae he said; “ and to ihe extent of my

ability I shall take care, as the Concatuion itself expressly enjoins


















ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Stateenth president of the United States.

FOR UNION. 211

upon me, that the laws of the Union be faithfully executed in all
the States.” And then, placing the responsibility where it rightly
belonged — upon those who struck the first blow —he said: “In
your hands, my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is
the momentous issue of civil war. You can have no conflict without
being yourselves the aggressors.. You have no oath registered in
heaven to destroy the Government, while I have the most solemn
one to preserve, protect and defend it.”

There is an old, old proverb that declares: Whom the gods would
destroy they first make mad. The destruction of slavery was
ordained; but its supporters were surely mad-
dened and blinded by passion or they would
have heeded, before it was too late, the tender
appeal to their memories with which this first
inaugural of President Lincoln concluded: “ We
are not enemies,” he said, “but friends. We
must not be enemies. Though passion may
have strained, it must not break our bonds of
affection. The mystic cordsof memory, stretch-
ing from every battle-field and patriot grave .
to every living heart and hearthstone all over
this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of
the Union when ea touched, as surely they will be, by the better
angels of our nature.”

But kind words and Paes appeals were of no avail. The
leaders of the South were determined. And when, in April, President
Lincoln ordered a fleet to sail to Charleston with supplies to the
starving garrison of Fort Sumter, the fiery cry for action came from
the chiefs of the rebellion. “You must sprinkle blood in the face
of the people!” one of them declared. South Carolina, as she had
led the revolt, fired the first shot. On the twelfth of April, 1861,
the Confederate batteries in Charleston Harbor opened fire upon
Fort Sumter which, for thirty-six hours, the commandant, Major



SEAL OF THE UNITED STATES.
Die of 1886.
212 _ FOR UNION.

‘Robert Anderson, held inthe face of a fierce bombardment. Then
with ammunition exhausted, provisions gone and the building on fire,
Major Anderson surrendered. The flag of the Union gave place to °
the flag of rebellion and the first victory of secession was won. _
But it was a victory that proved defeat. The South had struck
the first blow and that settled the question in the North. The word
“Sumter has been fired on,” flew from city to city and from town





























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































FORT SUMTER IN CHARLESTON HARBOR.

to town. There was but one response: The Union shall be
preserved! The North which—so the Southern leaders had de-
clared— would be torn and rent by feud and dispute if civil .
war was threatened, became, instead, united in an instant. Men
who had bitterly opposed one another in politics now joined
hands in defense of an imperiled Union.. From school-house and
‘court-house, from church and railway station, from hotel, from


A FIGHT FOR LIFE. 213

public building and from private house, the flag of the Union
was flung to the breeze; and when, the day after Sumter, Presi-
dent Lincoln declared the Southern States in rebellion, and called

_gfor volunteers to put it touey the struggle for life or death was
t rat hand.

CHAPTER XXIII.
A FIGHT FOR LIFE.

{HAT shot at Sumter, as has been shown, roused the North
to action. “Why, this is open rebellion!” everybody
cried, and at once without regard to party the men of the
North — Republicans and Democrats alike — sprang to
se 24 arms. President Lincoln, on the fifteenth of April, called
Fg seventy-five thousand men “to put down the rebellion” ; four
times as many responded; militia regiments hur-
ried to the defense of Washington ; old soldiers Bk G aS \
‘who had seen service were in demand as officers ; Ye es Pe FENG
" money for war purposes was voted i HG

by States and cities; the “ war gover- is eG
nors” were patriotic, active and alert ; FEN
new regiments were speedily formed
or “recruited”. in every Northern State,
and though the city of Washington lay
on the border of the Southern land it
was soon so circled with Union troops
that its safety was epoca assured.

But the “ war-fever” was not confined





214 A FIGHT FOR LIFE.

to the North. The conflict was to be a struggle between Ameri-
can citizens; and when once the American spirit of resistance
is aroused, enthusiasm and determination know no section. The
South, led into war by the efforts of its leaders, was bound to follow
the lead of South Carolina. The attack on Sumter and the rising in
the North were followed by quite as much ex-
citement and enthusiasm in the South; one
after another the seceding States wheeled. into
line; the Confederate Government called for
thirty-five thousand volunteers, and, as in the |
North, four times as many offered their services.
Men enlist to fight for various reasons. Love
of excitement, hope of reward, desire for glory,
love of country — these are the principal causes,
and in the war between the States, from 1861 -
to 1865, these reasons led many young men
to nage their comfortable homes, their studies, their occupations,
their pleasures and their gains, and with sword at side or gun at
shoulder to march South or North to fight for a principle dear
alike to each.

From the attack on Sumter on the twelfth of April, 1861, and the
first blood at Baltimore on the nineteenth of April following, down
to the surrender of General Lee, the chief of the Confederate forces,
on the ninth of April, 1865 — almost four years to a day —the
fight for life, for Union, for supremacy, went fiercely on. All too
soon the people, North and South, awoke to the sad truth that this
was an American war—a “duel to the death,” a strife between
equally brave and equally determined foemen. The seventy-five
thousand volunteers first called for in the North grew to an army
of three million men before the end came; the thirty-five thousand
volunteers of the South grew to a million and a half. In 1863
when the strife was at its height and the struggle was the fiercest,
the North had nearly a million men in the field; the South had -


A FIGHT FOR LIFE. : 215

seven hundred thousand. The North, as the defenders of the
Union, operating in a hostile country, had need for a larger force
than the South; conquered territory must be garrisoned; lines
of communication needed to be kept open and defended, and a
stretch of battle front reaching from the. Mississippi to the sea de-
manded constant watching to prevent invasion, raid or occupation.

ap ll : Li

a



























IN THE ENLISTMENT OFFICE.

Steadily, year by year, the power of the Union was more and
more displayed. The South fought bravely, stubbornly, heroically,
but from the first the result of the struggle could be foreseen. The
North had the stronger arm and this at last must win the day. But

rh
216 so 4 RIGHT FOR LIFE.

when that day came the cost of the fearful fight had been six hun-
dred thousand Northern and Southern lives laid down for a principle
and six thousand millions of dollars spent. This it had cost to destroy _
the doctrine of the sovereign power of the State as opposed to the
supremacy of the nation, to do away forever with slavery on Ameri-
can soil and to make of the United States a real nation; this it had
cost to make the republic a unit, to secure perpetual peace and a
lasting union to all Americans forever.

The war was a stubborn strife, not because of any hatred between
North and South —for this there really was not — but because of
the determination of both contesting sides to win. From 1861 to
1863 the government at Washington was busied in surrounding the
confederacy in its encircling grasp; from 1863 to 1865 this grasp
was gradually closed and tightened until it held within it the armies
and the cities of the South. The battle of Gettysburg in the Hast
and the capture of Vicksburg in the West, on or about the fourth of
July, 1863, marked the turning point of the war. |

Even in the first year of the war, although the Union army lost
its first great battle (Bull Run, July 21, 1861), and in the West found
_ itself defeated at Wilson’s Creek (August 10, 1861), it still advanced
its lines into the southern territory and narrowed the limits of
the Confederacy. In the second year, still more territory was cap-
tured ; but, within its lessening territory, the Confederate army stood —
firm and confident, undismayed by its defeat at Antietam in the
East (September 17, 1862) and Pittsburgh Landing in the West
(April 7, 1862). In the third year both sides being now trained to
war, clinched for a decisive grapple. General Lee and his splen-
didly disciplined army in the East made a wonderful attempt to
break through the Union lines and invade the North, but fell back,
baffled and defeated, at Gettysburg (July 3, 1863). Lookout Moun-
tain gave the victory to the Union army in the West, and the
grapple of 1863 ended in a loss of strength and confidence for the
South. In the fourth year the fight raged about Richmond, now



















A FIGHT FOR LIFE. 219

the Confederate capital, where Lee, proving himself a great soldier,
was at last pitted against a greater —General U. 8. Grant. There
it became the fight of the giants, while at the West General Sher-
man utterly crushed out the Confederate army and making his bold
and remarkable “march to the sea,” hurried northward to give his
help to Grant. In the fifth year the Union grasp tightened; the
forces of the Confederacy lay now within the hand of the Federal
government; its territory had shrunk to thie narrow sea strip be-
tween Richmond and Charleston ; Sherman drew nearer to Grant; in
April the end came; the grasp closed around the encircled Confed-
erates and the surrender of General Lee on the ninth of April, 1865,
with the consequent surrender of General Johnston on April 26
closed the stubborn strife, and ended the possibility of Americans
ever again meeting in the shock and struggle of civil war.

The war between the States had been fought for a principle, and
by its results that principle was forever assured— the Union was
established, the nation was supreme. “My paramount object,” said
President Lincoln, “is: to save the Union.” He did save it; and
Americans can never cease to revere the unfaltering faith in his
cause that sustained the great president, nor need they ever regret
the cost in blood and treasure at which the American Union was
saved from destruction. ;

But the war settled other questions than that of national suprem-
acy. Especially did it end forever on American soil the curse of
human slavery. From the first, men saw — more and more clearly
as the days went by —that slavery was doomed. The war was not
fought to abolish slavery, but slavery was abolished because of the
war. The conflict, however, had been raging a year and a, half;
twenty thousand men had laid down their lives; eighty thousand
had been maimed or crippled in battle and many other thousands had
been stricken down by sickness and disease before the stern necessity
that men knew existed but that the Government hesitated to ac-
knowledge was made into an absolute deed—emancipation. But
220 A FIGHT FOR LIFE.

the step was taken at last. Five days after the battle of Antietam

—on the twenty-second of September, 1862 — President Lincoln

made the greatest move of the war and issued a proclamation de-

claring that on and after the first day of January, 1863, “all persons
held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State the
- people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States
shall be thenceforward and forever free.” On the first of January,

1863, the official proclamation of emancipation was issued. “ And
thus,” says Mr. Schurz, “Abraham
Lincoln wrote his name upon the
books of history with the title dearest
to ‘his heart—the liberator of the
slave.”

Fighting is a bloody and brutal ex-
pedient— a course always to be avoided
if in justice and honor it can be
avoided. But when war comes it must.
be made effective by every possible
means. The abolition of slavery was
one of these means; the abolition of
wooden war-ships was another. The
_ war led thinking people to suggest and

invent many improvements in firearms, camp equipage and the mu-
nitions of war, but the cunning brain of Captain John Ericsson revo-
lutionized the navies of the world and showed that iron could float
and fight on the water. The story of his little ironclad vessel, the
’ Monitor, is as simple as it is stirring. The Confederates had taken
the captured frigate, Merrimac, fitted her with an iron overcoat and
sent her to destroy the Union war-ships around Fortress Monroe.
This she did and was about starting out on a voyage of destruction
among the sea-coast cities of the North, when on the morning of the
ninth of March, 1862, the little Monitor (“a cheese-box on a raft,” :
so the Confederates called her ), appeared on the scene, fought the






































































A FIGHT FOR LIFE. 221

Merrimac for four hours and drove her back to cover. From that
day wooden war-vessels were doomed. Ironclads were built by all
the nations as the only safe and sure kind of sea-fighters; and “ the
white squadron” of 1891 is the natural result in the navy of the
United States of Ericsson’s plucky little Monitor.

The war, though terrible and bloody, really helped to make men
and women gentler and more thoughtful. It taught the people to
look after those who were fighting their battles for them. Societies
were formed for the careful protection of the soldiers’ interests: to
help them as they marched to battle, to help them as they lived in
camp, to help them as they fell wounded on the field, to help them
as they lay sick or maimed in hospital, to help them as they returned
disabled to their homes. The greatest of |
the societies, the United States Sanitary
Commission, expended millions of dollars

_ in thus helping the soldiers. And, last
but not least, the humanity that was a —
result of this long and bitter war was one
of its most blessed influences. The war
was in fact an armed rebellion against
national authority. Such uprisings, before
and since, have always, when unsuccessful,
been attended by punishment for treason
inflicted by the victorious government.
The American civil war resulted in the
triumph of the national government, and
yet not one “rebel” was punished for
his treason; not one of the leaders of
the revolt was made to suffer the historic penalty of his action.

The war had been in progress for more than three years when in
November, 1864, a presidential election was held. The minority
party — those timid Northerners who declared that the war was a
failure and ought to cease — rallying under the Democratic banner,



WORKING FOR THI SOLDIERS,

}
222 A FIGHT FOR LIFE.

nominated for president, General George B. McClellan, one of the
brilliant but unsuccessful Union generals — a remarkable organizer
of forces, but not a successful leader of troops; the Republicans
(including very many “war Democrats” ) re-nominated Abraham
Lincoln, and the result proved their wisdom. Mr. Lincoln was re-
elected by two hundred
and twelve out of the two
hundred and thirty-three
electoral votes and, under
his guidance, the war was
fought out to the end that
was, even then, in sight.
But, when that end
came, the great president,
through whose wisdom
and patience it had been
reached, fell suddenly —
the chief martyr of the
great conflict, done to
death by the bullet of
_ | .an obscure assassin, from
an - no other reason than a
eS desire for that notoriety
that Americans, it is
hoped, will never grant. Abraham Lincoln may well be called
the great American. Springing from the people, reared in poverty,
struggling against hardship, attractive neither in form nor feature,
with everything against him, he yet conquered ey, obstacle and —
rose from the obscurity of a backwoods “ railsplitter” to be presi-
dent of the United States, preserver and savior of the Union and
the greatest, the best and the most honored of modern Americans.



eS = a <6
he}; 1 ae ie wo Scere
A nayeauttth Bre sidentyLtne




A REUNITED NATION. 223

“CHAPTER XXIV.
A REUNITED NATION.

BRAHAM LINCOLN died on the fifteenth of April, 1864.

Amid the tremendous excitement that followed the intelli-
gence of the dastardly deed and aroused all the vindictive
passions of startled men and women, Andrew Johnson of

ta Tennessee, elected as vice-president, took the oath of office
cn became president of the United States.

The war was over. The veteran soldiers of Generals Grant and
Sherman marched in final review before
the officers of the government they had
saved. The tattered armies of the Con-
federacy, surrendering to foemen who
worked in the spirit of the dead presi-
dent’s grandest words: “With malice
toward none, with charity for all,” re-
turned to their homes, and two million
Northern and Southern fighters became
again law-abiding citizens, honest, hard-
working, ambitious Americans.

The war was over; but now came
the hardest part of the work — to reunite
and put into running order the affairs
of the whole nation. The seceding
States had seen fit, solemnly and offici-
ally, to break away from their consti-
tutional associations and “go out” of
the Union. Now they must come back. OUR AI




224 A REUNITED NATION,

But how? It was a question to puzzle the clearest mind; it led
to grave and conflicting actions in the White House and the Capitol.
President Johnson was an honest but obstinate man. He was a
Unionist and a War Democrat., But he also believed in certain
rights of the States and was unwilling that the seceded States should
be “kept out” of the Union. He said: “They are all in the Union,
rebel and Unionist alike.” But

Congress decreed otherwise..

When the war began the North
held that no State could break up
the Union and that those that had
withdrawn must be forced to come
back without any change of con-
ditions. But the war had destroyed
slavery. The Thirteenth Amend-
ment to the Constitution of. the
United States forever abolishing
slavery had been accepted by three
fourths of all the States, and was
declared a part of the Constitution
in December, 1865. Nearly four
millions of negroes (“freedmen,”
as they were called) were emanci-
pated by this Amendment. If the
States came back again they must
accept this change in the Constitu-
tion. It was clear that the Governments of the seceding States must,
to a certain extent, be made over again — that is, “ reconstructed.”

And so the six or seven years succeeding the war are known as.
years of reconstruction. Almost from the start there had been a
disagreement as to methods between President Johnson and Congress.
Of course the return of peace found things in a very confused con-
dition in the South. The leading men of the Southern States had



ANDREW JOHNSON.
Seventeenth president of the United States.


A REUNITED NATION. 225

been in rebellion against the National Government, and Congress
did not propose to at once allow them a voice in the direction of
affairs ; the relations between the black people and the white were
full of uncertainty and trouble and the unsettled state of certain
sections of the southern country led to all sorts of disturbances and
worries. President Johnson, it seemed to the Republican Congress,



>

THE CAPITOL OF THE UNITED STATES.

was too ready to take the side of the white people of, the South,
who had not yet shown themselves repentant for their part in the
war; and Congress, so it seemed to President Johnson, was bent on
keeping the former leaders of the South out of power and giving
too much “protection” to the ignorant freedmen. There was
226 A REUNITED NATION.



ULYSSES SIMPSON GRANT.

Eighteenth president of the United States.

justice on both sides, but this always makes a dispute all the more
bitter and so there was a fierce quarrel between the President and
Congress which led at last to the impeachment of President Johnson
when, in 1867, he disobeyed one of the orders of Congress. This
“impeachment”’ declared that the President was guilty of disobey-
ing the laws. He was tried by the Senate, according to the direction
A REUNITED NATION. 227

of the Constitution, but in order to remove him from office, it re-
quired that two thirds of the senators should vote that he was ¢ guilty.
The vote stood: “Guilty” — thirty-five; “Not guilty” — nineteen.
This was not a two thirds vote and the President was acquitted.

In the midst of this “reconstruction” trouble and when all the
States, excepting Virginia, Mississippi and Texas, had (on their
acceptance of the conditions imposed by Congress) been restored
to their old place in the Union, President Johnson’s term of office
expired. It had been a stormy time, but even through all the dif-
ferences of opinion, the people of the North and South were coming
nearer together, though yet sore and stubborn over many things.

The result of the Presidential election of 1868 endorsed the
position taken by the Republican Congress. The most popular man
in the country was selected as candidate by the Republicans. His
success was assured from the start, and General U. 8. Grant, the
invincible leader of the Union armies, was elected president by
two hundred and fourteen out of the
two hundred and ninety-four electoral
votes.

Little by little affairs improved i in
the South. The Fourteenth Amend-
ment to the Constitution which decreed
“equal rights” to all men— white
and black — and the Fifteenth Amend-
ment, which decreed universal suffrage
to all, were accepted, or ratified, by
- three fourths of the States ; and though
at first the results were full of danger
in the South where unprincipled white
men sought to use to their own in-
terest the new voting power that had been given to the negroes,
this evil in time righted itself, and year by year the scars of war
were ee in the South; the spirit of progress entered in and



OLD FRENCH MARKET, NEW ORLEANS.
228 _ A REUNITED NATION.

the “carpet bagger” and the “scalawag,” the “Ku-Klux Klan”

and the other violent elements in Southern society gave place to
quiet, prosperous and loyal Americans.

But the real and final end

to al these troubles did not come for years.

RUTHERFORD BIRCHARD HAYES.

Nineteenth president af the United States.





In 1872 the presidential
election still turned upon
Southern affairs; some
even of the Republicans
were dissatisfied with the
course of their representa-
tives in Congress and, join-
ing with the Democrats,
nominated for president
an old-time anti-slavery
Republican and the great-
est of American newspaper

editors, Horace Greeley of
New York. But the bulk

of the Republican party
remained loyal to Con-
gress; the Democrats, as
a mass, could not bring
themselves to support their
old antagonist, Greeley ;
many of them abstained
from voting and President
Grant, who had been re-
nominated by the Repub-
licans, was triumphantly

re-elected by two hundred and eighty-six of the three hundred

and sixty-six electoral votes.

By this time the Southern States were fully restored to all the
rights and privileges enjoyed by the entire Union; a free pardon
A REUNITED NATION. 229

had ‘been given to all who had taken part in the Civil War; and
the principles of universal suffrage existed throughout the nation.
But the quiet determination of the white people in the South to >
secure control of political affairs, resulted finally in the retirement
of the negroes from their temporary power and for years the negro
voters were “terrorized,” as it was called, by the white leaders who
gradually gained the power they desired and simply kept the black
vote “under control.”

In 1876 nearly all the Southern States were Democratic again
and the presidential election of that year was so close because of























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE ART GALLERY — CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION OF 1876.

the changed condition of political affairs that it very nearly resulted
in serious trouble. The Republican candidate for President, Ruther-
ford B. Hayes of Ohio, and the Democratic candidate, Samuel J.
Tilden of New York, received an equal number of electoral votes,
while both parties claimed to have carried the States of Florida
and Louisiana. There was much excitement over this result; the
230 A REUNITED NATION.

question was referred to Congress which was also antagonistic —
the Senate being Republican and the House Democratic. It was
finally referred to a special committee of fifteen, called the
‘Electoral Commission.” After a careful examination into all













































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































a MACHMERY GALL.



the disputed points, this Commission finally decided that the Re-
publican candidate had been elected, and Rutherford B. Hayes was
inaugurated as the nineteenth president of the United States.

It was iow the year 1876. One hundred years had passed since
the. Declaration of Independence had been signed in the city of
Philadelphia and the republic of the United States had grown from
thirteen straggling and struggling colonies into a nation of thirty-
eight great and prosperous States. The wounds and worries of the
fearful war days were almost healed and forgotten; South and
North were both advancing rapidly toward wealth and strength and,
from a population of three millions in 1776, the Republic had grown
to more than forty-two millions. Invention, education, intelligence,
wealth and productive power had correspondingly increased and it
seemed wise to the reunited country to show the whole world what
these hundred years of national existence and growth had made of


AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS. 231

the uncertuin experiment of republican government which so many
people had disbelieved in when the new nation started out in life.

So, in the year 1876, in the city of Philadelphia, where independ-
ence had been proclaimed, the states and territories of the United
States of America held a great exhibition of its manufactures, in-
ventions, materials and products and to this “Centennial Exhibition ”
all the rest of the world brought over the Po they had, to add to
the great display.

It was a fitting and peaceful celebration of one hundred years of
progress. From ocean to ocean the land was free, united and pros-
perous and could proudly proclaim to all the world the successful
working out, through years of struggle and worry, of obstacle and
war, of persistent effort and unyielding will, of the problem of uni-
versal liberty for the first time in the history of the world.

ew

CHAPTER XXV.
AFTER AN ' HUNDRED YEARS.

HEN President Hayes took the oath of office on the fourth
of March, 1877, the United States entered upon a wel-
come season of calm. Peace had come at last; the sec-
tional disputes and feuds brought about by slavery, that
had filled the land with worry and anxiety for over
seventy years, were stilled forever; no great political question
was uppermost to disturb the minds of men and women and all
the energies of America were devoted to the upbuilding of the re-
united nation, the payment of the vast debt brought about by the
war, and the development of all the mighty ounces of the land.
232 AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS.

This national debt at the close of the war, in 1865, was nearly
three thousand millions of dollars. In less than a year over seventy
- millions of this great debt had been paid; each succeeding year has
reduced it more and more, and the United States has proved the
wisdom of that old proverb that is as true of nations as of men and
boys: Out of debt is out of danger.*

Between the years 1861 and 1876 five new States were admitted
to the Union. These were: Kansas:in 1861, West Virginia (made
of the loyal portion of the old State of Virginia) in 1863, Nevada in

























SITKA, THE CAPITAL OF -ALASKA.

1864, Nebraska in 1867 and Colorado in 1876. In 1867 the terri-
tory of Alaska, at the extreme northwestern corner of the North
American continent,.was purchased from Russia at a cost of over
seven millions of dollars and the United States had grown in 1876
from its original area of 827,844 square miles to a territory embrac-
ing 3,603,884 square miles.

As more and more people went west, drawn by the hope of find-

*«Tn twenty years,” says Mr. Johnston, ‘the United States has paid about twelve hundred millions of its
debt, and only stops now because its creditors will not consent to be paid any further at present.”


AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS. 233

ing gold in Caifornia or by the hope of successful farming and
auidle: -raising in other sections, men saw the need of a quicker and
safer mode cn traveling overland than the slow-going emigrant
trains, the rattling stage- aoc or the galloping pony express. The
dangers of travel across the plains from hostile Indians, highway
robbers, lack of water, and, sometimes, starvation and death kept
many from going into the new lands, but still the number grew
year by year. Itwas evi-





























dent that quicker methods





























































were demanded, and in 1862,













































































with the assistance of Con-































































ress, a company of railroad
gS 9 P



men began the building of
the Central Pacific Railroad,
-to run from Omaha in Ne-
- braska to San Francisco
in California. Across the
plains and over the Rocky Mountains the iron trail was stretched
and in 1869 the great enterprise was completed and the continent
was spanned. The Old World speedily learned the value of this
new system of rapid transportation. Fast steamers across the
Atlantic were connected by this railroad with fast steamers across
the Pacific; and the life-work of Columbus to find “ the new way to
India” was at last realized in a manner never dreamed of by the
Brest admiral.

- But even before the iron male had been stretched across the
- continent, another marvelous connection had been formed when,
in 1866, the telegraph wires of the Atlantic Cable were successfully
laid at the bottom of the ocean, thus joining Europe and America
by an electric bond.

The cable and the railways, the successful ending of the Civil
War, the development of the rich farming and mining lands of the
far west attracted the attention of the world to America, and each



‘OTHE NEW WAY TO INDIA.”
234 AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS.

year brought hosts of emigrants from over-crowded and over-worried
Europe to find and found homes in the great republic. These, too,
helped to people and improve the unoccupied lands of the west,
and the growth of the nation in population and prosperity showed
a large yearly increase.

The methods and habits. of fe in the America of 187 6 were
vastly different from those of 1776. If such remarkable inventions
as the steam engine and the telegraph had revolutionized the ways of
people, the advance made in intelligence and education had an_

equal effect upon the minds and

manners of men. ‘T'wo thirds of
_ all the boys and girls of America
» Were being taught in the public
[ schools; academies and colleges
_ were increasing in numbers and ad-
ne invention was astonishing the
world with its marvels of construction ;
science was enlarging opportunity with
its wonders of discovery; intellect was
. broadening knowledge with its fruits of
thought, and more and more Americans
=—— were using their brains for the enlight-
ening, the improving and the uplifting
of their fellow-men.
The century of America’s existence
as a nation that had begun with Wash-
ZO ington and Franklin, Jefferson and
tp Bre ee ONL OON Adams, Hamilton and Madison, had de-
veloped such statesmen as. Webster and Clay and Calhoun and
Sumner; such soldiers as Jackson and Scott and Grant and Sherman
and Lee; such sailors as Lawrence and Perry and Farragut and
Porter; such inventors as Whitney and Fulton and Morse and Howe
end McCormick, and Ericsson and Hoe; such explorers and path-









AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS. - 235

finders as Wilkes and Frémont and Kane; such writers and poets
and thinkers as Emerson and Bancroft, Prescott and Motley, Long-
fellow and Lowell, Whittier and Holmes, Agassiz and Hawthorne
and Harriet Beecher Stowe; such orators and teachers as Everett
and Beecher and Horace
Mann; such a_ philan-
thropist as Peter Cooper ;
such a leader as Abraham
Lincoln. cat

That first century had
fought out to a victorious
conclusion the great bat-
tle of human rights and
national supremacy; it
had established public
schools and popular edu-
cation; it had reformed
the habits and the
‘thought of men; it had
extended the borders of
the United States of
America from a strag-
gling line of coastwise
colonies to a land that
stretched from. ocean to
ocean and covered an area equal to the whole of Europe —and
this comparison would leave out all of New England, New York,
New Jersey, Pennsylvania and both the Virginias, for the United
States, at the close of its first century, found itself nineteen times
larger than France, twenty times larger than Spain and seventy-
eight times larger than England.

The American Republic had successfully fought a terrible civil
war in order to maintain its authority and preserve its union; but



RALPH WALDO EMERSON.
236 : AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS.

during those years of war it had also held its position among the -
nations of the earth, some of whom hated and many of whom were
jealous of it, because of its prosperity and its establishment of
republican ideas. Even when that struggle was at its height, its
old ally, France, sought to take advantage of its stress and of
Mexico's weakness; it defied the American declaration of “The
' Monroe Doctrine”’ and aimed to
establish a monarchy in Mexico, -
upheld by French bayonets and
ruled over by an Austrian prince.
Thereupon the Government of
the United States spoke out
boldly, demanding the with-
drawal of the French soldiers
from’ Mexican soil; troops were
moved toward the Mexican bor-
der; the French Emperor, Na-
poleon the Third, taking the hint
in time, withdrew his soldiers;
the Austrian prince was shot as
a usurper by Mexican patriots

monarchy in Mexico closed in .
utter failure. -

The United States also de-
manded justice and payment from
Great Britain because of England’s assistance to Confederate priva-
teers during the war. England long resisted the claim, but the great
republic was equaily determined and, as a result, instead of stupidly
going to war over the question, as had been the custom in earlier
days, it was decided to let certain calm-minded and clear-headed
outsiders decide the rights in the case. So the “ Alabama Claims,’
as they were cailed (because the chief of the rebel “ commerce-



WILLIAM H. PRESCOTT.

and the attempt at a foreign _
AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS. 2387







































































































































HENRY W. LONGFELLOW.

XN

destroyers” was the privateer Alabama), were submitted for discus-
sion to five men appointed by Great Britain, the United States,
Italy, Switzerland and Brazil. These men met in 1872 at Geneva,
in Switzerland; they talked the whole matter over, decided that.
Great Britain had done wrong and ordered that she should pay to
238 AFTER AN HUNDRED YEARS.

the United States as “damages” the sum of fifteen millions of
dollars. .

From this important event dates the employment of what is
known as “arbitration” in settling disputes between nations.
This is so much better and juster and nobler than war that it

. looks as if, in time, it will be













































adopted in the world’s quarrels,

































and that sword and cannon will
only be used as a sign of power
or as the very last resort.

Thus it was, that, with popula-
tion growing steadily, with a
‘prosperity that was almost con-
tinuous and with new wealth flow-
ing into its treasuries and the
pockets of its people, with gold
and silver, coal and oil and nat-
ural gas being constantly dis-
covered in new and rich sections,
with manufactures growing and
improving, and production in
every branch of industry becom-
ing each year larger and more

















































far-reaching, the United States

































































































of America closed its first hun-













PETER COOPER. dred, years of life. The nation

was at peace. The South, re-

covering from its years of war, with a load of poverty and debt
that was almost crushing and with the new and conflicting social
elements that must come from the downfall of slavery, still stood up
manfully to its task; slowly it made good its losses and its set-
backs; capital and energy both came to its aid; the former slave
worked to better advantage as a free man, and the “ New South,”
GROWING INTO GREATNESS. 239

as it was called, blessed by free labor and the noble exertions of
its people, began at last to take its part in the development of
the nation and, together, North and South entered upon America’s
second century in peace, in prosperity, in union and in a mutual
desire for self-helping and for national growth. ~

CHAPTER XXVI.
GROWING INTO GREATNESS.

[HERE is a saying — probably familiar to you all—that
“nothing succeeds like success.’ The advance made by
the United States of America in material prosperity since
the year 1876 is but a fresh proof of the truth of this

27} well-known adage. Before 1880 began fifty millions of
people lived in the land. Railroads and telegraphs zigzag¢ed across
it in every direction and the wonderful discoveries in electricity led
the way toward the triumph of the telephone, the phonograph, the
are and incandescent lights that to-day, in 1891, make you all so
far ahead of the boys and girls who hailed the close of the War of
the Rebellion.

Truly, the last half of the nineteenth century has been a great
time in which to live, even though the boys and girls of to-day —
who are indeed the heirs of all the ages of thought and work that
went before them — do not appreciate their advantages. Think of
the things that make life comfortable to-day that your grandfathers
and grandmothers knew but little or nothing of in their early youth.
Gas instead of dip and candle; electric lights instead of flint and



’
240 GROWING INTO GREATNESS.

steel, or the whale oil that fifty years ago boerfieay burned; par-
lor cars and palace steamboats in place of stage-coach and eine
boat; bridges instead of ferry-boats; the typewriter instead of the
pen; sewing machines in place of needles; ploughing, planting,
mowing and reaping machines in place of the slow-going affairs of
our grandfathers’ day; the bicycle, the camera, the electric car —
these and hundreds of other wonderful improvements that the boys
and girls of to-day accept as matters-of-course and look to see still
further improved, are not only new to the world since the days “be-
fore the war,” but are really the fruits of the success that has come
to the great American republic since its centennial year of 1876.
Some of these advances were the outcome of the years of calm
and quiet that marked the administration of President Hayes. In
those days however were heard the mutterings of the unrest that
always accompanies success, for where money is not equally dis-
tributed some are certain to get richer than others and those who
have to work and struggle without great success are apt to grow
envious and jealous of those who outstrip them in the race. So, in
some sections of the land, certain of the working people — the men
in factories or shops, or on railroads, docks and extensive works of pro-
ducing or of building — began to say that they ought to be allowed
to arrange their own wages and demanded more than their em-
ployers were willing to pay them. Failing to receive what they
asked for they laid down their tools, compelled their fellow-work-
men to throw aside theirs and, as it is called, “ went out on a strike.”
Sometimes these strikes were very disastrous to business interests
and to personal rights. The railroad strikes of 1877 broke out into
riot at Pittsburgh, in Pennsylvania, and led to the loss of nearly one
hundred lives and the destruction of over three million dollars’
worth of property.

There was also much discussion over money matters during the
administration of President Hayes. The law that made gold the
standard of values in money and said that a gold dollar was worth
GROWING INTO GREATNESS. O41

more money than a silver one caused much dissatisfaction and
uneasiness, especially among the farmers and the working people.
But in 1878 a new law was made by Congress placing an equal
value on silver and gold in purchasing and paying power.

The tariff, the labor question and the silver money values were —

leading issues of the presidential campaign of 1880, but the Repub-
lican party was again successful and James A. Garfield of Ohio was
elected president by a total of two hundred and fifteen electoral
‘votes. Mr. Garfield was a man
of strong character, impressive pres-
ence and great ability, but he was
called upon at once to face the dis-
graceful struggle for place and
position which the politicians and
office seekers in his party made,
after his election. In the midst of
such a struggle at the opening of
his second term of office President
Lincoln had said: “ Now we have
conquered the rebellion, but here
is something more dangerous to
the republic than the rebellion
itself.”

His words were almost prophetic,
for this struggle for the “spoils of
. office” that disgraced the country Pe cena
until the wiser ideas of what we Twentleth president of the United States.
call “ the civil-service reform” grew ;
into repute cost the nation the life of one of its most promising
- presidents. The strife for place and power between opposing fac-
tions and self-seeking men in the Republican party raged hotly
about President Garfield and on the second of July, 1881 — within
less than four months after his inauguration—he was foully

a








































































































































































242 GROWING INTO GREATNESS.

assassinated in the railway depot in Washington, struck down by
the cowardly hand of a miserable and disappointed “ office seeker.”

In great suffering, heroically borne, for eighty days President
Garfield lingered on, and died on the nineteenth of September
at the cottage on the New Jersey seashore to which he had been
removed. The Vice-President, Chester A. Arthur of New York,
succeeded him as president and his»
administration was one of general
prosperity with but few disasters
and but few drawbacks. A reform
in the “ civil service” — that is, the
appointment of the public officers
of the government—was brought
about by the sad death of Garfield
and in 1883 Congress passed the
Civil Service Act which provided for
appointments to office on the ground
of fitness rather than as payment
for political service. This isa great
step and will in time make the vast
army of office holders called for by -
the needs of so large a government
as ours the faithful servants of the
public rather than the hangers-on
of politicians.

During President Arthur’s. term
of office the oft-discussed tariff question came again to the front.
It was the leading issue in the presidential election of 1884 and
the campaign was an exciting one. The election was close and
turned finally on the vote of the State of New York which was cast
for the Democratic candidate, Grover Cleveland of New York, who
received two hundred and nineteen of the four hundred and one
electoral votes.



CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

Twenty-jirst president of the United States.
GROWING INTO GREATNESS. 243

President Cleveland’s administration— the first one under the
auspices of the Democratic party since that of Buchanan twenty-
four years before — gave general satisfaction, but that shifting opin-
ion of the people, that makes it always uncertain just who they

wish the most, changed
again before four years had
passed and the election of

1888 proved a victory for

the Republican party again
and resulted in the election
of Benjamin Harrison of
Indiana as president by a
total of two hundred and
thirty-three electoral votes
against one hundred and
sixty-eight for President
Cleveland, whom the Dem-
ocrats had renominated.
In this campaign the yet
‘unsettled question of the
tariff was the main issue
and the two elements of
opposition were known as
-Protectionists and Free-
traders, according as they
wished home manufactures
protected or foreign goods
brought into the country
free of duty.



GROVER CLEVELAND.

Twenty-second president of the United States.

President Harrison’s administration opened in the midst of a
discussion, that is still far from a conclusion, as to the rights and
wrongs of the laboring classes and the rights and limitations of
the rich men of the land —the capitalists, monopolists, trusts and
244 GROWING INTO GREATNESS.

syndicates. The working people combining into “trades unions”
sought to force their demands and were met with resistance by the
employers. The strikes and “ boycotts” of the employees were met
by the lockouts and “imported help” of the employers and both



BENJAMIN HARRISON.

Twenty-third president of the United States.

1890 shows a population of over sixty-two million people. Its.

sides sought to take the

control of affairs into their
own hands. The Ameri-
can people, however, have
never been patient under
tyranny, and it is certain
that neither the tyranny
of “unions” nor the tyr-
anny of riches can succeed
in establishing itself per-
manently in free America.

During President Har-
rison’s administration six
new States were admitted
to the Union—North Da-
kota, South Dakota, Mon-
tana and Washington in
1889, Idaho and Wyoming

in 1890; and since the
Fourth of July, 1891, the

stars on the flag —one for

each State —have been

forty-four in number.
The United States of
America by the census of

wealth is almost boundless; its energy is tireless; its intelligence
universal. A country the existence of which four hundred years
ago was unknown to the world — which, three hundred years ago,
GROWING INTO GREATNESS. 245

had not a settler — which, two hundred years ago, was buta scattered
collection of feeble trading posts and settlements and which, one
hundred years ago, was at once the problem and the butt of the
great nations of Europe, it is to-day the second nation of the world
in wealth, the first in energy, intelligence and inherent power.
The United States needs no standing army, but millions of its
citizens are ready to defend the honor of their home land in time
of need. It expends each year for education in its public schools
one hundred and twenty-five millions of dollars and educates therein
nine millions of scholars; four hundred colleges instruct one hun-
dred thousand young men and women in the higher branches of
study and a thousand daily newspapers carry intelligence, instrue-
tion and the spirit of progress into millions of homes.

In the one hundred and fifteen years of independence more than
sixteen millions of foreign folks— emigrants from every nation
across the eastern and western seas — have poured into the country.
Bringing here all their old world notions, faiths and ways they
have been a source of fear to the timid and a problem to the law-
makers of the nation, who felt that a danger to the republic might
lie in this “invasion of America” by the hosts of the world’s poor.
But the true American has too much faith in the lasting value of
the principles of freedom that have made his country great to
fear their overthrow by those who, in time, will become as good
Americans as is he himself. Two hundred years from now, when
all the conflicting elements of these days of emigration will have
been lost in the mingling and mixing they must undergo, the
United States will know neither German nor Irishman, Italian nor
Chinaman, Swede nor Hungarian, “ Barbarian, Scythian, bond or
free,” for there will be but one imperial citizen —the American.

To-day the United States of America, giving equal rights and
unrestricted sufirage to all its citizens, with eighteen hundred mil-
lions of acres of land in town and city, field and farm and forest, is
worth over sixty billions of dollars and leads the world in the pro-
246 GROWING INTO GREATNESS.

duction of cotton, wheat, cattle, pork and minerals; in miles of
railroads and telegraphs; in the ratio of intelligence, of church
privileges and Sunday-school instruction.

In other words the American republic has all the opportunities,
all the possibilities and all the probabilities of becoming within the
next fifty years the greatest nation on the earth. Whether it shall
also be the best, the brightest, the noblest and the grandest depends —
upon the boys and girls who to-day are receiving instruction in its
schools; for by studying their country’s past, they are learning
lessons of patriotism; by guiding their action by the successes and
failures of the explorer and colonist, the patriot and the citizen of
the days gone by, they shall, with truth and honor, energy and good
faith to help them on, make forever glorious and forever free the
mighty land which four hundred years ago was brought to the
knowledge of a ready and waiting world by the faith, the persever-
ance and the courage of Christopher Columbus the Genoese.

BN S SN \ —
‘ ~ Ss —

SW

—
_
















































































































































































































































































xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080515_AAAADO' PACKAGE 'UF00081050_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-05-16T11:50:40-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:12:22-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298321; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-18T09:09:38-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '2028' DFID 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg '
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 747705e11801d567c67094eae39ada5b
'SHA-1' 41c79db9a5cb322c6f319e3703dc3fd564505696
EVENT '2011-12-12T23:31:08-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-12-12T23:24:55-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile1' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg
747705e11801d567c67094eae39ada5b
41c79db9a5cb322c6f319e3703dc3fd564505696
'2011-12-12T23:29:56-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:24:59-05:00'
redup
'2828' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile10' 'sip-files00060.jp2
f62a2ce44ba79544ade944c51576d092
39ff8cd7d4303ea3b130bc6fda558cd63541f072
'2011-12-12T23:29:18-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:28-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile11' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
f62a2ce44ba79544ade944c51576d092
39ff8cd7d4303ea3b130bc6fda558cd63541f072
'2011-12-12T23:30:18-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:32-05:00'
redup
'778' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile12' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg
975b0681ba105e1c40fa85a9e4f3b0a1
a774dff735dcfbd67f1ea72d2ed42424e67cf33a
'2011-12-12T23:32:11-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:35-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile13' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg
975b0681ba105e1c40fa85a9e4f3b0a1
a774dff735dcfbd67f1ea72d2ed42424e67cf33a
'2011-12-12T23:28:56-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:38-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile14' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg
975b0681ba105e1c40fa85a9e4f3b0a1
a774dff735dcfbd67f1ea72d2ed42424e67cf33a
'2011-12-12T23:25:50-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:41-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile15' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
975b0681ba105e1c40fa85a9e4f3b0a1
a774dff735dcfbd67f1ea72d2ed42424e67cf33a
'2011-12-12T23:32:15-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:45-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile2' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg
747705e11801d567c67094eae39ada5b
41c79db9a5cb322c6f319e3703dc3fd564505696
'2011-12-12T23:28:09-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:02-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile3' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
747705e11801d567c67094eae39ada5b
41c79db9a5cb322c6f319e3703dc3fd564505696
'2011-12-12T23:27:09-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:05-05:00'
redup
'6747' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile4' 'sip-files00040.jpg
035ccfcdd0cf982166fa63b827ce3577
7db58686297951be1812bea2eda865061324cbaf
'2011-12-12T23:29:48-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:09-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile5' 'sip-files00050.jpg
035ccfcdd0cf982166fa63b827ce3577
7db58686297951be1812bea2eda865061324cbaf
'2011-12-12T23:29:57-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:12-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile6' 'sip-files00060.jpg
035ccfcdd0cf982166fa63b827ce3577
7db58686297951be1812bea2eda865061324cbaf
'2011-12-12T23:30:19-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:15-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile7' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
035ccfcdd0cf982166fa63b827ce3577
7db58686297951be1812bea2eda865061324cbaf
'2011-12-12T23:31:31-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:19-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile8' 'sip-files00040.jp2
f62a2ce44ba79544ade944c51576d092
39ff8cd7d4303ea3b130bc6fda558cd63541f072
'2011-12-12T23:31:57-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:22-05:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfile9' 'sip-files00050.jp2
f62a2ce44ba79544ade944c51576d092
39ff8cd7d4303ea3b130bc6fda558cd63541f072
'2011-12-12T23:29:51-05:00'
describe
'2011-12-12T23:25:25-05:00'
redup
'840288' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYJ' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
8ffd9bac12a231e4e4596e50c999eaf5
a1e82c0d4aeae69f7f7442bb2a78934738d22b75
'2011-12-12T23:30:57-05:00'
describe
'190302' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYK' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
9532ae90bad46669a95c003554fbf9a0
81538a0a6f3cf5eb5f0c911957bb14206ec40930
'2011-12-12T23:27:26-05:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYL' 'sip-files00001.pro'
acf71a06f0382b4167c9ea17159dc5e7
bcae35a2c9485c597e6173effcffb27d234858fb
'2011-12-12T23:31:34-05:00'
describe
'39784' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYM' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
ca7e49fe29d149f73cfe08dd0d4b4b80
ffbffe0b74eb486d7745db1783636f4ee52e292b
'2011-12-12T23:29:21-05:00'
describe
'20186740' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYN' 'sip-files00001.tif'
9890527419287383733dc90055fc3271
c2bc68aeaed7e556a7df0ea2ae832f995f78f20b
'2011-12-12T23:26:14-05:00'
describe
'100' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYO' 'sip-files00001.txt'
9c965fdc5d48c4421d611e5f1a2455dc
bd281e2dfac0725c31e26bc0f4a89ca3c5fdf1ad
'2011-12-12T23:29:36-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'8842' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYP' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
5fa25679db429d3e50896602697e7330
00200130c6045a561e499c65121c6d35c8b0286d
'2011-12-12T23:31:44-05:00'
describe
'846588' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYQ' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
a11dc1c4f021256a2de6ae7de813684e
bdaaa294bf5a46170d6aecbabc70f07250478866
'2011-12-12T23:31:28-05:00'
describe
'69035' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYR' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
1a0856d69ceacbfe33bf26a7d1619279
8331ee5b0f9fe5a35725685066c13eab13d90a83
'2011-12-12T23:29:01-05:00'
describe
'14617' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYS' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
111e42a12cc232e1d4958dc86798ad0f
36cb465f0ba3ef91de6766ab1a7a00ac4e24fdda
'2011-12-12T23:27:23-05:00'
describe
'20335016' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYT' 'sip-files00002.tif'
6f885f704d4ccd54c63380b553b9b7b1
6769e4e0fead4b8f92d40af18b223fbab85b63fb
'2011-12-12T23:26:30-05:00'
describe
'3622' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYU' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
7bb90d88aba8b2f612be981b5aa45a60
03fa9573d889b23dc50c5443513eccad1e9e8507
'2011-12-12T23:30:30-05:00'
describe
'801681' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYV' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
320c5e5f6f783da77561c10de41df1c5
78a83bfccf11cb8437f3097ad04c19985eb8083f
'2011-12-12T23:28:51-05:00'
describe
'148890' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYW' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
dfadd27958c040e0eeaa1e1f9e2bdf78
e76917949921abd196ac4ba5fe94d727ea1bfde4
'2011-12-12T23:29:35-05:00'
describe
'2468' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYX' 'sip-files00006.pro'
2f160c18e872c6a1248cfaa229a34f8d
0e914ace8a2214c770f1efa89cd7122ecce9bfdd
'2011-12-12T23:27:57-05:00'
describe
'33588' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYY' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
9935e9bfcd55ba1c8390ab328b4a7e46
b58139a6fafdef85017cbcad3bc1cb29a0bbf355
'2011-12-12T23:29:23-05:00'
describe
'6437440' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDYZ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
731a05d3978664350fd08e892955feb2
fbd965fd35f92c92e74e56bcb1bf0a051c6b0114
'2011-12-12T23:29:24-05:00'
describe
'235' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZA' 'sip-files00006.txt'
2a7aecc9e30291c4fd4cb8308fe6a9ce
be9547157324bec64a385fe46df1985bc8cdc1da
'2011-12-12T23:32:05-05:00'
describe
'7758' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZB' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
cfd2680a58c58eb48aa099a763a6d9fd
0bd4848dd40f959d060ccb171ea149b673d8ee07
'2011-12-12T23:26:08-05:00'
describe
'767078' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZC' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
87d3f2456cfb2f7ece1090c571ee5d91
97ede476d74b616f6a016f42300c1b70600d3317
'2011-12-12T23:26:36-05:00'
describe
'30979' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZD' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
167791e45f28d3a21f453f3a873fecce
32cf92bd53d2b692fcb6e7226201558b4cc9ab04
'2011-12-12T23:25:51-05:00'
describe
'9530' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZE' 'sip-files00007.pro'
9cc122c609265da32445477bf1adb228
6a03518dfd53415d9c771d52cdeee057b4a3c7ce
'2011-12-12T23:26:24-05:00'
describe
'8888' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZF' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
7e387bd78db2d217305c4fb15dc661df
cd2eee072056579ed5046665c4d6cdbcd06b86d7
'2011-12-12T23:29:58-05:00'
describe
'6155420' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZG' 'sip-files00007.tif'
9c8cd375903af75a85a0bb17c29769d2
ab37aeb71799bb888c528d5d38cdf9026a9afeba
'2011-12-12T23:30:02-05:00'
describe
'527' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZH' 'sip-files00007.txt'
50a0a412f4373f22510bf17b089f5778
f2a640f1bb51219b5d0d2d58b07bcc4d765f5131
'2011-12-12T23:31:11-05:00'
describe
'2565' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZI' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
b504506068013ee4b78f9f412715da91
25c8b94733d96f0fc6b82998b9fb3bcfd3a0a281
'2011-12-12T23:30:28-05:00'
describe
'801936' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZJ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
a474f107c725150f52cce17dc6d59785
9db7a0cd1b348c4263ba9caaa6aa5a77199bfb40
'2011-12-12T23:28:45-05:00'
describe
'17279' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZK' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
b1f7cde4640fd541e949722fb6fade40
77d477c30f3ce6bc058f8896b3712af26e671130
'2011-12-12T23:26:39-05:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZL' 'sip-files00008.pro'
c43950ba4169f447f1b87a5a2e6dec0d
056b464f67fbb705568c9c0f8322b4dbccffa7b1
'2011-12-12T23:27:48-05:00'
describe
'4356' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZM' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c5da67e061ad5ac5b3674abd28d4e941
395712fa9942041e27b5bc22daaa98b3847f1953
'2011-12-12T23:28:20-05:00'
describe
'6433320' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZN' 'sip-files00008.tif'
0b430bda797e631c5155e051559a0a29
4357f4b0dc68ed55c4573bdde020e05bf4b5ebce
'2011-12-12T23:30:44-05:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZO' 'sip-files00008.txt'
cc1ce50abbc3e38619871d8ca99c93c3
fea392ad49a941dd5732401ae2bb0089585ef7ee
'2011-12-12T23:31:17-05:00'
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZP' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
ef091042c1751c328b6f7905f86953d2
607ab1481845b7e456fff75a1fb1e65dd2038719
'2011-12-12T23:29:34-05:00'
describe
'760551' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
3fe07f6a594a64a06bdeeebb28957001
d7b142e0a804462ea9650e24e3e24aeaa71e85f8
'2011-12-12T23:30:13-05:00'
describe
'59710' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZR' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
9f8fe5758095163c8cf954d46a5f631c
26925694a5a6224f2bffecc188d9dd2a30ab7a7a
describe
'31836' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZS' 'sip-files00009.pro'
116e3602cd74748b86ca791a81f5ce15
ccb703772fc96d5236a89d199f1270c048d59944
'2011-12-12T23:28:38-05:00'
describe
'18092' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZT' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
d769f7db103b17b23668be94fe6addfa
46af2b19abb64885c794b52f50e06094e4ef442b
'2011-12-12T23:26:58-05:00'
describe
'6103592' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZU' 'sip-files00009.tif'
805fa392246508acfd01ee8e4d02c8ef
25db2b7a6ee2ea4a9800d055e0f69883c48fab65
'2011-12-12T23:29:39-05:00'
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZV' 'sip-files00009.txt'
0a88f2811f15dca4d622ccca368070bd
9b65ad9aa2e6b1c8eddc462669a13721ed37a836
'2011-12-12T23:31:00-05:00'
describe
'4323' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZW' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
ff27b1cec541d87236508bb1f3adde24
67e9018dfe870045e60480dd9fb0cc0b0e9977bb
'2011-12-12T23:27:07-05:00'
describe
'767074' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZX' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
3a5ba50ab9391ea0a0e429183686ba0a
1206f2195ca689c8540ecee4ca03899768ec45b9
describe
'35921' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZY' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
76a8b624fe6c1332f3b815423697f628
f07aff3258434fc76d0ad621b3dc6574a9a05fcd
'2011-12-12T23:26:20-05:00'
describe
'11723' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABDZZ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
70303cd2570dac101aade807e9895f46
dc267fabb36a9370b281c2f95d3077b04a09b690
'2011-12-12T23:27:12-05:00'
describe
'11763' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAA' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
40637a9df2c9b2f4f363b20b74c3ff08
5bff431689e53f1b17842deffc3d46c72a96a13c
'2011-12-12T23:30:59-05:00'
describe
'6155612' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
8dd117a0615d972a0294ade6f8b4ab24
42dd9c0f407b2b3f5a63d30acc68061de7c9d1fe
'2011-12-12T23:31:25-05:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAC' 'sip-files00011.txt'
896b49ec010044ebfcd3e12ed3ca9552
01d9279f48ea601c767ce52e6089298e3698114c
'2011-12-12T23:26:44-05:00'
describe
'3492' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAD' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
8125c3d74b2b2e6de89fe1e3f62a3c89
34c3a8560dc6b6e4a95c394236f8cac2f48faa40
'2011-12-12T23:28:30-05:00'
describe
'801908' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAE' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
17cf957089a0ecf1e19ef237541f20bc
3dcbe81a2954c69147cbee40afaf34a5fd2d6a80
'2011-12-12T23:27:15-05:00'
describe
'41432' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAF' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
24503f90088b51953b2cf8dc6db1b4b3
f53a07e20d949f5fb7c7e772ef04796feaaf5d93
'2011-12-12T23:30:52-05:00'
describe
'23250' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAG' 'sip-files00012.pro'
738a588587223fbe1cae4a33bba6dfa0
59abd282d86460d416518b6f0f0887a9f118c553
'2011-12-12T23:30:27-05:00'
describe
'12296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAH' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
0a2d44cf27edc4a3de0bbd48df751fce
c3e29de8ff0ff725ae3f6d58bb6cc706c0cffa8d
'2011-12-12T23:31:35-05:00'
describe
'6434904' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAI' 'sip-files00012.tif'
7021a085bd42898df3808a1f77066760
c9803d00daa1cc7ad71535c2e637e80425d8cc4b
'2011-12-12T23:27:05-05:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAJ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
1767f72a1ca749c0b8b5f2a9c9b71018
858f9197b6d968dbdad31ebd40e286a64ba2884d
'2011-12-12T23:26:52-05:00'
describe
'3607' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAK' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
743b8b31f92df960607fdbbb844959ac
74d1b12414fba2f3eac7edcdcb1c034e56a8b35a
'2011-12-12T23:27:18-05:00'
describe
'771407' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAL' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
ffcd49a6c4efdc7a8b9d59d42b198076
ae3a4dc56eab21cb8da8d6cc69b7001f75d4c1fd
'2011-12-12T23:32:07-05:00'
describe
'63534' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAM' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
b32a7b9db47e0624787bef7d54753b99
bbcd7edddf86469425c9322e9514e663481ba710
'2011-12-12T23:28:24-05:00'
describe
'45960' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAN' 'sip-files00013.pro'
ea281427e414aaf2b638792bc5e3635e
6ab1f5d6076738fb8c7e0ee2fbc49da6858b97e8
describe
'16916' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAO' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
41e53724dda6eef75414f418fd364a66
10498ea0bed970fdbf57569471b62562523e9b13
'2011-12-12T23:30:21-05:00'
describe
'6191008' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAP' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ca5a73a1bc733b44c6d6bcc555dda426
b63481aac0cb9e271c6738dc0cd56ce36d559548
'2011-12-12T23:30:35-05:00'
describe
'2080' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAQ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
77162ff1c8515ca250147174db4e5f34
cbc2312b3f793b98b8d315b9ea52a284250fd844
'2011-12-12T23:31:51-05:00'
describe
'4312' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
18a667144a37a3fd23e90f7fa2cba10d
42f1963831793c9e50d1ac6e5f8dfdfa736d3c41
describe
'801979' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAS' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
4c387bd0459801c8e7c41b763786c660
a75093fe8567196ca91314aef3302fefbcf3c1bd
'2011-12-12T23:26:59-05:00'
describe
'83619' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAT' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
55c70e062016a37df604b5b1ec54b64b
74d54b6cfd5727511b582f58ff85f521afe56833
'2011-12-12T23:27:53-05:00'
describe
'64175' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAU' 'sip-files00014.pro'
8d9fd4f83e10f6af3547499b5c10585f
5fdbc1605537892097786066396e4634b10c2f84
describe
'21893' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAV' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
8b764261b5026e3dcb795b03781b0119
b045afbe69b2b0523dc33d17fcbd8d66b5e045e6
'2011-12-12T23:26:26-05:00'
describe
'6436036' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAW' 'sip-files00014.tif'
8fc70be85e0ee27f6eea65945728818e
f843e38b95bf4122a3e123e899b6a65d94760948
describe
'2751' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAX' 'sip-files00014.txt'
164ac1c3233582d2685f636a85e2e85e
99206647a6fe43a10f1249a3bc180ca18644addf
'2011-12-12T23:31:58-05:00'
describe
'5309' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAY' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
ba2a7dcd0275957546145d8b63386c18
006cf267bbd9fcd76375b0c9bfe84d062b0b252a
'2011-12-12T23:26:23-05:00'
describe
'769276' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEAZ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
92d88a0f0af344cd8d7c48bb7cd8bb4c
d031ed00271f137705b912c37acf449a3c8146cb
'2011-12-12T23:31:27-05:00'
describe
'38420' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBA' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d0141c6881fd48a6119e457c72cf0646
af1616e5724f22506e0a00f8b362b50c8e9d6944
'2011-12-12T23:28:59-05:00'
describe
'19576' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBB' 'sip-files00015.pro'
2ce8f498306284ce3bda9b71fed1e4c1
04c861a2b67927181fe6b64c6c5ca1af514860fb
describe
'10543' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBC' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
b20dea3286fcacac2b4d3075747fa7de
0d3c73b9f1114e0f02720947f50fcb2f789df7ff
'2011-12-12T23:31:02-05:00'
describe
'6172424' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBD' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0a723a99fd2324461be9a65a63efc7a3
30f371ba4fa4faa5748a3b37c0d7df3b3e6aa70d
'2011-12-12T23:26:41-05:00'
describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBE' 'sip-files00015.txt'
5c7aebf8b5f4e0ef9a73739cf602304d
a183dff2a1ac48aa7bd0f77527a7c4b4d2e68b94
'2011-12-12T23:31:39-05:00'
describe
'2524' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBF' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5be7ddccadb914b3a881632a7fa2669b
58434ca12a3b6fccef7a01d7b8f420db0d11b31a
'2011-12-12T23:27:01-05:00'
describe
'760550' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBG' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
2927d302a93ca5b9ebf2e1f5a69300e6
cb925228b283e4bd2b1e91abc5d6a99396038a06
'2011-12-12T23:25:59-05:00'
describe
'83005' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBH' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
2b52de10da42c54bb2ff8a29abf0f491
68bcaed66e6f5adb5085695ed134314613cb6530
'2011-12-12T23:29:41-05:00'
describe
'31034' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBI' 'sip-files00017.pro'
4dbb40f8f2798542d3ac8a99eff5d72e
33b6c81a74dae07fd4436fd98f3175bdab0d4bdd
'2011-12-12T23:29:29-05:00'
describe
'22634' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBJ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
b4c98f5c59f5fe86934d489a9d0703d2
b4adca7416fd2e123ad6f41cbdd4b4cbbecb05a1
'2011-12-12T23:27:11-05:00'
describe
'6104768' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBK' 'sip-files00017.tif'
b5b37a031070749fe4c3a287666ca1b4
ee9da37a2abc1c91ae0d7e9e70dff462abe79051
'2011-12-12T23:27:54-05:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBL' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c8212140ac583d547495b4d7c8b55e20
f12b6354d49521a5d0dfb54f84279656e40cd5fb
'2011-12-12T23:29:22-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5107' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBM' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
0a3eff412f63ad4bdcd42d414265f177
e64f4517b7a2201ec3be2593919799ee2e8b9402
'2011-12-12T23:31:26-05:00'
describe
'801845' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBN' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
458c8afd67998f036f60705b31e2a825
609e25bb2937f33e8c5139404990f93537fc0252
'2011-12-12T23:30:10-05:00'
describe
'112287' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBO' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
7a700f1b17dcd8a6c483ac98640050b6
33b290f5c6c2e4408b7bcef2f3109fdae09a4119
describe
'35125' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBP' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ddbd48e54f09347939cdb02847f86eb1
85ad29411a9652c89df072a40b8360f210e5906b
'2011-12-12T23:28:58-05:00'
describe
'27990' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBQ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
7b269d596f3cf052f243e3476b003745
b439364d99f9128b2f3724d7b348313d3e2152b2
'2011-12-12T23:27:10-05:00'
describe
'6437012' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBR' 'sip-files00018.tif'
0222f76ad619fd3fc9c36d007a7d3052
bcdde31bbdc3666bca7843768eea75e8be52d2c9
'2011-12-12T23:27:47-05:00'
describe
'2035' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBS' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1b668cfedef64568d028cdda27f86576
e049e10ca73bc3bc95b7de960a31d0cc49a6f153
describe
'6783' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBT' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
43a580386161c67f1d9139669578b3e4
86d9ff79f3305d4d8246d46f97f99576cd572c34
describe
'765213' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBU' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
9320f454891a4e205264348d65383449
380b91d29ef6d3fa5df2abc2384642100e75f40e
'2011-12-12T23:30:50-05:00'
describe
'130443' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBV' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
4e3b01d2942c8ea3a3cf703939350315
2877e8375094404daefa6fb026a40235c1ea361d
'2011-12-12T23:32:03-05:00'
describe
'17939' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
e44c9bf1744f29b078d2cbbfccd2c6a2
b3f0b8c9e3b1f1706cddc96fdb0e029b8f4e64b4
'2011-12-12T23:31:16-05:00'
describe
'30950' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBX' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
b46627714d40e479f2f1b6b96377c020
0cc33645bae115d5e04fedb9da4962df1cef38fe
'2011-12-12T23:29:20-05:00'
describe
'6143324' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBY' 'sip-files00019.tif'
7dc2d51476f7c69ed37aea8646068ddf
81f3c4ab906cac88c4e1ce55ae812c993d422558
'2011-12-12T23:30:04-05:00'
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEBZ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ebcc1b9d7be09125e1136656a3badf4c
57597c91d5ac620ec1eacacfffc3ff318c8c5411
'2011-12-12T23:28:39-05:00'
describe
'7293' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECA' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
a6952ac18e71da1b859e3e2f8bb3865f
ebdec6488db68d5b9c0f41aa65b9d3022dfa81f5
describe
'782340' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECB' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
fbb3c7777055a7bf55a7364c85bbf7db
0374e2340c39b0680a8a106b9183bd314c881975
'2011-12-12T23:28:41-05:00'
describe
'123044' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECC' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5a034a69f5ff3030482636582bd14d56
e18b9b59b5cdbce32906ba018b49a1e0f8ff447d
'2011-12-12T23:31:18-05:00'
describe
'55130' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECD' 'sip-files00020.pro'
ece7d4a390c04f5b3d5460e7dbaf880c
c85532680982c05a94ce843f2ec42ef52dd1b65b
'2011-12-12T23:31:30-05:00'
describe
'31653' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
848610e83f267e593bf2edcee8b87267
d7c85dae5f6802a4f464bd7937e7b037d34b0216
'2011-12-12T23:32:12-05:00'
describe
'6280136' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECF' 'sip-files00020.tif'
e3093a778bbc8ec98ea46150f53a79fe
87dc9b3fc75118aa6fdc3758c4718c2e1c13f6a1
'2011-12-12T23:28:08-05:00'
describe
'2151' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECG' 'sip-files00020.txt'
a93aa0e8a6c526693035496b5889ade8
895492919a38cffeb8e4713c8dd4e6c8c7f0416a
'2011-12-12T23:31:47-05:00'
describe
'6948' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECH' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
332b08958933f24386da7c29bd32374f
c9c57a166294ba7c3db3191c060ba2f22a7f46e5
'2011-12-12T23:28:36-05:00'
describe
'753991' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECI' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
79fc70e29a0f189e7196567f77c5b6de
ba5fe50fad0999d2a178ca618eac5126312e8f5a
describe
'112204' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
59a94298599f995e820d88dbaf03fb09
dc53a200d8978370cdbf3c65661bdcf200d8d41e
describe
'34080' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECK' 'sip-files00021.pro'
3848bee5e4c6bd31b830c1e3fb2b0cfe
a50873e7bceb0306e80e5ac615d5f810e6b9bbe5
'2011-12-12T23:26:25-05:00'
describe
'29763' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
00d21f8a9465e8b2f85ba5a6cfa94743
c15b70030eb995b79f1e4d76e2105f3831efe85d
'2011-12-12T23:26:10-05:00'
describe
'6052932' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
d8f9e281b0c69716d03d81278cff7361
b4e8089ff553cd5992c87cd7f5404a6f995675ea
'2011-12-12T23:28:32-05:00'
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECN' 'sip-files00021.txt'
8e9361120aa6c2a44147687273fdc224
779e6dc6951a8b983a8150ce0af1e3ed74d3c739
'2011-12-12T23:31:33-05:00'
describe
'6921' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECO' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
582c255a8ec88a11262bb20744964461
0f166248c851a85ca88892841e53b2471c040757
'2011-12-12T23:30:05-05:00'
describe
'782299' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECP' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
0b4864159cd518126a370385400c7ab7
96790cdf4d11fc51966e2fca294546b1e4062c4c
'2011-12-12T23:30:34-05:00'
describe
'124642' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECQ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
191f7723a62d1db25f6f5d5b28d2e9ec
ba86b3dc9b30aa8ad5b2034beee6e34bdd619937
'2011-12-12T23:26:47-05:00'
describe
'51512' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECR' 'sip-files00022.pro'
86dcaf38643c95c5d0102f6c7c7d6b73
6ee5c719136957cba7900f2e315d52620efff7a7
'2011-12-12T23:29:50-05:00'
describe
'32567' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECS' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
166d0c86bcb56b44334d6881d61f1ee5
601db318b45a529113c7b65b524dc448ac235dc9
describe
'6280204' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECT' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c7dcf5888efa52fe6bc61878a04b4c7f
d741edcb1d7cfd1aa422ca2244c075a28146e157
'2011-12-12T23:31:36-05:00'
describe
'2193' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECU' 'sip-files00022.txt'
fbad8143446cfc8bc4ae7b481b2463f4
51d3775afcdf2d54bac3bd50498c9dbdd070c0d9
describe
'7496' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECV' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ff397b8aaa28d2a08f0bc908bb3473e3
ecc3c5af92b33bc00d4f97616605f8e181cd29b9
describe
'753939' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECW' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
513957456a965134045a5a852a79a875
ce9455897d897401bf898d4dab2356bae1177f98
describe
'109063' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECX' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cadf19157df77345c813ea7a55f18de2
e269b1ff8e53af22441361023ac3e7877c164084
'2011-12-12T23:26:05-05:00'
describe
'1994' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECY' 'sip-files00023.pro'
205a002ffaf8ff6edbc566da956c0f85
43bf8ea322ff15384c590313f8d3344f419c66f0
'2011-12-12T23:27:19-05:00'
describe
'25595' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABECZ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
4cebbab4b284be0dc17209489b5aad1e
550f6bafbc4eb74ec5e2faa032039d87729ee8df
'2011-12-12T23:30:31-05:00'
describe
'6051912' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDA' 'sip-files00023.tif'
a151cce37b4537d22132baca5e770860
973abccbd9aa4bf05ee3295646c342ab9bb8ff10
'2011-12-12T23:28:03-05:00'
describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDB' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ab724cf1d23880f9cded3588574e4a06
47d8953d6427239cbcb8a62b93f67aef5b27a41a
'2011-12-12T23:31:03-05:00'
describe
'6313' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDC' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
2d0bc8afddfc45c85f132964310c9f4e
58860b50f7286004e3686e0d05b14b2160db1da6
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDD' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
f62a2ce44ba79544ade944c51576d092
39ff8cd7d4303ea3b130bc6fda558cd63541f072
'2011-12-12T23:26:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDE' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
035ccfcdd0cf982166fa63b827ce3577
7db58686297951be1812bea2eda865061324cbaf
'2011-12-12T23:30:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
747705e11801d567c67094eae39ada5b
41c79db9a5cb322c6f319e3703dc3fd564505696
'2011-12-12T23:26:12-05:00'
describe
'6276044' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
963353d4b67c5be8f5090f9e08f9157c
7d031a40a1b1610edb5f0e026b621e8a11987928
'2011-12-12T23:26:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDH' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
975b0681ba105e1c40fa85a9e4f3b0a1
a774dff735dcfbd67f1ea72d2ed42424e67cf33a
describe
'756186' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDI' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
9d3857c224866f5c084cd6f9f1626294
a292cf2c9c199b5c8830d1314f78588cbeeb37e4
'2011-12-12T23:32:00-05:00'
describe
'118858' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDJ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
f7b9775f5525f4f6177132bdcae256f0
ef3055588fadd15af1fbedb26649f0a6f858888a
'2011-12-12T23:31:22-05:00'
describe
'54348' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDK' 'sip-files00025.pro'
12a76024248ecbb294a425ddd4618212
a432b3a26d7fc0c60169ef31efe42ec05d3ebc99
'2011-12-12T23:29:28-05:00'
describe
'32109' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDL' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
d42c2b99e434c5e1d0b5eb72919d03b9
3576d72e181e5c2f45a89d07d1e0d04bc84b26b7
'2011-12-12T23:30:20-05:00'
describe
'6070544' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDM' 'sip-files00025.tif'
f9802a02661e4cf07ce27c1989ba2a47
1c450400e09fd4b33d0ee017b8adf252aba0f54d
'2011-12-12T23:31:04-05:00'
describe
'2129' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDN' 'sip-files00025.txt'
7c4b8acf326f1568439ef6c1f4a99687
dee0ad572b9c7de7cb11e512cab5b2d23a225a41
'2011-12-12T23:29:40-05:00'
describe
'7147' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDO' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
a41e10b30c5f91725cdecaf1f50938cf
0474197ec7c117ab2a276fbb0f3ea9f6aadbf148
'2011-12-12T23:26:46-05:00'
describe
'782349' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDP' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
8b258c6c50ab124d0e512fc7a19badcb
c4650083d9e2430c642bc750ebe326e2682272aa
'2011-12-12T23:26:09-05:00'
describe
'122542' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDQ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
f3ac237217f7cbe3bb80aa50050edd4b
61c76449d4576eeedb60746b0193a533bfa1061e
'2011-12-12T23:28:33-05:00'
describe
'49189' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDR' 'sip-files00026.pro'
138e17e37d28b63cb9818b21cc7a533a
dcc6667c8c9a585e17e3b7f23bf06809037ac66d
'2011-12-12T23:27:14-05:00'
describe
'32034' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDS' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
2a9a6e34ed907c698d51c997aa46848f
a545f1ae779d98e414176b3a5de475a32f4864f6
describe
'6280268' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDT' 'sip-files00026.tif'
a6425cfb7d86d498625f9a29998f54e5
fef2564a04f2f3aeff181015cde80cb2c669b415
describe
'2169' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDU' 'sip-files00026.txt'
a8aa4490b7e96eb503fde786336ca6e0
02735a438d692fe093f4029ba6d91b2e6567cbf1
'2011-12-12T23:28:13-05:00'
describe
'7424' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDV' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
db3a77a19e40fb403cc85b8559af869e
2e8f1b38f000a731bfd318ccb51c8e7070dffd21
'2011-12-12T23:27:56-05:00'
describe
'751734' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDW' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
2b6a5c1be0a0a6d5a964189f1d4fecd0
4325bab03260cfcb02543b8e534d1273c4ac64cd
'2011-12-12T23:29:59-05:00'
describe
'106072' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDX' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
cdd9bde5ccf945d4a0d3bae837245d8b
a059783bbf8c7b3f21bde2856b0a37cc4fc4eb49
describe
'35053' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDY' 'sip-files00027.pro'
afb3162947394b172e65ee487ba8d10e
676e680e79862fbd66b769b8534aa99365720011
'2011-12-12T23:28:21-05:00'
describe
'28623' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEDZ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
1da3ef73d33bd918aff4ad679afac6fe
752a5e1f5e4c0b6d4bac58404258577ee2ece524
describe
'6035504' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEA' 'sip-files00027.tif'
01d90977412fef458fb4c09967aed615
baeed07cc74ee19ae2cba19d8c3ba388af8b84c8
'2011-12-12T23:32:01-05:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEB' 'sip-files00027.txt'
7a59a4e16acee692b1418879de133995
881b76eea1e63b7976a254d88d7c7b349613a73c
describe
'6978' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEC' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
7bef4a0642378096fd879938fdcdfa48
cca5ee3c4db759ceb26198a70bbab9960f0247c4
'2011-12-12T23:30:25-05:00'
describe
'766993' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEED' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
925f1de9cfa108852c6dc7c2b96cfb2b
0bb87767cdf29662fc045b241ee04beae97c6d5a
'2011-12-12T23:30:49-05:00'
describe
'126945' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEE' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
1b0cd400a4ed983a9b23e4cbbd8d0e51
332cfb19d8fe54baef7dc9ab48dec881f2652a6c
'2011-12-12T23:30:14-05:00'
describe
'48840' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEF' 'sip-files00028.pro'
8569110600bf6c71c60c9e4b3e0baf0f
406c5f185d484ac26fb1433d7ef22c2542acf002
describe
'32019' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEG' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
e00908b0ceb764f43ad64b2975d52fd5
564889313e1e2bb77893b4d6897542ec58f638ac
describe
'6158128' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
1a1b5c60c1bbd23cd7315b908303d79c
76f673071f2d72bfaaf9c75f3205fa479770c317
'2011-12-12T23:30:41-05:00'
describe
'2130' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEI' 'sip-files00028.txt'
64ac48a385ad0ca0974c7ae828f711e9
3b8c824307aa453dd9f5162eb88e195b934eb0d1
describe
'7572' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEJ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c681616e02949f495917dcd7e47cfdbb
888230af2e548b6de70d8d61a256837003413dc9
describe
'751824' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
60c3e9cd749e0697c7eaa7b01067314e
9260af5a3d85e52161c069c7dfd6ff399984ecfe
'2011-12-12T23:30:32-05:00'
describe
'138084' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEL' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
9b7f2b4719797d3ccaae32a8def23d29
cb84de9062be686a842f17a5f73dbfe34bf5867d
'2011-12-12T23:28:57-05:00'
describe
'6042' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
8dae55a8e0fbed5df4ef2c90474636a6
6de907c5dc769fad42762ac73ed501da57d0f9b4
describe
'33613' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEN' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
9a7a6949e257c1556f63df7e0cea6dae
11942637e674580421eecb809da4bdb9d140ee80
'2011-12-12T23:26:43-05:00'
describe
'6036156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEO' 'sip-files00029.tif'
95c46e3d6dadf0d92a688ae38bc65bcc
318bbfb26f7ae41e3108d9ff43abf50157d0593f
'2011-12-12T23:27:17-05:00'
describe
'491' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEP' 'sip-files00029.txt'
8ba3c05fa6f7651b69dd83a34c91eb5e
da6ebe83af5332e955f6b0fbb7010b01947cf72e
describe
Invalid character
'8051' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEQ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d125a9a4d5bcab9b47c6948b7aaac04c
e13ba07ce0ff551b9d571179b37dc25e9fc48b67
describe
'782352' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEER' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
67a6211cce4ff8f8b6a92f11aa161323
352dae1f784349bb87c7787c336fdfc2d09e4167
describe
'17904' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEES' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
f4ff4287b363017de3bb21c552d14b84
6655ed680e3c644fe581956a05ce6f7123d09eb4
describe
'3727' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEET' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ea596d75125ccc0e0fbb03e9ea141d2a
338ac83834e008cef5b3e883c14beee3098f3ee5
describe
'6276332' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
2b7273369e96bbd69611f0f1c9b94086
f1a95d694c7c1ce38516f3be12a520588d403b50
'2011-12-12T23:26:16-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
89d7d6d162b8a6ba496a87e2b7993fbb
9aba996277703c5529cc3cdfcefac9e6982a1623
describe
'740920' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d8de01ca9a7e940300aa27de32130156
99b26cf634f074bb5a4ab32a59193ce812cc16c5
'2011-12-12T23:30:58-05:00'
describe
'123831' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
bf36381fdf4ef0c7a01c76337e6307e1
39aa9a263c3ef31b685f4cd5535dcf097c07d1dd
describe
'53458' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
8921179774dd1a3a5f0acf37def5681f
a1c01f5eb4582cc2f281592132dbc29698a48f30
describe
'33654' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEEZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
6abe4ad4215eedcce586397e784ff1e9
b90ce3833027c228f3e48034d0393206c48d71a5
'2011-12-12T23:27:00-05:00'
describe
'5948536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
225706613fed1a709684db42552e954b
427a84f613ba7714213d49054d45d2f3f4373e7f
describe
'2091' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
e568c7c79eb743df72e858e5fbe3b1a3
ae2981cd65f1514f7f8e1fab484523333f4c3b59
'2011-12-12T23:25:58-05:00'
describe
'7817' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFC' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
133913e7ebad03487062d8c923f85ee9
9f4befc1fceb39311813ad742252fdeee395a2d2
'2011-12-12T23:26:34-05:00'
describe
'754008' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
25a58a5a3f2ee7e52881ec5de568df1c
99957d777a9d1e20a7360a0e005348c725cd82ae
'2011-12-12T23:25:52-05:00'
describe
'129798' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFE' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e92ca748cf74522ab1937f9f00b189d8
8db58305bad308d5d42e16004f310dd8f9e70192
'2011-12-12T23:29:04-05:00'
describe
'54832' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
a94dd5f79b0337fde90b097baa1704a6
32d980a6ffa75255bbfcb788f28aa980c921e68f
describe
'34398' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
c5f54f038b1ebd4fcc7bf35a1d696ecd
aed3dd74daf42b56f99ca56ad0c8552c51864d88
describe
'6053244' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
ca0f9747e4d3e0c115d319e55aac09e8
3754847e89fe53094d2f18447a90a6936531810a
'2011-12-12T23:30:40-05:00'
describe
'2137' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
78966b202ff781025e797badb2cac662
9375e373c569cba47f1f797689598cd284d06c1b
describe
'7706' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFJ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
cd5f753793ee542bfb24781193bc6465
fbd0806ea7f1b24db6f570b4c2d8204875b9b8e1
'2011-12-12T23:25:55-05:00'
describe
'723476' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
2be8bdb3b6be3ec7b72c15eb9912dd6a
5782104661ff7b911c649be5e386d83c892c2984
'2011-12-12T23:29:25-05:00'
describe
'126443' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
632cadf76febaf9c44cc96f1e5a7296c
757a93f2cb761ba733ddaf6f5e260d7e2375e611
'2011-12-12T23:27:49-05:00'
describe
'52618' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFM' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a3efbb76d1692da620cabdbcee156bd9
1d8351bd1289f49d07b012ea988ff9db777ba1f6
describe
'35802' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFN' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
a670b593e9dc667f8fe118f913155c0f
c7723017b2569491f7b45f7c95e8358c8748bfb3
describe
'5808788' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
59f6efb6659f0731035bcfbb58f70092
8eb9ee9774e7bf0d55854d037fb900d604638526
'2011-12-12T23:29:08-05:00'
describe
'2064' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFP' 'sip-files00033.txt'
63f8d3535b7957aa616daf2e75794e2b
f04c9c22b92ba4dfb24801876e6e11c72ba7c59b
'2011-12-12T23:29:44-05:00'
describe
'8243' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFQ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
935b923a3ee1e4796e198c74d9ed983c
64aa3d4f2c8cbe0c307461b55caca8d0df699858
describe
'756188' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFR' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0db34e30b362d4e96698338e465436b9
f9e2f9250a6f7104744fbce5c06616aa97c3972a
'2011-12-12T23:32:10-05:00'
describe
'97182' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFS' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
82a0a95cb6ba862bfedec1ee64652360
39c6a83533b5ddbad4aad74a9de4f30f90a7c51b
describe
'37063' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFT' 'sip-files00034.pro'
cc592b3879049c6d6163ffb628fa86cb
525ef5b9b674629b687949988d9f12118e44dd4d
describe
'25839' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFU' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f7b19e7dcb034bddc31bf7968d1965b9
4a1186bb106f978fff4fd5c0015e4507ef55cfc3
'2011-12-12T23:31:32-05:00'
describe
'6069924' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
1dba1cfa7672ac8397ccf757c776aa66
4a28ef7ded87d6529f64240edbd8b76fa2bed238
'2011-12-12T23:25:53-05:00'
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
433e12365b7ab05f1bc7228a8909be34
684848042caa6626ba0662f19b7f2e047504a831
describe
'6234' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFX' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
8a061dfc63dc285dda1d81bd5afcc38e
0aea807632d4c3ce70daddb2a60ffdce43edb384
describe
'719068' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
40d3789d913523725d16926c53dc46d0
ae5adbbdf59c674338dc79b710b25b31105aae07
'2011-12-12T23:29:54-05:00'
describe
'111509' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEFZ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9e44580fa055e1f5c39204479fd879f4
326b3151e4fe75966d67c2b5b0bc5816773b6311
'2011-12-12T23:26:06-05:00'
describe
'48057' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGA' 'sip-files00035.pro'
68e2e90f7381db8269f5eec4b5564fca
7f14dccc578ef023fecc8012944a94c2fdc7c5e5
describe
'30999' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
dcf6b28f4a3b33d393540431fd84d72f
6f6d6b99addea8a67d952d0c24a06c09e016ae32
'2011-12-12T23:26:01-05:00'
describe
'5773600' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
792f0b3c7b5ad84d88854d3392d32cb5
f4da51d3ba79612d157045c33840658858eff1ff
describe
'2102' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGD' 'sip-files00035.txt'
b8fbafcc8f200234e8c44ccf928a170b
1d805dd1d9d0b38635b486aa6db7a7765cca0423
'2011-12-12T23:26:37-05:00'
describe
'7492' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
61a2f5f250e486c6076f30c3cca8aca1
a4515c43015c600f35402a2eb5bebaf03049e181
describe
'725350' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
325455b72c4106c18802bd702dea2360
126afe35bc7b91ed062ff6d9d7db3856c0324e85
'2011-12-12T23:29:09-05:00'
describe
'138778' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
37f5f92b8972ff6ce4218f9a1d894101
731bace1cd49b02798740aa3daf4344c0cad261a
'2011-12-12T23:31:24-05:00'
describe
'42998' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
0a0c2e34dd85123db45ae8499841fbd1
7cf320ee01f0f59a4da77e9bd86a510fcde2c888
describe
'35823' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
7d21696d566c6ba064b2270f6d2cde23
a46bc2f921dbb8be0b7634feab13b886d88dcda7
describe
'5826564' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
1439d54dd48fcced01ea45009fbf7f3b
f57a9c50bba2eb2706d9cf74581462780f73968e
'2011-12-12T23:28:26-05:00'
describe
'2113' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
21cc02b0fed82af482e635c82c0f061f
1880c2d6c66c41d67308086ad75c2ccae25a2bff
describe
'8187' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
3487934fa44e023c6d44beeadd16f4f1
ffe59784352326f7b87fb299200d98ef03d4a1d4
'2011-12-12T23:29:11-05:00'
describe
'717289' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
9844bfcd1f9a13085fb644298cee5d17
fbb4b45d6cfe8547941c5e8a6833a55099d0e9f4
'2011-12-12T23:28:07-05:00'
describe
'110271' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
df39e45f3bfca8f931a3989643a84d70
37516d952adb70e2892aa51bb4037301247c4062
'2011-12-12T23:27:58-05:00'
describe
'37158' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
d5a336bdbc24192dc742843465104f7b
ae52dd4b49c098d1c140fe623d1a96828b5c498d
'2011-12-12T23:32:06-05:00'
describe
'29948' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGP' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
ac3884d0c23e1cac00e60106e2ef8fac
4d74bdcafeb479fea0519f148f56366c70c2e02e
describe
'5758868' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
9749693b89f82101fcc5336d3a88d87b
3af30cb873b63ec76af810e431d4543615d85fd7
'2011-12-12T23:28:48-05:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
6300a3640464f6e0a077220dde5e8b60
a8b4a51081fd47ba87e94bbec81fc2de79050a31
'2011-12-12T23:28:04-05:00'
describe
'7282' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
bc11c2407ddef9427dae5da0684fdc5a
2f4b69ad94e02c766feb0945b27668a8fdc0effc
describe
'745266' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c7b9f87001a89908d901e34bb7345cec
50f9542ee8fe8dc264de7ade85beee2b8a73b62f
'2011-12-12T23:30:48-05:00'
describe
'139008' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
e5a969b7cc14be82ac78b618ef31afd1
21139899b19b9c20e7948175c682a22266279438
'2011-12-12T23:26:31-05:00'
describe
'48481' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
9fc5581fb72e2cae9d2d995e1a6add41
ddb1bae285842d3d59d579ca25f551e08bf8ba12
'2011-12-12T23:29:07-05:00'
describe
'36976' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
103d109e7a0efceb25b3e30ecb669c8f
d50ffdc256d9404642c943dc17947e811350eccc
describe
'5983776' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
504ed9be718da8b47438301cf9ee0374
08b2a7e08d32f6b20e65138fd57edeea39ab5dcb
'2011-12-12T23:27:20-05:00'
describe
'2087' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ce4234bd49e7250ffc2ef73d93d4551e
22bbd94a3cf03d3f81670032ecd8328fa0997086
'2011-12-12T23:29:13-05:00'
describe
'8654' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEGZ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
7944fd2925f495579e58fb7ab8428f84
b05dcdd1bd592ab696a78221c480bbc1b718b4ce
describe
'712908' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
b97db8dffc5f30a034ce170348264d48
01fbd8fd08a4529d0423db2c4e430c871faab505
'2011-12-12T23:27:41-05:00'
describe
'66337' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
e08ef710ccb07a182ba5c6267cddd893
021f70ef187f65785125b32cec594ccc31327b01
describe
'5241' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHC' 'sip-files00039.pro'
2daac7d399cc897cc6f182c9e8e42709
ff08532c598eaa580301f31707f9979534784c06
'2011-12-12T23:31:10-05:00'
describe
'15771' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHD' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f966439028004b7771213ff34177cf9b
56411caae724a958b302d63d4cda706289d48b87
describe
'5723900' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
9b242eb207f34c03267c076448ebe943
b69343de8a2c7a1695ce05ee0d2d8953d6ab0ed4
'2011-12-12T23:26:02-05:00'
describe
'375' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
de649febb97b71c7f944c0fdd87c916a
4a5442629ea8f4290dc8691c06496bbdd49ac920
'2011-12-12T23:32:08-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4176' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
7add42f9681e57234196924a9ae9d336
60e5567b2587234d7e6c0d3dd4c9d9eb930de23f
'2011-12-12T23:30:01-05:00'
describe
'6276192' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
81bce5e7779a4624d873094f6291ed2b
d88bf4b5606f191384370a0496fa218fb89f825b
'2011-12-12T23:27:31-05:00'
describe
'730480' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHI' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
9c90123b68e770b5ead1b819089d2ecd
9d4c9be11e7b11e6ee73abbe3a8c7e8e29479ff4
'2011-12-12T23:27:13-05:00'
describe
'132155' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
9b4d7516a65543a8299d5f4976b09a9b
61342732eb8766332ced5cd23b0c6bb6aa1a9315
describe
'49859' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
5ff2ec035845fd39b0a2428656ba2614
43c36d0f2ef1741336894f41a59c15cc495846a3
'2011-12-12T23:31:12-05:00'
describe
'35329' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHL' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d4bc17676138048dde267cb948f2ea97
ac1c04a02cb45cd367fd87cb6cb2e368fc9857df
'2011-12-12T23:25:57-05:00'
describe
'5865284' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHM' 'sip-files00041.tif'
cabf3b5d540a9b1578b93e8e23b6566e
0128b72afd21e507814ce8c2af367fe2da063e08
'2011-12-12T23:26:13-05:00'
describe
'2325' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
90e027ec1f321f653d38205a5cfd7fcc
860341b704165d9a3d2872a9fd9de073df5837f9
'2011-12-12T23:27:42-05:00'
describe
'8646' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e7197f7a54e350d8cf89952d8a92a24d
3619cb6bbd96bf70282f1542e47544a89c35e183
describe
'739710' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
530e997327d5f968bcece7f737573f8c
d37091ad19f36726f98a1029fbf9a64d15500fda
describe
'137785' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
04cb584222f575b1e6089c3ef71a7df6
b1d5b1b17d4309c734316bc8d1adc939a1f6bb58
'2011-12-12T23:26:42-05:00'
describe
'47661' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
27ba29d340a92e4829a5166eff0a23c4
fa6e429c48f059f4e4b8ef65db644a73467cec1f
describe
'35711' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
4f68da9d75d2f1fe15bd284cc3e9c679
957c97b79e185411438ac70c06f231c6c0f34876
describe
'5939732' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
1cc74d50d76f6049d2ff1e1aa880846f
072e8546bfbb1a5434dd339bde6bf0fffc3232d3
describe
'2173' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
3b576d524549aec6fedd8dcd6fe14a02
c5df646e3f69f04cbd5b559ddf17dbd46d24ea15
'2011-12-12T23:27:04-05:00'
describe
'8201' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
7d7f4d4aa954a8d27a002124e3c9d5ea
7749dab1f685364d1ecac56cb1ded24a035ad69f
'2011-12-12T23:28:11-05:00'
describe
'735436' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a7044a0baf87df4da2395370941ea0a2
adf271faf358cbc945d6712fa056c5afe044a46d
'2011-12-12T23:26:07-05:00'
describe
'131647' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
b1a5cc4200c7cbf901406c878975c850
ea402988527db6227f3e1ca1d5ca94dfb109b6b8
'2011-12-12T23:28:27-05:00'
describe
'52893' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e28ebca15e33f617fb463572ce56c2c2
80456f136f026e2388a8535fab7b522357de802b
describe
'36152' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEHZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
acbf037d7933ce5311ee0c254c6d2a14
7753c694b19f8d629b87954416d1cedb2e4ce6bb
describe
'5905028' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f0066dfbc06b680260cb47b4d1891759
f24f7b14fd33bb558b8c719ad4e2b4327c2e362d
'2011-12-12T23:29:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
93bc8706aad3e4e74e8400aa2e80e84d
3fcd1e042f2cbb98bc4865cb393a810c74287501
describe
'8164' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
b6fb632d62793dec02aa0e22a5ba3154
e3b13e974654e04b58272eda0c1da01efb504019
'2011-12-12T23:26:49-05:00'
describe
'730152' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEID' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
3803a95aa31b50ce784b5327048ef1dd
65874f37bbb1d97dc77f0b58e37cde2c2827f6b0
'2011-12-12T23:28:10-05:00'
describe
'140203' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIE' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
12265511c74bab41732a9e3cf63576d7
3b9b5d2e07be745c16a1b46b61bec40aacfae5f6
'2011-12-12T23:30:24-05:00'
describe
'38788' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
5816c0ead9907011e05969b94ee34e52
38d5eecbe9ad79e794ea2c7d90140d0e76c1d8b8
describe
'35474' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIG' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
960acbaefe18b1ffe5d11f32aedb0768
848d1dedd714f96af2b4a09cc5bc235c97b44c12
'2011-12-12T23:30:37-05:00'
describe
'5863108' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIH' 'sip-files00044.tif'
94bb1bb4ed25c565444a6253b3576f29
ede07095c4f29dc488c1006eef8affe5db3485c2
'2011-12-12T23:28:14-05:00'
describe
'2157' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEII' 'sip-files00044.txt'
d3be4b463eae53cd397f15febe0efaef
e64923b0c04b4b27359a3fae9ce2676e9bd609b6
describe
'8098' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIJ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
cdfc34a78b4febad8db020f99ed2dc00
082c40a598be79f1d29331f427c49c0de8ea43b5
describe
'746538' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIK' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
71d21989a8a5740f47dd506c72493194
347d4303ad53c0b48acf0971497a288ca6736f35
describe
'80551' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIL' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
bbf71a6712debbf140cd9bb360f3f026
ddaade8db80eb7a0c0a8abb3f93560922bdd77ca
describe
'27867' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
113deefcbc982702418ae842ae4e31bf
0e71244b481e743b5483be67a4c366487c5eaf62
describe
'22426' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIN' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e5dd3c9dabb84c1d9c418b93665efeb2
e392c6420416ee9b3d7f172e8cdf2862abeff7e4
'2011-12-12T23:30:47-05:00'
describe
'5992232' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIO' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b4235303e2d7bb109add1df2cc20d5fd
708e42848dce14eb2399642ddce6a3e24d4ce5e4
'2011-12-12T23:30:11-05:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIP' 'sip-files00045.txt'
6e55fc7233f4bc1329cb2a4de38932b9
0b7410755a425163d20bfefbcbbb47125fbe540a
'2011-12-12T23:28:19-05:00'
describe
'5561' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIQ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9513da5e31c18357d01acafae1a90879
7bdfab434f4f8001284f7ab42b002cbddaa5857f
'2011-12-12T23:28:16-05:00'
describe
'772678' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
87ecc768e9f9d2425c58eac357ba1a6c
01fa1dd515ff4812a72db549732c3d53add7ff50
describe
'124272' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIS' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
fb5a89a122bd24715572d6f5186602bd
47cc205da4483fa4fae1d97bf24899cff080c6ad
describe
'41664' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIT' 'sip-files00046.pro'
91ac8969155530c354053d6103357748
09dcf6a472a44d40ad7009bde1d530b7614f2473
'2011-12-12T23:26:28-05:00'
describe
'31673' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIU' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
0d205b7b422d8e5040a914b740895625
3c8b025fc58e919f0621fa7d3e1e2cdacffbedd2
describe
'6202812' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIV' 'sip-files00046.tif'
dcb5d0563ac4acb7b28c0027c17482c5
a9dd1258385569d10a555e0d24db77eb535cf003
'2011-12-12T23:30:29-05:00'
describe
'2185' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIW' 'sip-files00046.txt'
116d16f25cf96f539103c3f708a3a08a
9911d9aae0578d9a07bd97e68637267115cc004e
'2011-12-12T23:32:14-05:00'
describe
'7342' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIX' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
b84c6cf60dcc9a52af69b92590b4ec41
3e3600361145e74d20958fc1cb257688b2e265ed
describe
'758364' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIY' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
f8966b58fcda5fad5a742a1c200bbe59
1ac9a095fee7a49012bed7e474324521d58544f8
describe
'120303' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEIZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
a8ecdae42ce0ca18aceb8568ad6265b3
a3e7350653ce125cd37d416f7a3326915b3f7c49
'2011-12-12T23:31:53-05:00'
describe
'51352' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJA' 'sip-files00047.pro'
41446de4544b5810a8079fb1d82f0caa
efd8dfc008eac3c286906c981adc033927195bf6
describe
'32440' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
09576d49a0d3cea1b5fd494978e4228a
2ead847833ded9a9e2634d2fbd8506f9bfe7f48d
'2011-12-12T23:30:42-05:00'
describe
'6088080' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJC' 'sip-files00047.tif'
81bb4edda274b0b55e1a382223f71806
331d6aafb8bdaba093a8b2a207b8f6c5c98fab6f
'2011-12-12T23:29:02-05:00'
describe
'2149' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJD' 'sip-files00047.txt'
5cb2ce2019053387feea9ae1a695f9d7
e8046753c4a1160bfa819ff1edc386c3c09d7cd5
describe
Invalid character
'7664' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJE' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
2138447e917f375c84fb385907ab2502
5cf663caffbe378d8138b7f6a2780c0b9fdf4d5d
describe
'782363' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJF' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
83701ccbda99305f39bc31d8e39074a0
82cc10e7de61f88f80bd911fe50accd305d6a5c9
describe
'137062' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJG' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e02e894202c90cfb00750f5015bc0fe8
999873b99026e4422f3b6ab7e22ab22f242c0f9f
describe
'49225' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJH' 'sip-files00048.pro'
e88801b423ffe775f72df1d9208341fd
4d174d90b16cd95387778023dcd0d3bd9b649f00
describe
'34782' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJI' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
b1ff990d8162cfd427c9c9597ccb590b
a906d528556d2302d533aea23e9a3136ca14b48f
describe
'6280232' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJJ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d619e5752ad463b51adee3d5a49b763d
cea8b928b9e567e7eb2bec78723f2624aee0ee80
describe
'2801' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJK' 'sip-files00048.txt'
ea79fc6e2fb53034cc3b53931e2416d1
1c4b5310a4c0eefa0494bb555ab845f1c0a14e36
'2011-12-12T23:29:03-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8310' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
1187dbe0c1ce47231cf7d41a11815406
9ed5ddd34165a73fa4e27a25db501dac4b06c026
'2011-12-12T23:29:16-05:00'
describe
'751808' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJM' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
4a4e09257e1311894156de16fdabcd1d
16c1fc956ddef0941f079b73911657b53c69cb16
'2011-12-12T23:27:37-05:00'
describe
'121181' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJN' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b37d284e09618dc810ec5b8a9665a98f
96bf9461afc62c62d8d5a3bd612720114647bafa
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJO' 'sip-files00049.pro'
dda13c2c4b6fa5d2e622d870f8e41002
cb733da6a44a8ad442256a05a9cb4e20029c39a8
'2011-12-12T23:28:44-05:00'
describe
'29265' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
e761c13f243e67efc6af8d3e4b55c473
7fa6afe5ba2b95f32e99f841606759ad6e7fde81
'2011-12-12T23:27:06-05:00'
describe
'6035344' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJQ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
e5d2844482e986c311de86df29cce137
e1d0b0b5f8b08ab08caaa2c20d2ffca980ebd09b
'2011-12-12T23:29:46-05:00'
describe
'238' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJR' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5ba662419dbef2f6b6e7aded5e99d58d
05ad460bd9d317d0c152421b63617559f1700bd5
describe
'6802' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJS' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1f094313ff53a9c279661893eedfc400
9c0b363ddea22767c010246f91788eea337aa35d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJT' 'sip-files00050.tif'
6c5ea8e4d56bed27db77126b43d3040d
1cf5b0088c115f98a718fd455c885cf8904df7af
'2011-12-12T23:27:08-05:00'
describe
'782359' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJU' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
75baa7e4023a55cac897a17e49effe8e
6bab3902a25e21f5b2566bcee53ba7d002a1627d
describe
'135558' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJV' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
7771272432bf48d98855a06bba478e41
a8e7271b81fcb6905f167521242a47c8dce53623
'2011-12-12T23:29:32-05:00'
describe
'41134' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJW' 'sip-files00051.pro'
ecb513d17433ca717bdd9ee528cde04b
4f33a02d7e9f216249be96247eaf79f01b977dca
describe
'35263' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJX' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
8853413650f684c0592a22aad312c2af
ab4b9b6209469f946fce452be471aa0eda0d4c93
describe
'6280580' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJY' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ccc2ba7e1053406fcbfad50cb048c97b
280afbc25581c47504a4ff7927b23f6d03b7c1a3
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEJZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f35c8c618d06f839e320b067afe61f3c
a2029372705ad6bfaf4ecfb7614e3212de83cd53
describe
'8109' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKA' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
822cdcc54c3195e181c8b56a57ab92c8
2006e487c68f97bdf8cdcaf73dad178a4306ea53
'2011-12-12T23:26:55-05:00'
describe
'762731' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKB' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2afe126b1f21b04a1daac126d1c4927b
6363f10bcd3249a2da6af223d81653c838cc136c
describe
'145206' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKC' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
40dbe61ce35890ab3eab1b0a2dc24601
0ff4606f0c7301b7a7e525a36649b7b753efd530
describe
'45094' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKD' 'sip-files00052.pro'
ba6f4a34657e36276bcbd1018d8d4792
426d0bc192b620f5c0ff023f257b5fae90c06439
describe
'37214' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKE' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
784e49a85f47274d8ad06380e09253a8
fb28491bde564089781cc13e2278d7dde5d1c37a
'2011-12-12T23:31:50-05:00'
describe
'6123412' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKF' 'sip-files00052.tif'
a48f5b043c094265f0dbc9caabde7bf0
816ee8cfe942da9af568a08686c9a9776be4e8ef
describe
'2301' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKG' 'sip-files00052.txt'
1415b402e8b3823e1c73a059c96abf43
300044a3b8d8c7644b3c0433aa0a50a61ba37691
'2011-12-12T23:26:54-05:00'
describe
'8429' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKH' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
1c5c1cbc729ac9eeefb3491c80d19099
8fa9b69cbb582f2bc181f4c688c13b5c44849322
describe
'764868' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKI' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
696283c3d54d3dfcc4f57357391ccacd
b4a2b8dbddc719320a007b4409b604715da728c7
describe
'125744' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKJ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
8532e465293942d86258907a28e4ed44
84b07dfe5e2a70d656bf9f00c5ff236c5d686bb0
'2011-12-12T23:30:36-05:00'
describe
'40773' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKK' 'sip-files00053.pro'
8eee1be75dc869903dd24122cf1bcb6d
bf669f7cc8dba3b36c593b17340a1033f9d3212e
'2011-12-12T23:31:42-05:00'
describe
'32356' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKL' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5321d60887e987ddd3808c46d3da9e7d
df8c5a208c3506a6d1f2a2695fc1a7ee9ea9e989
describe
'6140604' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKM' 'sip-files00053.tif'
6a37e0069a12fed20ee060e52b8d5ec3
f7404310b97ec3fed538b3e0e92316f6ec6afe91
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKN' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f78a4fff0bf11eadcd6d7a6c42a4f7b1
f24bd77612254547612b7ffa0f2ef273cbadc671
'2011-12-12T23:26:38-05:00'
describe
'7694' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
4b42c03bb87992e4f8cedd4bebba4913
63864f498a0f44492307094c01bf1e235021039a
describe
'772664' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKP' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3d3290f1df874a1e742fb6fa77407a50
9688aaaefbd0890e2d3a1fab39072887575ec2b8
describe
'120744' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKQ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a180ffcd985f395ad07014b5e59e0b21
14d8a40392b65b31312a05fdcab0bafb139357cf
'2011-12-12T23:27:32-05:00'
describe
'54494' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKR' 'sip-files00054.pro'
7198abe606df051e7912c91037a17fb6
8cd2c2e312861651bd144c6a8a973026008dc1e9
describe
'30866' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKS' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
a4cbaed266a1489d077bf7a953588334
015ea994c9d93fa217589c9259e5a86672590c4c
'2011-12-12T23:30:23-05:00'
describe
'6202640' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKT' 'sip-files00054.tif'
a41917bc21823f9c4ed2f732972f3ce8
d89f5367025d18f4dc30124813d7bd12b8b4b4e5
describe
'2123' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKU' 'sip-files00054.txt'
097124997b57ced3598e1eef1cf5a085
60586a80e427936ed9a72a562c140409640a6765
'2011-12-12T23:27:52-05:00'
describe
'7085' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKV' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
012ba63ef9acb7e9413d499a17ff8cce
5a51faaec391b8df83936a202c83588a9e7581dc
describe
'745179' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKW' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
afc0f169e6b152154b20aa5f6ad04149
fd0459966b6ed8b34819560f8b89f3ed8b3a91bb
'2011-12-12T23:26:35-05:00'
describe
'94190' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKX' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
fb5330ff30cf2a3938edadab12dc469c
6d1c6a861fde841aaebbd99268dcb38dfc8c3145
describe
'39902' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKY' 'sip-files00055.pro'
ecc7c34499f76d148f9b363b1ce22fbe
26b64f1ad5f87ac720f1c4b96f512962c231f2ae
describe
'26435' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEKZ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c3dda392f15a44407c35c814fed4044a
80edb5ff5951bd812cd071a0b7e2736021f74548
'2011-12-12T23:29:45-05:00'
describe
'5982664' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELA' 'sip-files00055.tif'
00ae7d67018a85b7c326568517bd6dee
a53161ddf978849d4576896f1cce0b42c2f40878
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELB' 'sip-files00055.txt'
f65333421e841710f4ecc3647bc8d17c
2e031b56184d1b09ea8a747c7a718cab30ff4025
'2011-12-12T23:29:14-05:00'
describe
'6207' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELC' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
8da2c06d90f0088913c5903f1f447bc1
f5087f7391ecc2f0ef24e833dbdf2bb92bf2044c
'2011-12-12T23:30:26-05:00'
describe
'774290' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELD' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
873cf25f8b7ebf35a586227580c0867c
2ba6cc3f57341f74f270b08aa9c886e743f24edd
describe
'112005' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELE' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
14e7003b07d067f634202b885538a71c
221faa9dab52808d0c5347dbddb470f8a52d69af
describe
'35004' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELF' 'sip-files00056.pro'
2271c1567a94d18204d6fb6ca76922a4
5a628702050593c71e45a3d1481f37aba48288f1
'2011-12-12T23:27:39-05:00'
describe
'29048' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELG' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
04e461cb2326957fa327a2840f955d26
cfef4e776dead40a826a18d2497d8a00e9301c2f
'2011-12-12T23:27:29-05:00'
describe
'6215520' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELH' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c3115d758a285e3c071314caaae9eacd
41f5b297ac1ab005f0ccd3aaebc1825bc96173af
'2011-12-12T23:30:55-05:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELI' 'sip-files00056.txt'
50f00084b6cdc8f209a7dd7b104ebb86
1b424510a1e9d6eef0f432e124af973a0bce1fdd
'2011-12-12T23:28:01-05:00'
describe
'6567' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELJ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
542dc54e31587fb80d0a8080d35435fd
e57f5bfacbe2b27a0876580fa113a822245d0404
describe
'762722' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELK' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
fc36014d8550a2e2e205e03db9433682
3121027a6240a201e1ec504d180eb6e75c1d9375
describe
'110979' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELL' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
937f208fdaa27359309e1fdd7f07f9ad
1046150f77811ca76f29869cf5a9c36276bbea59
describe
'45201' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELM' 'sip-files00057.pro'
eb4e3e5551c9c03b4f45565829b80eb9
ce471bbbae3180d97dde822039f89224f97efb01
'2011-12-12T23:30:07-05:00'
describe
'29596' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELN' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
98703cae3ce6fa8bb7f88136e9660854
29613dcde1efd1e4d290db9d1afb8c0889c3c5af
'2011-12-12T23:28:28-05:00'
describe
'6122832' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELO' 'sip-files00057.tif'
bf352392bdb5fc6d7a2ac450ccb94d0b
50d3acccd3c627ebd9e089e691c5c3924bd0773e
describe
'1845' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELP' 'sip-files00057.txt'
6a4588b8a9eb43178a51056f6e5183c7
36f5f221480596df32bc5d3f484455b53bb75498
describe
'7056' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELQ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
fa5c4d614f933acc55ae238785a336d2
3e75f9a5eb85da60aadb1121239b93639fb9e63b
'2011-12-12T23:29:17-05:00'
describe
'771065' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELR' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f4100a5b2f8415e5980a681acabcb0f8
79c098a7969651998fbc5d70b7fb87c713e25b63
describe
'112685' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELS' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
b93ff8fabb8b2b0badd85b737eaa6dbd
8efd9e50fbfd80877db99111e9dcb4908f4593e9
describe
'45983' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELT' 'sip-files00058.pro'
467ea8239e1af3300b8c8be1bfe7b4cb
4643786747a209783f112bef482ff102e848b0b1
describe
'29427' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELU' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
1702c97d6035c108b079887e8f8c6d5c
0da35fd00d6206287e6b45df8592e66da9a540fa
'2011-12-12T23:30:39-05:00'
describe
'6189736' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELV' 'sip-files00058.tif'
6620f53e5bdb65b2c3217eab65460ce8
2704e1a06dbd4b55792c49a103b4aae3e98859f6
'2011-12-12T23:31:09-05:00'
describe
'2341' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELW' 'sip-files00058.txt'
1b6c5f62153af70af4e7e06e0ff71260
e495863d1654fad207b8b4c5f77a47843793e50f
describe
'6828' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELX' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b64df4eac49f04fb0a30b5b706584f76
cf06feaf307d17edc26fd4de80751b7c43fa19e7
describe
'743060' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELY' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
345d02dfe0487e4c8e43f88cac837aa6
c37b604080c2ec6d569a9ad8dc087415bb6e488d
'2011-12-12T23:26:19-05:00'
describe
'55566' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABELZ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
a0ed481685ada355c7f31330e0aad0ae
e80c0060a8b8e7bf0549b834be18e23a0718c975
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMA' 'sip-files00059.pro'
6c94c5b1edc72f001b6bff3c0a75a781
076ca690939392597b02303e001edcefa7c902c2
'2011-12-12T23:28:23-05:00'
describe
'13773' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMB' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
fe4351e8ec32a3958a65ce4cf00efebf
1cebd74d429a67f7545431c0639c705052ce0ae3
describe
'5965592' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMC' 'sip-files00059.tif'
1a398269225027c7cf7609110c8500dc
8ae988d875c44cafb45402f5f0749bfe0d3a700e
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMD' 'sip-files00059.txt'
ef544d8bcd3a375a5658285da38641ba
ea1c37e436b60dd10b708d9fe34d1d5ec9c493e1
describe
'3526' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEME' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
a48415d06dc7ac5e9e24a8498929e377
dcec17b588543692cc1d6fd7120eb8a555213f61
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMF' 'sip-files00060.tif'
69d787d52268c7ca84c16a0e511fdd5a
2154b88c76a1799e13667234c6c338f275fdeb50
'2011-12-12T23:28:55-05:00'
describe
'766980' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
34e88109d7c8e66543ee23cf5305115c
bc09eacca8fc9716b0c3de38390f72861423637d
'2011-12-12T23:30:12-05:00'
describe
'111649' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
6a4fde9cd55102294fc5ed2dd6e48439
f79321924920dcb58f2f6f392d624f36a5a80592
describe
'22484' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMI' 'sip-files00061.pro'
3362f2ccafe89506a8bcee559a6ce62f
dd880510947852cced7cb4952801f14abbb95c0e
'2011-12-12T23:31:52-05:00'
describe
'27858' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
082dfdbd2860d6dcd473aa49bd22a913
f6151bba1d0e65a68514a29a136b362ce1700d89
'2011-12-12T23:29:38-05:00'
describe
'6157760' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
cb889a3bbfd7767539a249f17d6eb682
546fff2f3acb8556f16e8b36edfb5ec611d4b7c8
'2011-12-12T23:27:40-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEML' 'sip-files00061.txt'
1b715cc2ec7c46ab60bac3fbc6d7d7e2
170a626f14049d5c1b8176fbde3d11a04b49003a
describe
Invalid character
'6931' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
77436e270fc054976c292ae23b51c289
a7e60a3ced04cd933d3c9a2021e64864da27c078
describe
'782317' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMN' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4106838dfd36273239bd96c24b172a0a
35d6a98df119169e970445ca8a794f9e7c308c39
describe
'109649' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
9502a90394a2e5c7fc4cab638b083e4c
b5e29b4325b97d7c23d6a83a7d64bad0f14d9393
describe
'53644' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
71ff3d71d31f2de1e3070de39657af87
bbac8294ef4bbbd9ff93e0018e4c5867f5a798b3
'2011-12-12T23:29:26-05:00'
describe
'27818' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
9989f2c8dca73d1a70099e650734284e
22bc99b406ff7dbe8e2c1435bf0df5165ceef807
describe
'6279888' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
0c756538f850c01384fdfd42f67ac34f
e6c6c4438550d1fa6d65dc0f24a36e26928d1585
'2011-12-12T23:26:53-05:00'
describe
'2095' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
fb24983ea1674188a35f6be13de45d73
5958fbdfcd39bbc5f15dbced27095282b2756a28
'2011-12-12T23:31:48-05:00'
describe
'6314' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
9e9f4dd75f7dd7b106c94d9c784b2c46
04cec1931f7620a228d7f4fc41382a97772dc4ac
describe
'764902' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
195d9e4573c1586e09c8efd9168aaaa8
1828ebca1fa48750541b342a7ddc9c039c2ffffb
describe
'118494' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
726224c69566ae5f3c8e7f5d5c960d71
44ab9885034faecc9fb2e9bfc2cffd226e5091c6
'2011-12-12T23:26:33-05:00'
describe
'49241' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
4c7387d49a4f6485e4cb3a70a6cc30e1
dfa8a5ebcab99628b681e11b825fc16593fa1be9
'2011-12-12T23:28:50-05:00'
describe
'30327' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
2bf544bec703a5b752a8a986763087ea
94d324ed1d6cbe62f387bd1353ffec18a69d0365
'2011-12-12T23:26:11-05:00'
describe
'6140184' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
38111e9da8546ed9ba0dbdbb6d8b3dc2
065b25f075d9bf2714e6d755323baf6390086eda
describe
'1938' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEMZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
890f9b0705efa44cad808a4f0ebcf1da
90ba888d52bda3c791cd8ad4f091e1e003d09024
describe
'7271' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
624249d7489037fb58d28493507a5ae5
6fc2c25239e1b603e4310d0a6edbeeb3f744deed
describe
'771045' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
b9a249661c7cc1bed98c21a7462d6200
9f58cdb9259f9dd6038badcae6530c2de6062654
'2011-12-12T23:26:50-05:00'
describe
'95494' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
202e08703b4b599b706c6c139babc0ae
c6a213c06560ab231ccd98d5a2e7ce0443c4b01b
describe
'38444' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEND' 'sip-files00064.pro'
402ccb0378ae9b5568bca409d5dc2f3f
e10a7f5fc9eb358bfd26629950263d7c3b465ff9
describe
'24701' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
26cc67d0d2e0fe0315b6017a2e846ac0
7cf8c9d16ba935ab2e3fca49272c4d3dfb8c55e9
describe
'6188960' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
a32fc83e2ece500d6c1125d79a273395
7d47035186ae7bfcaabb4ae7dd37098f56bb07bb
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
90bf0d7ead498bbe9e58193e70794e36
3e7a443097a584588219fabb3afac0d34b00509f
describe
'5804' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
a74f7d1d73f14bd8c84e7202b079adfe
34b36a2e07b8ed3b77b31b6c4906544e1b90dea5
'2011-12-12T23:29:37-05:00'
describe
'782160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
90ea947faadb086bec7bfd2e6d8c10df
619890e9ba166ad8d3a519f598e6eebaf8371242
describe
'119324' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
bb3f6429dc72f44198e683d185336ad6
34e4dffc5fdf9def343c082f120241839cca8517
describe
'23566' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
8ab4845a38678365c3942bc700708bbc
44a0683e4ceff795c23016b3d4c3f596dd6197a8
'2011-12-12T23:31:37-05:00'
describe
'29101' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
f071d3b44f191adcaccccb9169772aac
12a526be0688442ae646c9cbfc221e044cf1e4ef
'2011-12-12T23:29:33-05:00'
describe
'6279564' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
1c3ec88270214773ac461e2da32ecde8
6975b17c04754d5d4357ccb9772036c386db462e
'2011-12-12T23:31:20-05:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
5a1e819c8781e2ab6c5cd43638304cee
fd537bc78c35956cccf98946f4b03c8aa3b4e092
'2011-12-12T23:26:40-05:00'
describe
'7067' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
3d323702f79517224f759b7aa114025b
9a262d3ec1d9917f3eb35cb14cc66e78b75236f7
describe
'767826' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
21a80846236259c6f6af3b058859838b
31678b116b318a248c5377e343f1abaa8666508b
describe
'118502' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
2f511b74446ad0ebebf5a87572cad875
a920984568d051f94ccb936c1bf7ec3cbba1cfc0
'2011-12-12T23:27:24-05:00'
describe
'53413' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
8148c575f42e67e57dfc58d0f5d89e07
5b213195f71335aff044d02129335d78e62da773
'2011-12-12T23:26:56-05:00'
describe
'30546' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
568938e03ed26895e3a86709fe183609
4683721f0185c7d58de0789ac7b590e3e7128dcd
'2011-12-12T23:31:05-05:00'
describe
'6164032' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
a893ffaa3fdb7c32ffd8201126175e34
cdfabeb4d2f756d128a1c7ca7ada552a28971c95
'2011-12-12T23:27:55-05:00'
describe
'2423' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
c5b82eaa75e443d6ab21f15c7e4a1db3
a2524a9f334db8fe313340502eab34ab24ec5f11
describe
'6661' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
9e5deabdb401913a202d28fba92e0819
b8c89a3199d07cfff7fb1aadaea6c50d68edd0b7
'2011-12-12T23:31:14-05:00'
describe
'764458' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d62fe98f818431913bc6eff862fb6b77
73435ce9ce28155c2555bfb7953a7bf888c0c2b2
'2011-12-12T23:32:04-05:00'
describe
'61460' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
9a7884a0752048c9982a9e67daa005e5
7f5a507fa69177ba17f95c0fff11435d26cefa95
describe
'2014' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
69ad4ace775e1fb827ed0a5d39b0c34e
30bc3f672527b687bb933ab92a00727062ffc4db
describe
'14400' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABENZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
a5f56443b74464fb4ecb665652449512
eca920bf4f89c666cb4c22f886f2e688fca8b62c
'2011-12-12T23:28:29-05:00'
describe
'6137108' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
bac9f84cae025f1200485f51803c43f7
822a4225b9b06187e6fcd27aeb75652e8094fd06
'2011-12-12T23:29:27-05:00'
describe
'126' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
17d447ef4aa4d81eb60b6e0a500bf1fc
169c534122d881f50df85378f668a47e3c8a4279
'2011-12-12T23:31:23-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3692' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
38eb98b3f9cb59d182ffe9d26a1a5636
dada87cd9b5f18df040db9f28b6543eea3754c9e
'2011-12-12T23:26:32-05:00'
describe
'6276196' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOD' 'sip-files00068.tif'
4b69e526aabd918fb0db71a00d5c2b5f
e08825441f6d6fb44f7fd4b6366e72d28f773040
describe
'771450' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOE' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
fde369470aa6cdaca638871d50b64ec1
2e0f6b37c56f51aeec6694e6dfa8c44940b4a2e0
'2011-12-12T23:27:28-05:00'
describe
'122615' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOF' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a62e357d8bc24a5fda1179da73c717b4
6bfc0555c38b204c2e12a67a65014ff3773fe1f9
'2011-12-12T23:30:45-05:00'
describe
'57064' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOG' 'sip-files00069.pro'
c5a7eb24c706a50a4bb3ae2504b11a2f
b03ceed03d90c6a8c8dd0006dd8303e5a33bf2b5
'2011-12-12T23:27:43-05:00'
describe
'32672' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOH' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
a37572da207fe245168e21b523868a14
79db53f796a1021ea1d3e2721b54202907434017
describe
'6192728' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOI' 'sip-files00069.tif'
bc55b838ae870a927cc507a896489f34
f459838b0ca46f0d1cd92a4cafc951a22afe2632
'2011-12-12T23:28:43-05:00'
describe
'2224' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOJ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
968da7402101a5e8037a6befe76930b7
45a490ef6a962b4dd5df02b33e8317e4ea454cb5
'2011-12-12T23:30:43-05:00'
describe
'7804' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOK' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
5abda21b5fd121cb9ee512e77416488e
1140fe597e2da9a86a5cef56eb9172db443bac1d
describe
'771022' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOL' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e22dc08c7ca80856766daf6e5057d7be
de89ec18676e258b9090f08a72c7e5670f47846b
describe
'116307' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOM' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
90f8d660b0976220547f836e58888587
ea2981db769697348b487dd462d2db15cf66a326
describe
'40303' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEON' 'sip-files00070.pro'
7c9d2b8daaa923d5dc80763cc87556df
cf5fb83bf95b92c924acb38aa5eb106d8fd6e99b
describe
'31371' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOO' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
ee90d62f55f645dbfee9cec8a6d34ea7
e3ba4b8e030e040ce994caacd98739820720c67c
describe
'6190156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOP' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b6be43d40786f3537e48a85ab14b6628
f65e37a5344e09a41eeb9fc5851d9dacbdae7960
describe
'1901' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOQ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
22f02e3ccb356b52d8ea610ac58881a7
0b0bb549e1a1748fd6419349a56928a246742e26
describe
'7434' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOR' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
e0882223ca491071870d62a142b8f7c1
4e4a8a4b8794a6210f927b75e448f10db216cb8b
'2011-12-12T23:28:40-05:00'
describe
'760543' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOS' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
7aeb351d26e292193fc38a77b9fad496
97c75f0703e58286a02f25677df508bb2558f49b
'2011-12-12T23:29:15-05:00'
describe
'123193' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOT' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
5ffdfe5e5167caca0323940bbe795025
10cece566a6ac7ca4f9136e4556fa21d849058a0
'2011-12-12T23:28:42-05:00'
describe
'43881' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOU' 'sip-files00071.pro'
f6b1bb3830cf4fcb9ad256a496e64005
035adc5b82d56af9be3bac40acc8fe420c9edd2b
'2011-12-12T23:28:25-05:00'
describe
'33293' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOV' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
624441605d91860bebb6754f6b94109d
8fe75993838886b5891c890a216316b3130ff8e2
describe
'6105724' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOW' 'sip-files00071.tif'
64429d58d5fc4778ced263609d9188f7
56ae436ab4856858176d0415de9e72793601e3f6
describe
'1758' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOX' 'sip-files00071.txt'
afe01005f57f608477426311ea1bfef5
0af32b2323ad948e4fb994b6bee84808b4cbf8bb
'2011-12-12T23:28:00-05:00'
describe
'7914' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOY' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
424fb3f611c2986fb085ba5dfabb65d8
1f0821f16a66cd7535fbdaae7da005ec560791b1
describe
'770999' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEOZ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8bb18f55d6d86747a23e41ec8b19fd40
2d86bc2870befb496f25896dd9c358aee8d2ae9a
describe
'97232' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPA' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
b90adf25e6fbc9f96493d4a8653ada77
fe7b37153fff444348574997b0bb6748261a6076
describe
'38818' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPB' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ee23569e2d755a69700a7e89d8941370
b55fd843d94cfa6e19989fb0f8a24abbc4697d1c
'2011-12-12T23:29:12-05:00'
describe
'25156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPC' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
c99bd6bcf1fceb91255d167de6af3558
efa4c96f6d1fd871a40beeb61ba4ba42db7bbafc
describe
'6188868' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPD' 'sip-files00072.tif'
d0f4379e410ad71256da7282e61c6def
084cd66c52c51d97382354666d351d34fcae00de
'2011-12-12T23:29:05-05:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPE' 'sip-files00072.txt'
9293d5762bdedd5afd56d16d430f595f
ce3055a612e722f0c571a121ea4c528d3485bef5
describe
'5762' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPF' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
611ad9e43f0854125f5ea4662eec3597
b1d5fd64346eb7cf187fe07e7ea1260810d19253
describe
'762724' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPG' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
572b87902a43a7884ba070b465573d9b
8be2b0a37bf22e9fde94c1e7a91e6915421224f4
describe
'121399' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPH' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
7ddc40da3027c2c2dabbbf8cabcf83c1
ea573d711f9b0eb199f8f6a65712c12c98b55b4d
describe
'47153' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPI' 'sip-files00073.pro'
ccfc651c3ea694a9bc6812ba76eb04bc
1f01606f08d70ff74fdb2fd33ef37f6031f4f723
'2011-12-12T23:26:29-05:00'
describe
'32966' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPJ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
cbbab3cbbebf5b84a4fe3fb1c2ef17a5
d075762d0cf452be494d175ccb5bb74bbbddf615
describe
'6123164' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPK' 'sip-files00073.tif'
132962935539f59dffa44bc10ae58163
7db14b0ff25ea08314e141f457ffad05b30d006f
describe
'1959' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPL' 'sip-files00073.txt'
e2aa69379124a67e84077c97a0012b97
7864634a2d9f2a8811a3847ffb40e873de03e72c
'2011-12-12T23:31:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7689' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPM' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
94694c2167e775613303d12c6f3096cc
6c7f444220831a4b27bab820f1e78d84015fa0c8
describe
'771031' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPN' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
6384caa8856cac4bf5d9b26bcb8dedf9
df276f48078707c2d665c73381dc1b9e7310076b
'2011-12-12T23:29:49-05:00'
describe
'107674' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPO' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
0456451afc9378729931ef50b03d5fca
527a96594d0f3c8bd8373049bd20fe1061239791
describe
'30723' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPP' 'sip-files00074.pro'
bcfc6bf95eb38450e36ebbed934069a3
3053a986a52518795a2a83c369e639d352a29f82
'2011-12-12T23:27:36-05:00'
describe
'27957' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPQ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
18ed1b22b25beee9907aa08e1b3b0160
47104a227d4cd5d31b788f087a5645b1d0ea9a21
'2011-12-12T23:28:54-05:00'
describe
'6189540' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPR' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c8b3c81708c9db0b3507eaea87a420bf
3aa5ed961aa2d49c21cf25bafb11a436e1c048bb
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPS' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f8690c5456f36684f2c035b7097425e4
70a29e63c8c27ab32ec1522dda14ac832c97b618
'2011-12-12T23:27:03-05:00'
describe
'6348' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPT' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
7d9d9cfb602f329dc6959d8450f1ba8d
ce0c794e1aef031cc3d83683c0c5437e74d492c7
describe
'762900' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPU' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
423933ef59cb7a4e56d410c4893d49f6
b081cbff5941ae40e84a6da4044a9478af771e22
'2011-12-12T23:27:50-05:00'
describe
'111855' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPV' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
1685c8a5ac86ce8bd4804bdbfe590828
e0bf90d10955880aba63508207d98f28d1ed4952
describe
'38799' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPW' 'sip-files00075.pro'
6405bc9a96306952853e22ace615cea4
26a6717f633d260928fefec2a82f053795387a07
describe
'30000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPX' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
62803e7a5eb36b375ae2513c989b3398
cec4bf88c636c9ed96105565447206de3bf814b2
describe
'6124864' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPY' 'sip-files00075.tif'
e6ae57f7ffca8414aa02cf34bda163e7
213c859f319c00e366444fd8aad73ae65db86672
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEPZ' 'sip-files00075.txt'
779fcf53668a9e96501a7b6db0e24a7c
4e66dccb846d906727d6eaa6ce62ca617ac71b97
describe
'7381' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQA' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
cb49600b92bc323bb6e08e1d217f03f4
d134206cd5e5ecb70f65afc923c336166dce9c9f
describe
'769438' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQB' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
ad0cd631aa5fc0f3484e87d7873f7a43
76cf4364b3d538d913f963cc946ab6017c64f531
'2011-12-12T23:32:16-05:00'
describe
'125028' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQC' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
0b9cd1e03d99263051610fbc69524ff2
2ddafb98efed2736fbadc2064dd2b090fc56ffa6
'2011-12-12T23:26:48-05:00'
describe
'54944' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQD' 'sip-files00076.pro'
8a71165c5ec3481d20ca58f3dcb79dde
6a9d16738602d45f5b83def85a61899413eb3e6c
describe
'31738' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQE' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
b74eb1168e88a301706401509a330d01
a1c7f3f0cffe93e5a9d69f7a13b68b1fbdb579fc
describe
'6176888' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQF' 'sip-files00076.tif'
050c2bcc9c615e5d88f4e28f9bde4ee8
72469c3bb67d93ecad8ac360f3587a3ffd305d0a
describe
'2141' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQG' 'sip-files00076.txt'
f44aa8232dfab9982f2fe0c6150e7a2a
8fb1d4ba23fa56346f10198febeaef57c036f1a7
describe
'7125' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQH' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
0783613edc389e1c071b0fcb1ffcea86
1d7b1dbb236f5dfc7715f5d139de2f1c004b5349
describe
'749465' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQI' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
e6483bd6bf1656ea59385c3a1c11e445
ced3f0ebd5b47d8ea14b7f581fa25decaa76a828
describe
'61265' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQJ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
3a7a34854681f6e04666e3c3ffab1e40
9d3d5f87c98eb21b88f3163c59aeb4c314af0650
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQK' 'sip-files00077.pro'
12d66a6d099de8483934443579c849e9
771c1230ba678e090cd60bf5f667b0c4d8d44776
'2011-12-12T23:30:38-05:00'
describe
'14486' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQL' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
0c59ae6c4c96fdfecbe2eb636f3d2770
2178135a3919cc487f50be26f89de13d027602f5
'2011-12-12T23:26:17-05:00'
describe
'6017156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQM' 'sip-files00077.tif'
64b77995b914add8ced3768c16eb5e30
489fb3f84b6eecda2f95d0e7eb4e06e28f3e9eeb
'2011-12-12T23:28:17-05:00'
describe
'139' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQN' 'sip-files00077.txt'
5a7a01d0adb0b06fb19c1838ff7ecef1
81ca70bb7dc273f33fda8d7e09a116c26858e81d
describe
'3673' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQO' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
143706331a6b5f26bb286fb202c2a9eb
d7c059945cce880e9895b7b8e201d7cf596e80dd
describe
'782334' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQP' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
eacbb215081e35ecc35d765d9700d3ed
4ab992c3807f82f1d9d45de0fab1d780724173e8
describe
'16898' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQQ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
9d06aa64d399577f2bdcf05a5e4e72c6
4ad70c32f5c28d44897a7eb670f03c87c4176f4d
'2011-12-12T23:28:35-05:00'
describe
'3484' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQR' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
29219f4a7857f024f9c3956a566b2613
98fb44d479373f9ccb67a1b4c31bd8b9fbc4e7f5
describe
'6276324' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQS' 'sip-files00078.tif'
0cdc9b0b7529730f5e9770880a898f83
9978f0831c195f98b4923659a1ca8a7bebfb9487
'2011-12-12T23:25:54-05:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQT' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
37f004fefd526c8b34230f4e18cb922f
3ae8be2c3e90bc1d7505c2a7049c1f39602a3dc4
describe
'782358' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQU' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
6503a0da54f356a9ec794d85deeb5aff
d7f0d0d5da7b8878188f8fa870e67b40dfc8d1c1
describe
'120515' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQV' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
0998d8be46a8d10450ee319b7e1261d3
75b05e63cdea7437b021646628e14843da99a9bb
describe
'55910' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQW' 'sip-files00079.pro'
9ad6cb1c4029f1e5161309f932f4e7f2
af173d6314676dad4c60196516a00babe46bcfe1
describe
'31338' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQX' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
d492c444d031c4d07ecf61ba4053cab4
a130a4d16a2da3ef076a2b026e90914f49c24fee
describe
'6280144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQY' 'sip-files00079.tif'
fc5ec730e7337c5ffee4b629cd4af5bd
b44516ccff4458e6b6b0ada29cf223462d1577a7
'2011-12-12T23:29:47-05:00'
describe
'2179' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEQZ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
17a31434b5399d3ddf8a6e0121f27503
617862f0fb90d4c7b24bfec51976fbffaec23d76
describe
'7363' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERA' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
5154b65fa40aa75c52302ce56a2a1ff5
6b26325719b296c772af961eb4de78c7c78d9757
describe
'782284' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERB' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
221e3ed7e150c4b35a6c6fa2d9d0cb37
eebeb2638b718abff6d344d2d81f74fde71cd39b
'2011-12-12T23:28:53-05:00'
describe
'111927' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERC' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
887c84bf1edad5f8106cc79420f4bebd
b3455169ae7886052fc0c34f5222746ff497f347
describe
'47529' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERD' 'sip-files00080.pro'
7290969fb49c38e24966649986774a3a
62a58c2999e966afd835395073c57cd24c474f59
describe
'29232' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERE' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
e5922114e631bb70b18e257f7ca1f6a6
9a6afb94e5670a57a66f0938a8f547b6f98371f7
'2011-12-12T23:26:51-05:00'
describe
'6280196' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERF' 'sip-files00080.tif'
db3d63f91bf440eaac241dddb6302fa2
62a6f2cfbbd0f48dcb51451b4d49fcff3e059a49
describe
'2135' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERG' 'sip-files00080.txt'
b9c5d9fe6ceef7ca90e4f5d8310e968d
4231c3621dec4325ce7bbbd7711d2f289a19d229
describe
'6717' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERH' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
84a45de09b93034654e662ec28a15fe3
ab30fd54cb032fb576b1740672b92ecf91a12218
describe
'764861' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERI' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d0c0351a288c85841d8261c2648d7b0e
f7c9488f32c5eb49660f5395b4288c6360f7b1a6
describe
'116012' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERJ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
d785ea851e2404a61fab9aa270d2a4ad
8b27ea41c9872c566c625dc37cf3ecc35ac06c36
describe
'48839' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERK' 'sip-files00081.pro'
dd896bcb56ac87cfe92162f6d221e88f
0b8f1289367d1ea24e055ecc18d8d6c3da7816ee
'2011-12-12T23:29:19-05:00'
describe
'30949' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERL' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
684ccce8b7b401167c98fd2af882d964
16266c1fa38b10819c1b64d060c7423538fe75cc
describe
'6140332' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERM' 'sip-files00081.tif'
cbc84d60d417e89df5f70449274ec9cb
772fc536d6a133f4672f2be7e88df19402a609fb
'2011-12-12T23:29:52-05:00'
describe
'1966' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERN' 'sip-files00081.txt'
8837629840a469c386b5ea84ebaec045
a84a2df57e4970fb2e236454d057f0f192727c0d
describe
'7305' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERO' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
41761987fdf551d2290f38a8e627ba08
e7e922d929415bb94b20960dd2b00af9933580f2
'2011-12-12T23:29:42-05:00'
describe
'767817' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERP' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
c365646cb9cc0fb57a89ffa5cc6a61bb
4e931da6d8f7a722b734b57be51b5301331f685c
describe
'90100' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERQ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
2ab26912a02f86f805d90e945402a6d4
4616a3f05591a28ae0d25e9bf1f748469faf85a3
describe
'37389' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERR' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5df4144a7bb0f0f1dca9f958bd5fae44
76b46f93be31e3be9d02716cc2834b29efd8e972
describe
'24104' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERS' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f345ae115dc05a3be79024a491b5419c
c96fed9befb0b7c55c8c15da5a3cb71045cf17d6
describe
'6163024' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERT' 'sip-files00082.tif'
21af616007ebd185ab6622d1dea9ee1c
a75ff8d56d9a8d7ed23d68077d4c3640967b6291
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERU' 'sip-files00082.txt'
f2d514f17db51a9bc9a281225a82c166
d9d8d468e10a8ad56bd6275db4598b594324d4c9
describe
'5629' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERV' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8ab1e3e55405b54c2220b21ed4a1571f
0bf10e25b2e91855e5c93ae75bbbc17f54491130
describe
'771451' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERW' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
0cb7247d8e11718a8541854269f97a14
284e9a21eddaedf613693ddcacbb527580639f88
describe
'118530' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERX' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
699b0e8d4623bb07ac7700c191740ded
9017664181938714b7fe260238ccf7da369d4cbd
describe
'47280' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERY' 'sip-files00083.pro'
aeee8834d284761397192fd4384a1d1f
6393cd87afb5df89de1c6ec99af20ed18865a8b9
'2011-12-12T23:31:43-05:00'
describe
'31536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABERZ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
f346b2e4a761277e31db20e37086e55a
967abbfa72483606293fe70aa9847e16bb5909c9
describe
'6193136' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESA' 'sip-files00083.tif'
42bb50a5626959d72c9a1f585fd3cc69
6b93d728c8b94e004953e8a4da855f023e9be270
'2011-12-12T23:27:38-05:00'
describe
'2220' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1e0579e813a4621c8c1bb1d0a43c59de
04bf974612a701b1e83249da2d86b447bddce479
'2011-12-12T23:26:22-05:00'
describe
'7542' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESC' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
dadbc2cc456d71779396802a44952df2
c9163ff7e1b47802779d57bc52e32c5a71a7c7e0
describe
'769449' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESD' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
839002c568f519e3dddf4c11a3201d82
b5b07ef1ef4aa2d3eb05487457aff26ac65c8f29
describe
'122014' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESE' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e730afe087fb936268c7722afa3edfc1
e99455a7db501ba99601429ecd9789dda43e8813
describe
'19753' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESF' 'sip-files00084.pro'
ed3eaf76a67741cca88a77554ff0c10d
849bdd18014285658482fe79a1151f03d89d69f1
describe
'29218' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESG' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
03e8bc2b151cf04b73b24c4485a28766
db2097e455a224777d2fc3b07f8e72be438233b9
'2011-12-12T23:26:04-05:00'
describe
'6176464' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESH' 'sip-files00084.tif'
cc1321fcf716f37df885f5fc6883c0ce
694a8959ba0f50379d8c84ee362ae41a1f24fac9
'2011-12-12T23:30:33-05:00'
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESI' 'sip-files00084.txt'
4200dd938524de35f8627a7652245279
21d8fd5e68f8652f0baccd659988fd518ffcc096
describe
'6965' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESJ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
3cc5d8cd23f26431bed063afbb1d7e42
6cc4743ea8781614b4d7f90fc23c9c99f0d6f87d
'2011-12-12T23:30:56-05:00'
describe
'758340' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESK' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
4cc17d281427ff58cb34dd59645f2549
e73225c3d346d9984b4721745ab03e46aae65d5b
describe
'116111' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESL' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
99b1113ae6cd2ce48c85b64c5fb93b1e
825160347cd9eba02afa41f0427c91c3c3d89e1c
describe
'53548' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESM' 'sip-files00085.pro'
0d4a579e4ba4e8fa8be5059db2f25691
b4d1962203853acff463e5d9902a8b81cf1a2515
describe
'30474' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESN' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
22139dbd07e77346876f6976f7642cac
d291893990de25238a57048b2179b8675248db46
describe
'6088228' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESO' 'sip-files00085.tif'
cf31a34c6eafdcc9f1b80ab76aa501ad
a712479ed454e4283edef2591150ae1cadf2c63f
describe
'2093' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESP' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5abac7177de0bcf018c2419f48bc66f4
50595662ebedf7a0b800c8e3830a4e161cc79062
'2011-12-12T23:31:29-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7447' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESQ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
d0b9686a42c30ab521792b030a4e48dc
7c9daf588ab22b4dd5e6915ae4c584bacd56b419
describe
'775892' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESR' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f934719a4642cef1c15bb212bcf77b2a
2b61bfcc813ed4bb1e343a21b0bb2c839c31dca4
describe
'111504' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESS' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
c35ff391cec8823842ccad774a5ca692
43258ebfea0f36d5270cd2ef06d310ae9fbb7e88
describe
'50562' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEST' 'sip-files00086.pro'
a260f7192f45da9a4b102f9a4a2b3a17
61330e42899523987731641f208607809d602a18
'2011-12-12T23:31:07-05:00'
describe
'28208' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESU' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
02689eba0fdf775f3edd25b05d5f69a5
2cfc3382e9af284bfa5be007e406626a82e9cede
'2011-12-12T23:31:55-05:00'
describe
'6228124' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESV' 'sip-files00086.tif'
91f28ee0b9e361aaccc3045b773389ca
c100932e37928fffc88c6fd87d6b5303ec96d3f3
'2011-12-12T23:26:03-05:00'
describe
'2293' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESW' 'sip-files00086.txt'
da74b364b12c607bbe300effa82917a5
97562cfcee1b4165025742d95ce5eec05adb789a
'2011-12-12T23:30:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6506' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESX' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
9ea30f8dba8a813c810e8121be1fcb01
5de98e5fbe0725caded33abe22c46bc3a0a9fb57
describe
'760496' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESY' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
3b608988ecb035dc3eddc9512efade61
11cb1bee6b6150c484d3fc1cee3fc77648365211
describe
'91408' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABESZ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
f4a4e301a6180470a6bd863d3fd0b1ff
e48485b35ec73c26dde77b0f68b5603089c76911
describe
'1818' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETA' 'sip-files00087.pro'
d5f065516c5eb4719712e33d3bc29ce0
699679684231dabac48bdffc058ddf65f84aaa08
describe
'20779' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETB' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
672fac83ab1eb93de31cf2cbb9e83409
ab73cfe84980fd3df363ddd3e7f017d4bbee69d8
describe
'6104316' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETC' 'sip-files00087.tif'
91e72a9d2e81b0aed49fd1a41e20c379
ac598c42f7e55d39c1eaed9d49773ff48973befc
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETD' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9f78130b2b89dd1c36272968c062f4d4
86db260a91d8597c6ce5585f528750135f2358fe
describe
'5252' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETE' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
7207deee93b46116c8ad889a668e9e07
c0780f0cfb2edc7222adb07c01a76234716114e9
describe
'782138' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETF' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
681f4df7533e4cbbfa280a7056a189e5
eb02014b995e23069b383d15314e82ef016b370b
describe
'21556' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETG' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
29f99ff2532fd759da2a9ebc7b3ab784
3faef4de5ee4d05c50a747b09f1eeeadada3bcf0
'2011-12-12T23:30:46-05:00'
describe
'3759' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETH' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
33a259f0c622a14c356c39ebd7c2d7b0
aed3b43506c917048a6a339eab9be116bb2d5d65
describe
'6276316' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETI' 'sip-files00088.tif'
8c9b10d9bfab882fb31752e7acc95a75
b68f1699f168dc86d2cd89ef6fcb71de291d402d
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
dda1e3ed29f20f477378949d8503a6dd
4165303289ccfbf7a41881e2c304adcd4839b09e
'2011-12-12T23:26:45-05:00'
describe
'767095' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
1d1184841dbd1decea881c5c3a8ce6f4
26a2bdefdb4731eae5c2d516954aff7afc1c30de
describe
'119638' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
2e810f4d60e18d1ac43b1cc719d51776
e764544a41df10de629d47d7de857471f8f86553
describe
'50086' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETM' 'sip-files00089.pro'
4c01924999d67f4936cb73e0bc0a4e7e
39de6b793bbd1ae952c5741386141468dc106507
describe
'31804' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
2337c102d8e6d20c97008cf0e2eb6410
8ecab9c3aeca0d1d2e37eb2977fc2e202eedce97
'2011-12-12T23:26:27-05:00'
describe
'6158008' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
9ae69d86d7d1c9bd49211542164bdd3b
9aba98968daf2bf0346ff640553e6325dab067ee
'2011-12-12T23:27:22-05:00'
describe
'1971' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETP' 'sip-files00089.txt'
259fbaefbb9f004f94f4d8471878920f
22d77c2728444746a0886ab50366381cced7428e
describe
'7691' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETQ' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
a8aee41d28ee23400fefaf87dc79dd6a
083c55e99e4d8365135af2376ec4eeaabe758204
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETR' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
6d9e29856d3ca339e34c2c55e0039a9d
f530eaedc4b70a64e1147395eef59a20c5017395
'2011-12-12T23:28:49-05:00'
describe
'110900' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETS' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
ad37b5aa87925dc7bde734bd260fea0a
27e5f7203a22f56c4c0b7a539bf2e35e4d96eaa9
describe
'47622' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETT' 'sip-files00090.pro'
83634497947b21cdcc57e2e627b6b191
0e595354bec8727f9055f72926f45220a371c4e3
describe
'28660' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
a2ea1d98264eefd13bea51992f982069
59bc9a3ccb4e0f2a7836a037f1f7f200c9c797d5
describe
'6279864' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETV' 'sip-files00090.tif'
3734e99a9cf9988a73c99b3d58e5ea60
9c1223b0b7399d0e77283c0a5f895f76c65ea26a
'2011-12-12T23:31:21-05:00'
describe
'2183' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETW' 'sip-files00090.txt'
fc82583499ba34d359b91e428c01ab72
a1985014f634b434eaed04314187b013702b1e0e
describe
'6843' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETX' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
b110bfe3696d2482f615ba8de2d03422
caf0e62fb5260e751256bf9622ed02332816274c
'2011-12-12T23:28:02-05:00'
describe
'745261' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETY' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
1fa72c3ca0f24a70d3fb7fdb83d55c03
bbace4dd727c02db491add6b0bb1376d30248c50
describe
'125259' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABETZ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
600fb03a381bafe0be80d5a1cf5ec4c3
1cb5195c225baefa9e77ecf933432e31cc6f5853
describe
'19032' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
23b89a2240557a59db7a2b1df1f2ea31
8287d37db367072b758604530c5d42400dd4031c
'2011-12-12T23:31:49-05:00'
describe
'30709' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUB' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
09ba25b2f2dd4ac0b180643612b02e35
8ed73c24baa7e64cd2e17b1d9f7f7e20a85766a7
describe
'5983568' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUC' 'sip-files00091.tif'
805be7af6c1c167a957fce0beb6fa76e
bca52b5e012ba9dc12898067a4a72de3271194bb
describe
'753' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
41a84d7f385419149669e84cb54cfb50
5c1c09934fa4e1c45bc78b5468b9d508ce68cbbe
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUE' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
3683592d3734a500263d44f95baac7b3
169464329bc8513ef8270b4ff6198ce39ab1b69c
'2011-12-12T23:27:51-05:00'
describe
'782332' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
c6739fe4295f0284fe2d3c85f7d48931
45551ea50c9bf507302824aff2bbd3fd3dfe0cf6
describe
'103182' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
36eeb9837502701b7daf18884d44be76
09407390027f9b934a0418baafd73793d3757928
describe
'42670' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUH' 'sip-files00092.pro'
c663d284575a2f7357b8feeef9fdca69
9e6a15d92e9c63ae794639afd17bf1425bb8dc5d
describe
'25822' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUI' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
1d0d8dcd36b980988cc78509ceb93fe8
8f0e72d2ee6a9d852fdb9b36c0735036f95ce890
describe
'6279580' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUJ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
16b6c0a04ee5507a0e4ac32ad9d6301a
b425a70e811687c7d350a480c740c2d17badcc61
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUK' 'sip-files00092.txt'
9aebdf12c5badc3fd2aa31ab64eb2aeb
80968874540b765b0ce3de3ba564e58bcde51cce
describe
'6075' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUL' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
6afde339cdb29bb76c51ff726de51432
14678605d5de7f9302c773d02fe8e3fcd5e7752f
describe
'769274' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUM' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
6241b34bba81962a06bdaae72e72d4c5
3bbcb9c77aeba74b5ba67f4ff1cdd1d6317d2ed8
'2011-12-12T23:28:34-05:00'
describe
'113239' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUN' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
8dc673877203f5c1e308c34ba01c2087
e5570a4a888e47d7aa765895321f7808dde68620
describe
'48007' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUO' 'sip-files00093.pro'
28f02a66bba358a78464d1e245324274
17ae7ca091eaeead93885d017c9ab26f7aa0452f
describe
'29890' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
6157a4da99e7c01bc67324bc4c5e0c27
60bd34809b0367c1dd1c7f1cb19c3b00bf2f0204
describe
'6175364' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUQ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
59ee2ea022635eaa11146ec56c791405
808e63943aa3ceecb160d1473b8aa74cf678dca6
describe
'2166' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUR' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b46e170593fb642cc759d2959cd83e9d
59284a7414cff3ab69d694032d06cc4554e78d9b
describe
Invalid character
'7304' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUS' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
1f818e0a9e4c1c733ea4ba661fb89209
d98b2c125eac278891ac0b71ec5d912012619bbb
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUT' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
24929dca4f64a8ad8bec4dadce3c6c8a
f312c5d365aa8e078cb66a2719b4cce6de84a4b0
describe
'115695' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUU' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
246822e57c35cbe8e0ff52d2d9762eef
e983303ce6670968023920d95cd83efcca15b976
'2011-12-12T23:29:06-05:00'
describe
'49379' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUV' 'sip-files00094.pro'
87136622ccc35a02aebc0d0e6d16a600
9b85fb013a3c6c3c0509f38d67bbe61b575d6116
describe
'30073' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
3278f101456ffbdda4d86d61ad0df91f
dacb4d78c0f1e2ecfb3df200b3955ebae8dfdeeb
describe
'6280120' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUX' 'sip-files00094.tif'
95afcb384da89b033dd9a68b173b5daf
2a6f5ea66dfcd3be1b317072eba864acf421aa11
'2011-12-12T23:27:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUY' 'sip-files00094.txt'
3f423c9b16e54d35fbc7a35d79996db3
ab3bca1fdb2ed3f4f6b68fc53c4f3d5c8c3ce5b1
describe
'6838' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEUZ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
c04164dec15a5d37b126bef26ebe71a3
c6b0f98007b91171d14ee6e777cf9eb03f9d8715
describe
'764809' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVA' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d37429ac307555a510732fcfbd8e95d8
c628439c8fdcc99d0acb06c6ed8df2ee178c9ce8
describe
'114577' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVB' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
e8b9cd0276914f8cd5930d583ff579d8
ad4692b841f40196994c70a35c29f768a668b4ca
describe
'52953' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVC' 'sip-files00095.pro'
96edea2553c2a78493d55cc607d85c15
088c20d934ea8f9f609a43aa2be7a1a972de7c01
describe
'30853' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVD' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
da8058e63cc2f9e342fe2961309ce9c9
4cbfebc7284ac05aa35fbaa0b32659a91ac49e82
'2011-12-12T23:31:59-05:00'
describe
'6140632' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVE' 'sip-files00095.tif'
a5d7808c282dba2dffa2c7ccb7c5be2f
3025b091e235adab5069a10ba08724f0c3d67104
describe
'2180' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
641f42a29c720de1a5af2760da46f32f
2b12fccbcf68e87b006cf6bccba8e157d5c5e688
describe
Invalid character
'7454' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVG' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
bf76d3e0846edafbd8175840c4312a5d
815623f0ed0b10d88be804456f3c2ecadba3f4da
'2011-12-12T23:28:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVH' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
cfffbc83332534b5ec2a9a239a517f6f
70813260c133eb7ac4aca3a17f7af839bd763db7
describe
'121855' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVI' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
129e2c6feb38552de1e6e012c83bccb4
97562104a7750c1fc6e90c8b118c5a348d54b31c
describe
'56174' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVJ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
df57542d6b0f30a8ba22dfec9ac0151a
21d32fa7d5c14ca973a3dda31db87ed96250d2b2
'2011-12-12T23:31:41-05:00'
describe
'32023' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVK' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
3600896b8161c324cf943cfb89c86bff
c09a8c181aae0095f8107a77118273e1fc41865d
describe
'6280116' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVL' 'sip-files00096.tif'
ec46eed01a1528c6eb07d205df7d89a8
54365ef66001e6136e73ffae8d6735177ca5054e
describe
'2187' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVM' 'sip-files00096.txt'
c66a82d3aed521c9141a042bde3c69de
0d2c46bd1a9f72e474f69e79a7938cbc09f3b515
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVN' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
4a4f3006a1f7151c9dcd2f6fa0bbb128
4dc4d2057ca1909ab847c205a6ab3db8f4e71d6f
describe
'767096' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVO' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
82591345f46029a2d87997d41d630300
446c0d6af508735974e52c64b2beb66f097d3fd0
describe
'117050' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVP' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
1c2b7f29081b2bd8f9f82445beb960bb
f08c3bd352f4f19a7f4af66b6e562496fdfa2ba0
describe
'13584' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
c935b0dae467c7a5f10be976d918e1c9
cb7fad747d17d362c43c54da03d3270f60e2a1b1
describe
'27718' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVR' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
6b6b7577f37d8fdd4332f7de27433947
7f4ea30ae0b0c759e0ba9b99e79d8e4eac700da4
describe
'6157860' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
3a62c0d6d63b67e09a8e1c0b7c71f393
1822be3d951275d41d31618854902786ccbd3748
describe
'547' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVT' 'sip-files00097.txt'
3599a84240b8fafb20a4010d6f9e28c7
6964cf6625be330cfb53a060d47bed7e2343bd32
describe
'6960' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVU' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
56885c21457713aa0314d42815581aff
3227837ac52272a546d56d325ff2f898804a0b1d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVV' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
21bd0d9180ebabdb6e748881ecd8e220
65ee43182ca4aacfc91e5c51efa9a8ea79cdc95f
describe
'118288' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVW' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
0cc81f7189f678344d38ad341ef5dc6a
14b2ff8090ac53495c87af9aa9b2a8c8ff04377e
describe
'21713' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVX' 'sip-files00098.pro'
d6269e5f5657518a384821e1a5930935
c6e2dcae5ef2d43fff5b120e37c6819d025be8e6
describe
'30336' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVY' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
d66778eb13ae1063cca4e5d4b0d59f4b
7fe4ad20d82357c971e6afa0d4a6b867e5ea9535
describe
'6280476' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEVZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
29b18eee59612f9bcb3186afa9a36276
19d339107d3499939ed9ff62c9eb23ea8e8dee7d
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWA' 'sip-files00098.txt'
9509bbfcaddd5d05a61277e20e3f4526
24273d938e63f9d775af7f9824041770de0634ba
describe
'7300' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWB' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
d62656d7c3d7a0ab746e005768033348
9e76617c06d007bfce9fdb70efef9ec2eb052131
describe
'751818' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWC' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
9e57e9e1cee63e64477d7eab90f6f115
71298f833e24f58a7b70a04c87f8ad0bf6003e5c
'2011-12-12T23:29:53-05:00'
describe
'115240' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWD' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
159cf758ff1fa9d5a5f3927f0266e76a
19ca8d037b69e05bf8e2e99aa5bf11968bd01355
describe
'54588' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWE' 'sip-files00099.pro'
8bd404b20bc315210541fb6e6fdac669
e20bdcc7543f8b06d22cdee50b2e6a1d42e0ceff
describe
'30437' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWF' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
6e35aa66fb89084eda2d08e38f50c456
54f41312d590d7ef8fd2ce7265696c1ad9402b7d
describe
'6035424' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWG' 'sip-files00099.tif'
2b26cbfb93ce3f23d2cf8dcfce8fbf78
cec85415637b62af5a2d5cb1d501ecf53c2a9b39
'2011-12-12T23:27:21-05:00'
describe
'2145' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWH' 'sip-files00099.txt'
160d8a820f3a4e7e81644fef6adfb516
200c739a8ddef3db0f0f35733c7df377a7648b01
'2011-12-12T23:30:53-05:00'
describe
'7004' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWI' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
b1f95dc2a4d91785e5eec2041b250f1f
480b3bcde211b98a418e847577fecc53ec0a634a
describe
'771402' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWJ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
8d5cb7d1bc573d28ce353a277e24586e
374ccd50651c679b68356e8d88c4fcac62ecc77c
describe
'132175' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWK' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b5dc07543ae8a905dddb3a1d7735c2ec
ed1de195bb9a0fdff7a035fc0abc3f10f873db76
describe
'15436' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWL' 'sip-files00100.pro'
d522c59473cd9821ec2d495de2123725
f35c812f897973ac72e6154e4e6933bf125fcd06
describe
'31380' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
85756710762b8cda7a441e38bcf56110
127ae5137d7d19200c925268d8e14762bda4b883
describe
'6192920' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
07216a45219262850f47f2c3ebd30127
c40a84028456287b2d9e982c6337de446fd6dad3
describe
'624' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWO' 'sip-files00100.txt'
203d7dce9048148cfb3db10000a3dd91
376c584faa40f1c7c55770d5530db9c6f23d4d3a
describe
Invalid character
'7225' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWP' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
f9edeae399f5171435d570a2d534dbe3
9b6d774daab055ce6c6002b3d93846d56b8aad3b
describe
'762674' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWQ' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
bda718e7aca25cca9272580391d56445
9ae7c44bc84333e5f70d714d875df10f18c34cd3
describe
'101391' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWR' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
148f48d22d2c50843a6aff85a0c77f5d
26b14c768a51e3afb7cb167e885f017d281f7594
describe
'39542' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWS' 'sip-files00101.pro'
8bf99d14651c8b85874a4b4c74d2c60e
e2ffd44c798a2dd5339eacfe5d499474d093c23f
describe
'26756' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWT' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
909630efd789c9028c98eec61b39993f
50b8f9b15db98ea132be4f616ff9d6eed2818e7c
describe
'6122528' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
8b77b59360f7b92945a37b4d90d73f40
351cf60c4eea87c5f71c3f971148de7811849e0e
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWV' 'sip-files00101.txt'
ac5fb727c78387d74568b216858ec376
99c66007bdcacaefd3858230f48e8beec9ef1d7c
'2011-12-12T23:29:00-05:00'
describe
'6485' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWW' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
8532b690afe904796ea65931d6d18924
381dff108323c495084c71944f9fd983c199eb11
describe
'782330' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWX' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
a96e42394f7ccdc2dc4f093b15f13527
39a34804b1769d29035eb8a90338326b5415ea33
describe
'116198' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
1c729b023ba28bc42e72465e925b2d0e
dbed03e2319c6cce30a8fe2b73e0802e7e4b7c1f
describe
'46858' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEWZ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
83dc0d50b3f326529bddfe370924bc09
6326764c256fdb2ef1d028a0d903c77835b9e6a6
describe
'30146' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
611bc1d068108e01e686b8e5d7204094
18f50589955cac30e6ae1161bba5a26a67321ead
describe
'6280264' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
70d629b9ff568bfbe87fa820b2746dc7
ee5ea6c31d63b0aa3f20116a719e2fd10e84cd8a
describe
'2197' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
170ce86ce5e007598f3e2f7df620ec27
ec0ba4b667ee9c0cef0b1c466d1035560f6aed92
describe
Invalid character
'7246' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXD' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
d304bc1f29e63b49f0eddae071a08b76
86e11912f4bcdf4c439d85dce180e8a72f6670db
describe
'736490' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
b42c2a905109b638ab41c7a1ca11a084
fd3caba7860b35412a09df48ee57f8e08e2a56ce
describe
'108263' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
b9cc8e1e602cb8d6e76c92c8230ddecd
dbe5b10c4bc311eb61851803a69656ad58b87176
'2011-12-12T23:30:16-05:00'
describe
'45018' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
6100503b8e2c5ee70cfa5ba18ede9e5b
4e46b2a0c87d1ce85726e3ff0aad4c010634f05d
describe
'28813' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
dc06ef7c1e4579339c622b77d939aaef
bc59264385b1699226c70c7efbc304ae7a3831a5
describe
'5913404' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
e886e7318db79399bc8705b347f434bd
7a6b910107991677d1c503f108e26fbc3c62ec20
'2011-12-12T23:27:33-05:00'
describe
'1920' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXJ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
0fb39d5e94570d748363a6bfc3c48bde
cc1b1ec3224dde973e7ad2ec916370beb9d35fee
describe
Invalid character
'7082' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
cce90487851a8b63768c0cf02b6b9857
49564d50c7ca6dd26fbe48c0d326b517c6344b68
describe
'782235' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
83d183c0b83489131e10d4bf908e63b8
0ed8ef0dce1a1d9408717b3c2e198fc70496803a
describe
'116472' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
788d8adde60c724fd85a3d0f8d143807
3bf95efbe02c120c7f03b65cc8400cf26a8a03e6
describe
'42271' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
efbd3274c9f7a66ad655afc0f58c6e69
d59a37bdd05d30a83883f65c24a972ff7c8644f5
describe
'30323' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
4fea5e16618a2eb64561ff3cea4c9dfe
195294950d6a3d5bd2aa851fbb6bd6dc2c645937
describe
'6280008' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e747d8edac93d68314f1a8a816714720
12f49718276db94ab4aff768f7178df64e23d88d
describe
'2101' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
ebf16952277a12e161bc20f3e1034b6b
8fa9400e347b699e0c7f3ed79294fb771b8a36b9
describe
'7076' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXR' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
9ba423db31f892abb01068a92dd10e6d
1a810b1ee996193edc6e3ede1f88db7b7a5c283e
'2011-12-12T23:29:43-05:00'
describe
'745038' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXS' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
91e07aa5c1bc8b7aa3e4bb3bda7ab7f3
6ab770d80089de19ff5858fb491d76936e7dea00
describe
'59026' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
f600bec369b44f02e6745b62cf651085
942c970a51e6f746f4e17279f74d00424027eabc
describe
'3044' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXU' 'sip-files00105.pro'
1ed056a44deee8bd1d9d291e1431f546
b01d8022d00a7b66406a4042d6256da9df284b6a
describe
'13889' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXV' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
6055e858a5d34cc7183338408dcb3e46
982bd612c594242a7f9d72c4820d5cbdd8efe47f
describe
'5983000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXW' 'sip-files00105.tif'
6973e207199fe9bc127b9167c172b00b
15dd88aa9c35827df6e8e235b79100e420850202
describe
'233' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
d52fcda3955b4d033a6edaf5a76e50d6
98d81c8aa2aa90058f8c031d18bd223fe7700936
describe
'3525' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXY' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
cfc67df0ae247fe5f03827d5f718bc14
9d0033b9cd509106524e781aace8dcc75ec9e639
describe
'782166' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEXZ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
0b9f2ad533578a720024a1f65ca05918
2af991decddfa1c882393d7b180d7d6d1adfc588
describe
'21383' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
8844889c069bc5f1e7c37e37ee69b5bc
1874c16e7ff1255f33796baa2fe221260a3dc3bb
describe
'3786' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYB' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f741cbb19bb19aed3af9a702606962ff
0230f9768cf8e97b020d84d3b48bd717ac2b420e
describe
'6276320' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYC' 'sip-files00106.tif'
0422cba0c13b71a37ca4a49b89349ed6
2b3d7eb07e6aa435baba11b124a53edc1c65ab3e
'2011-12-12T23:30:03-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYD' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
927524f23261afae6132c0769329fe3e
8e6e23eb890c3d836592bd4b402be22310384874
describe
'757133' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYE' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
2db3fd13b7762ecaef31a030adf3ef7e
f81f828293943c67a24498f66820108e75e0b07a
describe
'114492' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYF' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
2d3324396e94544cbd2ebc1ed11c9622
3113b48d007dc1dfa2edab9a176a146e97caeb6b
describe
'45836' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYG' 'sip-files00107.pro'
fc4ee9bbebc06432b3b58ac572662298
ce5ffed44387758fd6d5c8a9b77f753f493cb857
describe
'30096' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYH' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
69a0cb6a4159b71c4ec0d994d43fd00e
165178fc016c0a051104b8c720aae7a25cb28fac
describe
'6078468' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYI' 'sip-files00107.tif'
173ea210b2f5d96324b9f37d82a70741
249ec76d2af312129c87f6f853165868b5ff3495
describe
'1846' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYJ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
c63633d6038e952101746c4f65e1be8f
9a5cf65ad83e2f7956735178a1d1efe46fe9641f
describe
'7077' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYK' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
844f7f934e332ed684176549aac0febd
225f1e5e2c39c334c6d7430f61fc0ba3af0db273
describe
'782286' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYL' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f8e15073cc42e4554b59ab69ede800a3
3d922b806c56f2fd7735a21b7529c65b0d5ddf9c
describe
'99209' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
b6a3d3025a39764d069acaacc817af22
43c93339a0d3745c503e8b201c1419332639a0d4
describe
'42409' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYN' 'sip-files00108.pro'
6cfcf2f93da570bac2caaf5819f649e4
56b5a19abdc846613cd9cee6ee84211c513c21ae
'2011-12-12T23:30:17-05:00'
describe
'25801' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYO' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
576ada5b8124a62674121afa58c4f788
3b07a9320a0d036c5a28a4efc1d08fb35a3e96ee
describe
'6279548' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYP' 'sip-files00108.tif'
09d4b2a4f59c5d1d99b1dd4c6a57dfc4
2ab4dcee9168042c980ef212deef21d378ff452f
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYQ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
6686c8e948e686e6b48724dd083b41ed
d47f0d02fa25590945fa957475532ef0f241a586
describe
'6106' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYR' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
619c4f7e76b4327f4965b470ea95011d
b1bb2ca41204d2e40fddada39df4cd7c3e126a39
describe
'764056' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYS' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
aad05bbf9a380acad37c02dab944f922
b79879dc5cb15b54d2f5e39c37ac2eb964758494
'2011-12-12T23:31:13-05:00'
describe
'110943' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYT' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
0458d3d9d7b11112c29d1330dbc85a8f
8db456d56be3de116b29784ac09ff172024ed05d
describe
'46997' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYU' 'sip-files00109.pro'
dadc16387f28553abc6a6d0361ea50e8
56c5cfdf78533e64ee8b89c2f59c0a3bdb337828
describe
'28326' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
be1577f9ad50adc3952cbabd4aa082a2
00b36ee87df236a9d8c0b529271086dc00495314
describe
'6133620' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYW' 'sip-files00109.tif'
33c6fb33d8dadcf5c2df6c1a7a954c5b
efb477440ed3deee80b67f00709bc5fc93d3662a
describe
'1892' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYX' 'sip-files00109.txt'
175236a18bfa2796af15741438d5419f
8819c4f8865b20a7d996535ad5fd5d48c0a1da04
describe
'6523' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYY' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
fa9b96fd0354af6bde2ae677d41fe07a
c578d6024ec67d82368be302accb7ffc8a028ae4
describe
'782344' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEYZ' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
a80500a92c4ec07cd43d9779217a5b91
c4b4aaf1fd2343ea5bcff672c66b0a9fc5216b3d
describe
'131404' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZA' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
6b45bf6a78cd1edc3878c26ba324beb3
a79bcf2a39c7eb7e1abb1c58ecb693b6d124c937
'2011-12-12T23:27:02-05:00'
describe
'18792' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZB' 'sip-files00110.pro'
00f9916a93eae126d877a77bbdc00c10
1cab5efbb91a981e714ec4ddbf0c51460ba6739e
describe
'32187' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZC' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
1e4907ea793ab98f3aa82c0439d2b7bf
f5043284e68d734774f4df9813737a2f6ea535e2
describe
'6280540' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZD' 'sip-files00110.tif'
cbfc49a965d77b0c7ffb267c88e73b5b
8cde4c23861df915382fa451c840443098a9f6d6
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZE' 'sip-files00110.txt'
52f58c909ab683846f7d0592b9a84702
ca8efd399e3f688ac29b9d77e40f33e45a808f96
describe
'7855' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZF' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
76d4b5fde822c044ff1b533ca11aff03
ed221d089980fcc827b3d236b66051b444c0f01a
describe
'782144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZG' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
0843c0b58cdbbe9790430a1d6845d1da
e4a12e60a88745fd8d7d80efd6c27d4e81ca0de3
describe
'119795' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZH' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
edec37f2ba8d1bf519431487f031f89b
cb21234b5517bc8909c2e4304f030c00370eaffb
describe
'57366' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZI' 'sip-files00111.pro'
bde46e7bbc9b761af47ef185d4ef9429
fdd484fdeea2bc005cd5910aa0183160d4a154df
'2011-12-12T23:27:27-05:00'
describe
'30743' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZJ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
0e8f76bd74ccb8d69f69fef4d7198bcd
90bf23bffd339807f6fe3f96debcd6f391044c0a
describe
'6280044' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZK' 'sip-files00111.tif'
fbc5e0f233afda4d652945917bfd2a30
92c23e9d5cbddb10ab6a614b28e262b67ed73887
'2011-12-12T23:27:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZL' 'sip-files00111.txt'
e0dd112f6d49224c8ed865e2f02b3d96
b94c142cfe937bf144b8dd0318171f607224799b
describe
'6617' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZM' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
8172bdd66d57d522285dfb02f131133e
8bfdb079f9ebdeee246bb995eb36524d4beb12a4
describe
'782348' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZN' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
9b5cd8e5fcc70aa76116ec14323024c2
be43c2584f6223b6ce59377f1eec5f261aa13662
describe
'116854' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZO' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
002b6aa9934c88b5ba994f06148c9777
b628ef42be03221c2c94d3dc10751ddb98971d8e
describe
'55376' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZP' 'sip-files00112.pro'
0361c39b550070498dd61fe4b72df2f7
c9278ec03e1028e6cd91c87752d74cad05d6df63
describe
'29968' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZQ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
4f02ff8debe5895c533792e882096b9c
719763cfb25be52c6c514d88f9418264923e2187
describe
'6279848' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZR' 'sip-files00112.tif'
9e27e08b5575bcb373f70a92fda61c56
08005c9c06addeca2a34620793052c180c04653e
'2011-12-12T23:27:16-05:00'
describe
'2159' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZS' 'sip-files00112.txt'
62e10d01608d40705160ab19ca7606aa
679e59c72886794b29c00465257234c42123758f
describe
'6897' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZT' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
372818d90eaf77e2729ad4fdd3cb099d
b774b0384bdc16fc4a3892035c39e151b741009a
describe
'782302' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZU' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
38c340cf479d9cf64fac004981dbdabb
699309be6db742e93a825326df7a4a52160a620b
describe
'96154' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZV' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
fc395dc901255a302eb47b7fe152fc1e
49dfe934fa19ed179e6e11c0978b366dae49a795
describe
'13035' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZW' 'sip-files00113.pro'
7779361366778bd9f9836a7109931faa
687deb9811f78d5fd3d6c26bd1d1ddb7629a9d80
describe
'22843' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZX' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
0ef9e644b782414c604a004b8ab05fb2
93089fe1bc565864a256e5821e2982ca73ac1c18
'2011-12-12T23:32:09-05:00'
describe
'6279416' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZY' 'sip-files00113.tif'
3cde08a4b8feebb336e7fd4b03b2fe17
4d27a783f85caa74cf53c24de78b5b00d7d18b71
describe
'524' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABEZZ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
5dbd56a6a0a2dd1e226dcc4268c141fa
89c812a138763743e1fcfd88536747319d251dd5
describe
'5852' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAA' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
fa1499c9c93a8afa7e5a3fdb19c9f3b7
f7d774fefdc764a174c017f11aa8caa7079c35ee
describe
'782309' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAB' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
43009a7b225dfa4226590743fd4ce8a2
f858101c8f528a04bd06a9af2007b743b513d5ba
'2011-12-12T23:28:46-05:00'
describe
'120836' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAC' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
9c0f7e4ba02da28e7cad3370e441960c
415d0a2bc0769c2ba4817d6c147945cdb92ec2e8
describe
'47212' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAD' 'sip-files00114.pro'
ffc4a5a7b6b41da61e3005313810b16a
f64be1b0cd5c0dc2b780b03162f3409d3c9fa118
describe
'31078' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAE' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
714ff1cb183f7a1be9e7eef1faca3d40
df3bb7dab09f1a7b2883dc08e816513310ca28d4
describe
'6280536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAF' 'sip-files00114.tif'
6f099b4455c1e93be0d0002da472b5de
4787a45f3e344557c9660af4866e406334a2e04b
describe
'2090' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
ee9a7df3cccce3deb5a82f4db902151a
1c069daccfe472f354ce55e8716ca136d72037a2
describe
'7340' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAH' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
9e3d5022d753fc1f408ecd8dfb0a7fb1
f85f2999c0f50e5fe8164b1582ed6ffc1446206b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAI' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
9c4c30e025beca35d2cc5e4ef7933379
15d04cbeb78daf05447887702c29de86d5b6f58f
describe
'115985' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAJ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
c634444c0febff42e0f05192a90803d2
cdb11e2649060591833fbcf713764ab52f35271d
describe
'51289' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAK' 'sip-files00115.pro'
7781c3c3040272c6202f1420897d513e
07b84c11c58e42ec21369959bcac17424d627836
'2011-12-12T23:25:49-05:00'
describe
'30850' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAL' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
786511bd13d44704502776d3e75c84f7
aa928a04f82289fb753aa3a33008b1436d62d17d
describe
'6280368' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAM' 'sip-files00115.tif'
e2884d3c3cd32939c855b48afd7f73ac
8232269d5801844ef5526576b15ff86c09736309
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAN' 'sip-files00115.txt'
ca419da8906d9f5f7b109c6af5ec2e6e
03d98a8d803051280265740aa90061a47373baac
describe
Invalid character
'7144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAO' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
c5b5df4cbcbc3cbf408a12c5360a0cfc
dcea02e02cf239ed8c0715f2467be7395c04935a
describe
'782356' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAP' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
56baac90b8765889d878f86498435e13
74b1185221ae8c679dec1663acd074c60a9722e1
describe
'96749' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAQ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
77970fc2938530712699f39b1afa8c88
2525129a134b32464fb1db926455508b026a5d72
describe
'34162' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAR' 'sip-files00116.pro'
2de7c09e5ad8902533ed404a5a70d25c
21c91976fc4567ff3b1420ec110c74573a7b9036
describe
'24617' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAS' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
343cdf9912c17241db3a04acbd7e75c3
eb8683d4188a5d6b3dd2a3d375358f9ecd09285a
describe
'6279336' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAT' 'sip-files00116.tif'
50c3594e81dd87b5881f14f5188e2e87
f2918d57eb4dfc5bcaf05b88ce47d5a22f246bba
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAU' 'sip-files00116.txt'
25d5dde8b4b38fee73f8654674eba55e
de35119c350edd7d9fd19be8851bcd18c0f63653
describe
'5734' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAV' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
79882073d4ce5b3de00e4771efb77ff5
29cab45d4792454430f786fe1e9c4f6926e38352
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAW' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
588be6a8d36bd5a2bcd538edf088d38c
980999ef5f304f9467a228e010313c50f589d155
describe
'102158' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAX' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
cc0af0e7ba6d03b898355961b2a37530
9c9c32aef3354d51c3c57adcea9006c71afb9dff
describe
'43267' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAY' 'sip-files00117.pro'
ae0f9631107261218b3188361c9afe6c
98697e723daf3adfed27e796fcd0bd559214b399
describe
'27672' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFAZ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
b2c6c1b8cba5c4134cfe9433de6cc311
46b31abf0eb2e3cb7be08da7ecf655f62f5b4de5
'2011-12-12T23:29:10-05:00'
describe
'6157716' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBA' 'sip-files00117.tif'
3df23fe3ae59b8ef59c2465ca6830225
e7a98a982568ea5bc424856fb9676c604e0bc41d
describe
'1886' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBB' 'sip-files00117.txt'
b9b652553d3ee329b5827979722ef0dc
7f30169ce89a1471b87624b5821212518b1acb96
describe
Invalid character
'6644' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBC' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
cc09056899cf3a6f811dd8a47c6d1f38
2baf1f702d2803ec977398be53064120f890c83f
describe
'771043' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBD' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ffe51a2d1010374cd585651eccf8d5c1
32e70e4546042bd2105aaa842faa20f36a88568c
describe
'122356' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBE' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
e62c00702a39a8150275f51e2e61a7b2
aca89ae27c50dd4886a1e6f4039912cbd5570f8c
describe
'46813' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBF' 'sip-files00118.pro'
d13c0f4fea62c4e39e054675aa9c6e43
9dd18fc11e616d3413e0d910fdbe3295d972cace
describe
'31066' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBG' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
917efac444f2ba152c30f8ec038488d4
07d52e6d80f9ff297eb07b23f0fe4e676a914ea6
describe
'6189656' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBH' 'sip-files00118.tif'
0db6e4c476cffa740f8d37921a63f4fe
92227843ee46c6195b387ab6864cc8fc75846c6c
describe
'2229' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBI' 'sip-files00118.txt'
0e719c04d9b7a9d2c56cd77cd1b37c91
71662472a08245acb71be3a8dc23667c6c358f9b
describe
'6988' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBJ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
c73a81b11999c164252eed34a8c5f6c2
871028f48ea24a2e6d9359e502cc83e1384b0f19
'2011-12-12T23:29:31-05:00'
describe
'782261' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBK' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
f3a39fb02f43109eb95ba6fa5591f510
7207839cacf44776645f740ffaf61956b286e4e8
describe
'119277' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBL' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
9b5c031086490133d70c617710cba2fd
d4147d6745c6535f0524761501048192b1d938d2
describe
'58088' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBM' 'sip-files00119.pro'
bd0a7238364cad2b2ea1fcc24dc797a6
c69d38f0de3bdacb336ea35f19dbb261e16a7f6e
describe
'30730' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBN' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
7ecb942fb1d33e84f810048baa67f7d3
efd50c86fb43308ec7f289c06bcf88b5c98c4bfe
describe
'6280252' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBO' 'sip-files00119.tif'
4d04b45c848744463815686d344d5b80
495c8611606952961dc3a811b85d3f0c6642e263
'2011-12-12T23:26:57-05:00'
describe
'2396' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBP' 'sip-files00119.txt'
f350bde16fe213cea691e058d2ee4a64
b6e3282a57e0d90705eceeea263ad0aa6c2459a2
describe
Invalid character
'7168' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
cc0b232f03eb348248cdd6f5ed1c1430
24e3f18720b68a2de0396e9c563c38c3fde33d6e
describe
'775903' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBR' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
a46e53f4b37b90a278d90848858742e4
b4b1cfe692344289d6399fbcd70f7462486cb1ed
describe
'118001' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBS' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ca65f2e54d84f918bb3364a98ba9b520
b6f16148b0d7c0a33551df82fb91c860b26837dd
describe
'21883' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBT' 'sip-files00120.pro'
5b00cc531e443f1c95cd3b9a5a3199ef
549c21a1e33ba64ee8573ba2c69bc1129dd6af9e
describe
'27861' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBU' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
aa0fbcf9a3b9b2ef8342cb103b66e9c5
57b046ddf5e748d397966cb2dd56ba9ee293fb12
describe
'6227808' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBV' 'sip-files00120.tif'
2c9108f0343807298a9cd72cc2be948c
dee1349d0243077ff130225ceb26e1557fb5be3a
describe
'873' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBW' 'sip-files00120.txt'
0d39b13f2c2c998d5da92c6f10e528e4
edb91ed9649f7ad580e3b48bcb54581de9296ce3
describe
'6328' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBX' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
6985ab02ec4b5ac9963085232c1f72b1
40e29e211f3799d16cb60ba1093ac2a6054b0f67
describe
'758669' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBY' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
774b513b87bc0d88c9a335ab98511384
63cb0b7542e96a8792844ae8d8f13612f2d3a7af
describe
'117846' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFBZ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
0612df0b9313d86d82c73dbcadc2f5bb
fcb95e2a70480650a9e908ffc0dddb26e9c00ee3
describe
'56792' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCA' 'sip-files00121.pro'
25f987be3a312bfeada3c5b0dbc39e02
ff294db28fb0b5a7f1dfc3038cb375e4bd8974ac
describe
'30920' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCB' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
65f4437431ae784e823684062633e161
260efcc75edca030d989aab6fb577211c4e46dba
describe
'6090916' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCC' 'sip-files00121.tif'
ca28570f6637583a5d573b8ada0602a2
bb8181638a2c272fdb7e7664ac2cc65308db87b9
describe
'2208' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCD' 'sip-files00121.txt'
1fa95d8fcc550601b14634f6d7a2e2fa
4aa98e748de971da9052bc554a08b90c1771bbd9
describe
'6555' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCE' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
0b42e7ff7c10d012ddb3dc77837cfcd6
d54bbeb93f0ef8764e13885c7d6c889eb77d1cf5
describe
'777472' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCF' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5f385803cf5c398a5de01b7c77511f65
f829e8569f06fd46ad3c9a5bfbcf22ab4e90078c
describe
'126846' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCG' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
b1a5a18045da513fd8b622665de2cdb5
12acd349cd9bfcd686cda957ef07cbf848f350bc
describe
'44256' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCH' 'sip-files00122.pro'
5cb40b838fdb132a6f123635a77a2462
f76972c17fbe15da4d4602a3b2c937631ec1fc35
describe
'32185' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCI' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
2ff84dfb8887b1d4fff7ca90c65c5023
385719b37a724f38b4a061a0631c891b7300a296
describe
'6241656' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCJ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
e2dc5018f171beeaa4b66a9b13c96d11
ab0702ef77c4e40c76f0cefc1175d046be1ac292
describe
'2250' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCK' 'sip-files00122.txt'
10698c5ed92d323f56755bc7c1a040b1
96c0095932efbfb8cfad0c11bb7dbbb407b125ee
describe
'7074' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCL' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
80ce3d83bad7265463bf9af596672022
f6e663e68f31d43ada60d4294bfefd1bf517e655
describe
'772648' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCM' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
714090d47a26b87bb7d60748ceb85a1a
8f2c04ea4af16d2f4bbaaf57c7c11b147203b401
describe
'108836' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCN' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
8e3454be468cb4bee9a6ff6be86cde50
b2cdd2b74fbd179cd55852096bf3d3bfc3730372
describe
'7904' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCO' 'sip-files00123.pro'
f086e4a615912bb5e5f599b13b312e80
ab9ff077a618a210c8198a048f3d8c26de59f58a
describe
'24746' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCP' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
36a36532d8045dcf21bf2af091d4ef72
f200e96a8f919d266213ccfdb5aaf4eba7be6d08
describe
'6202748' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCQ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
eac5bf88e6d37bc8b8666db47ea3a00a
1cad67086b9d24af1f6e23f7aca84ccc2d8e58e9
describe
'640' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCR' 'sip-files00123.txt'
b20e86b52c8d4ea688919f9c9a749c4b
85499f99bf501cb586501eec633ed381298c6c02
describe
Invalid character
'6153' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCS' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
43d5ca3ba5f5b47cd71516d25020cbf7
07a084c7fabe39a32f66ecff4518bbc7df3d1ed0
describe
'782296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCT' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
d4b428b7435d1b244ccd3aa68ca0b7dc
04e848a7d59869042721a305e95188d68365d30d
'2011-12-12T23:32:13-05:00'
describe
'19102' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCU' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
3d4858baac75248c21f3628859c063ef
a1b484f3d841a3c8b7a79d07ca3630a5d8feee5b
describe
'3530' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCV' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
afc371922d7429cc50fd8b0c156e494e
c927e0fe891d2f01a9fba6f053d41432c1c4e71a
describe
'6276352' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCW' 'sip-files00124.tif'
dd9331b86cea3333127e30653173d38f
5eda5f71e9952cf4c9ae88d7b447b3ebb0a139d3
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCX' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
dc10605ae4cd865aa72643b19395a897
99ce4ee362c19d6a541a6947789887d0518e1668
'2011-12-12T23:31:46-05:00'
describe
'766081' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCY' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
c45cfbb5fbb577ff5ffef7813d49a4f0
95aaf18f7eab55c6e50413add334e6a23de26bd2
describe
'115941' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFCZ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
4fef3f4ed3f5e81caf3dcacccba27fd7
eb37ad9b2bdd889c1e85cb5106985ced6979bd7b
describe
'57630' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDA' 'sip-files00125.pro'
872c25e065b8aa83e255616a76b3c69c
dd64b887aa4dec42fd4820a1d10acc3ccb0f7c77
describe
'30042' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
ea11b22022ecd50cac2ffc0e55539214
3f52c1ffafa9c5781e889075dc5858dd3919d98c
describe
'6149744' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDC' 'sip-files00125.tif'
4c31e6d61fe705253a9d1ba3d1e95a77
558c77791e4b98f74d9e67f13a93e3dad5fb828f
describe
'2245' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDD' 'sip-files00125.txt'
4ddf184530bc1b38b12f2c06c205d97a
9c3735960716cc557cba3c1917d93e352c696c75
describe
'6607' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDE' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
c8a246b0584ded5f52d5a14d77402f08
21efb47f97967ae3b62cc49d7b09defa4e96ce29
describe
'765998' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDF' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
f8c4286b355cc3df76923d35151094e0
6f5fd6140622246b5c08b4c005f7087f8a40b02e
describe
'138706' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDG' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
bd9984ed50987df37a4cc7238428db81
a7fccb4e84b70931850d8353a75f367fcea683e8
describe
'23122' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDH' 'sip-files00126.pro'
60e0471c6ed6738563f7ffcb75e9db34
9e91f5eaad3ce47335e5024e3314fd795f34ada9
'2011-12-12T23:27:30-05:00'
describe
'33768' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDI' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
cc6ca5dc9aeb9f5d58d80200a46af454
0d9a953675f110386e40e9306a36a773ba280e51
describe
'6150660' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDJ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
78f964718d226c7471958bcb06164891
916d4157f1c7e2be1e65081903e19efe76f8f34d
'2011-12-12T23:25:56-05:00'
describe
'909' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDK' 'sip-files00126.txt'
ce11ab7afb34668620972c7acc38f3de
33eca5ccd4358a69fe7a7f4bfde826b40d4bf708
describe
'7656' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDL' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
86615a775825f806c65d8a5c86ff3785
f41583c1af4dc12caa203d572159839417ec2650
describe
'766060' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDM' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9d2ac3140f275ed11d052cfb313753f8
fc7d895eb570b3c45c0d9dd79b426ecc9d586e8a
describe
'96898' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDN' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
c60ba65783dcea3c1df1a95cc87a07b2
7d5227632a27b4e44298e78e388ec704ac343854
'2011-12-12T23:31:15-05:00'
describe
'40176' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDO' 'sip-files00127.pro'
21c7aebb87d92172bd5d4e5c9559dc42
40f1c0861b05aac71bfdb6fea723545d70244d9b
describe
'24469' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDP' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
6c21721c1f89d6f0006dc99900bb0d74
07512c09ad3175915569d783f0a532873f2df822
describe
'6149440' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDQ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
3fb99a778725d4a928015be228135837
499a588272b88f51dc152eedd62b0cc89408dc0b
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDR' 'sip-files00127.txt'
3a4446d3ee83443c6af88f9340ed1416
2c5cbc3918b8d61d82867998fb1c7a70ae7e7ca3
describe
'5994' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDS' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
667dad25b099e8cc5f523055f7a76fd1
30d85ffd16016900dc53f154636b45aeda5b89fc
describe
'766049' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDT' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a477b8df77fe68933209404d89d79221
9cbf835a440bca8dda13e84e73e277172a0e0465
describe
'104358' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDU' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
186dcf1405dcf6620d1a9480505287bd
b8952376991fd07e37ae7cffb0c5bb19eb16f967
describe
'28131' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
6c81654e3a936845c3e96ff05e96ba62
9b7ef5a8994579adbe56c78a65a79810f4319d03
describe
'26286' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDW' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
72ec99a79731b399404a6ec5a9a7094d
afb7774ebc6eb3aa3547c964fa5832e9167edf71
describe
'6149796' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDX' 'sip-files00128.tif'
e3973cfff5118809c93ad4af2c6f59a3
387ff04a28d4295793150ff4cf005c6941c27b3c
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDY' 'sip-files00128.txt'
8df029a31896e0b6476ec70a946178dc
4841b8f87df28eb4c4952776cea4aa9ce049825e
describe
'6510' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFDZ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
1278409c3c316eb44fd3bd75c55402c0
6f475c39b76217399fd55ebe8806dc7c92471f14
describe
'766085' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEA' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
8f982389e3efba3b5f0abc893eb06d3f
fdb6cbd334a189b0762d2c8bac88958edb9e98dd
'2011-12-12T23:30:06-05:00'
describe
'116694' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEB' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
ac87267c92e3f59a04cfaaf403e62d4f
0516dfd7151f3df17ecd39b6bb07795ea30e9206
describe
'51809' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEC' 'sip-files00129.pro'
e7bc1ebb2b6434f8114a69bb2c3b5f88
b9e5fad3d26c8b5298028453cf7483ddb477b090
describe
'30681' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFED' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
ba9c48eb867f29d34e2295b4f376de07
432cd6c65d0312dfc1ed600822a142ab87e5f424
describe
'6150016' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
e29423361ae99b955686a52dd1cf6b60
3b03317ccd203dde1e91fa82c99d1592918f8749
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEF' 'sip-files00129.txt'
dca0313fb51671eab904eaf3c33a14da
dc12aa3fa78891b99182462bd5806bdce3b40f6f
describe
'7253' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEG' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
9d2c99c7e4d6ed02506edd374cf32957
3c2c082badc5fad1ab737e027ab7926560e77a89
describe
'761292' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
63a52d35aef0df351e763d13b0ecaf01
3f9a135dce4f482eea2ceee8c14b6a0528efaebc
describe
'123556' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEI' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
2d946b9e2ee8f575540905b2529a8275
17d254e56a06438d2f8ebf88e81c336b91c64387
describe
'55352' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEJ' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8fb67ef812f8f747b5a21173581d1e99
6e56100dc932c99977469054d0a30eb39629ef2a
describe
'32362' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEK' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
87e003587be9dd7f885a7d7c434198fe
3d7ec0348becdffcb4edbbcced6189823e457648
describe
'6111924' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEL' 'sip-files00130.tif'
02efe7b9e7449453bc886ad224e6d690
5fe8dd3c353a6ec6b734d7e896459b9677f449d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEM' 'sip-files00130.txt'
29381fecfcf83059ff1350002e2ab273
9b3a2f426283f96ce8f4e08b2c8fa5a025e05257
describe
'6668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEN' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
a365c33ae54e592ce729bf73ef12a1b2
249265371c2ad809ea07a5faefd7b838c52c7d72
describe
'766088' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEO' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
27dd971b836a85172e1df29dee7c15dd
9ddf9439cbda7ae89937ab6d3bb106f6ce181da0
describe
'131802' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEP' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
0048e605c8ce2beb3e712f9c0103d8eb
cceb930061efe39f1cb8a783cf8a5854d28345b7
describe
'6568' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEQ' 'sip-files00131.pro'
5a5eb8b35e356d79071c05d904a3ed4f
6e798ee1f8c025b71a9808edce6169860cc1c24e
describe
'29117' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFER' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
2de8e36fb42708813ae1b0a4f021826a
4d0a567e5d67bd68a18e0639079d166ed3fc5be0
describe
'6148856' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFES' 'sip-files00131.tif'
3634b75f8988917e0043a2d461470a98
da27c2629cf059ec609093f44e75511cfb8cd391
describe
'655' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFET' 'sip-files00131.txt'
fdc85a6221c9f85123e9e965cd494a14
8de3407009ddc39dbbbd48527ee6b467b792187e
'2011-12-12T23:26:00-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6579' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEU' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
e83ed85ca8f1e8960455910223cd5934
82768082a7fbc53eef79e117f498e5b47a290938
describe
'754007' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEV' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
5d2a0e7a66f83095f620627a76c47b28
5445f5cd2da9e53bf701b7169c10ef01e6bc5fa9
describe
'9871' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEW' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
91264817dd4601ccceb0bdd836a6f778
6318f0a48fd617a30a96b051861ad9dc72724b0f
describe
'6049584' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
13ffe8db1b5629ee0b8b1db2e21721f2
e53ebfabdbaf2744e232949dd27ffc1008633f4b
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEY' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
34d430d69afa69c34394174868751d04
5fbd213809c0f03ed72d7c86ac036adffd5b8a9e
'2011-12-12T23:30:08-05:00'
describe
'753989' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFEZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
03398b8a02ae571be8a5d4ffba3706ff
1ea5b72e59045f860c7728398ad1e5e66f4dd0a3
describe
'110302' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
ced2d494bdce9c4249c04ca867287b44
a4c5b6224bd0ab70e300d337a5fd1d7dcc02f047
describe
'53671' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFB' 'sip-files00133.pro'
d94a18a4a687e7dd2c9a574d60fbfb0a
ae8f209551b7a89745e956ef1ece05ffb188f031
describe
'6053220' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFC' 'sip-files00133.tif'
232937ec9c9247d4d6e07a39fb9b504f
dcc20105b84c580a9e0653b5be21188cf9b4240d
describe
'2096' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFD' 'sip-files00133.txt'
090ea5456c8c554a6c020647dca9c4b9
4d6600d1edb7a7476cf9cb5ac2a449243e326f11
describe
'6769' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFE' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
3adb754a571144aae16f74639e6596bf
c0b2c1d28985ffe650a465e6830043d7b07a2382
describe
'754016' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFF' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
da573a4c0ecd060dae5a072c4cb41e06
95a4093c80ad86ea42061f37b17b25c3fe8e0cfe
describe
'119846' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFG' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
e9d48f95858f75c4f6a5eb677f573b8d
be62240bfffa1f0d6461524059fbd3a1e781ae7c
describe
'55984' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFH' 'sip-files00134.pro'
b4a4d874c89d93c5c614aaa0eca6c88d
f9fffde138b1927d5c798852fa9deac1a85b0271
describe
'6053564' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFI' 'sip-files00134.tif'
85d78dded9640b4db2369f04bd508d21
3e6fb6214eaf2a17e32a63230bbc745ba4067032
'2011-12-12T23:31:40-05:00'
describe
'2198' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFJ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
926e42b04fe4a4e66e71145f5f301655
a102e16fff3fbc441e158677e9cbdeda2924b478
describe
'6817' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFK' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
0b2e5e674804457c3175a3fed36231a2
9c753c9410e83eb8a06ea79e306c778843a0afb6
'2011-12-12T23:31:45-05:00'
describe
'753820' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFL' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
2b681e3b0e90981a02da815db2aa37a7
5f386eabf0d5d4c0ab6059daa9f329cfd6521137
describe
'93401' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
5670f2600a0e03d434a0162f6037cd1d
a46f99b6df89b3c0dac527ae553521efafa76805
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFN' 'sip-files00135.pro'
76ba78deb5bf346557d5aaf5bade27c0
bc549a37796cff7163bf944342908c1be56508b8
describe
'6051984' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFO' 'sip-files00135.tif'
d212ab2dfd5bd6ed1dce7790fff345e3
f5882f9b69bc2fcbcc29aa5195d9e2c9334f7e1a
describe
'170' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFP' 'sip-files00135.txt'
074320b1b207da1300733369f159f15e
ed33caf3176434f54aca1251b85e7db24fa16019
describe
'5030' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFQ' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
25a14e83aba410b64cc6fd1bc77121a0
d6ed104acf1c12c2a1b37abeba1b7ddbab508e80
describe
'754021' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFR' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
4e74d5d2296cfd6cc2c203f1f7903eda
e58eaa82b2b1e07592ab1667ffcb4277f56a1330
describe
'16133' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFS' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
40290e7fe2bf0ea9d8429cb433b3eb85
9b4a3e8347b13db662c33232ec225a515f349e9c
'2011-12-12T23:28:52-05:00'
describe
'6049616' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFT' 'sip-files00136.tif'
e8963e81a089e67a8fb6a5b4082b3de2
17367a9b4ee94070699ecc850d1241803d7a5362
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFU' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
e2ccf1f060357e92cfb69714bb55c881
457726634b1ae948a56c64e6b6b1a14a54343ff2
describe
'753769' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFV' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1f179d34645d740ab180464aaf944b56
f87dbad65a356526d7cdce9157766140d862d184
describe
'121320' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFW' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
cf293cb6f88b03da9386507990c80959
25eb372287be0effda075765c986f0495cec39b4
describe
'18319' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFX' 'sip-files00137.pro'
a26883239c898cd274999de60c20fe10
ba9886d69f6e41dca8a5b6f9b27850960f30135c
describe
'6053148' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFY' 'sip-files00137.tif'
7e0553a65441a24bd59eefaf4f96d403
323f4d80aa4e95d519fa57849e13ce02fd071e8f
describe
'726' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFFZ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
3087018fc68e51a25669b466758fabd7
3d21ac1be815d21788454177c173713e6243fa03
describe
'6976' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGA' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
af4a43402bf11df482907275e727b206
998018161627e8abcff49ba8e17c11e0a66d2b9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGB' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
12919a2a734484242b5139c252a74ea8
8bf479f6d2d82f7e3544006450b28cad94d8f4c6
describe
'90501' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGC' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
bcac5b59b5154b4cd562ec5a36522c72
202a4fa626efcd570d8a38a32cdd28b91d797b0e
describe
'40292' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGD' 'sip-files00138.pro'
1a3e52127cc0152b5c825718c335e04f
12a32fc082ad75f7b0a87fc8cb171d5c7f68d0ff
describe
'6052916' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGE' 'sip-files00138.tif'
8386ef96cbcb605fb9096a6b165998c5
a4a9c13ccaad0a447bd55513f942740745c1b7fc
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGF' 'sip-files00138.txt'
91d315e570c94bca5f41b6a5b766f387
cd2dbffa237420beb69775fc80edb7070a58502b
describe
'5984' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGG' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
af8c4af7117ff8e61ab31a6f715a0572
f425394c6e3b41fdf2677c193778be92b950d863
describe
'753995' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGH' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
2c28668ee6175225c324fac9b00d5e4e
a365d10a9a6c7f2dec584bd0b500f3da385fbab1
describe
'112800' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGI' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
193fe0d28c832c97c66ffde1ee086a70
3d62fa70465d3509eff89411278f2396bbb1bbb1
'2011-12-12T23:31:06-05:00'
describe
'51835' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGJ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
e0a52bb1099a6ca0bac371550513a0ab
6b00f4754a88194ff0e6ed265ba242eb7b2ce030
describe
'6053480' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGK' 'sip-files00139.tif'
08fda1d44259ad96dc132f590d2ae555
27264fd977cef19ba2d4e1d1a6884c167cf373b0
describe
'2044' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGL' 'sip-files00139.txt'
4764f6b7e8e92c3c8e9727e1b434bd4a
8b7b42ad86d3b35cbf5049b7d5baa28f5fa878ad
describe
'7022' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGM' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
028ad61e730e467b08539df8d26345ec
b2222c791d0feb4ba8951e8ede4436c178c9523d
describe
'754034' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGN' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
b6c1f10668a3ec2c8c17b920bf594eb3
1442d55732f38c43204c7911a24614474f42fef9
describe
'110820' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGO' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
48f2c7068257269eec0f2ddc7ce3c8db
33744d4a41fd4e79e141487a5bd4f4da8656369d
'2011-12-12T23:26:15-05:00'
describe
'49267' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGP' 'sip-files00140.pro'
5368c3b26ed5ef3b6bcc483bd2219bd1
06933f461323a21f7c5237c38816ad216f205339
describe
'6053352' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGQ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
8b5a97ef2ccfc6ac5e1643f79e204e72
c3ac22a2fa9331e3a62b8c7dc85ba66217a153d2
describe
'2347' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGR' 'sip-files00140.txt'
56c4cc8b3f719b13d1c536139fb1cf44
6c4f0fb93dffc1e1a56e449109b9a83b6e4365be
describe
'6797' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGS' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
eb240471a248ba5f2bbef6f12207e407
ba54bb2f8951366f1ac60d8d784265e9fd11b628
describe
'754031' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGT' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
2b3105502180b56b58fc878a87320245
69a41c8c1b73441ebe6c7de6bc60ef3715fe6fa4
describe
'106844' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGU' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
9a50520b5950dbef1f4b0e4ce6a923fd
a07c776189b8544b5439602befbf7dd87953724c
describe
'38008' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGV' 'sip-files00141.pro'
5b99bffd1d130aeeb38197d96a24a51a
24e49c58df41872acec085a232159ea2d457c3ed
describe
'6053040' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGW' 'sip-files00141.tif'
32dbafafa162543b35f4a8e1f93027dd
4c778a45b5d988fda69ceb6bfd8c7337664ef855
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGX' 'sip-files00141.txt'
19a384969def45f30f0f15edd5611df8
23c1e4354f0bde3cbe9fa84c7ae69ba0ea131baf
'2011-12-12T23:32:02-05:00'
describe
'6349' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGY' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
d760fb63647bb9a0bf86c0ed4d08ea31
46c340d3289ab318ddd02b7ffc309faf7889a3f5
describe
'753948' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFGZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
42b5f994e9e8183674953b134f3058f3
03a7f04cfd975effc4c18ca6a09c80b128d3d93f
describe
'131214' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
e209b7a0ab964884feec13a1426e5e82
ff27da36d1840b609636edb6df136ce724d44ae2
describe
'13195' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
c9c2fdb724a46307bea837579e525360
93f14c56ad819c5374a01d771c7a2fb4e2203113
describe
'6053796' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
08c62143c31631d859800d48b1d045b2
21effc59532b74d43de760a4369f623d861230c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHD' 'sip-files00142.txt'
b27e5a5da3264a5dc1ee616ce76852f0
3bec96477fcfb007ef778c59f174214aad76ee71
describe
'7380' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHE' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
0016f93abff40c3193254304b7687617
a73d802ae5f603b1c91e604bead078aef902d706
describe
'754001' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHF' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
be215c9405ac220bd6b6cae40fb0ff12
6c8c2bf3946adc1b71595c63b945bfd2eab8fc1d
describe
'115536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHG' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
6c7c3d45a4b9ce0187920632b79d05fe
9fcc871bece66e45eaaf3db709609986fe9e246e
describe
'50789' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHH' 'sip-files00143.pro'
7c16fb4223d34fe1821dbec23240afc0
7033f08affedfcef1fca95196cc35b046c47e713
describe
'6053676' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHI' 'sip-files00143.tif'
a6d2dd456816f0f6c89cfd490b4c9d92
89e450ee9d0c10e840ac18b55ebb982c886802b8
describe
'1999' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHJ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
b721dc5e591c2af9b78f346a94e12fa4
596173d36c6e8354d913b71abc22ffe70cf76d23
describe
'6982' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHK' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
15a686f661571f56b737dcf29c39e5c4
3d15d8cf99522a49f5d75a5d0fd5fa6c48d3c318
'2011-12-12T23:28:12-05:00'
describe
'754018' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHL' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
6b5c60364c52dcf5fa9516eed8d21bc0
c314aa5500ecd1fd33dd45a846b415c5660f7dda
describe
'113380' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHM' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
10ad7fcc62bfe75f355aa65408858385
d6d0d99f221f5cfe215f1dc4d9cf1c3b5847a713
describe
'50568' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHN' 'sip-files00144.pro'
dee76e422b9afb3630de192ec92a297f
93170421d1d37f29bafc400daa176b5523c3b8f7
describe
'6053556' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHO' 'sip-files00144.tif'
53cd63080551335f5f2bc03aefc86129
1639c6b64f98088a0c2a7cf5582ac3a784bcab5d
describe
'2392' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHP' 'sip-files00144.txt'
b8a7d03bf218943ac7035e311e97fd44
d2e7ec8119ab94780af68383bc2bceb5db68fc54
describe
'6915' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHQ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
5d8297f8790bec140743789c6d9879f3
eccf3579c2c2bb36827c7e4609136f87d5fd84d8
describe
'753955' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHR' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
376deecc5dc5251603673f9a13152d90
2c46b6ffcf5bb5cd080fb0e68a86ff9465baedc2
describe
'114411' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHS' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
5fbe312153dd5447007f966b1161eb7e
31c009f97efa982d765ad5f30a0fcee40e855731
describe
'5845' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHT' 'sip-files00145.pro'
81295c6a19da455f618e6f0da931dc37
a5852817b426d27585c9d4eb9996580227fca9f3
describe
'6052668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHU' 'sip-files00145.tif'
0a69f3f16e236c21a7c947b019338a71
1bd212a52f0fe527b4c216b5ab39b3c39a2817aa
'2011-12-12T23:27:45-05:00'
describe
'442' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHV' 'sip-files00145.txt'
54bdd5a16b0f584e26da66c605d0baf4
3072d8594ce8a1d5198735a6c992dd3b5c4abdc0
describe
Invalid character
'6221' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHW' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
1ea14097c4121517f57c52443abe6e43
ebdcfdf1262030d43f217582d421c71bcdf1a8f5
describe
'753814' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHX' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
e46f6e4fa4800450b3002ec25e9c6a29
89181f678d97fb9b9effe721d5a046bf5d653e4c
describe
'17706' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHY' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
a0d39db88867a577dedd66b4a8f729f1
401f25b50c2173a3e9a973dce781421edb9c9438
describe
'6049628' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFHZ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
21d9d76fa2c1eeaa9070168053499bc9
1ba2dbabd7844320f7ebc882bf57bd3b26ecbee0
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIA' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
d7f24b7f0d83a35e690a45892d370414
bf5b786474c03886abec8b8ab493f922a1b50aa1
'2011-12-12T23:28:18-05:00'
describe
'753942' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIB' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
f0c0d1e79d2f7bab0d8fec10cb6a3945
5f5b3d892a93743f54a888368e0c34b25ab1a62d
describe
'119457' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIC' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
55889364dc2bdea55c7a2213e97d1e57
d96c78ceb4daa7ff6498ce60cc563834ec9a2533
describe
'56851' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFID' 'sip-files00147.pro'
05f774a9f9fba391b483665035cf89a5
77d9870bcdb1061d25838803061bcb6c512e4046
describe
'6053288' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIE' 'sip-files00147.tif'
313b1a3422be2ac51596564c4264c63c
21890f6969726bf1f1c87dd17ecfc5d117e6f55d
'2011-12-12T23:28:15-05:00'
describe
'2213' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIF' 'sip-files00147.txt'
fb2e1f46246e2faf3e7e7c69b948ec44
5fe254ccf47f67ef94d8037fbeef944a59d5e950
'2011-12-12T23:30:54-05:00'
describe
'6912' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIG' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
fbc64358a3f2e04dc182f284d3be0565
c042ef3c3064e233aee5c1b40621173685f7eab5
'2011-12-12T23:28:37-05:00'
describe
'754024' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIH' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
f7dcdef9f0073c5f703af6e317dd3daf
71f2e4e1d8bfca62f5e26103fa1558f9228e606c
describe
'121006' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFII' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
27bedc66d4c9eccbcf09a33d35da3e16
41288d86aec80ab82094507128fe46428db51943
describe
'56374' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIJ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
8658b3fccc6677df3866ff166decd656
dd1d0379540a88f4dfedb871c2a59fd6680097e1
describe
'6053368' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIK' 'sip-files00148.tif'
563cd41bcc19b4a5eaf279d07cccfca5
f51dd5a9d87ee95283e9947af45c9d69b255e786
describe
'2212' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIL' 'sip-files00148.txt'
8a1ee0522e1f0aae9ea7fea6f478b4d7
91e6e4c5bba2d3e0283a0f16c5b47a74a3da24c6
describe
'6819' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIM' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
a98d6d5df01a578bdf9e5448d37966eb
2128be0391922785bdf49227afb28290af4fbc27
describe
'753980' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIN' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
805720eced77a2aa87dbc25c97043303
3ea265710af3aa27e837fc5b5e9528cafe0541b2
describe
'102004' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIO' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
d27c5fa9a97add9a728c9e4f2269380c
6845bb0244feaf1e3ff1bbbed211ea6bec95ecf1
describe
'37987' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIP' 'sip-files00149.pro'
e59d857ea4309d189b3e831366f2f1d0
2921f0550788dafea5c1c5cb143fc7af16c7e25d
describe
'6052716' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIQ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
0b633343c8fc84ea569d34fdb6c07cd4
31afc063887602abcefb15f5fdf0ac6b5d4aa048
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIR' 'sip-files00149.txt'
bc66e3eff1ae0bd1b9dd3d04d7b1cb1c
0cdee1ee1b9de68e091f8af4c0d57938551ad7ed
describe
'5929' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIS' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
3a688ce5e36873e8318eb4a9946494a3
9fd6a725e3880ae4f55c7857527b781dbd8d0db5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIT' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
694b0084a7eb598aeae520bcacf1f9f8
d4b0e3b7c027adc4cf30b52a0171b7f4e9bc5565
describe
'104046' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIU' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b1eed9fc7cd976c5012ec31860d4c896
eb351120268064056ec6b65b74994386a401c08b
describe
'19185' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIV' 'sip-files00150.pro'
6f5edf104fef3206e35c9877fabf4d16
1cfb880d49e2d6311ee721dcbebef495f8724482
describe
'6053356' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIW' 'sip-files00150.tif'
3b933805f2c2ae4a23a8364660faa413
3a0eca40d6f3a878aac38d5bad34878aabf64197
describe
'760' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIX' 'sip-files00150.txt'
45c57c1c6f8e063844a73e4bcd32a99d
31351ca42fc55ae465247fc258ca1a9470aecf07
describe
'6287' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIY' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
adf3b97c9c18e12ac8ce469b5d28bded
b5d333da33c5778b304e61a75c6e199b22d73589
describe
'754030' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFIZ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
395a89b9c4701bb24a6085c0ad2a08e6
4263301a67aa70bbc4421b24150553420bb40d04
describe
'112390' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
499ad52798a8d17924b92d7c723a9bb5
a74d29b3411d2dd870c9ac7773fcbf0cb8717c09
describe
'12516' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJB' 'sip-files00151.pro'
e0b4511fa711e5572c3ff5322b78697b
c568e158676472efe6d022d7ad4d91bc029fca69
describe
'6052356' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJC' 'sip-files00151.tif'
3ee9b3cfaac70acb87ad5ff496968b0b
d5a8e72fa1a5f240ed7ea632b2402f0946cd35f9
describe
'506' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJD' 'sip-files00151.txt'
80c0376e5ef15677ff69a0adc3bccb0a
7502b97579dd5b203fc1a7cfa6e7f735069f43d5
describe
'5895' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJE' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
cafadf4fc53096b946f3d4600dd58049
f7d34528e760a50a83afbc6917bba0684e986c63
describe
'754000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJF' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
2b845002e5774b419e029ca289ecf7fb
e5c29a580fcb936f66da824041819d521c098502
describe
'114429' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJG' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
6735753079d5253800ee200adca2f3c3
91c9f3341f3110a53dda0852cdf15aabeec2a945
describe
'54361' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJH' 'sip-files00152.pro'
32481038dc5171872d862e04488028e9
f4fb1358d82670366df78dbe6d29eb7be00801e6
describe
'6053332' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJI' 'sip-files00152.tif'
725fee1008914bb876df2183427c7a0e
5f96961340222d35337657678b04c37dc2bb266d
describe
'2121' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJJ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
7b42c3730dee286e12468b86c07d8ad1
4a98826fba1b19911930342e870967149c439a17
describe
'6678' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJK' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
06bfb78ed3b11d3fe0098f44b2e47fbc
a930dce71fb08d0c9ebfa4ca8111a7c98100694d
describe
'753993' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJL' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
7ff76f76c730d528f6af14e70b45a508
2b8f238b1b662abda5de865e2ffc018e72018768
describe
'119973' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJM' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
43045fd820c8e5b0284cc2dd282d1217
c794f3bf08770b701465ead7342f4e82de7e0f91
describe
'42707' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJN' 'sip-files00153.pro'
52d86d7055989ca15d97ae76b03bd740
350c3c6851f5e45ad3dac9368e09cc21b67a01a5
describe
'6053496' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJO' 'sip-files00153.tif'
55fac2b617b1c26e7087ac6ce79df04a
3fe137159fa34bd021e4ea82e7792f8e311b6281
describe
'1718' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJP' 'sip-files00153.txt'
b4fa73354ee6ffc65b24c46aab7c0185
0274509c5e6efcc9d2d64b6e5ab159ee52b06186
describe
'6860' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJQ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
74035c7e26f178a8e338f48489bca7e7
1417cbb4a52b56ef36cf83e237ef658a3b0b22b8
describe
'754026' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJR' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
d8ce7a9c9b50d7b05ffdaeef99cc6b2e
4c98fafa793164038e132a21df0952a77ea1d61b
describe
'104895' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJS' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
2f9b10e9e80758d917e921f44ed46ff5
7c2c775fd51acc47c4fd0b04b2230dfe8abda54a
describe
'46175' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJT' 'sip-files00154.pro'
8a266e8497434b8518837ad028964b07
dc331390312907c18228bdf6b4a454bc3bfdb871
describe
'6053252' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJU' 'sip-files00154.tif'
8b86742ff705a017a071fb2518eecc36
9608ec902628044efe4704d675f69eba889affb8
'2011-12-12T23:27:35-05:00'
describe
'2139' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJV' 'sip-files00154.txt'
4eceae456d4509a416e851b39edd04e8
a5919a570a1c2d383ab7cb61fa05f5689e1ecaf5
describe
'6554' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJW' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
07116e7a9221044d63d4493497a97fa0
58c69a8b33bb1e57b0e24c76ed5e7306b238e4d6
describe
'753857' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJX' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
2e042df945c0dc10ebb5d24474ccdd2d
de296d13536daec8ca69e05edc995e6ed1f321d2
describe
'104634' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJY' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
726c01239879224afbaf482e35231e4a
4070e272f4e9b671b496f348adbf392444303b7f
describe
'12166' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFJZ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
50bc762474d11101ce55a75c9b968272
82a033833dc9b8c592c89621fc75047cc07bec07
describe
'6052588' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKA' 'sip-files00155.tif'
b07cadda2d594fb6cf38c592d95dd94d
4dc8f45129608d560da4b32b30cc54fa1c2bb505
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKB' 'sip-files00155.txt'
64184a0f2e3acd151f3fcffe143b63f7
cc13eb8e1426265f36a8966601acc528b27780ca
describe
Invalid character
'5589' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKC' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
ed975c28ece09f688fd7515bbe8409f8
7f31efcc5b63beb543a7d426390e59c550b633f7
describe
'753828' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKD' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
846eeb02e97ca5eeb6e95e6d2b39f0a7
0e32b36ff6bb12a49a6fe1a10b05709a8f6fe337
describe
'18210' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKE' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
70eb9c5f5d041627bfeefed8870e90a8
622d368fb9c03eb5cccf40d2ebe5bc936210887c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKF' 'sip-files00156.tif'
4e6b866fd88102c76626586eec7c3d00
2860a4a84559b6fc2a41ebdd7de0b3a8de2fbec6
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKG' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
57c1ec7046e3b3af9140734159941f90
72b8c5bf0702773f388a37113b41ce33b159f434
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKH' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
09a0b1fbe44763da5a5ddc3fe727b723
cf250fcf42d60603aefa9088cebe378c41eb0696
describe
'116492' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKI' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
131427bef480d608de2c453ffd82f86b
0480596344e0bd4875e165a4c426ac3542de026f
'2011-12-12T23:31:54-05:00'
describe
'55943' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKJ' 'sip-files00157.pro'
4842c8c985d39ed423a9b2c599944265
0ea17f4dc283336caabdad5a5289dedf40b2bb50
describe
'6052944' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKK' 'sip-files00157.tif'
30cd92040def8b51ee6304531b07bf29
d7da9aba92cff9f97452bd82a937f0371e38c8e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKL' 'sip-files00157.txt'
b59783b5f4879dd801d882fe8eab102c
5fe83c842ca4e160e7c811f8c4d6ca19651a8e03
describe
'6633' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKM' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
819a15ff795c05ba27c181d10ce28fac
0cf5082bd77919e48718998fff02fcf9c6aaa366
describe
'754013' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKN' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
ae86fd2a040aef9ed2fcdbf439611d9f
4edb8d0e6d29884b48f212413845002489f16f44
'2011-12-12T23:30:15-05:00'
describe
'110118' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKO' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
a8b1c64e91e9adf48cc6a195f6142318
6553616f6f436037d879bd1ae355f4da4a73c0e9
describe
'48284' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKP' 'sip-files00158.pro'
80f3d28e8d5e3668a4ad7d97b0c2f468
0df183cb75443d40ea122d526f2121bf328ffbeb
describe
'6053420' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKQ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4daac1eea6586eb657cbadeea990d5ca
4bde48e01c07a210564512031135fe96a8aa8c69
describe
'2201' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKR' 'sip-files00158.txt'
8f962746baf93fb19ea3fd6b30b6117e
fda9b956be630bef871e0155bfb93dd23a7f120a
describe
'6794' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKS' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
320a73dacb1b23ce9d6877b6f4d8198b
b34e9f19437b7a8f1ecac7f24e6e0bc438623fcf
describe
'754029' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKT' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
6bc3e11ea640bf11550dac7709a1070f
f0b0f2900c450a0947ce708f96bfdc95c1eae6e5
describe
'112110' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKU' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
c87e7000ea7941be18edd1dd38ecaef4
acb7933635b47d61cc6f47899404138d9e07bed7
describe
'30682' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKV' 'sip-files00159.pro'
e32dc5b1891698ee857ec78991889763
d3b0e7ba8c7672d4615dfa4fd48277d815bf66fd
describe
'6053340' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKW' 'sip-files00159.tif'
5b7166f52103a232a274131ec92dea5e
593f3f6a5fdb60918fcf08eaec737b995db0eebe
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKX' 'sip-files00159.txt'
3bafec2e05a7c0426f5e70025d5f8cdb
b8d96bb1d17596800a15280371852b59288c6619
describe
'7075' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKY' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
a2d12025106b6e5b67589a6b8b9aaf3b
af4e0f9863984c82c14b319a8dba20255e313950
describe
'750897' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFKZ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
9e49a8705d9836278e4d08c56216c699
5827dc6937173e919feab26b45e5f93c336035fe
describe
'98351' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLA' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
70c0f3a460202a767ce63952833a912d
0d7ff9722bfcdb73f18251ceb3edebbb312ca453
describe
'37702' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLB' 'sip-files00160.pro'
f0e49855af89d471bb2af76711e16aab
ffc68e2651500ec25ef30a7b904340c20f235bbc
describe
'26058' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLC' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
8683ab1fdac0f12d2587a110dec9f495
57b91cb9bf3244fba343dcea8d292b01b5bcf580
describe
'6027672' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLD' 'sip-files00160.tif'
96057f9d2c4a742b609b22026aa77ac7
450d8e9a2ab40c0c3c07c646d1c56aa8f6b36878
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLE' 'sip-files00160.txt'
617a8fbc695ca9c26cc021c1d5b3b7d0
03011e5e13978882c3a3291eef593db290dc63d6
describe
'6394' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLF' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
278d1b075f66dc33f2fcbe271db42e4d
973a2ba4e9595a1b28865d12a9ef31d286968eae
'2011-12-12T23:27:25-05:00'
describe
'766055' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLG' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
7a3eec9144c72ce8808d25af21df9c5b
37420f842f1909188aa51c29397bbeeb6ae4cd9a
describe
'118626' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLH' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
86432e742a3a90b9129fb5ac0050bb0e
018323e13b9a7a8a61c77c50256aee5407e308b5
'2011-12-12T23:30:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLI' 'sip-files00161.pro'
1f11bcad1cdb08ff52adf3b45a93b96c
c6b0ce218ac3e3522724ad029ac703825817fc3a
describe
'30016' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLJ' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
8dcd0a248ca82fbb984486220c1c1d52
d0b7da3196b53890f8651451426a4f7f87b35985
describe
'6150284' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLK' 'sip-files00161.tif'
5e4a676f2d603441365cd1668c1f0c1d
39200aa6791399360ce1075c6389d06978f571f5
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLL' 'sip-files00161.txt'
e4948cf20276430cf3bf208187bb3cc9
22c436b47c6fb3ce7fd7aebb65e271f58b785f70
describe
'6969' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLM' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
53749afde0f11f80bb57a6e2bde14fea
4e5b6429a89b42f407c9698b9a3ef14e5b484b6e
describe
'766086' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLN' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
e4d834379d3cefb6d45cb3f91d37ecbd
fba580d25166a8845b6a431a9b72e22fe2677a4d
describe
'141554' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLO' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
c2f0ea04eee8a1106f666ef41d0adaa6
46e7323659d18b675667ce983d6bd548f64fff53
describe
'16890' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLP' 'sip-files00162.pro'
2b35d8d68f6f62c0b15df0bb22ce39f1
661f7d119de02abe66c70227bfd25f0d6a59ccf6
describe
'33582' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLQ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
2e6a98473a3940bb69d2a1b2a269be61
7e86532c30d433f8d87bc9873ef3e526c387e066
describe
'6150324' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLR' 'sip-files00162.tif'
93b045f3f6e5e4f25dd87ac64838508d
0dbfc8d940a91fc4ef85e6b159ff7bd898932a99
'2011-12-12T23:28:47-05:00'
describe
'672' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLS' 'sip-files00162.txt'
3c5d44ab256dc5f311bd632600f1c3a9
20fa46b05e5073846dfeac8be9c4ccad2cbdf639
describe
'7858' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLT' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
180627c82ce54a83a7b750402a8c7e4d
0382964be9c174f980d2e13bb7aefd4ee2fc4066
describe
'766077' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLU' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
56dc272f58005c7e155ecd4f4c45a1d4
3386548bf696aa5d1a1b35abb763a25cda3c8d25
describe
'121511' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLV' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
3d70dd1dac617fca60b31fe27436282f
b67d23af666b2dea6a386352a97dc8a5675b6bd9
describe
'51368' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLW' 'sip-files00163.pro'
969b113c3956b43e5c9a4d97b9c1b79f
f78474020285a85fad74328288bb75b02332921a
describe
'32378' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLX' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
e27b3c28721decedbe1521bdc5226c5f
880dac317018ade6a6936e3afb3d386aadf18fcf
describe
'6150320' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLY' 'sip-files00163.tif'
be6131a79c8eec56e9944ae87f358189
98e4465a4ca860a86a92a204a405863b8e6365f4
describe
'2024' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFLZ' 'sip-files00163.txt'
6304bcbb68e1b17f63006c96c900c6dc
39bf4134339cb93d7f829b3e2e455de52bfd854f
describe
'7481' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
6b69f6e637e289bfd5df4a065953cf30
a3314296c7e94878187ad15d4cb1cd20fc96b08d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMB' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
62c2468a838636a60c9716bf7ebb9f57
dfe0360983a24bdf3e64f94ba47dad9604891b5f
describe
'125123' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMC' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
4f375f25a075a14d2619e63b961dd83e
94c8f0bc487ed26bb65f96a681724138b8ce3f7d
describe
'54231' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMD' 'sip-files00164.pro'
d241d59299ff0e98a09ee31be11939d4
a67eab97d39c2568ee338dfc64094368cba18610
describe
'32525' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFME' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
7e2abd9cb2a674db194914bc893f4d17
2eb203cc28fba38b047ea275be3e48d0cb4f661a
describe
'6150060' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMF' 'sip-files00164.tif'
e8f175026955b238a916db23a3c0ee13
cae2d4e8891f6ef117f898dabcfe268e59610535
describe
'2391' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMG' 'sip-files00164.txt'
a4552272cfd001f29d549320423d18b4
61417815e718beb8157f30789831adac4c4d6d1a
describe
Invalid character
'7310' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMH' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
7cbd76cfab241f9242ed7754128c2475
6112b712fb726996003a3cfa6d1ad8ac5e63f2a0
describe
'766100' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMI' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
0ccc236712786119b306cfbd335670e6
9ed53463080250ce59f4b2c72a9cf225b3eac4dd
describe
'113991' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMJ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
0654282025903e9b90f4504b3c429a42
71fb9317f4d893e23cc4ec85ee727b42ba27a573
describe
'47505' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMK' 'sip-files00165.pro'
7b744640224a35bf473400e1d07eed2c
db6a3f13597716593d9a935f4eebfe935bb15ba0
describe
'30045' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFML' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
1cdf9193415b77f4a98865915a92258c
7cc66cf39d0eeef8265ed972f04d468a0dd56dcf
describe
'6150104' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMM' 'sip-files00165.tif'
c32a617c6ef2e6db8b39dbc1c9761b2f
2ffdf076edf3974304d115c31ab05d8b32a95112
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMN' 'sip-files00165.txt'
580a77ec4e9729a71835ffeddb4ab19d
047e7eaa45fcc5b8ef4cba1b55edebfd576b0263
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMO' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
51fc08d5662f8ca893aa44abbba970ea
1dc8a5ce05809a884c8249f715a0c7c185416f34
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMP' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
eadf84a7885b427ea7c3f24dba91d5e7
b37d7bd62130ec83ece18743df4e8d9cab7df470
describe
'124334' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMQ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
1c0fd1f24eacf4beb4055f35d26b7dfd
c08d280f1114ee4e7037ea8dad2fce7f765b8a82
describe
'54009' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMR' 'sip-files00166.pro'
d9506a94e281a84b3190986e0b6c30e9
b0014cc12f71bbccd0c6a795e9415ca32f8fcbf9
describe
'32709' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMS' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
437235b8f0c064d4a64a7751b603db31
1d28843820dd6822b2cd935c8ae1014197335804
describe
'6150296' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMT' 'sip-files00166.tif'
9b3c05bdfc4c21483a9eb58459211fd6
3d05f88787e89728156e40f54776a504da460b03
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMU' 'sip-files00166.txt'
db0672c8c347dbfd187b40d683528573
03cfd3d62ea461756ecb35f21773fb87c573e6bf
describe
'7106' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMV' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
3e181156fe1c8cde7115a76f4aa768ec
c6aa9491ccb052b8011da53fe4d664875b64bb0d
describe
'765917' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMW' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
b226b2ec52ad12b3750517ad88085107
20fc7295961619503dab0e040da74acc445b63e4
describe
'119909' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMX' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
70e22d801745202ce28554fedac66b46
7276d1b80124db8ba68f1b816f517e7675a527aa
describe
'16059' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMY' 'sip-files00167.pro'
079d1b47b31af96a5a80984781f6e1ff
1569f9f062de8759f033a04b714b816096a41855
describe
'28391' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFMZ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
198a7b3804cc34b4b57c1dc6a30e686b
8e0e68d45e47cb393f1a7aad0a18da3c0deaf320
describe
'6150212' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNA' 'sip-files00167.tif'
449ca44151fbbc1597fb8b2d43a35a85
023a9f494cd13f24ce1718849b2a61ef8e4e93c1
describe
'638' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNB' 'sip-files00167.txt'
1f187bca2b8dfa89f9c939bee7fbe5e5
f99688ae1f6fc9eea10e7a5c8dbe856faf7cac0b
describe
'6655' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNC' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
e4126c6c9c05f01f9c8578c8387120d3
09ef6fabccc2101ee426aded09a46c973533df57
describe
'766065' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFND' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
acaeae46d94ab0087101ab83a85c24f6
26e6fb66e9772ea1adfd562fe84008d8f7d1b566
describe
'120786' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNE' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
44ab9f1353b61c09795d16a26f561465
fbf523dbdc52059e3979bab9873740e15206c6cb
describe
'35850' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNF' 'sip-files00168.pro'
02184cda3ea2944e2f2b7b1e0c0a3295
0336fe03792a07697fd7a4875f24ce28d5c87976
describe
'29641' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNG' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
8f2d4244181f52abdb8feeeab4888615
324b376dcbb93b635233f2cd10a447605d1dba0f
describe
'6149912' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNH' 'sip-files00168.tif'
02dce7f7115e87938df5d119e50ce007
49e5f91dd955f6f61e0c7f7cbdedb14925639351
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNI' 'sip-files00168.txt'
58c022ad35ee03756843a09605426aa9
2d14af7fb6b30556452d7d382e465c08f819befb
describe
Invalid character
'7001' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNJ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
fec67ddeb2fe46434fe5021cef28551d
9e1f8f69c7349f9d1f303c094429dcdc07dff605
describe
'765978' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNK' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
09a9d404ee532eea1af23a588003afe5
d601de7c45760ccef7829285fcc3851a880ce940
describe
'101588' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNL' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
0ac5f0d6bf1a1ce960c490a7644e1936
4ff3a881d8367a78c0e5c8d9e00bd43aecf8c550
describe
'43745' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNM' 'sip-files00169.pro'
147fbe91c41a829e32d0d85ccdbb7678
36015e99c28399b0058c16b1ed4ee961b1797217
describe
'26348' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNN' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
5519d44d5d9d6445545e0f271e917fab
d73c155d8f5522b5186212ae088566087cbc6f52
describe
'6149332' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNO' 'sip-files00169.tif'
c11bac2916caad5ab8897d246456025a
92c42d9cd7396d37790a56ba9019b590b0e6e75a
'2011-12-12T23:27:34-05:00'
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNP' 'sip-files00169.txt'
19540822571e7e93ace0fdbf00261400
c388f9bceea7ad9ca7a98e09d04e06e5cce9f045
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNQ' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
22861d0dd2f84e9b82f9426f09246d39
f6c0fa6c494d7a27dc8c258bbc4940df21f699cb
describe
'766064' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNR' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
c669cf59517afbfbf73be3927780c643
64eb6edaefb3ed4710b26e964d60c276398b75ee
describe
'119356' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNS' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
19f24d47a56af9889b2d51205ddeff3e
703100d840653b37923e737fa27d2a9031482e44
describe
'29632' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNT' 'sip-files00170.pro'
67ba2a9bdf75a234004829fe9bf7edc5
d51eb102c885502acec70236859378aadfa726b2
describe
'29387' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNU' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
cfc94d5032b8a6a870bfca7e5d00d2b4
9bb3a6e91d912ee86b034a5e3c0b0c9d8aaab540
describe
'6150040' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNV' 'sip-files00170.tif'
cab6244bebec938f77652c369d22b167
6073f1cb3f37d4563fd10c8acf7dd168bb34dcd5
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNW' 'sip-files00170.txt'
5b396c0984b9c81d2236596b295f0136
f93d9c872819e38abe358f0bdca943ff30af1a03
describe
'6882' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNX' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
6551c7b3bdfb89ad90e7388cc4746b8f
345ed5689dc479a305a3a8b7b443176fb534aa75
describe
'766013' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNY' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
f47da2e3363d6fd8658e354c56550fbc
8a82c62e5e8d73cdf4560f91c4d479a929a6b80a
describe
'97136' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFNZ' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
877c8d3e3b19b846cd3fd6bb07593dfe
baf315964430200b9d931ea46d8d00ebd5f5fe50
describe
'2119' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOA' 'sip-files00171.pro'
1ebe9af15e6eee18ece6ff63383dba35
f3367e2f703a90a40d3ac0a206fcf983c5656a5a
describe
'22898' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOB' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
ddb3efd8b49ff8d3842c75d9c7f2b894
cdc3bb36d26779a3d74a44dd6095042c699e5772
describe
'6149284' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOC' 'sip-files00171.tif'
78c6816c90fe55aac831770140e4c867
d4830ae50aed13d5756c7bfb722aeb62a43d3e53
describe
'221' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOD' 'sip-files00171.txt'
9b2efc3d186aa79e16017cec3947be84
c2657af9fb03c1157d5f9735bd7de3cad2c00aec
describe
'5581' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOE' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
715cb6099af56988612bc64742a6bb01
779fc5588f84ad46849a71b39c1e9067873bfafe
describe
'765886' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOF' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
97fd5161f4b3ea37aa70d90d79443885
d41cb0f2b43d7bfde12fec21270d234e50addf23
describe
'17717' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOG' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
cbae2af8d51b93d8f8fcb09c143e438d
e4bfeeb56376a0b229d5cef930acfac7f694750c
describe
'3081' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOH' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
8dafea1654d3c74db8b0fbaf908da844
0567c9f056aa6057119a84e5878215c50f7339b4
describe
'6146156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOI' 'sip-files00172.tif'
9fec8896fbc9d50de70dba419f05fbac
a49d21ca6419b617c0b311367fc02396d0fe024a
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOJ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
81993f9a630169587bc1884984516f9f
4e666181e49451a17df95b2e20a74a1003a2a0c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOK' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
50f93d38e1d76a14c331f199569398b7
13dee9c4abf2637b126305cf3433a9638fca9097
describe
'116958' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOL' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
e9ee6fe7135ea91e1d82e42ac3f9d484
f3f322e72009539522aa8690312c69e0f8329b46
describe
'54714' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOM' 'sip-files00173.pro'
37aab7021fe52ba846f89950a5e16f82
6fdd96828937986aa540ed8a46c79bd3bbc96762
describe
'30312' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFON' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
18328091bbac80443c96a687323520c9
ff28541865d46d94ff38b8a6766f51f4216e41fb
describe
'6149976' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOO' 'sip-files00173.tif'
facf81ede346bc16aa0c350d653b063c
b22f16f140e585425a754eef66fd9ffc5c693bb6
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOP' 'sip-files00173.txt'
c343dce74086ab54edbb7b9ba423f300
923b5dd27ddd2f76406a152a90643f9a16b809a8
describe
'7032' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOQ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
12ef3eb7b8b499fb3c6d7f5c7679d4a9
45f1688c84f66446187b7ddbaeebaf9a104471a7
describe
'766067' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOR' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
9b87444b259111ed6be2a5ae0812cbde
f2e9d5028fe865d85c6d62137f6fb6e3be36daf2
describe
'121071' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOS' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
861a769f38c9a76b755f4432f4f6b82a
dba0d8ceca1a33391ef3e0a7cfd1901558e6c792
describe
'45282' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOT' 'sip-files00174.pro'
6925baa29f3fc506d929b132db33d34c
4ac69f8f984a0e7675384a65ff96c210bf98b3ae
describe
'31554' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOU' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
f6e871dc34b7129a26840e5205696b2c
e7bab6444e6f1721ebd24bac78476efeca97077c
describe
'6150140' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOV' 'sip-files00174.tif'
2e6082821f3b9f23360466a113bdc286
71b537f05a3ad86a4d24420acb5bda9e41ae7416
describe
'2226' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOW' 'sip-files00174.txt'
6e2d9e793fef5c71eb7108b8042c49bc
ccf5f12f1eb038d2c24f7b556b1096540152c9b6
describe
'7143' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOX' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
0807b79b539acae7e5cfef09d743d5ae
d64adf9a5c34cb8fcbaf98ded770ef611973ab13
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOY' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
9b9dd13ab9521070b5db626876299ce2
1124cc474f3ae174d1c4353aab235db4ead57cde
describe
'117878' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFOZ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
fe780c020af8c03089b9850acca3f51a
def92841aba798367aaeeaabc8a5b6b953361452
describe
'54629' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPA' 'sip-files00175.pro'
e3f66114e02e1c0138eb6a98e2d65d40
921359f3c5dacb7a8dd6bcda1b0a2a3ef1a46648
describe
'31355' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPB' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
8d6d3461d8a432d9bd33f0611a0821f2
bb675df11bc6a813cadfd235052b771807a59469
describe
'6149908' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPC' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4ca41921afbc3b8c1e4e8542d5380fdd
00d4373e1daf768137959afd8efc0db7f279b521
describe
'2133' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPD' 'sip-files00175.txt'
621fd2cdf3d57f4977962ee323797405
3197a72e41fcb51a39013dbd1addd379c57b0fd5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPE' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
fe7e3b8d6f128209df59a331f3fefa09
85635c769d16bc0829ef3e873830dfd1e98c7eaa
describe
'766020' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPF' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
b63b6eb0ccca7aedea76760ee37aa420
0c0ae20cc7e84a1b1bed9cf874ae7a5ff21f5dd9
describe
'117513' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPG' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
9e97ff043ccbcb389a3349007b7e69fb
075eaa8b41db33e404e89f9e1295dd2df2fbbb1f
describe
'32670' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPH' 'sip-files00176.pro'
10eea4a945449a60b3c18e90f75c8feb
0f889b184df173603b76f1c6117e43250eb1cbff
describe
'29462' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPI' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
d892b16eef395858f5d584fd165a7256
d3207e9d3ad446e6911a74373005e46b43eaa679
describe
'6150064' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPJ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
14135c50157cc7a2a8981aabf4574b8f
0c105c79e12c87c9361040cca7aa16638fe4829a
describe
'2106' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPK' 'sip-files00176.txt'
2e5ca2853ff2ef485ab08437c9ebf986
155bebfc884effcd250a3ddafccfd0d7df3dcd8b
describe
'7040' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPL' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
5c89bfa5cf8038a6bb826113211ee41d
93a5c8e9f9422c7f9e500baf5a61af1dfb05553a
describe
'766072' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPM' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
a081e32353eb6ebc8c7a6de9cb96a04a
797226cb2cf9c53fa22877c53e8895604c3192ec
'2011-12-12T23:28:31-05:00'
describe
'85012' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPN' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
b8dbaa219624eddcc9e3f9ec07b377c7
fed8c75be7794d3f96c56fc268d936676a7ab93a
describe
'35284' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPO' 'sip-files00177.pro'
7c54df7aae98e07f942f9d246d94e8a8
679f286333d414404e2bb0227629203c076e94c6
describe
'22714' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPP' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
150961376c47a9d8453b1d3d9b982be2
66073c663ced469efd14f247aadde88618c45c88
describe
'6148868' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPQ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
8fe34e9a23a2c286aea2fb5193819a1e
fd13af96c0ebeea84776fc7213347c4688e8713f
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPR' 'sip-files00177.txt'
8d95c7e56efd3a201a9eca0a8c7df3b1
c6bdcf7d250631fb819a262c937bc0fd6d47b900
describe
'5258' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPS' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
e9fbf5d22dfb7f03aeac2025e55b92d8
024c2831f8a40da880f3ad6a37aa1b243351f4af
describe
'766092' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPT' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
2b19440dd837a4744788b868ff4b324f
859f5cbd575be29326221e77e921bd954fb34398
describe
'102185' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPU' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
4d45b887e666735ab6948ce0518a0670
9bd5a396a35d1280717e25a1cc0323428e36f3cb
describe
'32507' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPV' 'sip-files00178.pro'
694c3b4b2234aae27e8eb98b0e3f1b80
99bafdd5ac19bc3699b39af93e251349ea7c746b
describe
'26326' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPW' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
a43639b21efde835d6e5d0df63c47cb4
916cf5d1a49af3e27dcb0836dd8d9065e42dcc58
describe
'6149676' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPX' 'sip-files00178.tif'
f77e028fa2082fc0be9e0e143f2b2b31
3656069d6fdb52a1b7c9d84feebbd28254dfceaa
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPY' 'sip-files00178.txt'
125117cfa29553055e7a39a46cd2cf60
89e81b15d752a7221a1e6004c5e92d9406c77721
describe
'6538' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFPZ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
766c7b72d4a90d22ed2b13f87706f082
f495456d037c4d86b7cb838354ccf8c350acbfd7
describe
'766045' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQA' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
189f5494c0bb6ea0d03d3cd81b3431db
552acae9592e6778961023eca2a962ec2bc5f4e0
describe
'121519' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQB' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
0b5595d5cacea0a55cf84a71b60f743b
94478d920f2867abba4b14f0a3b20abcaaef08e9
describe
'55333' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQC' 'sip-files00179.pro'
35f70845ae8bea013dacf08c8f2a3fe6
ece27cc7f7e4df781c3a60dbf7b26bd7e3e509ce
describe
'32380' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQD' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
5c0197cdd06ed81921b4c034d0c714ec
739cf788370dfdeb6881123e5ba1697c77a195cb
describe
'6150068' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQE' 'sip-files00179.tif'
d1058506450c1793db5cf463b17ff0ce
cf8dc6b5013ef3563b0c94d276680ac2a55b6d3d
'2011-12-12T23:28:05-05:00'
describe
'2156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQF' 'sip-files00179.txt'
35d1fad118a45f5977f67ad11fbf0d0a
53eb02dd0b34d255f1493f4172dfb8a17bc25a84
describe
'7208' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQG' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
92c270088d31f28faae1f6df2ca79380
f9e8f476947353fe24e05f4d0dc0ca4da0e96432
describe
'766075' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQH' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
b2ddb255f10f12fa5dbfd244961e6e91
e98d7b7d3da18193978c9a3912b7c7b406a8627e
describe
'124799' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQI' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
4774ab1a34d17307977727e255f97ff0
37973c8dbed8e8f76440cab3ea1fd63f20c7e315
'2011-12-12T23:27:44-05:00'
describe
'55068' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQJ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
372964692268d54929f2fed00cf37a5e
ce56caaf61d6944923388456cb83810fa43679ee
describe
'32571' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQK' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
b9297ff3c6e8d95b75bd7760cb955f5c
3b34c34c1302a010d76f064731745116fc08df52
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQL' 'sip-files00180.tif'
08d45b2979185721c2358702420c3c8a
a9eed5f5935fe3e8cd9eba75f1746b147fa50353
describe
'2168' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQM' 'sip-files00180.txt'
42661fa4a5634836d8e8ab40d12c1945
e7d690ab294f6a95f4530501828518b298e6f1a1
describe
'7054' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQN' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
cc365a029579c1c2fab102f0d9769527
477e87ed7b5418e97b8a02e7696ba5236795f673
describe
'766062' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQO' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
5cd7c11ac9285c1c05213de458dff0f2
f95095aca3a8cb9c4c03a297c1f571ef097e6f48
describe
'108186' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQP' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
9a323dce5948527373a7a444f6669e2e
8b2a4c87f246bd691883628dd3bf61f904187f7c
describe
'11875' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQQ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
5aed57dd22abf65b104736f9b2d6be4a
13b32f4036b50f2066695914100e017decb35732
describe
'25309' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQR' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
9acb01b0cecb0992f46052ff44a8b93d
9f2485d96f6caa6f8127ddd7a88b5df461614514
describe
'6149372' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQS' 'sip-files00181.tif'
2a0e9cf447bab2e7d5f107dc44910e2f
1ef8fec2be53ea7276e188ba9df33254a05d754d
describe
'512' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQT' 'sip-files00181.txt'
3969256540b0f84bbb22c41673776adb
14254fbb67947969ebc8b46113ee241615f97d3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQU' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
1b47237b2350aceea20e5f2953ead6e1
a397a137c6640e9ff2058c08662094e97e2a181d
describe
'766102' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQV' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
c60cb0436d06d491c632afdf013b8ddf
30fc7a11e5892e2c29a492692b0ce75488f18943
describe
'131448' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQW' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
0df571eea81f505f68fb810e089d5819
8734894922f3f9c3c37f7609ab8ce35982612f30
describe
'48691' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQX' 'sip-files00182.pro'
1e1e2872fd8aaf08bc1172102f707334
88f51b0dbdfa56fe4dd4b2043514e9ca274290e2
describe
'33904' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQY' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
31834cd75176c5ea449bf15ec0b37713
9483c7561f773fedf1d81417af85d73a03ea05da
describe
'6150484' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFQZ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
aede4bddca221ea41bb33639f6536ffb
ae8bff0bdc20e096ca8f28cc3995137b50920b5a
describe
'2263' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRA' 'sip-files00182.txt'
eacb7ee7d031926c2e17a05e94b4339e
cf58f070875a1d7cf68f5c9ca2ce7d272abfec0e
describe
Invalid character
'8214' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRB' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
6e40ad5246d4d70894381d12c26fab05
fbc26f4b864022f515680812c63235c015c5125f
describe
'765885' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRC' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
cdcacfe8dbbd1fcbc974f678429c7c71
781928b10b32832750bfc021c58bf1c513102788
describe
'119023' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRD' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
ed83fef14baa7e32ee61b12c6a77ee8e
4f6227a6725fa95e372ac27618d2f61eaf6efc6e
'2011-12-12T23:31:56-05:00'
describe
'1869' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRE' 'sip-files00183.pro'
d70fd7e37e75c3b98ee1eb73892c0f01
cf665c334157bee8fc8b182e75a32240114d5abf
describe
'26394' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRF' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
53923175c97e0afe412e6ed44f196f50
883bd5d8e812dd8410aefc0d3bc48646cd63cc70
describe
'6148536' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRG' 'sip-files00183.tif'
f9e5ba876fa7bf80350617d4327919a8
9dc26b43b54f9a481d366ec9cf6e20b17f9be156
describe
'223' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRH' 'sip-files00183.txt'
19295ee4d6a512d8947a70e07fc1de4d
3150a32ed6cbe317152fd3481b84a973ff172a86
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRI' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
f22bbfafa8ebd43611047fc4c8a9d6f7
86bcd7da626a1c904a5bce785bb8354ba9f682c3
describe
'765905' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRJ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
3b5e088023a55e1ad63c5d525c5d892f
02746f9e3881aa539975aa5f8ebc575cc8aad247
describe
'31845' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRK' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
37be873dcc48d57d088067629b240554
fa9d33bdf09b5b9d8b7bac600ffc1b83806e3b12
describe
'6904' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRL' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
b1782b1d5c25b11ef89b8c8712e93fe7
4d447b0ce3804987ed65e2d1d09bd584738344a8
describe
'6146152' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRM' 'sip-files00184.tif'
2ba4b0b34dcab4264d7208a66778d38b
28c56feec3b4b961dd8ea1be6b4b19af1b6e02ce
describe
'1724' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRN' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
7bd56ccb0432bdf8177c7745419d4974
473027a73635e2ae83ee76e6d0039f08e33cf5f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRO' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
e99637378c7b11dce4fb566de063b8ea
21f114a5d79f7e0a89108cd6ef21615f0f318a17
describe
'122676' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRP' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
6609be6be24a99a119274f2a6225da13
d8bc353eaace333bdf946f71bf6b780895c09333
describe
'47561' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRQ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
675889c712bd41199e711cbf05dc9dcd
c8437550a0b0c367d629a0ef306fde61d591153e
describe
'32850' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRR' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
62b93dc2899ef041d1fa7c640f03b6cd
45fb0ad4d2d59faf2d25c2295f803bb3cfcba385
describe
'6150236' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRS' 'sip-files00185.tif'
1c5f946fc6f08fb8892b1c15bc2bdaad
e0f727dc2497a2a78612b3da35a0862a44498e59
describe
'1916' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRT' 'sip-files00185.txt'
c82fee4ad85b1e4ff92e84eaba075a88
594c56fe0e346e5c2528347d83a38e8c66aa0ade
describe
'7852' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRU' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
b4d024196549ba123b8abb8f6bd0d897
d0c462a6d2a8a1f64bbbcd864db8e869e1a2811f
describe
'765957' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRV' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
bc19262d55a33ce3c1b9b797df3523ab
b0d3414f6d8a20f2679635b94e86ea7721686e5b
describe
'133631' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRW' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
95688d835239cf5028c381313b355c92
00bca5ba02b5fb17fab0680eae2100095735fa09
describe
'16156' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRX' 'sip-files00186.pro'
f822ed6b6c2ee11e5abc9e14e8c71e2e
d02a0cb0a2b5ec1398db2d2ee1d1b5a48bb128b7
describe
'32047' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRY' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
e0212d1fe874fdb967ef5e43a234d746
4d5e97fa7573c8d9f1a23059f387d486dee34658
describe
'6150092' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFRZ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
4355252b5a17a5ef4b962f2dbc3213ab
230f298fe1ae454a87e337154ec2a1bc3d4b0214
describe
'650' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSA' 'sip-files00186.txt'
26f1823d17afb3c34a54a70cb47fad5b
ce70fea1792f4524210d666016a4735b171d7e8e
describe
Invalid character
'7873' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSB' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
3d313564231768e71166c4c17c9934f5
8f728ad51f29eb006cd9ad2d5261b40c52c1bd0a
describe
'766083' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSC' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
b9f381dffbf45b09a62fdec947fc1613
09476ea2d60eff7dac3e6fefb67cb8189c862e2a
describe
'108598' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSD' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
f83002ddbb83f5b2ff8eb900135d94a8
8a6a44a3bbfe1105ca720649bc315c8b1cf5bc1f
describe
'39858' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSE' 'sip-files00187.pro'
2ffe8785e0b380ec7edb4c05a53d9884
97c2754d63da2294bbee231d49dcb817fd8c36ea
describe
'29160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSF' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
4a6873bef513a49a25ef1b4836ecf6b1
58b95b9bbdf501a219914c3ab6c0273b21fb2f69
describe
'6149864' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSG' 'sip-files00187.tif'
1c9de29b71547328cb151ef1a551e21f
fa5d7c184bc5872414a4ce1aa69f83faea18bb02
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSH' 'sip-files00187.txt'
bbef94f7cff90173f487bb413bbe88a1
f9f27abe052b0e0fb8919176267a07bc12b3b815
describe
Invalid character
'6939' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSI' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
3a128264be8ac080bf6d36668f23bb64
c5ba1d0af56605ae98b6c69c84a32cf6b7ffd5c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSJ' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
342fab7be1160201cbf01ffb48431c28
3ef7cd9484736b84877f1ae7b6837e21095b2cae
describe
'104302' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSK' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
e7124b62889eb7922b64e09edb4d0adf
97993198a0cf1a0baddb32c45d18a0c0e354f798
describe
'29013' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSL' 'sip-files00188.pro'
355a6ac166a6cad2d860396f1bbf02d4
5a3c979a5eacf090ae045bf8e6db2029862d87b6
describe
'27408' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSM' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
c699c7cf48a4003d2335b7c186e2c02a
ff33e8e3cd2f25ea8c2d52efb8046259d9190e8b
describe
'6149688' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSN' 'sip-files00188.tif'
ca8feab45cc58df1a98ef650d15b4511
1ee0044a366a1a21c530c272779fb5f485a1a04d
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSO' 'sip-files00188.txt'
f199166991b0a765e6459361113c0534
569b006880f59d04c0aa62fef3f8becf88e65ab4
describe
'6379' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSP' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
76fdfea0aa289fa733a5a27592bc7602
43e1d0a91e6492a8540b18d1f9030b3f21833ad2
describe
'766043' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSQ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
4c4c7dcbd344abf3dd19f02e18bbef3f
dd6fad260453b4c7503d702a9abb95a3a564390b
describe
'117788' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSR' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
a596fcbad87bbb503aff0776e2a71428
bcca55eeb32a6532b8b7a321ea5036c2841bc057
describe
'37177' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSS' 'sip-files00189.pro'
cbc91ee2031124b3178516cfe338a9c1
492934b4d24e280843ff3463054dccf2a6e24670
describe
'30173' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFST' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
c17bfcce6b519843a01055f5560cb448
d46e024746a9593dae384001e3ff84835482c173
describe
'6150144' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSU' 'sip-files00189.tif'
00385c79c7b68babc0eb97b18add1abe
7e6a6d41e2ffeaef1944d28c3031e77152c47c68
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSV' 'sip-files00189.txt'
3aa7d9f98f23db9588e007148134cfb2
a8cc4a4035e185fc1d79ce3cbbb7941d30ac1cde
describe
'7215' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSW' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
8aeb3936fc436330fd1f67e68d75540b
ce21f9eb583a3cc0939c73fb65a826cf14816eb5
describe
'766073' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSX' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
a59906111eb337fc60572fff75b5a277
c9f1a6fb980bfc748e3e347f5565f04a63c56dd8
describe
'128087' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSY' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
e3cb3317d8ba62eaf394a9d2f99afbed
ad397c130d31c7e114bd0a92ac5ad958bb06b580
describe
'40589' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFSZ' 'sip-files00190.pro'
ab74810275eaef14ac9353e26501ec0f
a43d3be55dac93296d0e9e681cc1b695f3b97ceb
describe
'32671' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTA' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
e98ab713d3c76f05a11f520a3143d132
e0419b1f2332e25e292c408589e286151ce09945
describe
'6150136' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTB' 'sip-files00190.tif'
1492593c2a7ee32b00e7b77a0fa51a39
2ec75a41d6816185e1266cb7bd936124426c2c93
describe
'2189' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTC' 'sip-files00190.txt'
9865186920739e6ce59cfe14a23a85d9
16047ba118279e39beb12a3155867d2ecc0e0f5f
describe
'7590' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTD' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
0d19f37492c5e80dbc1807b2ac061b1f
e30506f3c36be1bef76a1f4b6e1f7b794be8a820
describe
'766089' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTE' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
f991858a4f2c4f46c5f19adfc074f302
1647e70520f4fce0f2feb53cddc87a3efdc370b1
describe
'123880' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTF' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
83659711a0e975fedd1d3482ad04b9b1
a6e4c1e823e452c023fc559348dfc2e53cadc3cb
describe
'49727' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTG' 'sip-files00191.pro'
29be7175603a416c3b8c27b5dadde1ac
a55d77f02ef9d9305e6f13a0fa0a9fa08ffc1992
describe
'32625' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTH' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
9ad5bc2183c4fb18ee70b10882903d76
47609083300a4b5c6908b78641aab254a68ef441
describe
'6150440' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTI' 'sip-files00191.tif'
42093322cd435ca971eb7962f54283f9
ef2bdce91812830e22ddfe4814188bcf25410432
describe
'1986' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTJ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
3a058797da3fcd9dd3685181ad7d172b
fafb645842ed2df147674f8229d58070de8a117d
describe
Invalid character
'7683' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTK' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
b17a87617db14422a548a69638501ee9
b8321072a04cd27b96e02bcfc66f90a3d718576f
describe
'765846' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTL' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
25f751bd750c086e072d81bd61eda72c
02f7fa70e49a26da9e9d8fd5ded12ad1c2c630a7
describe
'118007' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTM' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
ee18fe06a0126ff4d396528a6a024f4c
241747adb6a6da9e558a9bd09283f63db8e54e8a
describe
'12816' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTN' 'sip-files00192.pro'
0b7f89859d4e7146786a99ed1a25aa9f
241286b0d3bffe50d340656b2f2eb53f8da37807
describe
'26191' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTO' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
066ae9f0cd2067ad8c8ab6478270a8d4
0d154e45ec7a2ed6b06bf6cbfba448005e2b1d78
describe
'6148616' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTP' 'sip-files00192.tif'
f9946d98678e7940d95c733917da9658
e09329031aedfdc165800d65f68c06f3808747bb
describe
'516' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTQ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
cb354ab15f92fbb729e144f7d8b08725
df926da82ed4356b79c5de23181cdd1329704b7d
describe
'6004' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTR' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
b926559ea35fdc06229164c74695e751
0d9da775543d595b0c754fcc81a3360c91a103e2
describe
'766087' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTS' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
9dda18b7f41f453421a47ad0b24f4f6b
072e9d13cc40c46c2e61e3c5e3a50319970d50f9
describe
'120918' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTT' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
b088a89c91c73fbe57b6f75fd867c78c
7ada9b7eda97dfe1d8cf4ffb45d3e70eee5cf130
describe
'56390' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTU' 'sip-files00193.pro'
c54744e15dd00f4a6971a14df0f44652
e6e1af38d7feaeb1a219da84cc12f076b0e0171f
describe
'31716' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTV' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
00e25726b69a9df0e222edbd46e6ab2a
475506ecfff93df1a7f65427064e0c49d63936a7
describe
'6150048' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTW' 'sip-files00193.tif'
b27561d80b533be465f1bcd886bae7c5
1ef643e5e2e5af5f3228c742baf59ea1a7f4ee34
describe
'2241' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTX' 'sip-files00193.txt'
db2ea829272cae74de7ba5f1f951cb33
d258438b1dd485380bfdcff65a64a610991bc9e5
describe
'7184' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTY' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
7b5b59b4bed6c37344e4dd7bb2a1867c
6f381b6f80663f4aa4333acfb7dce0119e2bce93
describe
'766097' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFTZ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
822716c2412af5e11e654023fd8d138a
a4d1107976e4cb6fd0550ca7adaae088877499b6
describe
'122769' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUA' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
7a12d7dab8e13dee0b58b9e9cbad3d49
b9a453cfe72aa30bea5b19540292accf2a26e288
describe
'42765' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUB' 'sip-files00194.pro'
b3154f0dca78a6a706a6d4a9823d4a03
45cd68ddf40a605daab43160073477b2b02a83cc
describe
'31019' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUC' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
e364c3c52d0c49cc161060364a36bfed
69ad896ec6d5521d1128079ea3bba766b2fa292c
describe
'6150208' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUD' 'sip-files00194.tif'
517fa22ff2ed85651127890681df6d21
95b11468880c4fbb14f68f0ae0c9a66d9b8f8165
describe
'2292' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUE' 'sip-files00194.txt'
6eda6acf5a8912abdadcb2aaebcead2b
16e940685af12511a26cb26e31396b79bcc4be5d
describe
Invalid character
'7364' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUF' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
9effffe9c65c7e389ce5d94eed0b2658
78e0e7e65f91da62bf6bc771a180e17b74efbc09
describe
'766101' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUG' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
2469a889101bac25f1b9a91ed26bb2ff
f14f8d62936a504b0b6c41ffead2f2e72a910db5
describe
'117697' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUH' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
d45adfd18cfa604d79a05685b7210206
be83ee9592f483d9519a1a006d8313d0c384c756
describe
'32544' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUI' 'sip-files00195.pro'
547a9d7d6038ebea51b463d4a7becb82
2cf411020affea58cc35674afdab1c7c9fe37856
describe
'30957' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUJ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
1913e6ace2fda854188e3fcf09a38368
a664fa6b7cc9e8de3669ea8655fc8e6dc6d1496d
describe
'6150248' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUK' 'sip-files00195.tif'
fc35c39e2ca31562c0c893ed2e87bbac
e30804372f6a888963969fc89b28e06d584a47e0
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUL' 'sip-files00195.txt'
d9aa1894e80c2bfda79351ba91057b6f
01a0e0e0e2452cfe2d827ab91aafcc7c7cef3f28
describe
'7538' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUM' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
622bebc69f6ae2963bd32f706c8c5387
97f6d6c7ee112f4b1f89d7747fe576c81f01e59d
describe
'766079' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUN' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
16d3057fe8610989a0f45bbd6263f6e6
1ce1e0ec3c8e11e3678a58e5d23eb3017ed587fc
describe
'126614' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUO' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
cf0e2b13be60bd193066e77b9c6325d5
6b9b3091589fc7ab6b93425a62c37428352450d3
describe
'36219' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUP' 'sip-files00196.pro'
9fbf500b94e33d3560465fb28a0c30e6
e3d30d2fc5dd81483bb84350f30e96ed111bef3b
describe
'31458' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUQ' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
6532e6121a045b07580c5ca6b0c00e1c
fc8d291ecd93725eea8d396d2228884c6abef5a0
describe
'6150076' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUR' 'sip-files00196.tif'
dd3b6639e420538e434ab4fa122bfc9e
70c4d2dc0fda7493ae3c203426531c351cc60069
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUS' 'sip-files00196.txt'
e67f85f3c2fe4ff1276a0766752f7df1
84ad7100eaf7b65d77461c999ed2f16564f0dc8b
describe
'7548' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUT' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
40fc8afbe625fc03fdc16533b8b42100
2bb54ceeb492fc8acd3fa793ea3d93fd7ee0b294
describe
'766096' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUU' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
0c4ad04950644736c14122829af7b5ce
e19ad7b685965e0a2743b9409babd245b8dffe5a
describe
'105123' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUV' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
c2382d81fe4cd9adea1b6e53941ad4fc
8ad7d64a701da6477c50460ba2e7d6b87b65230f
describe
'41065' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUW' 'sip-files00197.pro'
67bc99764566f576b2e1f0fbf4515a5a
93c051d7670da6efdca0d61ab7d1319cdaa1baf9
describe
'28104' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUX' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
3d60f556ba74b3ca6b3d9fc4b2a7257a
37e4adc8c70c50f6259d50df1bbac838e778bbf0
describe
'6149944' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUY' 'sip-files00197.tif'
c3870586ac531252a4595d1c53d48eed
1eb1c87fcb54e9317c0d41a3b3d780fb47500d6b
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFUZ' 'sip-files00197.txt'
2d3216f42d2441fa2d3f8096babeeed9
c344cb2f8e16ff082ca16018e8b768877937020f
describe
Invalid character
'6985' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVA' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
61a6fda592cb3263ca3ab728df637bb1
f75a038a609e31a93ce3ec8308072178a172953a
describe
'766103' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVB' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
fffa7cba39db2998fc0fa9411172edd5
28e67dbe13fd50e000de325800b09c4b4bc899db
describe
'129467' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVC' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
db6e57acd1a3ccc09255f7b8baae3777
41001804a9a0b218aa2d0ac451bb8f0266340bca
describe
'55442' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVD' 'sip-files00198.pro'
8fb0d2cf9a766427e75c892442795170
abd3bbb8b8a3b9e9b57b6aec086d713321b8dc15
describe
'34136' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVE' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
335aa1b3a56a0a956867320c2cf66a87
e7fb6ba06614220984331779b6aac6d99ffdd1ce
describe
'6150292' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVF' 'sip-files00198.tif'
6ccea7e248c5cf51db22505b538719ae
7d666086e733884e0db5a0e9af37292f4031fddb
describe
'2160' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVG' 'sip-files00198.txt'
0643474739ff21d1aabf1686d6c15a02
b461a82665a39d5f0b371aa98a1eea721fd811b4
describe
'7321' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVH' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
5772a51898641d1815ab814c45b6aa93
3e4633f29915d479d62e2a4cd5c9aeb0241268f4
describe
'766071' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVI' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
cd569b5ae5b86e7e63be6d0c46bac5a7
2c56a5771294f3aedec6632a743f4cfd41605867
describe
'126325' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVJ' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
405aa2c794a44672785f03a7973867c3
d0ec8708505ac5b879320e383980f5518891dbce
describe
'20322' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVK' 'sip-files00199.pro'
d63317216321268e88dd3bbdcaa31fde
5770de8a91ce6f1d457c0ba30973c3f70aab57c9
describe
'30590' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVL' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
c043c5712c5c43cc1812f49064db556b
0b1a44241d3d96b636401656e047622aed1f9165
describe
'6150132' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVM' 'sip-files00199.tif'
fa825bcc3ff1d1defd78654214fae74a
cbe0ecc3c75641ea7197ad6552cba2d4333432da
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVN' 'sip-files00199.txt'
e9212b8bd605127bd374034261276fb1
a91aff6140d453d86e0b40cea38bc9a28fc45462
describe
'7477' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVO' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
2a5731b8a746f0f6c0e174e88bbe7876
6c0faa6441f1028abbf61089dd914435c8d32e35
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVP' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
8856e37e610a350b7ba74905532b4543
87d21db16238235f94977024e7d72034dca0daad
describe
'134473' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVQ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
dc13f5a4b2ebb650ea80ea297595d425
2fa619591a5b3dbfb9e3177ce3397f8d75da9d52
describe
'55038' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVR' 'sip-files00200.pro'
a81d6334b5c815b16d4ca66462116d48
1a7b3be2e1e516685ac4fa23c7e65316c8d87b72
describe
'35702' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVS' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
f21207514e48facbb82481ebb0537a90
5bbb896e04daf3037caf4aa8b9e5f25377720a2f
describe
'6150372' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVT' 'sip-files00200.tif'
67930f31c9c4203ba18e1de46a99bc56
42555e31945684812bf0fd57b36316799851e225
describe
'2152' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVU' 'sip-files00200.txt'
1cfe8886167fe300f189121208243c72
a4f8450d9e00b166c95587ff270276c78a41ed56
describe
'8368' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVV' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
c6be05c272ffc20539905e97bd5fb248
3bf4972ff23356572ceb0470a20606d0ee8e1e9f
describe
'766039' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVW' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
9488cb778c0a3bfddf5bb744d04eabeb
904b89965907d505f354ab6e5fea475d1aec04c2
describe
'123173' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVX' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
0836577cae5fb7c74c53880a243298e7
ac6a42b1bf9a8988d9816faa9656b7c42fa80ea3
describe
'41468' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVY' 'sip-files00201.pro'
aae41677f19a6ad0697cec6c956693a5
538b259088666303b9bfb8806a09d8beea463b63
describe
'32152' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFVZ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
5fe752008bd153b657c701d3f4588ded
1595dc355dfc4e16e3748c2ad5b32486a8e08484
describe
'6150204' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWA' 'sip-files00201.tif'
12e76a9e89298c9cc430992d89745095
6dffe0a1f13d8328668f9cecf6cad25052cccd5d
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWB' 'sip-files00201.txt'
1a012a69ef03c52dc0b0d0b1f62f2dcd
97d348ac4f376d19a02a1d07be0b7635f6e5fc8b
describe
'7754' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWC' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
f2c6d19f7957642b635da19a267d1173
76c11dadb75e71a4f13d39eeba0c109159d5c9f9
describe
'766093' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWD' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
003f4091894e4ea598e9430dff96e0d6
e3339b040044decdf83ed574e5500497d8ca084a
describe
'130733' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWE' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
d780bc44aecea81177dc61e609f31940
07d719f355c2d106dc71abacbab06127cb563d3d
describe
'56742' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWF' 'sip-files00202.pro'
6778fadae7822dbde0dac2fd9244d0f0
f87924212c8836d9f3901e268014930195e81183
describe
'33832' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWG' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
88aa8eb19466183a08c83878996c3983
fb507053acf0e6b4585f07a2650605a31a691155
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWH' 'sip-files00202.tif'
362bd5f6ccf7a83787822618edd3f1a9
3d71c8a929d98bbd903a5c55512ae335d836189e
describe
'2216' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWI' 'sip-files00202.txt'
72384b433a4be5fc7319750bd9ddfd13
4eedb28f8648d9a69d1b69b2ee4a76ebab52dccb
describe
'7985' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWJ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
81f9ad97c8a12978146c04d3468de00a
0649a6c14e2a37c66e1e57005beba72a5d68f801
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWK' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
c759e25ba23fdcdd503939cae066db45
ccdb76cd9e7c7976566ea25358c6a86679623132
describe
'117980' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWL' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
2a05bf1bef2f1f428463f7ef23f71283
6e696689818a8d5300180e6aeea89b123ac6e9cf
describe
'2023' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWM' 'sip-files00203.pro'
16333f5529fcfb99f3387ea454f58105
5966b2810e7e37e742fe20d428d918c46cea27c5
describe
'27979' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWN' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
96fd243f9d04bbf379531129258de339
1cec7b7f769a45913e0a5aa653c339cc96ee110d
describe
'6149760' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWO' 'sip-files00203.tif'
85efc2ccb7379a41802de00db7879926
ebc6c31cff9b190c9b0c60860f7fbef3c0c65c31
'2011-12-12T23:31:01-05:00'
describe
'224' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWP' 'sip-files00203.txt'
088422dd3eef1e2613cd6fad093aec2f
903a61ba254ff39333cb82193c337f6d122b2bde
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWQ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
e11c9396d9755f0494881061852c1c3a
f46b093b6728f00a240bb0e8de56b3a3a96d6d96
describe
'765903' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWR' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
47b460b6e7de360514c941d00861d76d
d04f30cc05452817ed648022cd492760ef1e4336
describe
'13419' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWS' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
a2ad9990c9952d523aec234e04197453
45a7b82707f0cabebd404669bd075e68373f524e
describe
'3028' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWT' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
32c46550b7592a9a29d9e11846da225f
6b435a59a08c662e58f22128f2437a61be0196e0
describe
'6146132' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWU' 'sip-files00204.tif'
87be7e90cce5874dbd08b6c28639b794
e6472588aa001c3d15f73a722af880735219c76b
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWV' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
e0975a7d27f3dface7e8a334c1cc7f56
7b90165c8f19891b0c01b96c467cef3a707c2e51
'2011-12-12T23:29:30-05:00'
describe
'766053' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWW' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
b776875e2d3c424d62f0e59dfe932743
918511f09eeb29775c707a922ec27794c406d601
describe
'116807' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWX' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
7e67a615c7ef9d6347ea9e1e351dd756
5240249afa94fb9f77ad4bb2f0929a8a0472a6dd
describe
'33969' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWY' 'sip-files00205.pro'
35db1a722474e8f99f57ba0132ac52b5
4e5fa00a8f62c7a1969442dd26fc0637a300a90f
describe
'31204' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFWZ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
48f6fd3d9262540352e5e4f29ae2d101
38ef487e937898985ddc37fa8a4e4e4822d396be
describe
'6150108' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXA' 'sip-files00205.tif'
18c9fea424b59da0a633f4ccc0a96707
d554c659fccaf70d47f024579e64511fc8fb92bd
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXB' 'sip-files00205.txt'
47799477405f6d154ea7c8ce73e57b9f
834077d14ec00231ee7096e670c6ea5c16ce952a
describe
'7707' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXC' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
d5aabd5a117e2119022302c8d2028f2c
54b759c8ddb4ba7650d82c13809223597c27a8c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXD' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
39d0b10aa6946c6e05f7517cb4bd6c31
59f58e6ca55a6f52632339676608ffb1e3c67dc5
describe
'122465' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXE' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
9dccf1c20629d8221daefb0bebbc18a3
5d01d5973144fda987e3d004a824edf619acc5c5
describe
'43384' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXF' 'sip-files00206.pro'
7a315f4d68f9caac28da494583d8a5cf
182d7cbbdefcf02c9915f4ba09367731adcbc4c5
describe
'31711' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXG' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
06bc5024d66d9248b033722376695914
1ce9f824dec2e71c9203f283a1c48d9a1f01214f
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXH' 'sip-files00206.tif'
cb37b60ce4b6ebd2dea25da954fd0a4c
7310ce0eff45905c652eb9c5421e17c56fec9530
describe
'2273' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXI' 'sip-files00206.txt'
08a8622e288d209ff1d08cae6bf8376f
4ff4e5bab462724f041c4da31448f6a6694ae186
describe
'7390' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXJ' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
2a55825dbebf11ca9623f02f8c1d8ef5
8beaf36dc593fb45fdb618326d131816b68e9eb8
describe
'770187' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXK' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
df2cb96f2a0f2eaf1465470e7c2b7beb
dd48eb951a6aee1e9b0758d91384a61690eb9430
describe
'113257' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXL' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
be0114e966f61cedec165b43a6197944
c9be84e7564dd4d2162bff2e6e7a446d86f26247
describe
'41788' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXM' 'sip-files00207.pro'
0a5e02b1f093626635872d319325f653
14e90845771ee03c3ce8fed14238f6b09a0cd97b
describe
'28505' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXN' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
abd96733a1f3e2e8deac63a9434acdf7
60600de03a6517e9b2bafc3c804f5b6b90af5333
describe
'6182988' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXO' 'sip-files00207.tif'
a8c19ea57a4fe2b27a41af5d1983e258
1a2b97761087c2d048ffa63bb310a1542ffc50e1
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXP' 'sip-files00207.txt'
d94e21b2c49567c66f0380ff59a6d848
0cf7224cbf05215bdcb2310f3b5780687c7b398a
describe
'6705' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXQ' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
055e6fa9a61e39349ff3ed741fde25ad
0d1dcdcd2ede42cd58a42766dc30514b991d92d2
describe
'770209' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXR' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
7dcf5b46369b6a300a983f7134bdc1b4
20a4cdf8cf1649875fca745449de53d1893bf9a1
describe
'123714' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXS' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
714363803b394d79152519562634e75f
3be215ff03c1f6a1e39986c363bc3b0ed7ae560a
describe
'40858' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXT' 'sip-files00208.pro'
46d85dd371896b366dfc531b1de37acc
2960d972181109eba80e767b506acffdbbeff515
describe
'30461' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXU' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
11de66f53fc7a821c7abad5e24415165
83613a0b6c79414f174dda779b9d5d208b340106
describe
'6183268' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXV' 'sip-files00208.tif'
7e6392ba5abbd36d33edc6e131fab0d6
2145c23e5b79efc08f2ecad6e99365a9c844ebe8
describe
'2146' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXW' 'sip-files00208.txt'
d3f1bf3e091016fedb6eab901b300875
044062104a92bbb5e57471dd9f8f3d813191827c
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXX' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
0646f8ad85b9b16a0a4a80bf7bf9ec6d
42fa2cb540ac1f16b908d9600b32fb5e412dd28b
describe
'770149' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXY' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
5230977c6c70aa214c4c258d0b4333db
6984a731da14ac795a5d00619caeedb8059a12de
describe
'101275' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFXZ' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
71af3d1ef71d975803351fc5c34794a9
242c202fb9c0f2bb7d5352a2515e63b67a9b6e88
describe
'37133' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYA' 'sip-files00209.pro'
0be8bb9a5808efc780d3c6c5b20c925a
694100ddfe57c7adb151dcd17acd6388a28d8a41
describe
'25696' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYB' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
152193511c716d02834595dd7a9d0c0e
1451cbb20e0c4f1796dd782dc2f02952ee17a426
describe
'6182668' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYC' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d88ad6e85b27689aed471caccdb74121
9da62a4cdeaf8fef00fe9a32cd1a554e56bd6053
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYD' 'sip-files00209.txt'
87018162020e5c034c6fe75c9c2b17f9
abffbbff57b22ad2345646d4a36d0e78227ec32c
describe
Invalid character
'6098' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYE' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
461f0fbf748ff02dd40c8e792726c5ca
e8f23e5654a9aaa57c11f737b3ccd7ce3b0a4e3e
describe
'770224' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYF' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
1435400512567c3a29a6b5c2ef2bdee3
9f7e1f5ee5cc7196c58aac7b7ca375049a4dc33c
describe
'112671' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYG' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
6c2d3296a3fad69f911988b0fe920d3b
276e1112d13f3452f63b0ce106240877869e2c8c
describe
'37977' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYH' 'sip-files00210.pro'
96a6ea95a291985be9d7a3e741e08729
9f035b3e7cd436e819e57ea12e97cde52657d3c6
describe
'28219' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYI' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
95ab5a67742b400f17a579b4464e2817
37ddb19c5ae0711647704df0cfbd670628b04cfb
describe
'6182720' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYJ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
7a8e1670dc1fe549eb303e27d31e8b71
ed69b8ca964d8e62b645dc23231733f18e50af0e
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYK' 'sip-files00210.txt'
624b3e3c297c623e5531cac170942b36
feb3c59afea40dcd14af95032beb88a76f6501ae
describe
'6507' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYL' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
672b9aca30fa42e1035978cf08972b64
54be4c2cbee2e83469c7caf6f7701ac1f28cfedf
describe
'770219' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYM' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
07d3d9d921b3bb713d9c5e560972de58
a652f5d1e785288f8078b7069b7e63e794cb2630
describe
'93570' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYN' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
ceb90115c0cfc3ce4614acc4e8eb9ecc
535024983a8fbb86546c0fab58699179c92a7eac
describe
'26727' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYO' 'sip-files00211.pro'
1de6395c9283eeaf307204e445f70ed2
ec85508a9e68ddf00950b08e93dcf9736c8ec790
describe
'23317' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYP' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
f36cafe5aaf4e74a272227c175ce25b1
938de58b1cea93447127d085db3d752fcec1bc7b
describe
'6182472' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYQ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
b7092f3422ff6dd98fb578b506851a39
fe10e4bdec07f2da9f11fdbe9aa5bcd043b63ad6
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYR' 'sip-files00211.txt'
f6bd81d15575d2cd06b8c8de8522e082
a33150b8613dfb9b043432576ab781275f4c17bd
describe
'5563' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
e5522c1f5e56bbb7f01524f4fb135d6d
3020fae1af4f07c958d4ef91b22f1ee76e822f99
describe
'770241' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYT' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
5cba34c2eb201df4f10eab46988ce12c
659950cc7b26605a4597bd9b1079fb219be520cf
describe
'131594' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYU' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
2f6a1a0aa5500e168e453df3519d8c67
6ee072e3482d375d502dc8c4ae51b8cf690e48e9
describe
'56404' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYV' 'sip-files00212.pro'
9e3b377b1fe0fa74ddd68de980ca9183
e919864aa3a5e10410c21d4532deefb1e69246a2
describe
'32656' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYW' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
88863a1be005d47169ec4394aaf39a43
3aa2d6d2f180ce8967f12cadb1950e9020a3abd9
describe
'6183512' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYX' 'sip-files00212.tif'
9f2bfc2aa17e8cda758d421f6fbcfbe3
ca41e5a6c2a8f68709246c9ecdc0c9b972b7ad76
describe
'2200' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYY' 'sip-files00212.txt'
391c805ea5cf5d3293f172bfdf82fdd2
d46882d6af2719460624bce1bd70cfe4ce7f55fb
describe
'7165' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFYZ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
82882829dfadb0cde23774ec02a8e69d
f9c355e9aa5536dde3347561d7dabcf379d1c382
describe
'770170' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZA' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
3d684918e7a8d96511d8a541ccf8a022
4dffa9877a58feef7a9fdf7e189ac710b33d071b
describe
'129136' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZB' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
d35e40e6d1d2f73881ac75dd3abf5572
a08d62d34913bd582bdb585386d27c6907fd450f
describe
'20539' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZC' 'sip-files00213.pro'
a89ccac4fb12f718cf711ac3d4ab5b14
cb5c87245be7d70f2827b1f4f872a9bd072ebe2d
describe
'31215' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZD' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
74c96c7b35bebcaf2fac66d32c086e3f
f8062b0039fb1c6dd1c054f5e246113c0fb6dc55
describe
'6183368' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZE' 'sip-files00213.tif'
1bce3c404ff2e43d639ee36a64c3226f
56b796d81d6a4cd619d7f66268a9778b53355aa2
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZF' 'sip-files00213.txt'
e0cd378ef598d1a70892bdc0c8155240
1a5ba8f4f04081f3db4ddfa51ab28875b3873f54
describe
'7378' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZG' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
1eadf5925cd94169fb7d24a6b52d9b93
886293c9cf52f7a87ad83fc3c9d7797a9f23881e
describe
'770243' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZH' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
860f2512606deac1ab6abf3a8c30296f
2c58e31fa133dc1aa627f8ae6d598820f03faaad
describe
'124635' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZI' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
34875563a0365ee720a920871a4df018
aac501e8a3418040752ae7f641c4b099dacc2d82
describe
'55412' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZJ' 'sip-files00214.pro'
55893176db4c3a94acc3f517e4e1f237
1a08c86e960d7a90ba1466cc5177c38559dbd34b
describe
'31513' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZK' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
4149d3b0120dee6d042d1370518f1a6a
dd70a65ab97e32c42ffc352102a6bf4c726eaec3
describe
'6183396' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZL' 'sip-files00214.tif'
2c4fb4cae4d90d04facc2f3578decda5
902bdd1b72426060ad2dd4bb2cadf64aad78eafc
describe
'2178' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZM' 'sip-files00214.txt'
7c866aabe0dfe0ce54c357db5e069f36
2b0289a209594ceb4fdfe0e9deb9520fc8d8a930
describe
'7172' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZN' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
24efa8423370f339d01f388a88f60d0f
d693a493a93089c32b81e7bbad0dc09ab94c0708
describe
'770229' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZO' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
2a2c1037761a6b5a94304a16f87ef6d2
d79eeefb38c5e6e51194864b9c5332e2742a2533
describe
'119265' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZP' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
1435e9b146018f8c19a7750fed829ad3
6ef9341e344c199d369040fe7d6c0c2ba40369c7
describe
'49555' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZQ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
d8a2e03c55e82f8cb44dadece7db285f
abecaba7cc5687d2b8e4287252cfd74a152599f5
describe
'30904' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZR' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
783969396a039a6ea3edcdf329169f4c
c98b0ae062f6e7836dc498950b537d2a1395eaf8
describe
'6183564' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZS' 'sip-files00215.tif'
b3c8fc391b8a9174e8b2e28aa3b44475
d3d944b0ded72938a0275460f7274808b4d35546
'2011-12-12T23:30:00-05:00'
describe
'1965' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZT' 'sip-files00215.txt'
aa40dd34237e9719d327399d5ff7e40e
d65275dc80a62bc9af0968170d6f283aa4c3651e
describe
'6990' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZU' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
3b5647113a179cf43294fc73fa485cd6
bcc8523397300ba80e3193431327c9f10206c526
describe
'770213' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZV' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
2fd98aaf880fef1bc763c3bee66c81d8
898815b3288b1a77a28c6e8c3442661cac00e9fe
describe
'121656' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZW' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
874aac2580c81711a58d1ead2e4490e5
5954f27416536e5268aa0fafecbe55956c93c8f8
describe
'54632' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZX' 'sip-files00216.pro'
73cbaa20cbee631dba928cf4a1cab010
a91d46fae21f6f57ab1d18198d7d33327946117d
describe
'30010' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZY' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
ea34ce59a14023a7ddc630dbeec9547f
1b0ee71cbc3ee8ef4382cb446fad8e0069263672
describe
'6183072' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABFZZ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
0c68c0ff876e8647eda0ea4f84b62d63
95f11886feab2972ea3ea8a31d694d57d4a4cd2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAA' 'sip-files00216.txt'
abadef2b19eb60774a92ea99a314b2a2
84acbe2ef3451de03d86ebce2bd7f863f8b7b879
describe
'7000' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAB' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
d3860d96c8a527b1367fd6938f5ed14b
32d5623834def27a34e045eb407bddaadc3614ff
describe
'770596' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAC' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
5c9d9ff828c0e0f21991b66cec83cb23
a1a5f47d5f7dcb7de47b62ad83ff1e2a78fbfe4d
describe
'131611' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAD' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
c59080570bc5801658f5dcb836d3b714
707f734928140f21ce3bb9fcd54e7f3c1e84e947
describe
'2505' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAE' 'sip-files00217.pro'
0fe468d138a0d26cd449a28daa99bb3a
6c2a8d4df97f0fc58866b993ef765b097602a40b
describe
'28706' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAF' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
1a8fc105a8d9668d29548e4cbc181555
bb3ba3f04708286bdf9d362e75afda41a1e7641c
describe
'6185024' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAG' 'sip-files00217.tif'
a6f61b68091d2d40e0b28a9a6a95e958
e1e107520d49324f7e912757cf30537ac30c605a
describe
'173' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAH' 'sip-files00217.txt'
206384b602f862d742b8d698b3fdbaa4
0e4ecc8ce6960b5669bbc6b026c3d5caf5f4166d
describe
'6664' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAI' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
504f12e40367b5cbe7d624e33b360225
fa6f8603e9def2c4bde470d1e37c40997f14e5f4
describe
'770164' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAJ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
4e73764f7b98009683dfb64b6b32b23b
1d7dea2869f2febeb0e6823fb1b8a7e7a4b523a3
describe
'24379' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAK' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
327381fe41d97aacdf1806a92f7199a9
08083a596ac899346e29ff5676ad822d08b26bfe
describe
'4047' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAL' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
9ee02401a3d798768a8484668c5da6ea
cbe90089054c67a62641f84839cbb0a32d0f8822
describe
'6179336' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAM' 'sip-files00218.tif'
5db0e08a56c7189c727996fe53c28b9f
c83a385c1647043aa65b116c409606ce0ed09739
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAN' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
411d37b8bdd83e4b71e87da9c2590f8d
edb2ec00b28a12ea82c1e726bc227a63ea86c0d2
describe
'770233' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAO' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
569687e345fc3d2e7c678fd05f40b06a
e6eb674205c91efbc4c17744a844ed811827b252
describe
'119143' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAP' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
e0d256cc33a4e6c0316f32ba17da4d60
ec923182d84a169472996f5a97e1c3175ea22455
describe
'50437' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAQ' 'sip-files00219.pro'
e02264bd7477569f44e4b97cd0fbef5b
63f850b88ba4f4623a8055c5ac53f1873efb3394
describe
'30753' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAR' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
ccae5251612738fa33e7303526624c52
c45e84dea2133ff1b1225a85a5530544cf650db8
describe
'6183408' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAS' 'sip-files00219.tif'
10701cd69cc78db09e513f1c8c49b321
e22dbd2f182d9a39b60b6a277dbf390d69d656a5
describe
'1974' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAT' 'sip-files00219.txt'
1cac5a02aadb126df8113e4ea13b76cc
54358d11f77f26fe53b14d659e7c998e0bbe816f
describe
'7070' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAU' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
08b04bb399d22e61d58d6eecbf29da0a
e610756d125b39daddb630ebe96bb4cff7791604
describe
'770176' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAV' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
6e2bfe8ba8a74d8e84aeaf6d24bcf6a3
d11cecc9dfb84cfc5e0d0d745caff32eb8c9c116
describe
'121812' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAW' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
6a38c2e16143ea223ea296fbcc85084d
fd5b1a57b969dc2769b0542814de3e880d4f2e4e
describe
'24734' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAX' 'sip-files00220.pro'
f433c89fc8ebeb182b0c2ac9516e33f8
dce2c020315ee6b12d828ec210ec7ace958be0b6
describe
'30083' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAY' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
240029e0d973dca2865c48423b64a28b
306f36032ad5833e69a716344698464f25e572a5
describe
'6182400' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGAZ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
4b0c3ff26abb16867875e40c2ac344d3
0f48e9544330e57fd2c2e6542aec5701d0216bb7
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBA' 'sip-files00220.txt'
2a5cd7ba87ee5d4128d6e0ed7f136308
375db275d32ff3c6d356337f0023b09f91bb1f2c
describe
'6741' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBB' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
69e9112fcb4c66047c0acd36c370d509
2279cfb0a8764cd691164db7a1b84602fc8115dd
describe
'766078' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBC' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
0c68af1f5e19ed506a2226d45385a450
61c8586a33acfb71a4d5f3a66537da5e2b0d233b
describe
'95855' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBD' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
31bf795a15374ae72ce8b32069eacdef
441dc228f932d9c8867a0cb9c3ce358838f39527
describe
'32064' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBE' 'sip-files00221.pro'
43144d77d71e89cd9a83b85a054bf654
466a0d98654354adafd867fb233de86f9f660464
describe
'25483' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBF' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
b209a747d5f3bb0ef022c6523a84d1c7
2a01e94a628d36ce263e27c4f5afb3c977b1a3dd
describe
'6149604' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBG' 'sip-files00221.tif'
982dd6e9bc018786110d1881723a37c7
6a5b2dd5edc1d1096242df6fda073a1ab645301b
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBH' 'sip-files00221.txt'
c57aeded4a6c00a16b4a6ca3a9a90b7f
5ee4bed4dce7a0edc43e92d30b20798d90616f8b
describe
'6361' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBI' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
5779147f774d2e4c684d3d0fe31b1649
32245845f3bd95fccea9332a16aa5e79cf5995c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBJ' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
2f69a0ea882fcb9fd1fd6c3726d55017
4a216945d54e1b8da09d450c5f4ee2efab5e800b
describe
'124006' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBK' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
2699f2191d793133f3672935eb3a5c49
7ad576496e810e3a0cdcc94e5bcca74d45f13bb6
describe
'50858' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBL' 'sip-files00222.pro'
1a68a819861a71ea0d9976f4ebfaa3c2
9b643c4e3180c632de1dd5002fcf03278e44be16
describe
'31975' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBM' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
357c3ab2f535f83fbab8d12c82b46a75
243e4ef218f9d00dbaa5b5302560b01c91f15b67
describe
'6183480' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBN' 'sip-files00222.tif'
e2236a13441f385938705e188c18c9c2
df9a1110c3ecf2382d4fa2cc83ef2f76fe28739d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBO' 'sip-files00222.txt'
27a42611824adc3b4c1fd0744a8fdc66
78cabaeaa5462f6e30bebfee8fca67b35c325f69
describe
'6929' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBP' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
0b0040693dcc3376347b0e270c2eed2d
efabc58e8d2da65616993d721968a1330de3b01d
describe
'770583' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBQ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
71e5264c225ee78ddaaa6242de45fac7
864da07ecf9746ca049149bfaaf08bbc7937ab26
describe
'149646' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBR' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
eff5fb8a78faeed8387fda1832658c25
3e5185f707684c416e21b0a8a59f1669aaffdf04
describe
'18469' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBS' 'sip-files00223.pro'
a583cdbe9ab7440f82b5ae09ef09ae4e
55ee199f3e8713f25a60f991f9878e75586c0a52
describe
'36895' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBT' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
2d3a673c5a0f7839cbca197283b50639
73b49fc0551b4592761e4b8d83692c0b10f87409
describe
'6187280' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBU' 'sip-files00223.tif'
96727fc6df7bc91c55960c1458841bda
7b608f1d935e9d8e10cd10698755b04e5a7e2195
describe
'733' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBV' 'sip-files00223.txt'
8497f6d5ebe6c6d1143c5fd98e431ef8
a7840b1f96c558e4a80ee00de04a78ab63fbd59f
describe
'8703' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBW' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
ea9b3a9fa875de13fa998768e6a51185
5acbeabab39ef9b8b76dc6aff5aadf0337ba623d
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBX' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
23b6781624aebad22cbce5cb8e6fc4e8
78ea73f150de5776ddb4c0a62ce07ea69fcc217f
describe
'126790' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBY' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
da48e8c7f64e862829762ca8d53bc808
3f67704fa09d4f513cdb71fdfcd082b941007fc1
describe
'57154' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGBZ' 'sip-files00224.pro'
d4ffef51507bff81b9e46039a09565bf
0195da96bd743cadb122e9d5f686aca776cf13b0
describe
'31422' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCA' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
722625266ef7569843117558bb92bdb5
dd486c41293c279d10831a2f89b572b15b47d895
describe
'6183192' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCB' 'sip-files00224.tif'
7c81d55f6bca64b29b70dd1fde58e5ca
583b10eab0415c0db03c02292e2b668b13b09960
describe
'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCC' 'sip-files00224.txt'
c3db3dfc123dadf60c65f4ec92648100
8e38d4f0cc8197f29a0fce75f2c693704001c1b3
describe
'6833' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCD' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
531946d9376b8fa3bde2bd9b693e1785
a5995566d584f6d0a4dda10780837b2121805027
describe
'0' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCE' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e
da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709
describe
'262806' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCF' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
01d4b9d1aa980026ca587f31864f2230
5a133011de0e6b8529c5687a25e74d9becd22cef
describe
'2734' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCG' 'sip-files00225.pro'
4686a78c49acdc8658a7147fc22d6773
549ab374954947f3c51559da4ad1b651f838aa07
describe
'85642' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCH' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
2381f203f55a2bd5e120c608bc6d86cb
3b4c7c500db469c770973b3db77ca8553b31f8ff
describe
'7517682' 'info:fdaE20080515_AAAADOfileF20080516_AABGCI' 'sip-files00225.tif'
2ef8bd2d2eb88f00f60aeaa3b8714302
3be11b855849212fd9ca47da1882a2f87d6f6ac6
'2011-12-12T23:28:06-05:00'
describe
Tag 60063 out of sequenceTag 36583 out of sequenceTag 32527 out of sequenceTag 822 out of sequenceTag 37531 out of sequenceTag 7081 out of sequenceTag 7905 out of sequenceTag 25964 out of sequenceTag 37012 out of sequenceTag 30091 out of sequenceTag 25418 out of sequenceTag 15390 out of sequenceTag 871 out of sequenceTag 4494 out of sequenceTag 36897 out of sequenceTag 17128 out of sequenceTag 38547 out of sequenceTag 38368 out of sequenceTag 29589 out of sequenceTag 40699 out of sequenceTag 53182 out of sequenceTag 8291 out of sequenceTag 31718 out of sequenceTag 27943 out of sequenceTag 29967 out of sequenceTag 12250 out of sequenceTag 60983 out of sequenceTag 19026 out of sequenceTag 10081 out of sequenceTag 33123 out of sequenceTag 17009 out of sequenceTag 13232 out of sequenceTag 27316 out of sequenceTag 9673 out of sequenceTag 30151 out of sequenceTag 21831 out of sequenceTag 41722 out of sequenceTag 20028 out of sequenceTag 3979 out of sequenceTag 5171 out of sequenceTag 19886 out of sequenceTag 36144 out of sequenceTag 48865 out of sequenceTag 35569 out of sequenceTag 1328 out of sequenceTag 43594 out of sequenceTag 8371 out of sequenceTag 37787 out of sequenceTag 16746 out of sequenceTag 31447 out of sequenceTag 22553 out of sequenceTag 42444 out of sequenceTag 49034 out of sequenceTag 24024 out of sequenceTag 42559 out of sequenceTag 6187 out of sequenceTag 44576 out of sequenceTag 6825 out of sequenceTag 57503 out of sequenceTag 58107 out of sequenceTag 41402 out of sequenceTag 26701 out of sequenceTag 29344 out of sequence