United States House of Representatives elections, 2020

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2020 U.S. House Elections

Election Date
November 3, 2020

U.S. Senate Elections

U.S. House Elections by State
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U.S. House Primaries
U.S. House Democratic Party primaries, 2020
U.S. House Republican Party primaries, 2020

Democrats maintained a majority in the U.S. House as a result of the 2020 elections, winning 222 seats to Republicans' 213. Democrats flipped three seats and Republicans flipped 15, including one held by a Libertarian in 2020.

Heading into the November 3, 2020, election, Democrats held a 232-197 advantage in the U.S. House. Libertarians held one seat, and five seats were vacant. All 435 seats were up for election, with Republicans needing to gain a net 21 seats to win a majority in the chamber.

In 2018, Democrats gained a net 40 seats to win a majority. Republicans had held a majority in the chamber since 2010.

Ballotpedia tracked 41 districts as battleground races: 20 held by Democrats heading into the election, 20 held by Republicans, and one held by a Libertarian. Democrats defended 30 seats that President Trump (R) carried in 2016, while Republicans defended five seats that Hillary Clinton (D) carried that year.

In 2020, 49 U.S. House seats were open, meaning the incumbent was not running for re-election. Thirty-six of those seats were open because the incumbent did not run for re-election, eight were open because the incumbent was defeated in a primary or party convention, and five were open due to a vacancy.

On this page, you will find:

Contents

Partisan breakdown

Following the 2018 general elections, the Democratic Party gained a majority in the U.S. House. Democrats last controlled the chamber during the 111th Congress from 2009 to 2011.

The Democratic Party needed to pick up 23 seats in November 2018 to win the chamber.[1] They gained a net total of 40 seats.

U.S. House Partisan Breakdown
Party As of November 3, 2020 After the 2020 Election
     Democratic Party 232 222
     Republican Party 197 213
     Libertarian Party 1 0
     Vacancies 5 0
Total 435 435


The chart below shows historical partisan breakdown information for the chamber.


Districts that flipped in 2020

Updated March 11, 2021

The table below shows which U.S. House districts flipped partisan control as a result of the 2020 elections.

2020 House election flipped districts
District 2016 margin of victory 2018 margin of victory Pre-election incumbent Open seat? 2020 Winner
California's 21st Congressional District Republicans+13.4 Democrats+0.8 Democratic Party TJ Cox Republican Party David G. Valadao
California's 39th Congressional District Republicans+14.4 Democrats+3.2 Democratic Party Gil Cisneros Republican Party Young Kim
California's 48th Congressional District Republicans+16.6 Democrats+7.2 Democratic Party Harley Rouda Republican Party Michelle Steel
Florida's 26th Congressional District Republicans+11.8 Democrats+1.8 Democratic Party Debbie Mucarsel-Powell Republican Party Carlos Gimenez
Florida's 27th Congressional District Republicans+9.8 Democrats+6.0 Democratic Party Donna Shalala Republican Party Maria Elvira Salazar
Georgia's 7th Congressional District Republicans+20.8 Republicans+0.2 Republican Party Rob Woodall Democratic Party Carolyn Bourdeaux
Iowa's 1st Congressional District Republicans+7.6 Democrats+3.6 Democratic Party Abby Finkenauer Republican Party Ashley Hinson
Iowa's 2nd Congressional District Democrats+7.5 Democrats+12.2 Democratic Party Dave Loebsack Republican Party Mariannette Miller-Meeks
Michigan's 3rd Congressional District Republicans+22.0 Republicans+11.2 Libertarian Party Justin Amash Republican Party Peter Meijer
Minnesota's 7th Congressional District Democrats+5.1 Democrats+4.3 Democratic Party Collin Peterson Republican Party Michelle Fischbach
New Mexico's 2nd Congressional District Republicans+25.5 Democrats+1.8 Democratic Party Xochitl Torres Small Republican Party Yvette Herrell
New York's 11th Congressional District Republicans+24.9 Democrats+6.4 Democratic Party Max Rose Republican Party Nicole Malliotakis
New York's 22nd Congressional District Republicans+5.4 Democrats+1.8 Democratic Party Anthony Brindisi Republican Party Claudia Tenney
North Carolina's 2nd Congressional District Republicans+13.4 Republicans+5.5 Republican Party George Holding Democratic Party Deborah Ross
North Carolina's 6th Congressional District Republicans+18.4 Republicans+13.0 Republican Party Mark Walker Democratic Party Kathy Manning
Oklahoma's 5th Congressional District Republicans+20.3 Democrats+1.4 Democratic Party Kendra Horn Republican Party Stephanie Bice
South Carolina's 1st Congressional District Republicans+21.8 Democrats+1.4 Democratic Party Joe Cunningham Republican Party Nancy Mace
Utah's 4th Congressional District Republicans+12.5 Democrats+0.2 Democratic Party Ben McAdams Republican Party Burgess Owens


The map below shows flipped districts.

Incumbents defeated

This section tracked incumbents defeated in 2020.

Incumbents defeated in primary elections

The following table lists incumbents defeated in 2020 House primary elections or conventions.

Incumbents defeated in primaries
District Incumbent Primary election/convention winner
Illinois' 3rd Democratic Party Daniel Lipinski Democratic Party Marie Newman
Iowa's 4th Republican Party Steve King Republican Party Randy Feenstra
Virginia's 5th Republican Party Denver Riggleman Republican Party Bob Good
New York's 16th Democratic Party Eliot Engel Democratic Party Jamaal Bowman
Colorado's 3rd Republican Party Scott Tipton Republican Party Lauren Boebert
Kansas' 2nd Republican Party Steve Watkins Republican Party Jacob LaTurner
Missouri's 1st Democratic Party William Lacy Clay Democratic Party Cori Bush
Florida's 15th Republican Party Ross Spano Republican Party Scott Franklin


Historical context

See also: Incumbents defeated in 2018 congressional elections

In the 2018 midterm elections, 378 U.S. House incumbents ran for re-election. This was the lowest number of U.S. House incumbents seeking re-election since 1992.

Thirty-four incumbents—9 percent—lost their re-election bids. That included two Democrats and 32 Republicans. This was the highest percentage of incumbents defeated since 2012, when 10.2 percent were not re-elected.

The following data for congressional re-election rates from 2000 to 2016 was reported in Vital Statistics, a joint research project of the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute. Find the original datasets and methodology here. Data for the 2018 election came from Ballotpedia.

Defeated U.S. House incumbents by party, 2000-2018
Year Democratic incumbents lost Republican incumbents lost Total
2018 2 32 34
2016 3 9 12
2014 12 6 18
2012 10 17 27
2010 54 4 58
2008 6 17 23
2006 0 22 22
2004 5 2 7
2002 12 5 17
2000 4 5 9


U.S. House incumbents retired, defeated, or reelected, 2000-2018
Year Not seeking re-election Total seeking re-election Defeated in primaries Defeated in general election Total re-elected Percentage of those seeking reelection
2018 52 378 4 30 345 91.2
2016 41 392 4 8 380 96.9
2014 24 392 5 13 374 95.4
2012 25 391 13 27 351 89.8
2010 32 397 4 54 339 85.4
2008 25 400 4 18 377 94.3
2006 28 403 2 22 379 94.0
2004 29 404 2 7 395 97.8
2002 35 398 8 8 383 96.2
2000 30 403 3 6 394 97.8

Outside ratings

The following table compared U.S. House race ratings from The Cook Political Report, Sabato's Crystal Ball, and Inside Elections prior to the November 2020 elections.

Districts that flipped in 2018

The map below highlights congressional districts that changed party control in the general elections on November 6, 2018.

The following table lists congressional districts that changed party control in the general elections on November 6, 2018. It also includes 2020 general election race ratings from three outlets.

Flipped congressional districts, 2018
District Pre-election incumbent 2018 election winner
Arizona's 2nd Republican Party Martha McSally Democratic Party Ann Kirkpatrick
California's 10th Republican Party Jeff Denham Democratic Party Josh Harder
California's 21st Republican Party David Valadao Democratic Party TJ Cox
California's 25th Republican Party Stephen Knight Democratic Party Katie Hill
California's 39th Republican Party Edward Royce Democratic Party Gil Cisneros
California's 45th Republican Party Mimi Walters Democratic Party Katie Porter
California's 48th Republican Party Dana Rohrabacher Democratic Party Harley Rouda
California's 49th Republican Party Darrell Issa Democratic Party Mike Levin
Colorado's 6th Republican Party Mike Coffman
Florida's 26th Republican Party Carlos Curbelo Democratic Party Debbie Mucarsel-Powell
Florida's 27th Republican Party Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Democratic Party Donna Shalala
Georgia's 6th Republican Party Karen Handel Democratic Party Lucy McBath
Illinois' 6th Republican Party Peter Roskam Democratic Party Sean Casten
Illinois' 14th Republican Party Randy Hultgren Democratic Party Lauren Underwood
Iowa's 1st Republican Party Rod Blum Democratic Party Abby Finkenauer
Iowa's 3rd Republican Party David Young Democratic Party Cindy Axne
Kansas' 3rd Republican Party Kevin Yoder Democratic Party Sharice Davids
Maine's 2nd Republican Party Bruce Poliquin Democratic Party Jared Golden
Michigan's 8th Republican Party Mike Bishop Democratic Party Elissa Slotkin
Michigan's 11th Republican Party David Trott Democratic Party Haley Stevens
Minnesota's 1st Democratic Party Tim Walz Republican Party Jim Hagedorn
Minnesota's 2nd Republican Party Jason Lewis
Minnesota's 3rd Republican Party Erik Paulsen Democratic Party Dean Phillips
Minnesota's 8th Democratic Party Rick Nolan Republican Party Pete Stauber
New Jersey's 2nd Republican Party Frank LoBiondo Democratic Party Jeff Van Drew[2]
New Jersey's 3rd Republican Party Tom MacArthur Democratic Party Andy Kim
New Jersey's 7th Republican Party Leonard Lance Democratic Party Tom Malinowski
New Jersey's 11th Republican Party Rodney Frelinghuysen Democratic Party Mikie Sherrill
New Mexico's 2nd Republican Party Steve Pearce Democratic Party Xochitl Torres Small
New York's 11th Republican Party Dan Donovan Democratic Party Max Rose
New York's 19th Republican Party John Faso Democratic Party Antonio Delgado
New York's 22nd Republican Party Claudia Tenney Democratic Party Anthony Brindisi
Oklahoma's 5th Republican Party Steve Russell Democratic Party Kendra Horn
Pennsylvania's 5th Republican Party Vacant Democratic Party Mary Gay Scanlon
Pennsylvania's 6th Republican Party Ryan Costello Democratic Party Chrissy Houlahan
Pennsylvania's 7th Republican Party Vacant Democratic Party Susan Wild
Pennsylvania's 14th Democratic Party Conor Lamb Republican Party Guy Reschenthaler
Pennsylvania's 17th Republican Party Keith Rothfus Democratic Party Conor Lamb
South Carolina's 1st Republican Party Mark Sanford Democratic Party Joe Cunningham
Texas' 7th Republican Party John Culberson Democratic Party Lizzie Pannill Fletcher
Texas' 32nd Republican Party Pete Sessions Democratic Party Colin Allred
Utah's 4th Republican Party Mia Love Democratic Party Ben McAdams
Virginia's 2nd Republican Party Scott Taylor Democratic Party Elaine Luria
Virginia's 7th Republican Party David Brat Democratic Party Abigail Spanberger
Virginia's 10th Republican Party Barbara Comstock Democratic Party Jennifer Wexton
Washington's 8th Republican Party Dave Reichert Democratic Party Kim Schrier

Flipped seats 2014-2018

The map below highlights distrits that have changed party hands from 2014 to 2018, along with the number of times the district changed party hands. These are elections that took place with the same maps created as a result of the 2010 redistricting process. The 2012 election is not included in the data below because it was the first election with the new maps. The 2020 election will be the final election with the 2010 redistricting maps.

Of the 435 U.S. House districts, 67 districts (15.4 percent) changed partisan hands at least once during those three elections. Ten districts changed partisan hands twice over those three elections, while no districts changed partisan hands in each of the elections.

The table below lists districts that changed partisan hands between 2014 and 2018. Click "show" to expand the table. Click on a district to view its election history.

Incumbents who did not seek re-election in 2020

See also: List of U.S. Congress incumbents who did not run for re-election in 2020


Thirty-six representatives did not seek re-election to their U.S. House seats (not including those who left office early):

  • Democratic Party 9 Democratic members of the U.S. House
  • Republican Party 26 Republican members of the U.S. House
  • Libertarian Party 1 Libertarian member of the U.S. House

The chart below shows the number of announced retirements by party over time beginning in January 2019.

Incumbents who retired from public office

  • Democratic Party 5 Democratic members of the U.S. House
  • Republican Party 20 Republican members of the U.S. House
  • Libertarian Party 1 Libertarian member of the U.S. House
Retiring from public office, 2020
Name Party Seat Date announced 2020 winner's party Party change?
Rob Woodall Republican Party Republican Georgia's 7th February 7, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic Yes
Jose Serrano Democratic Party Democratic New York's 15th March 25, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic No
Dave Loebsack Democratic Party Democratic Iowa's 2nd April 12, 2019 Republican Party Republican Yes
Susan Brooks Republican Party Republican Indiana's 5th June 14, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Paul Mitchell Republican Party Republican Michigan's 10th July 24, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Pete Olson Republican Party Republican Texas' 22nd July 25, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Martha Roby Republican Party Republican Alabama's 2nd July 26, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Mike Conaway Republican Party Republican Texas' 11th July 30, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Will Hurd Republican Party Republican Texas' 23rd August 1, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Kenny Marchant Republican Party Republican Texas' 24th August 5, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
John Shimkus Republican Party Republican Illinois' 15th August 30, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Bill Flores Republican Party Republican Texas' 17th September 4, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Susan Davis Democratic Party Democratic California's 53rd September 4, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic No
Jim Sensenbrenner Republican Party Republican Wisconsin's 5th September 4, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Mac Thornberry Republican Party Republican Texas' 13th September 30, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Nita Lowey Democratic Party Democratic New York's 17th October 10, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic No
Francis Rooney Republican Party Republican Florida's 19th October 19, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Greg Walden Republican Party Republican Oregon's 2nd October 28, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Peter Visclosky Democratic Party Democratic Indiana's 1st November 6, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic No
Peter King Republican Party Republican New York's 2nd November 11, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
George Holding Ends.png Republican North Carolina's 2nd December 6, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic Yes
Ted Yoho Ends.png Republican Florida's 3rd December 10, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Mark Walker Ends.png Republican North Carolina's 6th December 16, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic Yes
Phil Roe Ends.png Republican Tennessee's 1st January 3, 2020 Republican Party Republican No
Ralph Abraham Ends.png Republican Louisiana's 5th February 26, 2020 Republican Party Republican No
Justin Amash Specialsession.png Libertarian Michigan's 3rd July 16, 2020 Republican Party Republican Yes

Incumbents who sought other offices

U.S. House members who ran for President

  • Democratic Party 1 Democratic member of the U.S. House
Running for president, 2020
Name Party Seat Date announced 2020 winner's party Party change?
Tulsi Gabbard Democratic Party Democratic Hawaii's 2nd October 25, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic No

U.S. House members who sought a seat in the U.S. Senate

  • Democratic Party 2 Democratic members of the U.S. House
  • Republican Party 3 Republican members of the U.S. House
Running for Senate, 2020
Name Party Seat Date announced 2020 winner's party Party change?
Bradley Byrne Republican Party Republican Alabama's 1st February 20, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Ben Ray Lujan Democratic Party Democratic New Mexico's 3rd April 1, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic No
Roger Marshall Republican Party Republican Kansas' 1st September 7, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Joseph Kennedy III Democratic Party Democratic Massachusetts' 4th September 21, 2019 Democratic Party Democratic No
Doug Collins Republican Party Republican Georgia's 9th January 29, 2020 Republican Party Republican No

U.S. House members who ran for governor

  • Republican Party 1 Republican member of the U.S. House
Running for governor, 2020
Name Party Seat Date announced 2020 winner's party Party change?
Greg Gianforte Republican Party Republican Montana At-Large June 6, 2019 Republican Party Republican No

U.S. House members who ran for another office

  • Republican Party 2 Republican members of the U.S. House
  • Democratic Party 1 Democratic member of the U.S. House
Running for another office, 2020
Name Party Seat Date announced 2020 winner's party Party change?
Paul Cook Republican Party Republican California's 8th September 17, 2019 Republican Party Republican No
Denny Heck[3] Electiondot.png Democratic Washington's 10th April 9, 2020 Democratic Party Democratic No
Rob Bishop[4] Republican Party Republican Utah's 1st January 16, 2020 Republican Party Republican No

Historical comparison

The following table includes figures on Democratic and Republican members of Congress who either left office during their term or announced that they would not seek re-election for each election year since 2012.

Outgoing members of Congress, 2012-2018
Year Chamber Democrats not seeking re-election Republicans not seeking re-election Total not seeking re-election Democrats leaving office early Republicans leaving office early Total leaving office early
2018
U.S. Senate 0 3 3 1 2 3
U.S. House 18 34 52 3 14 17
Total 18 37 55 4 16 20
2016
U.S. Senate 3 2 5 0 0 0
U.S. House 16 24 40 2 5 7
Total 19 26 45 2 5 7
2014
U.S. Senate 5 2 7 3 2 5
U.S. House 16 25 41 3 6 9
Total 21 27 48 6 8 14
2012
U.S. Senate 6 3 10[5] 0 0 0
U.S. House 23 20 43 4 1 5
Total 29 23 53 4 1 5

Rematches in 2020 general elections

See also: Rematches in 2020 general elections

Updated February 8, 2020

An election rematch occurs when the same candidates run against each other in consecutive election cycles. In the 2020 general election, 56 races for the U.S. House were rematches.[6] Of the 55 called races, Republicans won 32 of the rematch districts to Democrats' 24 in 2020. In 2018, Democrats won 29 of the districts to Republicans' 27. Twelve races were decided by a margin of 10 percentage points or fewer in 2020, compared to 19 in 2018.

The map below highlights congressional districts where the race was a rematch.

U.S. House rematches, 2020
District Candidates 2018 margin 2020 margin
U.S. House Alaska At-large District Democratic Party Alyse Galvin Republican Party Don Young R+6.61 R+16.3
U.S. House Arizona District 5 Republican Party Andy Biggs Democratic Party Joan Greene R+18.85 R+12.73
U.S. House California District 1 Democratic Party Audrey Denney Republican Party Doug LaMalfa R+9.77 R+11.33
U.S. House California District 19 Republican Party Justin Aguilera Democratic Party Zoe Lofgren D+47.51 D+25.86
U.S. House California District 2 Democratic Party Jared Huffman Republican Party Dale Mensing D+54.02 D+58.67
U.S. House California District 21 Republican Party David G. Valadao Democratic Party TJ Cox D+0.76 R+0.89
U.S. House California District 30 Republican Party Mark Reed Democratic Party Brad Sherman D+46.8 D+41.34
U.S. House California District 32 Republican Party Joshua Scott Democratic Party Grace Napolitano D+37.56 D+33.96
U.S. House California District 39 Republican Party Young Kim Democratic Party Gil Cisneros D+3.11 R+1.22
U.S. House California District 41 Republican Party Aja Smith Democratic Party Mark Takano D+30.2 D+28.91
U.S. House California District 47 Republican Party John Briscoe Democratic Party Alan Lowenthal D+29.71 D+33.84
U.S. House California District 51 Republican Party Juan Hidalgo Democratic Party Juan Vargas D+42.4 D+44.49
U.S. House Florida District 11 Democratic Party Dana Cottrell Republican Party Daniel Webster R+30.3 R+33.44
U.S. House Florida District 17 Republican Party Greg Steube Democratic Party Allen Ellison R+24.52 R+30.56
U.S. House Florida District 27 Democratic Party Donna Shalala Republican Party Maria Elvira Salazar D+6 R+2.74
U.S. House Georgia District 10 Democratic Party Tabitha Johnson-Green Republican Party Jody Hice R+25.78 R+27.12
U.S. House Georgia District 6 Democratic Party Lucy McBath Republican Party Karen Handel D+1.03 D+7.92
U.S. House Idaho District 2 Republican Party Michael K. Simpson Democratic Party Aaron Swisher R+21.34 R+19.49
U.S. House Illinois District 13 Democratic Party Betsy Londrigan Republican Party Rodney Davis R+0.76 R+9.46
U.S. House Illinois District 5 Republican Party Tom Hanson Democratic Party Mike Quigley D+53.33 D+42.96
U.S. House Illinois District 7 Democratic Party Danny K. Davis Republican Party Craig Cameron D+75.23 D+67.16
U.S. House Indiana District 6 Republican Party Greg Pence Democratic Party Jeannine Lee Lake R+30.96 R+46.83
U.S. House Iowa District 3 Republican Party David Young Democratic Party Cindy Axne D+2.16 D+1.39
U.S. House Kentucky District 2 Democratic Party Hank Linderman Republican Party Brett Guthrie R+35.65 R+45.28
U.S. House Maryland District 3 Democratic Party John Sarbanes Republican Party Charles Anthony D+40.85 D+40.13
U.S. House Maryland District 4 Republican Party George McDermott Democratic Party Anthony G. Brown D+58.2 D+61.4
U.S. House Massachusetts District 2 Republican Party Tracy Lovvorn Democratic Party Jim McGovern D+34.38 D+36.69
U.S. House Michigan District 12 Republican Party Jeff Jones Democratic Party Debbie Dingell D+39.19 D+35.29
U.S. House Michigan District 4 Democratic Party Jerry Hilliard Republican Party John Moolenaar R+25.25 R+41.91
U.S. House Michigan District 7 Democratic Party Gretchen Driskell Republican Party Tim Walberg R+7.59 R+17.5
U.S. House Minnesota District 1 Democratic Party Dan Feehan Republican Party Jim Hagedorn R+0.45 R+3.04
U.S. House Missouri District 8 Democratic Party Kathy Ellis Republican Party Jason Smith R+48.37 R+56.29
U.S. House Nebraska District 2 Republican Party Don Bacon Democratic Party Kara Eastman R+1.99 R+4.74
U.S. House Nevada District 1 Republican Party Joyce Bentley Democratic Party Dina Titus D+35.3 D+28.71
U.S. House New Hampshire District 2 Democratic Party Annie Kuster Republican Party Steve Negron D+13.36 D+11.08
U.S. House New Mexico District 2 Democratic Party Xochitl Torres Small Republican Party Yvette Herrell D+1.87 R+7.81
U.S. House New York District 21 Democratic Party Tedra Cobb Republican Party Elise Stefanik R+13.69 R+28.77
U.S. House New York District 22 Democratic Party Anthony Brindisi Republican Party Claudia Tenney D+1.78 R+0.0003
U.S. House New York District 23 Republican Party Tom Reed Democratic Party Tracy Mitrano R+8.49 R+27.23
U.S. House New York District 24 Democratic Party Dana Balter Republican Party John Katko R+5.26 R+10.16
U.S. House Ohio District 6 Republican Party Bill Johnson Democratic Party Shawna Roberts R+38.5 R+48.85
U.S. House Ohio District 8 Republican Party Warren Davidson Democratic Party Vanessa Enoch R+33.15 R+38.09
U.S. House Oklahoma District 4 Democratic Party Mary Brannon Republican Party Tom Cole R+30.06 R+39.01
U.S. House Pennsylvania District 2 Democratic Party Brendan Boyle Republican Party David Torres D+58.03 D+30.12
U.S. House Tennessee District 2 Democratic Party Renee Hoyos Republican Party Tim Burchett R+32.88 R+36.66
U.S. House Tennessee District 8 Democratic Party Erika Stotts Pearson Republican Party David Kustoff R+37.56 R+39.06
U.S. House Tennessee District 9 Republican Party Charlotte Bergmann Democratic Party Steve Cohen D+60.75 D+57.24
U.S. House Texas District 10 Democratic Party Mike Siegel Republican Party Michael McCaul R+4.27 R+7.16
U.S. House Texas District 14 Republican Party Randy Weber Democratic Party Adrienne Bell R+19.93 R+24.8
U.S. House Texas District 25 Democratic Party Julie Oliver Republican Party Roger Williams R+8.75 R+13.97
U.S. House Texas District 34 Democratic Party Filemon Vela Republican Party Rey Gonzalez Jr. D+19.98 D+11.36
U.S. House Virginia District 2 Republican Party Scott Taylor Democratic Party Elaine Luria D+2.24 D+4.33
U.S. House Washington District 1 Democratic Party Suzan DelBene Republican Party Jeffrey Beeler D+18.54 D+21.3
U.S. House Washington District 3 Democratic Party Carolyn Long Republican Party Jaime Herrera Beutler R+5.34 R+11.91
U.S. House Washington District 7 Democratic Party Pramila Jayapal Republican Party Craig Keller D+67.12 D+69.36
U.S. House Wisconsin District 4 Republican Party Tim Rogers Democratic Party Gwen Moore D+54.04 D+32.55


Annual Congressional Competitiveness Report, 2020

See also: Annual Congressional Competitiveness Report, 2020

Ballotpedia's Annual Congressional Competitiveness report for 2020 includes information on the number of elections featuring candidates from both major parties, the number of open seats, and more.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • More U.S. House races were contested by members of both major parties than in any general election since at least 1920, with 95.4% of races (415 of 435) featuring major party competition.[7][8]
  • Of the U.S. Representatives and U.S. Senators who were eligible to run for re-election in 2018, 55 of them (11.8%) did not appear on the general election ballot in 2020.
  • In the 53 open seats where an incumbent either did not seek re-election or was defeated in a primary, there were 13 races where the incumbent's district overlapped at least one pivot county (a county that voted for President Barack Obama (D) in 2008 and 2012, before switching to support President Donald Trump (R) in 2016).
  • In 20 races, only one major party candidate appeared on the general election ballot, the lowest number compared to the preceding decade.

  • Click here to view the full report.


    Battleground elections

    See also: U.S. House battlegrounds, 2020
    See also: Democratic Party battleground primaries, 2020
    See also: Republican Party battleground primaries, 2020

    Democrats lost seats but maintained their majority, winning 222 seats to Republicans' 213.

    Ballotpedia identified 41 of the 435 House races (9.4%) as battlegrounds. Of the 41 seats, 20 had Democratic incumbents, 20 had Republican incumbents, and one had a Libertarian incumbent.

    The following map displays the 2020 House battlegrounds shaded by the incumbent's or most recent incumbent's political affiliation. Hover over a state for more information.

    Battleground U.S. House elections, 2020
    District Incumbent Open seat? 2018 margin
    Arizona's 6th Republican Party David Schweikert No R+10.4
    Arkansas' 2nd Republican Party French Hill No R+6.3
    California's 21st Democratic Party TJ Cox No D+0.8
    California's 25th Republican Party Mike Garcia No D+8.7
    Florida's 26th Democratic Party Debbie Mucarsel-Powell No D+1.8
    Georgia's 6th Democratic Party Lucy McBath No D+1.0
    Georgia's 7th Republican Party Rob Woodall Yes R+0.2
    Illinois' 13th Republican Party Rodney Davis No R+0.8
    Indiana's 5th Republican Party Susan Brooks Yes R+13.5
    Iowa's 1st Democratic Party Abby Finkenauer No D+5.1
    Iowa's 2nd Democratic Party Dave Loebsack Yes D+12.2
    Iowa's 3rd Democratic Party Cindy Axne No D+2.2
    Maine's 2nd Democratic Party Jared Golden No D+1.3
    Michigan's 3rd Libertarian Party Justin Amash Yes R+11.2
    Michigan's 6th Republican Party Fred Upton No R+4.6
    Michigan's 8th Democratic Party Elissa Slotkin No D+3.8
    Minnesota's 1st Republican Party Jim Hagedorn No R+0.5
    Minnesota's 7th Democratic Party Collin Peterson No D+4.3
    Missouri's 2nd Republican Party Ann Wagner No R+4.0
    Nebraska's 2nd Republican Party Don Bacon No R+2.0
    New Jersey's 2nd Republican Party Jeff Van Drew No D+7.7
    New Jersey's 3rd Democratic Party Andrew Kim No D+1.3
    New Jersey's 7th Democratic Party Tom Malinowski No D+5.0
    New Mexico's 2nd Democratic Party Xochitl Torres Small No D+1.9
    New York's 2nd Republican Party Peter King Yes R+6.2
    New York's 11th Democratic Party Max Rose No D+6.5
    New York's 22nd Democratic Party Anthony Brindisi No D+1.8
    Ohio's 1st Republican Party Steve Chabot No R+4.4
    Oklahoma's 5th Democratic Party Kendra Horn No D+1.4
    Pennsylvania's 10th Republican Party Scott Perry No R+2.6
    Pennsylvania's 17th Democratic Party Conor Lamb No D+12.5
    South Carolina's 1st Democratic Party Joe Cunningham No D+1.4
    Texas' 21st Republican Party Chip Roy No R+2.6
    Texas' 22nd Republican Party Pete Olson Yes R+4.9
    Texas' 23rd Republican Party Will Hurd Yes R+0.4
    Texas' 24th Republican Party Kenny Marchant Yes R+3.1
    Texas' 25th Republican Party Roger Williams No R+8.7
    Utah's 4th Democratic Party Ben McAdams No D+0.3
    Virginia's 2nd Democratic Party Elaine Luria No D+2.2
    Virginia's 5th Republican Party Denver Riggleman Yes R+6.6
    Virginia's 7th Democratic Party Abigail Spanberger No D+1.9

    Fundraising by candidate

    The following table shows the top U.S. House fundraisers of the 2019-2020 election cycle based on FEC filings through October 14, 2020.

    Fundraising by party

    See also: Party committee fundraising, 2019-2020

    Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

    See also: Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

    The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) reported the following fundraising amounts for the 2021-22 election cycle:

    Monthly fundraising for the DCCC for the 2021-22 election cycle
    Reporting month
    (Dates covered)
    Total receipts Total disbursements Cash on hand (end of month) Debts owed (end of month) FEC document
    March 2021
    (Feb. 1-28, 2021)
    $11,514,274.03 $7,996,913.63 $25,920,312.62 $11,000,000.00 Filing
    February 2021
    (Jan. 1-31, 2021)
    $6,999,288.32 $5,561,026.58 $22,402,952.22 $13,000,000.00 Filing

    The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) reported the following fundraising amounts for the 2019-20 election cycle:

    Monthly fundraising for the DCCC for the 2019-20 election cycle
    Reporting month
    (Dates covered)
    Total receipts Total disbursements Cash on hand (end of month) Debts owed (end of month) FEC document
    Year-End 2020
    (Nov. 24 - Dec. 31, 2020)
    $7,166,422.62 $14,573,154.90 $20,964,690.48 $14,000,000.00 Filing
    Post-General 2020
    (Oct. 15 - Nov. 23, 2020)
    $48,026,680.52 $51,026,859.45 $28,371,422.76 $18,000,000.00 Filing
    Pre-General 2020
    (Oct. 1-14, 2020)
    $12,300,063.18 $45,420,560.38 $31,371,601.69 $0.00 Filing
    October 2020
    (Sept. 1-30, 2020)
    $29,487,667.59 $69,738,007.68 $64,492,098.89 $0.00 Filing
    September 2020
    (Aug. 1-31, 2020)
    $22,662,257.77 $15,813,429.36 $104,742,438.98 $0.00 Filing
    August 2020
    (July 1-31, 2020)
    $18,360,260.49 $14,569,451.94 $97,893,610.57 $0.00 Filing
    July 2020
    (June 1-30, 2020)
    $17,078,205.20 $9,309,304.25 $94,102,802.02 $0.00 Filing
    June 2020
    (May 1-31, 2020)
    $10,932,391.27 $7,092,852.50 $86,333,901.07 $0.00 Filing
    May 2020
    (Apr. 1-30, 2020)
    $11,328,061.98 $9,562,275.34 $82,494,362.30 $0.00 Filing
    April 2020
    (Mar. 1-31, 2020)
    $14,339,756.86 $6,153,310.46 $80,728,575.66 $15,096.56 Filing
    March 2020
    (Feb. 1-29, 2020)
    $17,054,723.31 $6,756,246.61 $72,542,141.05 $15,096.56 Filing
    February 2020
    (Jan. 1-31, 2020)
    $12,148,804.08 $6,953,877.84 $62,243,664.35 $15,096.56 Filing
    Year-End 2019
    (Dec. 1-31, 2019)
    $14,554,564.47 $5,091,703.10 $57,048,738.11 $15,096.56 Filing
    December 2019
    (Nov. 1-30, 2019)
    $9,046,423.20 $5,134,576.54 $47,585,876.74 $0.00 Filing
    November 2019
    (Oct. 1-31, 2019)
    $12,235,996.28 $4,778,398.76 $43,674,030.08 $0.00 Filing
    October 2019
    (Sept. 1-30, 2019)
    $12,885,959.02 $5,519,250.48 $36,216,432.56 $0.00 Filing
    September 2019
    (Aug. 1-31, 2019)
    $7,207,666.41 $7,124,624.71 $28,849,724.02 $0.00 Filing
    August 2019
    (July 1-31, 2019)
    $7,296,664.70 $3,970,688.75 $28,766,682.32 $0.00 Filing
    July 2019
    (June 1-30, 2019)
    $12,509,381.43 $4,184,652.22 $25,440,706.37 $0.00 Filing
    June 2019
    (May 1-31, 2019)
    $8,858,334.45 $4,273,130.98 $17,115,977.16 $0.00 Filing
    May 2019
    (Apr. 1-30, 2019)
    $7,849,260.16 $10,124,779.02 $12,530,773.69 $0.00 Filing
    April 2019
    (Mar. 1-31, 2019)
    $13,499,703.70 $9,104,535.79 $14,806,292.55 $6,000,000.00 Filing
    March 2019
    (Feb. 1-28, 2019)
    $11,654,633.76 $8,135,188.41 $10,411,124.64 $11,990,300.00 Filing
    February 2019
    (Jan. 1-31, 2019)
    $7,288,899.01 $6,012,715.61 $6,891,679.29 $15,865,930.22 Filing

    National Republican Congressional Committee

    See also: National Republican Congressional Committee

    The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) reported the following fundraising amounts for the 2021-22 election cycle:

    Monthly fundraising for the NRCC for the 2021-22 election cycle
    Month
    (Dates covered)
    Total receipts Total disbursements Cash on hand (end of month) Debts owed (end of month) FEC document
    March 2021
    (Feb. 1-28, 2021)
    $7,218,458.86 $5,087,977.25 $15,658,643.40 $0.00 Filing
    February 2021
    (Jan. 1-31, 2021)
    $7,478,182.49 $6,509,518.98 $13,528,161.79 $0.00 Filing

    The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) reported the following fundraising amounts for the 2019-20 election cycle:

    Monthly fundraising for the NRCC for the 2019-20 election cycle
    Month
    (Dates covered)
    Total receipts Total disbursements Cash on hand (end of month) Debts owed (end of month) FEC document
    Year-End 2020
    (Nov. 24 - Dec. 31, 2020)
    $10,323,599.81 $19,156,712.18 $12,559,498.28 $0.00 Filing
    Post-General 2020
    (Oct. 15 - Nov. 23, 2020)
    $44,819,245.97 $57,790,387.60 $21,392,610.65 $7,000,000.00 Filing
    Pre-General 2020
    (Oct. 1-14, 2020)
    $11,684,791.06 $30,429,931.28 $34,363,752.28 $0.00 Filing
    October 2020
    (Sept. 1-30, 2020)
    $23,058,292.28 $38,821,862.53 $53,108,892.50 $0.00 Filing
    September 2020
    (Aug. 1-31, 2020)
    $17,347,306.66 $15,554,787.09 $68,872,462.75 $0.00 Filing
    August 2020
    (July 1-31, 2020)
    $13,619,065.22 $8,420,198.69 $67,079,943.18 $0.00 Filing
    July 2020
    (June 1-30, 2020)
    $13,551,965.06 $6,868,403.36 $61,881,076.65 $0.00 Filing
    June 2020
    (May 1-31, 2020)
    $10,620,391.20 $7,682,719.69 $55,197,514.95 $0.00 Filing
    May 2020
    (Apr. 1-30, 2020)
    $11,413,134.82 $7,970,419.31 $52,259,843.44 $0.00 Filing
    April 2020
    (Mar. 1-31, 2020)
    $11,597,775.22 $7,889,073.87 $48,817,127.93 $0.00 Filing
    March 2020
    (Feb. 1-29, 2020)
    $15,056,514.24 $6,827,295.71 $45,108,426.58 $0.00 Filing
    February 2020
    (Jan. 1-31, 2020)
    $12,656,389.16 $7,505,025.79 $36,879,208.05 $0.00 Filing
    Year-End 2019
    (Dec. 1-31, 2019)
    $8,064,839.44 $5,730,180.36 $31,727,844.68 $0.00 Filing
    December 2019
    (Nov. 1-30, 2019)
    $6,736,678.95 $5,634,141.18 $29,393,185.60 $0.00 Filing
    November 2019
    (Oct. 1-31, 2019)
    $10,005,888.39 $5,576,364.47 $28,290,647.83 $0.00 Filing
    October 2019
    (Sept. 1-30, 2019)
    $7,769,028.87 $5,705,720.25 $23,861,123.91 $0.00 Filing
    September 2019
    (Aug. 1-31, 2019)
    $3,973,447.51 $6,432,927.90 $21,797,815.29 $0.00 Filing
    August 2019
    (July 1-31, 2019)
    $4,094,553.30 $5,449,530.57 $24,257,295.68 $0.00 Filing
    July 2019
    (June 1-30, 2019)
    $9,042,212.80 $3,978,483.46 $25,612,272.95 $0.00 Filing
    June 2019
    (May 1-31, 2019)
    $4,864,817.49 $4,422,814.63 $20,548,543.61 $0.00 Filing
    May 2019
    (Apr. 1-30, 2019)
    $5,492,633.16 $4,321,500.11 $20,106,540.75 $0.00 Filing
    April 2019
    (Mar. 1-31, 2019)
    $13,005,429.76 $11,482,041.43 $18,935,377.70 $0.00 Filing
    March 2019
    (Feb. 1-28, 2019)
    $7,001,504.64 $5,796,587.28 $17,411,989.37 $5,750,000.00 Filing
    February 2019
    (Jan. 1-31, 2019)
    $5,112,412.05 $5,470,537.61 $16,207,072.01 $8,600,000.00 Filing


    Targeted districts

    Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

    See also: Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

    This chart lists each district that the DCCC announced it would target in 2020.[9][10][11][12] Also included are the margins of victory for each seat in the 2018, 2016, and 2014 elections. Results are not included for elections which took place in Pennsylvania before the 2018 round of redistricting or in North Carolina before the 2019 round of redistricting.

    Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee target districts, 2020
    District Incumbent Winner 2018 Margin 2016 Margin 2014 Margin
    Alaska At-Large Don Young Republican Party Don Young R+6.6 R+14.3 R+10.0
    Arizona's 6th David Schweikert Republican Party David Schweikert R+10.4 R+24.3 R+29.7
    Arkansas' 2nd French Hill Republican Party French Hill R+6.3 R+21.5 R+8.3
    California's 22nd Devin Nunes Republican Party Devin Nunes R+5.4 R+35.1 R+6.2
    California's 25th Mike Garcia Republican Party Mike Garcia D+8.8 R+10.4 R+6.6
    California's 50th Vacant Republican Party Darrell Issa R+3.4 R+26.9 R+42.4
    Colorado's 3rd Scott Tipton Republican Party Lauren Boebert R+8.0 R+14.3 R+22.3
    Florida's 15th Ross Spano Republican Party Scott Franklin R+6.0 R+14.9 R+20.6
    Florida's 16th Vern Buchanan Republican Party Vern Buchanan R+9.2 R+19.6 R+23.1
    Florida's 18th Brian Mast Republican Party Brian Mast R+8.6 R+10.5 D+19.6
    Georgia's 7th Rob Woodall Democratic Party Carolyn Bourdeaux R+0.2 R+20.8 R+30.8
    Illinois' 13th Rodney Davis Republican Party Rodney Davis R+0.8 R+19.3 R+17.3
    Indiana's 5th Susan Brooks Republican Party Victoria Spartz R+13.5 R+27.2 R+34.4
    Iowa's 2nd Dave Loebsack Republican Party Mariannette Miller-Meeks D+12.2 D+7.5 D+5.1
    Iowa's 4th Steve King Republican Party Randy Feenstra R+3.3 R+22.6 R+23.3
    Kansas' 2nd Steve Watkins Republican Party Jacob LaTurner R+0.8 R+28.3 R+18.4
    Kentucky's 6th Andy Barr Republican Party Andy Barr R+3.2 R+22.2 R+20.0
    Michigan's 3rd Justin Amash Republican Party Peter Meijer R+11.2 R+22.0 R+18.9
    Michigan's 6th Fred Upton Republican Party Fred Upton R+4.6 R+22.2 R+15.5
    Minnesota's 1st Jim Hagedorn Republican Party Jim Hagedorn R+0.5 D+0.8 D+8.5
    Missouri's 2nd Ann Wagner Republican Party Ann Wagner R+4.0 R+20.9 R+31.5
    Montana's At-Large Greg Gianforte Republican Party Matt Rosendale R+4.7 R+15.7 R+15.0
    North Carolina's 2nd George Holding Democratic Party Deborah Ross N/A N/A N/A
    North Carolina's 8th Richard Hudson Democratic Party Kathy Manning N/A N/A N/A
    North Carolina's 9th Dan Bishop Republican Party Dan Bishop N/A N/A N/A
    North Carolina's 13th Ted Budd Republican Party Ted Budd N/A N/A N/A
    Nebraska's 2nd Don Bacon Republican Party Don Bacon R+2.0 R+1.2 D+3.3
    New Jersey's 2nd Jeff Van Drew Republican Party Jeff Van Drew D+7.7 R+22.0 R+24.2
    New York's 1st Lee Zeldin Republican Party Lee Zeldin R+4.1 R+17.9 R+8.7
    New York's 2nd Peter King Republican Party Andrew Garbarino R+6.2 R+24.9 R+36.4
    New York's 24th John Katko Republican Party John Katko R+5.3 R+21.1 R+18.8
    New York's 27th Christopher Jacobs Republican Party Christopher Jacobs R+0.4 R+34.4 R+39.9
    Ohio's 1st Steve Chabot Republican Party Steve Chabot R+4.4 R+18.4 R+26.4
    Ohio's 10th Michael Turner Republican Party Michael Turner R+13.7 R+31.4 R+33.7
    Ohio's 12th Troy Balderson Republican Party Troy Balderson R+4.5 R+36.8 R+40.3
    Pennsylvania's 1st Brian Fitzpatrick Republican Party Brian Fitzpatrick R+2.5 N/A N/A
    Pennsylvania's 10th Scott Perry Republican Party Scott Perry R+2.6 N/A N/A
    Pennsylvania's 16th Mike Kelly Republican Party Mike Kelly R+4.3 N/A N/A
    Texas' 2nd Daniel Crenshaw Republican Party Daniel Crenshaw R+7.2 R+24.6 R+38.3
    Texas' 10th Michael McCaul Republican Party Michael McCaul R+4.3 R+18.9 R+28.0
    Texas' 21st Chip Roy Republican Party Chip Roy R+2.6 R+20.6 R+57.1
    Texas' 22nd Pete Olson Republican Party Troy Nehls R+4.9 R+19.0 R+35.0
    Texas' 23rd Will Hurd Republican Party Tony Gonzales R+0.4 R+1.3 R+2.1
    Texas' 24th Kenny Marchant Republican Party Beth Van Duyne R+3.1 R+16.9 R+32.7
    Texas' 31st John Carter Republican Party John Carter R+2.9 R+21.9 R+32.1
    Virginia's 5th Denver Riggleman Republican Party Bob Good R+6.6 R+16.6 R+25.0
    Washington's 3rd Jaime Herrera Beutler Republican Party Jaime Herrera Beutler R+5.3 R+23.5 R+23.1


    Vulnerable Democratic incumbents receive campaign support through the DCCC's Frontline program. California Rep. Adam Schiff was named the program's finance chair on March 27, 2019. This chart lists each district that the DCCC announced it would seek to defend via the Frontline program in 2020.[13][14] Also included are the margins of victory for each district in the 2018, 2016, and 2014 elections. Results are not included for elections which took place before the 2018 redistricting in Pennsylvania.

    The "Result" column was updated on December 11.

    Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Initial Frontline Candidates
    District Incumbent Result 2018 Margin 2016 Margin 2014 Margin
    Arizona's 1st Tom O'Halleran Approveda D+7.7 D+7.3 D+5.2
    California's 10th Josh Harder Approveda D+4.5 R+3.4 R+12.3
    California's 21st TJ Cox Defeatedd D+0.8 R+13.5 R+15.7
    California's 39th Gil Cisneros Defeatedd D+3.1 R+14.5 R+37.1
    California's 45th Katie Porter Approveda D+4.1 R+17.1 R+30.2
    California's 48th Harley Rouda Defeatedd D+7.1 R+16.6 R+28.2
    California's 49th Mike Levin Approveda D+12.9 R+0.5 R+20.3
    Colorado's 6th Jason Crow Approveda D+11.2 R+8.3 R+8.9
    Connecticut's 5th Jahana Hayes Approveda D+11.8 D+16.0 D+6.9
    Florida's 26th Debbie Mucarsel-Powell Defeatedd D+1.8 R+11.8 R+2.9
    Georgia's 6th Lucy McBath Approveda D+1.0 R+23.4 R+32.1
    Iowa's 1st Abby Finkenauer Defeatedd D+5.1 R+7.7 R+2.3
    Iowa's 3rd Cindy Axne Approveda D+2.2 R+13.7 R+10.5
    Illinois' 6th Sean Casten Approveda D+7.2 R+18.4 R+34.3
    Illinois' 14th Lauren Underwood Approveda D+5.0 R+18.6 R+30.8
    Kansas' 3rd Sharice Davids Approveda D+9.7 R+10.7 R+20.0
    Maine's 2nd Jared Golden Approveda D+1.3 R+9.6 R+5.0
    Michigan's 8th Elissa Slotkin Approveda D+3.8 R+16.9 R+12.5
    Michigan's 11th Haley Stevens Approveda D+6.7 R+12.8 R+15.5
    Minnesota's 2nd Angie Craig Approveda D+5.5 R+1.8 R+17.2
    New Hampshire's 1st Chris Pappas Approveda D+8.6 D+1.3 R+3.6
    New Jersey's 3rd Andrew Kim Approveda D+1.3 R+20.4 R+9.6
    New Jersey's 5th Josh Gottheimer Approveda D+13.7 D+4.4 R+12.1
    New Jersey's 7th Tom Malinowski Approveda D+5.0 R+11.0 R+20.5
    New Jersey's 11th Mikie Sherrill Approveda D+14.6 R+19.1 R+25.1
    New Mexico's 2nd Xochitl Torres Small Defeatedd D+1.9 R+25.5 R+28.9
    Nevada's 3rd Susie Lee Approveda D+9.1 D+1.3 R+24.6
    Nevada's 4th Steven Horsford Approveda D+8.2 D+4.0 R+2.8
    New York's 11th Max Rose Defeatedd D+6.5 R+24.9 R+12.3
    New York's 19th Antonio Delgado Approveda D+5.2 R+8.6 R+28.1
    New York's 22nd Anthony Brindisi Defeatedd D+1.8 R+5.5 R+48.1
    Oklahoma's 5th Kendra Horn Defeatedd D+1.4 R+20.3 R+23.8
    Pennsylvania's 7th Susan Wild Approveda D+10.0 N/A N/A
    Pennsylvania's 8th Matt Cartwright Approveda D+9.3 N/A N/A
    Pennsylvania's 17th Conor Lamb Approveda D+12.5 N/A N/A
    South Carolina's 1st Joe Cunningham Defeatedd D+1.4 R+21.7 R+86.8
    Texas' 7th Lizzie Pannill Fletcher Approveda D+5.1 R+12.3 R+28.7
    Texas' 32nd Colin Allred Approveda D+6.5 R+52.1 R+26.4
    Utah's 4th Ben McAdams Defeatedd D+0.3 R+12.5 R+3.3
    Virginia's 2nd Elaine Luria Approveda D+2.2 R+22.9 R+17.6
    Virginia's 7th Abigail Spanberger Approveda D+1.9 R+15.3 R+23.9
    Washington's 8th Kim Schrier Approveda D+4.8 R+20.4 R+26.5


    Candidates participating in the Red to Blue program receive financial and organizational support. Participation in the program requires that a candidate meet certain fundraising and organizational goals. This chart lists each candidate that the DCCC announced it would support via the Red to Blue program in 2020.[15] Also included are the margins of victory for each district in the 2018, 2016, and 2014 elections. Results are not included for elections which took place before the 2016 redistricting in Florida, the 2018 redistricting in Pennsylvania, or the 2019 redistricting in North Carolina.

    Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Initial Red to Blue Candidates
    District Red-to-Blue candidate Incumbent Winner 2018 Margin 2016 Margin 2014 Margin
    Alaska at-large Grey.png Alyse Galvin Republican Party Don Young Republican Party Don Young R+6.6 R+14.3 R+10.0
    Arkansas' 2nd Democratic Party Joyce Elliott Republican Party French Hill Republican Party French Hill R+6.3 R+21.5 R+8.3
    Arizona's 6th Democratic Party Hiral Tipirneni Republican Party David Schweikert Republican Party David Schweikert R+10.4 R+24.2 R+29.8
    California's 25th Democratic Party Christy Smith Republican Party Mike Garcia Republican Party Mike Garcia D+8.8 R+6.2 R+6.6
    California's 50th Democratic Party Ammar Campa-Najjar Vacant
    (previously Republican Party Duncan Hunter)
    Republican Party Darrell Issa R+3.4 R+27.0 R+42.4
    Colorado's 3rd Democratic Party Diane Mitsch Bush Republican Party Scott Tipton Republican Party Lauren Boebert R+7.9 R+14.3 R+22.3
    Florida's 15th Democratic Party Alan Cohn Republican Party Ross Spano Republican Party Scott Franklin R+6.0 R+15.0 N/A
    Florida's 16th Democratic Party Margaret Good Republican Party Vern Buchanan Republican Party Vern Buchanan R+9.2 R+19.6 N/A
    Georgia's 7th Democratic Party Carolyn Bourdeaux Republican Party Rob Woodall Democratic Party Carolyn Bourdeaux R+0.2 R+20.8 R+30.8
    Indiana's 5th Democratic Party Christina Hale Republican Party Susan Brooks Republican Party Victoria Spartz R+13.6 R+27.2 R+34.4
    Iowa's 2nd Democratic Party Rita Hart Democratic Party Dave Loebsack Republican Party Mariannette Miller-Meeks D+12.2 D+7.5 D+5.1
    Illinois' 13th Democratic Party Betsy Londrigan Republican Party Rodney Davis Republican Party Rodney Davis R+0.8 R+19.4 R+17.4
    Kansas' 2nd Democratic Party Michelle De La Isla Republican Party Steve Watkins Republican Party Jacob LaTurner R+0.8 R+28.3 R+18.4
    Michigan's 3rd Democratic Party Hillary Scholten Libertarian Party Justin Amash Republican Party Peter Meijer R+11.2 R+22.0 R+18.9
    Michigan's 6th Democratic Party Jon Hoadley Republican Party Fred Upton Republican Party Fred Upton R+4.5 R+22.2 R+15.5
    Minnesota's 1st Democratic Party Dan Feehan Republican Party Jim Hagedorn Republican Party Jim Hagedorn R+0.4 D+0.7 D+8.5
    Missouri's 2nd Democratic Party Jill Schupp Republican Party Ann Wagner Republican Party Ann Wagner R+4.0 R+20.8 R+31.5
    Montana at-large Democratic Party Kathleen Williams Republican Party Greg Gianforte Republican Party Matt Rosendale R+4.7 R+15.7 R+15.0
    Nebraska's 2nd Democratic Party Kara Eastman Republican Party Don Bacon Republican Party Don Bacon R+2.0 R+1.2 D+3.3
    New Jersey's 2nd Democratic Party Amy Kennedy Republican Party Jeff Van Drew Republican Party Jeff Van Drew D+7.7 R+22.0 R+24.2
    New York's 1st Democratic Party Nancy Goroff Republican Party Lee Zeldin Republican Party Lee Zeldin R+4.1 R+16.4 R+8.7
    New York's 2nd Democratic Party Jackie Gordon Republican Party Peter King Republican Party Andrew Garbarino R+6.2 R+24.2 R+36.4
    New York's 24th Democratic Party Dana Balter Republican Party John Katko Republican Party John Katko R+5.2 R+21.2 R+18.7
    North Carolina's 8th Democratic Party Patricia Timmons-Goodson Republican Party Richard Hudson Republican Party Richard Hudson N/A N/A N/A
    Ohio's 1st Democratic Party Kate Schroder Republican Party Steve Chabot Republican Party Steve Chabot R+4.4 R+18.4 R+26.4
    Ohio's 10th Democratic Party Desiree Tims Republican Party Michael Turner Republican Party Michael Turner R+13.7 R+31.4 R+33.7
    Pennsylvania's 1st Democratic Party Christina Finello Republican Party Brian Fitzpatrick Republican Party Brian Fitzpatrick R+2.6 N/A N/A
    Pennsylvania's 10th Democratic Party Eugene DePasquale Republican Party Scott Perry Republican Party Scott Perry R+2.6 N/A N/A
    Texas' 2nd Democratic Party Sima Ladjevardian Republican Party Daniel Crenshaw Republican Party Daniel Crenshaw R+7.2 R+24.6 R+38.3
    Texas' 3rd Democratic Party Lulu Seikaly Republican Party Van Taylor Republican Party Van Taylor R+10.0 R+26.6 R+64.0
    Texas' 10th Democratic Party Mike Siegel Republican Party Michael McCaul Republican Party Michael McCaul R+4.7 R+18.9 R+28.1
    Texas' 21st Democratic Party Wendy Davis Republican Party Chip Roy Republican Party Chip Roy R+2.6 R+20.6 R+57.1
    Texas' 22nd Democratic Party Sri Preston Kulkarni Republican Party Pete Olson Republican Party Troy Nehls R+4.9 R+19.0 R+34.9
    Texas' 23rd Democratic Party Gina Ortiz Jones Republican Party Will Hurd Republican Party Tony Gonzales R+0.5 R+1.3 R+2.1
    Texas' 24th Democratic Party Candace Valenzuela Republican Party Kenny Marchant Republican Party Beth Van Duyne R+3.1 R+16.9 R+32.7
    Texas' 25th Democratic Party Julie Oliver Republican Party Roger Williams Republican Party Roger Williams R+8.7 R+20.6 R+24.0
    Virginia's 5th Democratic Party Cameron Webb Republican Party Denver Riggleman Republican Party Bob Good R+6.6 R+16.6 R+25.0
    Washington's 3rd Democratic Party Carolyn Long Republican Party Jaime Herrera Beutler Republican Party Jaime Herrera Beutler R+5.4 R+23.6 R+23.0

    National Republican Congressional Committee

    See also: National Republican Congressional Committee

    The following table lists 55 Democratic-held seats the NRCC announced, on February 7, 2019, it would target in 2020.[16] Also included are the margins of victory for each district in the 2018, 2016, and 2014 elections. Elections which took place in Pennsylvania before the 2018 redistricting are not included.

    National Republican Congressional Committee Initial Target Districts 2020
    District 2018 winner 2020 winner 2018 Margin 2016 Margin 2014 Margin
    Arizona's 1st Tom O'Halleran Democratic Party Tom O'Halleran D+7.7 D+7.3 D+5.2
    Arizona's 2nd Ann Kirkpatrick Democratic Party Ann Kirkpatrick D+9.5 R+13.9 R+0.1
    California's 10th Josh Harder Democratic Party Josh Harder D+4.5 R+3.4 R+12.3
    California's 21th TJ Cox Republican Party David G. Valadao D+0.8 R+13.5 R+15.7
    California's 25th Katie Hill Republican Party Mike Garcia D+8.7 R+6.3 R+6.7
    California's 39th Gil Cisneros Republican Party Young Kim D+3.1 R+14.5 R+37.1
    California's 45th Katie Porter Democratic Party Katie Porter D+4.1 R+17.1 R+30.2
    California's 48th Harley Rouda Republican Party Michelle Steel D+7.1 R+16.6 R+28.2
    California's 49th Mike Levin Democratic Party Mike Levin D+12.9 R+0.5 R+20.3
    Colorado's 6th Jason Crow Democratic Party Jason Crow D+11.2 R+8.3 R+8.9
    Florida's 7th Stephanie Murphy Democratic Party Stephanie Murphy D+15.4 D+3.0 R+31.5
    Florida's 13th Charlie Crist Democratic Party Charlie Crist D+15.3 D+3.8 R+50.5
    Florida's 26th Debbie Mucarsel-Powell Republican Party Carlos Gimenez D+1.8 R+11.8 R+2.9
    Florida's 27th Donna Shalala Republican Party Maria Elvira Salazar D+6.0 R+9.8 R+100.0
    Georgia's 6th Lucy McBath Democratic Party Lucy McBath D+1.0 R+23.4 R+32.1
    Iowa's 1st Abby Finkenauer Republican Party Ashley Hinson D+5.1 R+7.7 R+2.3
    Iowa's 2nd Dave Loebsack Republican Party Mariannette Miller-Meeks D+12.2 D+7.5 D+5.1
    Iowa's 3rd Cindy Axne Democratic Party Cindy Axne D+2.2 R+13.7 R+10.5
    Illinois' 6th Sean Casten Democratic Party Sean Casten D+7.2 R+18.4 R+34.3
    Illinois' 14th Lauren Underwood Democratic Party Lauren Underwood D+5.0 R+18.6 R+30.8
    Illinois' 17th Cheri Bustos Democratic Party Cheri Bustos D+24.2 D+20.6 D+10.9
    Kansas' 3rd Sharice Davids Democratic Party Sharice Davids D+9.7 R+10.7 R+20.0
    Maine's 2nd Jared Golden Democratic Party Jared Golden D+1.3 R+9.6 R+5.0
    Michigan's 8th Elissa Slotkin Democratic Party Elissa Slotkin D+3.8 R+16.9 R+12.5
    Michigan's 11th Haley Stevens Democratic Party Haley Stevens D+6.7 R+12.8 R+15.5
    Minnesota's 2nd Angie Craig Democratic Party Angie Craig D+5.5 R+1.8 R+17.2
    Minnesota's 3rd Dean Phillips Democratic Party Dean Phillips D+11.4 R+13.7 R+24.4
    Minnesota's 7th Collin Peterson Republican Party Michelle Fischbach D+4.3 D+5.0 D+8.5
    New Hampshire's 1st Chris Pappas Democratic Party Chris Pappas D+8.6 D+1.3 R+3.6
    New Jersey's 2nd Jeff Van Drew Republican Party Jeff Van Drew D+7.7 R+22.0 R+24.2
    New Jersey's 3rd Andy Kim Democratic Party Andy Kim D+1.3 R+20.4 R+9.6
    New Jersey's 5th Josh Gottheimer Democratic Party Josh Gottheimer D+13.7 D+4.4 R+12.1
    New Jersey's 7th Tom Malinowski Democratic Party Tom Malinowski D+5.0 R+11.0 R+20.5
    New Jersey's 11th Mikie Sherrill Democratic Party Mikie Sherrill D+14.6 R+19.1 R+25.1
    Nevada's 3rd Susie Lee Democratic Party Susie Lee D+9.1 D+1.3 R+24.6
    Nevada's 4th Steven Horsford Democratic Party Steven Horsford D+8.2 D+4.0 R+2.8
    New York's 11th Max Rose Republican Party Nicole Malliotakis D+6.5 R+24.9 R+12.3
    New York's 18th Sean Patrick Maloney Democratic Party Sean Patrick Maloney D+10.9 D+11.2 D+1.8
    New York's 19th Antonio Delgado Democratic Party Antonio Delgado D+5.2 R+8.6 R+28.1
    New York's 22nd Anthony Brindisi Pending D+1.8 R+5.5 R+48.1
    New Mexico's 2nd Xochitl Torres Small Republican Party Yvette Herrell D+1.9 R+25.5 R+28.9
    Oklahoma's 5th Kendra Horn Republican Party Stephanie Bice D+1.4 R+20.3 R+23.8
    Oregon's 4th Peter DeFazio Democratic Party Peter DeFazio D+15.1 D+15.8 D+21.0
    Pennsylvania's 7th Susan Wild Democratic Party Susan Wild D+10.0 N/A N/A
    Pennsylvania's 8th Matt Cartwright Democratic Party Matt Cartwright D+9.3 N/A N/A
    Pennsylvania's 17th Conor Lamb Democratic Party Conor Lamb D+12.5 N/A N/A
    South Carolina's 1st Joe Cunningham Republican Party Nancy Mace D+1.4 R+21.7 R+86.8
    Texas' 7th Lizzie Pannill Fletcher Democratic Party Lizzie Pannill Fletcher D+5.1 R+12.3 R+28.7
    Texas' 32nd Colin Allred Democratic Party Colin Allred D+6.5 R+52.1 R+26.4
    Utah's 4th Ben McAdams Republican Party Burgess Owens D+0.3 R+12.5 R+3.3
    Virginia's 2nd Elaine Luria Democratic Party Elaine Luria D+2.2 R+22.9 R+17.6
    Virginia's 7th Abigail Spanberger Democratic Party Abigail Spanberger D+1.9 R+15.3 R+23.9
    Virginia's 10th Jennifer Wexton Democratic Party Jennifer Wexton D+12.4 R+5.8 R+16.1
    Washington's 8th Kim Schrier Democratic Party Kim Schrier D+4.8 R+20.4 R+26.5
    Wisconsin's 3rd Ron Kind Democratic Party Ron Kind D+19.3 D+99.9 D+13.0


    The following table displays members included in the NRCC's Patriot Program for the 2020 election cycle.[17] Also included is each district's margin of victory in the 2018, 2016, and 2014 elections. Results are not included for Florida elections which took place before the 2016 redistricting, Pennsylvania elections which took place before the 2018 redistricting, or North Carolina elections which took place before the 2019 redistricting.

    National Republican Congressional Committee Patriot Program
    District Incumbent 2020 result 2018 Margin 2016 Margin 2014 Margin
    Alaska At-Large Don Young Approveda R+6.6 R+14.3 R+10.0
    California's 25th Mike Garcia Approveda D+8.8 R+6.2 R+6.6
    Florida's 18th Brian Mast Approveda R+8.6 R+10.5 N/A
    Illinois' 13th Rodney Davis Approveda R+0.8 R+19.4 R+17.4
    Kentucky's 6th Andy Barr Approveda R+3.2 R+22.2 R+20.0
    Michigan's 6th Fred Upton Approveda R+4.6 R+22.2 R+15.5
    Minnesota's 1st Jim Hagedorn Approveda R+0.4 D+0.7 D+8.5
    Nebraska's 2nd Don Bacon Approveda R+2.0 R+1.2 D+3.3
    New Jersey's 2nd Jeff Van Drew Approveda D+7.7 R+22.0 R+24.2
    New York's 1st Lee Zeldin Approveda R+4.1 R+17.9 R+8.7
    New York's 24th John Katko Approveda R+5.3 R+21.1 R+18.8
    North Carolina's 8th Richard Hudson Approveda N/A N/A N/A
    Ohio's 1st Steve Chabot Approveda R+4.4 R+18.4 R+26.4
    Pennsylvania's 1st Brian Fitzpatrick Approveda R+2.5 N/A N/A
    Texas' 10th Michael McCaul Approveda R+4.3 R+18.9 R+28.0
    Texas' 31st John Carter Approveda R+2.9 R+21.9 R+32.1
    Washington's 3rd Jaime Herrera Beutler Approveda R+5.3 R+23.5 R+23.1

    Special elections

    See also: Special elections to the 116th United States Congress (2019-2020)

    Special elections to United States House of Representatives are required in the event of vacancies. This table lists special House elections to fill vacancies in the 116th Congress.

    Results of special elections to the 116th Congress (House)
    Race Election date Incumbent Winner Election MOV Previous election MOV 2016 Presidential election MOV[18]
    Pennsylvania's 12th Congressional District May 21, 2019 Republican Party Tom Marino Republican Party Fred Keller R+36 R+32 R+37
    North Carolina's 3rd Congressional District September 10, 2019 Republican Party Walter Jones[19] Republican Party Greg Murphy R+24 R+100 R+24
    North Carolina's 9th Congressional District[20] September 10, 2019 Republican Party Robert Pittenger Republican Party Dan Bishop R+2 R+16 R+11
    Maryland's 7th Congressional District April 28, 2020 Democratic Party Elijah Cummings Democratic Party Kweisi Mfume D+49 D+55 D+55
    California's 25th Congressional District May 12, 2020 Democratic Party Katie Hill Republican Party Mike Garcia R+12 D+9 D+7
    Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District May 12, 2020 Republican Party Sean Duffy Republican Party Tom Tiffany R+14 R+21 R+20
    New York's 27th Congressional District June 23, 2020 Republican Party Chris Collins Republican Party Christopher Jacobs R+5 R+0.3 R+25
    Georgia's 5th Congressional District December 1, 2020 Democratic Party John Lewis Democratic Party Kwanza Hall D+8[21] D+100 D+73

    Historical special election data

    Special elections, 2013-2020

    Fifty special elections to the United States Congress were held during the 113th through 116th Congresses. During that time, special elections were called for 16 seats vacated by Democrats and 34 vacated by Republicans.

    The table below details how many congressional seats changed parties as the result of a special election between 2013 and 2020. The numbers on the left side of the table reflect how many vacant seats were originally held by each party, while the numbers on the right side of the table show how many vacant seats each party won in special elections.

    Congressional special election vacancies and results, 113th Congress to 116th Congress
    Congress Total elections held Vacancies before elections Seats held after elections Net change
    Democratic Party Democrats Republican Party Republicans Democratic Party Democrats Republican Party Republicans
    116th Congress 10 3 7 4 6 +1D, -1R
    115th Congress 17 4 13 8 9 +4 D, -4 R
    114th Congress 7 2 5 2 5 No change
    113th Congress 16 7 9 7 9 No change
    Averages 13 4 7 5 7 N/A


    U.S. Senate special election partisan change from special elections, 113th Congress to 116th Congress
    Party As of special election After special election
    Democratic Party Democrats 4 7
    Republican Party Republicans 6 3
    Total 10 10
    U.S. House special election partisan change from special elections, 113th Congress to 116th Congress
    Party As of special election After special election
    Democratic Party Democrats 12 14
    Republican Party Republicans 28 26
    Total 40 40


    Special elections, 1986-2012

    The table below presents the results of special elections to Congress from 1986 to 2012. Contact Ballotpedia at editor@ballotpedia.org for access to earlier data.

    Results of special elections to Congress (1986-2012)
    Election cycle Total special elections U.S. House elections Seats changing partisan control U.S. Senate elections Seats changing partisan control
    2011-2012 11 11 None None None
    2009-2010 15 10 3 (2 Democratic gains; 1 Republican gain) 5 2 (all Republican gains)
    2007-2008 14 12 3 (2 Republican gains; 1 Democratic gain) 2 None
    2005-2006 12 12 3 (all Democratic gains) None None
    2003-2004 6 6 None None None
    2001-2002 6 5 2 (all Democratic gains) 1 1 (Republican gain)
    1999-2000 9 8 1 (Republican gain) 1 1 (Democratic gain)
    1997-1998 3 3 None None None
    1995-1996 11 9 1 (Republican gain) 2 1 (Democratic gain)
    1993-1994 9 6 1 (Republican gain) 3 3 (all Republican gains)
    1991-1992 10 7 2 (all Republican gains) 3 1 (Democratic gain)
    1989-1990 10 8 1 (Democratic gain) 2 None
    1987-1988 12 12 3 (2 Democratic gains; 1 Republican gain) None None
    1985-1986 8 8 1 (Republican gain) None None
    Total 136 117 21 (11 Democratic gains; 10 Republican gains) 19 9 (6 Republican gains; 3 Democratic gains)

    Presidential data

    The following statistics were compiled using the Daily Kos' presidential results by congressional district data. These trends can be used as an indicator of expected competitive districts in the 2020 elections.[29]

    Democrats won House seats in 2018 in 31 districts that Donald Trump (R) carried in 2016.

    U.S. House districts won by Democrat in 2018 and Donald Trump in 2016
    District 2018 winner 2018 margin 2016 presidential margin[30] 2012 presidential margin[30]
    Arizona's 1st Democratic Party Tom O'Halleran D+7.7 Trump+1.1 Romney+2.5
    Georgia's 6th Democratic Party Lucy McBath D+1.0 Trump+1.5 Romney+23.3
    Illinois' 14th Democratic Party Lauren Underwood D+5.0 Trump+3.9 Romney+10
    Illinois' 17th Democratic Party Cheri Bustos D+24.2 Trump+0.7 Obama+17
    Iowa's 1st Democratic Party Abby Finkenauer D+5.1 Trump+3.5 Obama+13.7
    Iowa's 2nd Democratic Party Dave Loebsack D+12.2 Trump+4.1 Obama+13.1
    Iowa's 3rd Democratic Party Cindy Axne D+2.2 Trump+3.5 Obama+4.2
    Maine's 2nd Democratic Party Jared Golden D+1.3 Trump+10.3 Obama+8.6
    Michigan's 8th Democratic Party Elissa Slotkin D+3.8 Trump+6.7 Romney+3.1
    Michigan's 11th Democratic Party Haley Stevens D+6.7 Trump+4.4 Romney+5.4
    Minnesota's 2nd Democratic Party Angie Craig D+5.5 Trump+1.2 Obama+0.1
    Minnesota's 7th Democratic Party Collin Peterson D+4.3 Trump+30.8 Romney+9.8
    Nevada's 3rd Democratic Party Susie Lee D+9.1 Trump+1.0 Obama+0.8
    New Hampshire's 1st Democratic Party Chris Pappas D+8.6 Trump+1.6 Obama+1.6
    New Jersey's 2nd Democratic Party Jeff Van Drew[31] D+7.7 Trump+4.6 Obama+8.1
    New Jersey's 3rd Democratic Party Andrew Kim D+1.3 Trump+6.2 Obama+4.6
    New Jersey's 5th Democratic Party Josh Gottheimer D+13.7 Trump+1.1 Romney+3.0
    New Jersey's 11th Democratic Party Mikie Sherrill D+14.6 Trump+0.9 Romney+5.8
    New Mexico's 2nd Democratic Party Xochitl Torres Small D+1.9 Trump+10.2 Romney+6.8
    New York's 11th Democratic Party Max Rose D+6.5 Trump+9.8 Obama+4.3
    New York's 18th Democratic Party Sean Maloney D+10.9 Trump+1.9 Obama+4.3
    New York's 19th Democratic Party Antonio Delgado D+5.2 Trump+6.8 Obama+6.2
    New York's 22nd Democratic Party Anthony Brindisi D+1.8 Trump+15.5 Romney+0.4
    Oklahoma's 5th Democratic Party Kendra Horn D+1.4 Trump+13.4 Romney+18.4
    Pennsylvania's 8th Democratic Party Matt Cartwright D+9.3 Trump+9.6 Obama+11.9
    Pennsylvania's 17th Democratic Party Conor Lamb D+12.5 Trump+2.6 Romney+4.5
    South Carolina's 1st Democratic Party Joe Cunningham D+1.4 Trump+13.1 Romney+18.1
    Utah's 4th Democratic Party Ben McAdams D+0.3 Trump+6.7 Romney+37.0
    Virginia's 2nd Democratic Party Elaine Luria D+2.2 Trump+3.4 Romney+2.3
    Virginia's 7th Democratic Party Abigail Spanberger D+1.9 Trump+6.5 Romney+10.5
    Wisconsin's 3rd Democratic Party Ron Kind D+19.3 Trump+4.5 Obama+11


    Republicans won House seats in 2018 in three districts that Hillary Clinton (D) carried in 2016:

    U.S. House districts won by Republican in 2018 and Hillary Clinton in 2016
    District 2018 winner 2018 margin 2016 presidential margin[30] 2012 presidential margin[30]
    New York's 24th Republican Party John Katko R+6.3 Clinton+3.6 Obama+15.9
    Pennsylvania's 1st Republican Party Brian Fitzpatrick R+2.6 Clinton+2.0 Obama+1.6
    Texas' 23rd Republican Party Will Hurd R+0.5 Clinton+3.4 Romney+2.6


    How representatives voted on impeachment

    See also: Impeachment of Donald Trump

    In December 2019, the U.S. House passed two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump (R). Media outlets discussed impeachment as a prominent issue in the 2020 congressional elections, particularly in battleground districts.[32][33] See how each representative voted below.

    Abuse of power

    On December 18, 2019, the House impeached Trump for abuse of power by a vote of 230 to 197.


    Obstruction of Congress

    On December 18, 2019, the House impeached Trump for obstruction of Congress by a vote of 229 to 198.