Crossroads (1942) - IMDb
6.7/10
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28 user 9 critic

Crossroads (1942)

Passed | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | July 1942 (USA)
An amnesiac French diplomat is blackmailed for crimes that he committed before he lost his memory.

Director:

Jack Conway

Writers:

Guy Trosper (screenplay), John H. Kafka (story) (as John Kafka) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
William Powell ... David Talbot
Hedy Lamarr ... Lucienne Talbot
Claire Trevor ... Michelle Allaine
Basil Rathbone ... Henri Sarrou
Margaret Wycherly ... Madame Pelletier
Felix Bressart ... Dr. Andre Tessier
Sig Ruman ... Dr. Alex Dubroc
H.B. Warner ... Prosecuting Attorney
Philip Merivale ... Commissaire
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Storyline

1935. David Talbot is a successful and well-respected member of the French Foreign Service, currently based in Paris. Everything in his life is going his way: he is responsible for handling a large public trust, is pegged as the next French Ambassador to Brazil, and is still in the honeymoon phase of his marriage to his newlywed bride, Lucienne Talbot. He receives a letter addressed to "Jean" - he knowing it is for him as David Talbot is the addressee on the envelope - asking for the FF1 million owed. He eventually learns that the letter is he being accused of really being Jean Pelletier, who committed a bank robbery and murder in 1922, that 1 million half the take probably owed to Pelletier's partner(s). Part of David's known history is that he was long ago treated by Dr. Andre Tessier - still a close friend - for amnesia the result of a physical trauma, and that the one person who could positively identify him did so as David Talbot, that person now deceased. Everything that Tessier... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

They called him Murderer and made him believe it! See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film was first telecast in Seattle Wednesday 19 December 1956 on KING (Channel 5); it first aired in Los Angeles 9 January 1957 on KTTV (Channel 11), followed by Chicago 17 January 1957 on WBBM (Channel 2), by New York City 18 January 1957 on WCBS (Channel 2), by Portland OR 5 February 1957 on KGW (Channel 8), by Philadelphia 16 February 1957 on WFIL (Channel 6), by New Haven CT 11 March 1957 on WNHC (Channel 8), and by Altoona PA 18 March 1957 on WFBG (Channel 10); in Minneapolis it was first televised 21 October 1957 on KMGM (Channel 9) and in San Francisco 1 March 1958 on KGO (Channel 7). See more »

Goofs

Although the story takes place in 1935, all of the women's fashions and hairstyles are strictly in the 1942 mode, which was significantly different from 1935. See more »

Quotes

Lucienne Talbot: Some tea, darling? I think the water is still hot.
David Talbot: Thanks, dear. I think I'll have a little cognac.
Lucienne Talbot: A busy day, darling?
David Talbot: Yes, rather.
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Crazy Credits

After 'The End ' AMERICA NEEDS YOUR MONEY BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS AT THIS THEATER See more »

Connections

Referenced in Ed Wood (1994) See more »

Soundtracks

'Til You Return
Music by Arthur Schwartz
Lyrics by Howard Dietz
[Instrumental version played during the opening credits, then later sung by Michelle Allaine (Claire Trevor - uncredited) at the nightclub (probably dubbed)]
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User Reviews

 
Delicious...
28 July 2010 | by inspectorfernackSee all my reviews

Not a lot to add to what others have suggested, but this is a very lovely bit of movie making.

Powell really gets to display the acting chops that he had in spades. His ability to show pain, uncertainty and angst is not something that he got to do a lot, and it's enjoyable here. And the writing really helps. Powell seems, in so many ways, to be a contemporary actor, despite the thin mustache! He was just such a natural!

Hedy is mostly eye candy, but that's not her fault. Felix Bressart puts in a spot-on performance. He really nails his role beautifully. Trevor and Rathbone are solid, as always.

And this movie is really shot well, too. Great B & W photography that helps maintain a noir- esquire mood.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French | Portuguese

Release Date:

July 1942 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Man Who Lost His Way See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$846,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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