Catalonia

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Related to Catalonians: Cataluña

Cat·a·lo·nia

 (kăt′l-ōn′yə, -ō′nē-ə)
A region of northeast Spain bordering on France and the Mediterranean Sea. A center of socialist and anarchist activity in the late 1800s and early 1900s, it was granted limited autonomy in 1932 by the Spanish Republic. After Catalonian separatists unsuccessfully opposed the Falangist forces in the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), Catalonian national identity and the Catalan language were suppressed until after the death of Francisco Franco (1975).

Cat′a·lo′nian adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Catalonia

(ˌkætəˈləʊnɪə)
n
(Placename) a region of NE Spain, with a strong separatist tradition: became an autonomous region with its own parliament in 1979; an important agricultural and industrial region, with many resorts. Pop: 7 012 600 (2003 est). Area: 31 929 sq km (12 328 sq miles). Catalan name: Catalunya Spanish name: Cataluña
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cat•a•lo•ni•a

(ˌkæt lˈoʊ ni ə, -ˈoʊn yə)

n.
a region in NE Spain, bordering on France and the Mediterranean: formerly a province. Spanish, Ca•ta•lu•ña (ˌkɑ tɑˈlu nyɑ)
Cat`a•lo′ni•an, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Catalonia - a region of northeastern Spain
Espana, Kingdom of Spain, Spain - a parliamentary monarchy in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula; a former colonial power
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Katalonia
Katalónia
Katalonia
Catalonia
Katalonija
Katalonien

Catalonia

[ˌkætəˈləʊnɪə] NCataluña f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Catalonia

[ˌkætəˈləʊnɪə] nCatalogna
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He spoke Catalonian, the Italian of Corsica and the French of Provence with the same easy naturalness.
"[By telegraph.] The king, Don Carlos, has escaped the vigilance of his guardians at Bourges, and has returned to Spain by the Catalonian frontier.
This girl was of mixed Belgian and Spanish origin; her Flemish mother was dead, her Catalonian father was a merchant residing in the Isles, where Juanna had been born and whence she was sent to Europe to be educated.
I had a letter of introduction to an old Catalonian Spaniard, who treated me with the most uncommon hospitality.
Up to 191 MPs, mostly from the right-wing and conservative camps as well as the separatist Catalonians, voted against the bill and 156 legislators cast their ballots in its favor.
This would involve a separation from Spain, whose population of Spaniards are distinct from the Catalonians in language, history and culture, but who seek to ensure a continuance of the overlordship of Madrid over Barcelona.
Nothing spreads independence fervour as quickly as a martyr to a cause -- and for uncommitted Catalonians with lingering separatist sentiments, seeing political activists jailed for a quarter of a century simply for organising a plebiscite and engaging in political and democratic activity would indeed provide a new touchstone for yet more independence protests.
Since then, the regions--especially Catalonia, which was one of the major battlegrounds of the civil war, and Catalonians are among those ethnic minorities whose language was banned under Franco--have grown increasingly uncomfortable.
Catalonians then shout that the democratic will of the people must prevail.
The globalists had hoped the European Union would serve as a template to encourage remaining doubters to join their bandwagon, but their jewel is now hopefully destined for the scrapyard of history following the bloody noses of Brexit in the UK, German election results that left Merkel vulnerable, and recently Catalonians voting for independence.
Barcelona participated in every battle Catalonians entered, from the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s till their battle for independence nowadays.