Homage (feudal)

homageliege lordliegefeudal homageliege homageliege lordspaid homagehomage and fealtyoath of homageact of homage
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).wikipedia
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Vassal

vassalsvassalagefeudatory
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).
In fully developed vassalage, the lord and the vassal would take part in a commendation ceremony composed of two parts, the homage and the fealty, including the use of Christian sacraments to show its sacred importance.

Lord

lordshipseigneurseigneurs
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).
A liege lord was a person to whom a vassal owed sworn allegiance.

Feudalism

feudalfeudal systemfeudal lord
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).
This was done at a formal and symbolic ceremony called a commendation ceremony, which was composed of the two-part act of homage and oath of fealty.

Fealty

oath of fealtyin feeoaths of fealty
The oath known as "fealty" implied lesser obligations than did "homage".
The oath of fealty usually took place after the act of homage, when, by the symbolic act of kneeling before the lord and placing his hands between the hands of the lord, the vassal became the "man" of the lord.

Henry II of England

Henry IIKing Henry IIHenry Plantagenet
So Henry II was king of England, but he was merely Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Anjou.
Under the settlement Henry did homage to Louis for Normandy, accepting Louis as his feudal lord, and gave him the disputed lands of the Norman Vexin; in return, Louis recognised him as duke.

Normandy

NormanNormandy, FranceNormandie
After King John was forced to surrender Normandy to France in 1204, English magnates with holdings on both sides of the Channel were faced with conflict.
In exchange for his homage and fealty, Rollo legally gained the territory which he and his Viking allies had previously conquered.

Knight

knighthoodknightedknights
The implication was that no "knights service" was owed for the conquered English lands.
Early notions of chivalry entailed loyalty to one's liege lord and bravery in battle, similar to the values of the Heroic Age.

English Channel

Channelthe Channelcross-channel
After King John was forced to surrender Normandy to France in 1204, English magnates with holdings on both sides of the Channel were faced with conflict.
In exchange for his homage and fealty, Rollo legally gained the territory he and his Viking allies had previously conquered.

Feudalism in the Holy Roman Empire

Lehnsherrfeudal systemfeudal system in the Holy Roman Empire
Feudalism in the Holy Roman Empire was a politico-economic system of relationships between liege lords and enfeoffed vassals (or feudatories) that formed the basis of the social structure within the Holy Roman Empire during the High Middle Ages.

William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke

William MarshalWilliam MarshallWilliam Marshal, Earl of Pembroke
Two of the most powerful magnates, Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester and William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, negotiated an arrangement with the French king that if John had not recovered Normandy in a year-and-a-day, they would do homage to Philip.
Self-restraint and compromise were the keynotes of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege.

Philip IV of France

Philip IVPhilip the FairPhilippe le Bel
But when Phillip III died, and his son Philip IV ascended the French throne in 1286, Edward dutifully but reluctantly performed "homage" for the sake of peace.
As the duke of Aquitaine, English King Edward I was a vassal to Philip, and had to pay him homage.

Gascony

GasconGasconsGascogne
When Edward I was asked to provide military service to Philip III in his war with Aragon in 1285, Edward made preparations to provide service from Gascony (but not England – he had not done "homage", and thus owed no service to France for the English lands).
In May 1286, King Edward I paid homage before the new king, Philip IV of France, for the lands in Gascony.

Medieval Latin

LatinMiddle LatinMediaeval Latin
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

Ceremony

ceremonialceremoniesevents
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

Investiture

investedappointment and investitureconfirmed
Homage (from Medieval Latin hominaticum, lit. "pertaining to a man") in the Middle Ages was the ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

House of Plantagenet

PlantagenetPlantagenetsAngevin
For example, the Angevin monarchs of England were sovereign in England, i.e., they had no duty of homage regarding those holdings; but they were not sovereign regarding their French holdings.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
For example, the Angevin monarchs of England were sovereign in England, i.e., they had no duty of homage regarding those holdings; but they were not sovereign regarding their French holdings.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
After King John was forced to surrender Normandy to France in 1204, English magnates with holdings on both sides of the Channel were faced with conflict. For example, the Angevin monarchs of England were sovereign in England, i.e., they had no duty of homage regarding those holdings; but they were not sovereign regarding their French holdings.

Duke of Normandy

Dukes of NormandyCount of RouenDuke
So Henry II was king of England, but he was merely Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Anjou.

Duke of Aquitaine

dukes of AquitaineAquitaineDuchess of Aquitaine
So Henry II was king of England, but he was merely Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Anjou.

Counts and dukes of Anjou

Count of AnjouDuke of AnjouAnjou
So Henry II was king of England, but he was merely Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Anjou.

House of Capet

CapetCapetianCapetians
The Capetian kings in Paris, though weak militarily, claimed a right of homage.

Monarch

kingSovereignkings
The Capetian kings in Paris, though weak militarily, claimed a right of homage.

Paris

Paris, FranceParísParisian
The Capetian kings in Paris, though weak militarily, claimed a right of homage.