On this Day in Music (TWO) | History Forum

On this Day in Music (TWO)

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]5 August[/FONT][FONT=&quot]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1994 - Rocker Billy Idol admitted to the hospital after drug overdose.

in 1995 - Take That played the first of ten sold out nights at The Nynex Arena, Manchester, (the shows were without Robbie Williams who had quit the group on 17th July 1995). The group were also at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Never Forget', their 7th UK No.1 and last with Robbie Williams.

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in 1995 - Menachem Avidom dies at age 87. Israeli composer born in Stanislaviv, Austria-Hungary; he emigrated to Mandate Palestine in 1925 and, soon after went to study at the American University of Beirut from 1926-28. After further studies at the Paris Conservatory 1928-31, after which he moved to Tel Aviv, where he taught music theory. From 1945, he served as general secretary of the Israeli Philharmonic; in 1955 he was named director of ACUM, the Israeli Performing Rights Society. In 1961, Menacham was awarded the Israel Prize for music, in recognition of his opera Alexandra ha'Hashmonait.

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in 1996 - It was reported that UK TV music show 'Top Of The Pops' had hit rock bottom with it's lowest audience ever - only two and a half million viewers. In its heyday the show attracted over 17 million viewers each week.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1996 - Soul singer Wilson Pickett checks into a court-ordered rehab for cocaine addiction.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1998 - Eldon Shamblin, guitarist and arranger,[/FONT][FONT=&quot] dies at age 82.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Of BOB WILLS'S myriad Texas Playboys, none had a greater impact on shaping western swing's sound than guitarist arrange Eldon Shamblin. If not for the Depression, Shamblin would have been a welder in Weatherford, Oklahoma. Hard times drove him to perform in Oklahoma City beer joints in 1934. A short-lived solo spot on Oklahoma City radio station KFXR preceded Shamblin's enlistment in the Tulsa-based Alabama Boys, who recorded for DECCA in 1938 after Shamblin's two-year stint in the group. On Tulsa's KTUL, Shamblin was a staff guitarist noted for playing swing versions of popular classics. Bob Wills tuned in and hired Shamblin on November 8, 1937. By 1939 Shamblin was arranging for the Texas Playboys; Wills also entrusted him with extensive hiring and firing powers. [/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The evolution of the Texas Playboys from a funky stringband to a horn-heavy big band was in large part Shamblin's doi ag. The duos he worked out with steel guitarist LEON McAunFFE, most notably 1941's "Twin Guitar Special," swung tightly. In 1941 the jazz journal [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Metronome [/FONT][FONT=&quot]cited Shamblin's electric guitar lead work as "closer than any other white plectrist to getting the solidity and swing and steady flow of ideas of Charlie Christian." Mter World War II the emphasis in Shamblin's playing shifted from lead to rhythm in a scaled-down Playboys. [/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Ever the pragmatist, Shamblin credited his fluid bass lines to the need to "cover for a bad bass man." (In 1974 [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Rolling Stone [/FONT][FONT=&quot]said he played "the world's best rhythm guitar.") Shamblin left the Playboys in the mid-1950s and, following stints in bands of McAuliffe and fiddler-singer HOYLE Nix, settled in Tulsa to tune pianos. He was recalled to active duty by MERLE HAGGARD, first on the 1974 Wills tribute alburn [/FONT][FONT=&quot]For the Last Time, [/FONT][FONT=&quot]and then as a member of Haggard's road band, the Strangers. Since the mid-1970s Shamblin had also been a key figure in various Playboys reunion bands (principally the Original Texas Playboys, 1975-86) and played on ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL'S 1994 [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Tribute to the Music of Bob Wills & the Texas Playboys. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]"Eldon," says Wheel boss Ray Benson, "is like Elvis to us." Born in Weatherford, Oklahoma, April 24,1916.[/FONT]
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in 1999 - Music written by Johann Sebastian Bach was found in the Ukraine. The music was thought to have been destroyed over 50 years ago during World War II. The material was found in the musical estate of Carl Phillipp Emanuel Bach, who was one of J.S. Bach's children.

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in 2000 - Police were called to Gary Glitter's West London home after a crowd gathered outside and started to shout abuse. The former pop star was back in London to attend to business affairs before heading abroad again.

in 2000 - Maya Bond (Japanese-born, US experimental singer-songwriter, drummer) is born.
in 2001 - David Gray returned to the No.1 position on the UK album chart with 'White Ladder'.
in 2001 - *NSYNC started a three-week run at No.1 on the US album chart with 'Celebrity'.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2001 - Part-time C&W DJ and quadruple murderer Robert Spangler dies from terminal cancer in prison.[/FONT]
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in 2003 - Dido started a four week run at No.1 on the UK album chart with ‘Life For Rent’ the UK singers second No.1 album.


in 2005 - Carlo Little (CARL O’neill Little) is born. A lauded British drummer who passed through several notable musical acts, Carlo Little co-founded Screaming Lord Sutch & The Savages in 1960, appearing on their UK hit ‘My Big Black Coffin’. Hailing from north-west London, Carlo became a local legend thanks to his prowess as a drummer and uncharacteristically offered drum tutelage to a young Keith Moon.

In 1962 Little joined Cyril Davies & The R&B All-Stars, and while with the group, he reportedly turned down an offer to join The Rolling Stones, instead suggesting Charlie Watts. During the Stones’ early years, Little and All-Stars bassist Ricky Fensen occasionally deputised for Watts and Wyman when they were indisposed. Little then rejoined Sutch for a brief period before drumming with Long John Baldry’s Hoochie Coochie Men – who, ironically, were formed out of the remains of Cyril Davies’ All-Stars (after Davies died in January 1964).

Little also played in Neil Christian’s Crusaders and a touring version of The Flowerpot Men before quitting music in 1969 to focus on family life. Together with Nick Simper (of Deep Purple and Johnny Kidd & The Pirates) he owned a grocery shop, as well as operating a fast food stand outside Wembley Stadium, occasionally when, with bittersweet irony, his old bandmates The Rolling Stones were performing. Occasionally returning to music Little formed the groups Flying Fox, Florida Sun and Bandana. (Lung cancer). - Died August 5, 2005.

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in 2005 - Bob Dylan's song 'Like a Rolling Stone' topped a poll of rock and film stars to find the music, movies, TV shows and books that changed the world. The 1965 single beat Elvis Presley's ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ into second place in a survey for Uncut magazine. Sir Paul McCartney, Noel Gallagher, Robert Downey Jr, Rolling Stone Keith Richards and Lou Reed were among those who gave their opinions.

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in 2007 - DNA testing on about a dozen people who claimed late soul star James Brown was their father revealed that at least two of them were telling the truth. A former adviser for the singer, Buddy Dallas, said he could not confirm exact figures, as further test results were forthcoming. His will, which is being disputed in court, named six children.

in 2007 - Beatles fans feared the misuse of the Fab Four’s music had hit rock bottom following the decision to license ‘All You Need Is Love’ for use in a nappy advert. Procter & Gamble had purchased the rights to use the song from Sony/ATV Music Publishing, which now owned Northern Songs, the Beatles’ catalogue. The ad featured a baby jumping on a teddy bear in a disposable nappy which offered “ultimate leak protection.”

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in 2007 - Florian Pittis dies at age 63. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Romanian stage and television actor, folk music singer and radio producer; he attended the Gheorghe Lazar High School in Bucharest and in 1968 he graduated from the Institute of Theatre. As a young actor he was hired at one of the best theatres in Bucharest, the Bulandra Theatre. In 1992, he was one of the founding members of the Romanian folk rock band Pasarea Colibri and appeared on 3 of thier 5 albums before he left the band in 2000. In 1998 he became the director of Radio Romania Tineret, known as Radio3Net since 2001, the only Romanian radio station that broadcasts exclusively on the Internet. Florian's songs were usually his own compositions, but being a great admirer of Bob Dylan, he had masterfully translated and adapted some of Dylan's songs: A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall, Death is Not the End, Don't Think Twice, It's All Right, Mr. Tambourine Man, Rainy Day Women #12 & 35, She Belongs to Me, Silvio (prostate cancer)

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in 2007 - Paul Rutherford dies at age 67. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]British trombonist with the band Iskra 1912, one of the earliest free improvising groups to omit a drummer/percussionist. Famous for solo trombone improvisations, he also played with Globe Unity Orchestra, London Jazz Composer's Orchestra, the Mike Westbrook Orchestra, Soft Machine and more (sadly died from cirrhosis of the liver and a ruptured aorta) Born February 29th 1940.

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in 2008 - Robert Hazard/Robert Rimato dies at age 59. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American musician and songwriter probably best known for composing and recording the song "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun", which Cyndi Lauper covered, he also composed the 1980s New Wave and MTV hits, "Escalator of Life" and "Change Reaction", which he performed with his band, Robert Hazard and the Heroes, (pancreatic cancer) [/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2008 - Reg Lindsay OAM dies at age 79. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Australian country and western singer who won three Golden Guitar Awards and wrote more than five hundred songs in his fifty-year music career. Born in the Sydney, Reg was two years of age when his father gave him a harmonica which he quickly mastered. He then learned how to play the banjo, mandolin, guitar and fiddle. In 1951 he won a Sydney radio talent quest which launched his career as a singer-songwriter. In a music career of over 50 years he wrote more than 500 songs and hosted various TV shows including The Reg Lindsay Country Hour in 1964 which ran for eight years, followed by his own TV program, Country Homestead, which ran for four years and earned him four Logie Awards. He became the first Australian to appear at Nashville's Grand Ole Opry in 1974 and is officially recognised with a plaque on Nashville's Walkway of Stars. He was winner of three Golden Guitar Awards and was inducted into Australia's Country Music Hall of Fame in 1977. In 1989 he was honored with the Medal of the Order of Australia for his services to Australian music (pneumonia).

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in 2009 - A 53-year-old who claimed he was secretly engaged to Miley Cyrus was charged with trying to stalk the US singer. Mark McLeod was arrested after trying to contact the Hannah Montana actress on a film set near Savannah, Georgia. McLeod claimed he had met Cyrus 18 months earlier and that she had accepted his marriage proposal. He told police that Cyrus' father, country singer Billy Ray Cyrus, approved of their relationship and that Cyrus had sent him "secret messages" through her TV show.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2009 - Steven Tyler was airlifted to hospital after falling off stage during a gig at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in South Dakota. The 61-year-old Aerosmith singer fell from a catwalk onto a couple of fans, he suffered neck and shoulder injuries. About 30 minutes after the accident, guitarist Joe Perry came out to tell the crowd that the remainder of the show had been cancelled.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2012 - Stephen Hill dies at age 55. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American gospel singer-songwriter; raised in upstate South Carolina, he regularly appeared in Bill & Gloria Gaither’s popular “Homecoming” series of videos, CDs and concerts. Over three decades in music, he collaborated with notables including Dolly Parton, Tammy Wynette, Vern Gosdin, Charlie Louvin, Dottie Rambo, Sam Moore, Marie Osmond and Nancy Sinatra (heart attack) - Born 1957.[/FONT]
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in 2012 - Chavela Vargas / Isabel Vargas Lizano dies at age 93.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Costa Rican-born Mexican singer. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]She was especially known for her rendition of Mexican rancheras, but she is also recognized for her contribution to other genres of popular Latin American music. She has been an influential interpreter in the Americas and Europe, muse to figures such as Pedro Almodóvar, hailed for her haunting performances, and called "la voz áspera de la ternura", the rough voice of tenderness. The Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, presented her with a Latin GRAMMY Statuette in 2007 after receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award on behalf of that organization.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]She was born in Costa Rica, in San Joaquín de Flores, as Isabel Vargas Lizano, daughter of Francisco Vargas and Herminia Lizano. She was baptized on 15 July 1919 with the forenames "María Isabel Anita Carmen de Jesús." She had a difficult childhood: her parents divorced and left her under the care of an uncle, and she contracted poliomyelitis. She went by Chavela, which is a pet name for Isabel. At age 14, she abandoned her native country due to lack of opportunities for a musical career, seeking refuge in Mexico, where an entertainment industry was burgeoning. There she resided for almost eight decades and obtained Mexican nationality.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]For many years she sang on the streets, but in her thirties she became a professional singer. In her youth, she dressed as a man, smoked cigars, drank heavily, carried a gun, and was known for her characteristic red jorongo, which she donned in performances until old. Vargas sang the canción ranchera, which she performed in her own peculiar style. The typical ranchera, as represented by José Alfredo Jiménez, was a masculine but emotional song about love and its mishaps, usually mediated by alcohol, since in a macho culture, the display of feelings by men is allowed only to the drunk. The ranchera is sung from a man's perspective and with a mariachi accompaniment. Chavela sang this type of song as a solo, using only guitar and voice, evoking the singing style of a drunk man. She often slowed down the tempo of melodies to draw more dramatic tension out of songs, so they could be taken as naughtily humorous.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Towards the end of the 1950s, she became known within artistic circles, due in part to her performances in Acapulco, center of international tourism, where she sang at the Champagne Room of the restaurant La Perla. Her first album, Noche de Bohemia (Bohemian Night), was released in 1961 with the professional support of José Alfredo Jiménez, one of the foremost singer/songwriters of Mexican ranchera music. She eventually recorded more than 80 albums. Vargas was hugely successful during the 1950s, the 1960s, and the first half of the 1970s, touring in Mexico, the United States, France, and Spain and was close to many prominent artists and intellectuals of the time, including Juan Rulfo, Agustín Lara, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Dolores Olmedo and José Alfredo Jiménez.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In the late 1970s Vargas partially retired from performing due to a 15-year battle with alcoholism, which she described in her autobiography (Y si quieres saber de mi pasado [And if you want to know about my past], published in 2002) as "my 15 years in hell." Chavela couldn't keep on with her heavy drinking and intense lifestyle. In 1970, "submerged in an alcoholic haze" as she described it, she was taken in by an Indian family who nursed her back to health without knowing who she was. In 2003, she told The New York Times that she had not had a drink in 25 years.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Vargas returned to the stage in 1991, performing at a bohemian nightclub called "El Hábito" in Coyoacán, Mexico City. Her career started to recover international prominence, with performances in Latin America, Europe and the United States. Vargas debuted at Carnegie Hall in 2003 at age 83 at the behest and promotion of Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar, an admirer and friend.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]At age 81, she publicly came out in her autobiography titled And If You Want to Know about My Past.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]But it wasn't really a surprise to her fans. For years Vargas refused to change the genders in her songs. In "Paloma Negra" ("Black Dove"), Vargas accuses a woman of partying all night long and breaking her heart.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Vargas is featured in many of Almodóvar's films, including La flor de mi secreto in both song and video. She said, however, that acting was not her ambition, although she had previously participated in films such as the 1967 movie La Soldadera. Vargas also appeared in Frida, singing "La Llorona" (The Weeping Woman). Her classic "Paloma Negra" (Black Dove) was also included in the soundtrack of the film. Vargas herself, as a young woman, was alleged to have had an affair with Frida Kahlo during Kahlo's marriage to muralist Diego Rivera. She appeared in Alejandro González Iñárritu's Babel, singing "Tú me acostumbraste" ("Because of you, I got accustomed"), a bolero by Frank Domínguez.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]On February 10, 2017, the biographical film "Chavela" debuted. Directed by Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi, the film features Pedro Almodóvar, Elena Benarroch and Miguel Bosé among others.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Joaquín Sabina's song "Por el Boulevard de los Sueños Rotos" ("Down the Boulevard of Broken Dreams") is dedicated to Vargas. Sergio Ramírez Mercado, a Nicaraguan writer, published in 2011 the novel La Fugitiva, a fictionalized account of the life of Costa Rican writer Yolanda Oreamuno. In Ramírez' work, Oreamuno's life is told by three women who met her. According to many critics, one of the female characters telling Oreamuno's history is a singer who resembles Chavela Vargas. The character talks about her own life and her non-reciprocated lesbian love for Yolanda Oreamuno.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Chavela Vargas had been hospitalized for several weeks as a result of respiratory problems. She died in Cuernavaca, Mexico. According her official Facebook page, her last words were "I leave with Mexico in my heart."[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2013 - Singer/keyboardist George Duke (Frank Zappa collaborator and half of The Clarke/Duke Project with Stanley Clarke) dies from chronic lymphocytic leukemia at age 67 in Los Angeles, California[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2013 - Frank Valdor, dies at age 75. He was one of the great German bandleaders having sold over 2.5 millions records during the 1960s and 1970s. In particular, Valdor was popular for his instrumental arrangements intended to be played non-stop at parties. He has been called "King of Dynamic Party Sound". His discography consists of more than 80 LP's, 10 singles and 8 CD's. Valdor's record covers often have a "genius" graphical touch, where he is shown surrounded by scantily dressed women. His album King Size sold 25,000 copies in Finland and was awarded gold status.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2013 - Aboriginal singer, activist Willie Dunn dies at 71.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] “It’s important for aboriginal people to tell their own stories,” Willie Dunn told his fans, “because Hollywood has done enough.”[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Mr. Dunn was given his unofficial middle name – Roha’tiio – by a Mohawk chief in Akwesasne. It means “his voice is beautiful.”[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]A singer, songwriter and award-winning documentary filmmaker, Mr. Dunn was a trailblazer in the native community. The spirit of his work was saturated with the lives and histories of aboriginal people. He always said that reclaiming a voice for native people is critical because optimism and hope haven’t brought change.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]“Please understand that Willie and other activists, singers and poets of his generation had no role models to direct them …” said elder Albert Dumont. “The drum and our ceremonies came back into the light because of them.”[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Mr. Dunn died on Aug. 5 in Ottawa of cancer. He was 71. He leaves his partner, Liz Moore; children William, Lawrence and Pamela; and granddaughters Jessica, Mya and Melody.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Over his career, Mr. Dunn released several albums, including [FONT=&quot]Willie Dunn[/FONT], [FONT=&quot]The Pacific[/FONT], [FONT=&quot]Metallic[/FONT] and [FONT=&quot]Son of the Sun[/FONT]. He was inducted into the Aboriginal Walk of Honour and earned lifetime achievement recognition from the Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He was compared to Leonard Cohen and Gordon Lightfoot, but the power in his protest ballads were more like Pete Seeger’s [FONT=&quot]We Shall Overcome[/FONT], Buffy Sainte-Marie’s [FONT=&quot]Universal Soldier[/FONT] or Neil Young’s [FONT=&quot]Ohio[/FONT].[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Particularly notable is his 1968 National Film Board short, [FONT=&quot]The Ballad of Crowfoot[/FONT], about the 19th-century Blackfoot chief. The film, set to Mr. Dunn’s song by the same name, is considered Canada’s first music video and one of the earliest NFB films directed by an aboriginal filmmaker.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Using a powerful montage of archival photographs and film footage of buffalo being slaughtered, it starkly displays the history brutally inflicted upon aboriginal Canadians by colonial settlers. “You are the leader, you are the chief. You stand against both liar and thief,” Mr. Dunn sings. “… They shoot the buffalo. Kill the game. Send their preachers into shame.”[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The Ballad of Crowfoot[/FONT][FONT=&quot] won seven international awards, including a Gold Hugo for best short film at the 1969 Chicago International Film Festival.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Mr. Dunn’s other NFB credits include working as a filmmaker on [FONT=&quot]These Are My People…[/FONT] and [FONT=&quot]The Other Side of the Ledger: An Indian View of the Hudson’s Bay Company[/FONT]. His music was used as a soundtrack for the films [FONT=&quot]Incident at Restigouche[/FONT], detailing a 1981 police raid on the Listuguj Mi’gmaq First Nation, and [FONT=&quot]Okanada[/FONT], about the 1990 standoff in Oka, Que.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Often called a First Nations ambassador for Canada, there’s a story in the native community about Mr. Dunn whispering into the Queen’s ear during her 1971 visit to British Columbia to celebrate the centennial of the province’s entry into Confederation. “We are not your children any more,” he reportedly said.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Born in Montreal on Aug. 14, 1941, into a family of eight children, he was of Mi’kmaq and Scottish/Irish background. His father, William Dunn, was a labourer, a poet and a sometime hobo. Willie recorded into music one of his father’s poems, [FONT=&quot]Rattling along on a Freight Train[/FONT]. Every Saturday afternoon his mother, Stella Metallic, would tune in to the Metropolitan Opera. Poetry, music and the noise of children filled their home. Later in life, Mr. Dunn would perform T.S. Eliot’s poetry and Shakespeare’s sonnets to the sound of drumming and native chants.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]According to his partner, Liz Moore, Willie was 15 when he was handed his first guitar. He taught himself to play and sneaked into Montreal cafés to watch blues musicians Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2015 - Raphy Leavitt, Puerto Rican composer and founder of the salsa orchestra "La Selecta", dies at age 66.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Rafael Angel Leavitt Rey, born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, was the second of four siblings in his family, and was born to a Jewish father and a Catholic mother. He and his brothers became orphans at an early age and were raised by their aunt in the Puerta de Tierra section of San Juan. Leavitt was able to attend a private school, Colegio San Agustín, where he received his primary and secondary .[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]During his childhood, he was also able to take classes at The Academy of Accordions. He participated in an accordion orchestra and was named "premier" accordionist. Leavitt enrolled in the University of Puerto Rico to study Business Administration. It was during this period of his life that he debuted as a professional musician when he joined two cousins who shared Rey as last name to form the "Combo Los Rey". After four years in the university, Leavitt earned his bachelor's degree in business administration and graduated with high honors.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1966, Leavitt organized an orchestra which he named "Los Señoriales". This was the first time that he assumed the role of orchestra director. Later on, he renamed the orchestra "La Banda Latina" (Latin Band).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1970, Leavitt organized an orchestra which was to have a different sound and style. He wanted to select the band's repertoire from songs with a particular, positive social message and philosophy, and arranged his new band's sound as to sound as raw and powerful as the typical all-trombone salsa sound in vogue at the time (made popular by Willie Colón), but with the addition of trumpets to lighten up the sound melodically. He composed some of the songs of this new group, which he named "La Selecta". Ever since its beginning, La Selecta has featured Coamo-born Sammy Marrero, considered by many as a gentlemanly character in salsa, as one of its singers. Marrero, who has always been strongly influenced by jibaro music, had a chance to show his dramatic singing style in early hits such as the anthemic Jíbaro Soy, a patriotic Puerto Rican song unusual for the times, Payaso, and El Buen Pastor. However, it is the band's signature song, La Cuna Blanca, that Marrero's voice is mostly associated with.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]On their way to a dance in Connecticut on October 28, 1972, the band's van had an accident, killing trumpet player Luis Maisonet and severely injuring Leavitt. Leavitt was in a coma, he sustained several fractures in his hip (he walks with a limp ever since), vertebrae and ribs in the accident, and was placed on intensive care. After he recovered from the coma, he had a persistent vision of an empty white crib, from which baby cries could be heard. Somehow he associated the vision with his trumpet player, unaware that he had died in the accident. Maisonet was reportedly dressed in black, and telling him: "Raphy, I'll help you from here". When fellow band members mustered the will to tell Leavitt about the player's death, Leavitt claimed that he already knew about it. After seven months of recovery, Leavitt and his band recorded the La Cuna Blanca as a tribute song, with Leavitt writing dramatic lyrics interpreted by Marrero, arranged to an upbeat, heavily contrasting cha-cha-cha beat. The bittersweet feeling evoked by the song has made it a popular farewell song at Puerto Rican funerals. Marrero's daughter's death from a stray bullet at a reggaeton club in 2005 brought the song back to light in the collective Puerto Rican conscience, and had the dramatic consequence of having Marrero sing it in a tribute concert to La Selecta the day immediately after her death.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1978, he discovered the young singer Tony Vega, who was to become a legend among salsa singers in his own right. Leavitt and La Selecta were responsible for the introduction of salsa in many countries.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In the 1980s, Leavitt became an independent producer and produced two records for Bobby Valentín Bronco Records. In the 1990s, He established his own record recording company, R. L. Records. The company's first production was the album titled "Provocame" (Provoke Me), which became a "hit" in Puerto Rico, United States and South America.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1993, Leavitt and La Selecta made their European debut in Spain. During that tour, they also held concerts in Germany, Switzerland, Italy and France.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Later years and death[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Leavitt was presented the Rafael Hernández Golden Bust Award for his compositions "Payaso" (Clown), "Jíbaro Soy" (I'm a Countryboy) and "La Cuna Blanca" (The White Crib). In 2003, Leavitt and La Selecta held a concert at the Luis A. Ferré Center of Fine Arts in San Juan, where the group was awarded a Tu Musica Award for "Best Salsa Recording of the Year". The event was made into a T.V. special titled "Raphy Leavitt and his Selecta Orchestra: 30 years of Music History". Raphy Leavitt and La Selecta continue to be active with musical presentations and tours. Raphy Leavitt died at his home in Miami, Florida, two days after surgery to remove bacteria found around his artificial hip.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Vander Lee, Brazilian singer-songwriter. His songs were a fusion of rock, pop, and classical jazz.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He began his career singing in bars and festivals in Belo Horizonte and cities of Minas Gerais. In 1987, he joined the band Morro Velho, and recorded an EP that was never released. He released his first album in 1997.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He died in Belo Horizonte on August 5, 2016. The cause of death was a heart attack which came while at a spa. He was admitted to a hospital and underwent surgery.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Richard Fagan, an American songwriter and musician, dies at age 69. He had six top ten singles and 18 charted singles on the Billboard Country charts. Fagan's songs have been recorded by Neil Diamond, George Strait, John Michael Montgomery, Clay Walker, Ricochet, Hank Williams, Jr., George Jones, Shania Twain, Patty Loveless, Collin Raye, Shenandoah, The Crickets, Jason & the Scorchers, The Blues Brothers Band and many others.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1979 his song "The Good Lord Loves You" was recorded by Neil Diamond and released on the September Morn album. The song charted in the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at number 67 in April 1980. Fagan accomplished nine Billboard Country chart singles in the 1990s including two of John Michael Montgomery's number one singles: "Be My Baby Tonight" and "Sold (The Grundy County Auction Incident)". Fagan had three additional songs on the Billboard Country charts in the 2000s, including the song "Why Can't We All Just Get a Long Neck?" that appears on the Hank Williams, Jr. album, I'm One of You.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]On April 26, 2008 Fagan had a physical altercation with his publishing partner and best friend, Tom Oteri. Fagan was arrested for drunk driving after leaving the scene of the fight where Oteri was later found dead, having suffered a heart attack. Fagan was convicted of the drunk driving charge and sentenced to rehabilitative therapy with the support of Oteri's family members who still regarded Fagan as a close friend after the incident.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Richard learned basic guitar skills as a young child and began to refine those skills and singing do-wop in Philadelphia as a teenager. According to Richard’s account, he encountered two other people singing in the Junior High lunch room, suggested some changes while joining along and immediately had new friends and singing companions. After being drafted into the Army and serving a year in Vietnam, Fagan returned to Philadelphia where, for a while, he was homeless. He married and had a son, but divorced in 1975. Tom Oteri discovered Fagan's songwriting talents and invited him to a recording studio audition. In 1976 Oteri recorded five of Fagan's songs and sent them to various producers but because the recordings did not identify an address or phone number they never received any response. Bob Gaudio, Neil Diamond's producer, heard one of the songs and hired an ex-FBI agent as a private detective to find the song's author.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1978 Bob Gaudio acquired Fagan's song, “The Good Lord Loves You.” The song finally appeared three years later on Diamond’s “September Morn” album. Gaudio also managed to get Fagan signed with Mercury Records and produced his first album. Fagan relocated to Los Angeles, learned to play piano and recorded the tracks for his first album, "Richard Fagan" which was released the last week of 1979 just about the same time that “September Morn” was released. Fagan's album received critical acclaim and he recorded the tracks for a second album, "Jiver", but Mercury never released it.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Nashville and country music[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Fagan's initial success was not achieved again until he relocated from Los Angeles to Nashville, Tennessee in January 1986. Within a week of his relocation, he had one of his songs, "Blue Suede Blues", recorded by Con Hunley. The song reached number 49 on the Billboard Country charts in 1986. That same first week in Nashville Fagan had another song accepted – "Americana" – by Moe Bandy, which was released in 1988. In March it reached number 8 on the Billboard Country charts and was quickly adopted by George H. W. Bush as a theme song for his Presidential Campaign.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Fagan’s songs have appeared on the soundtracks of five Hollywood feature films. He has written a network television theme song, a Presidential campaign song, a national sports anthem, show tunes, gospel songs, comic numbers and a Billboard Country Single of the Year. Working with a variety of collaborators, he has been responsible for such unforgettable hits as “Sold,” “Only on Days That End in Y,” “I Miss You a Little,” “Overnight Male” and “Be My Baby Tonight.” Albums containing Fagan songs have sold more than 25 million copies. “God has always given me a pot of gold,” says Richard Fagan. “I think there’s a reason for it all. And I guess my being naïve helped me to succeed in Nashville. I didn’t know it at the time, but my timing was great.” [/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Death of Tom Oteri[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]“Their relationship was more like father and son than anything,” said Fagan’s friend and frequent co-writer Kacey Jones. “Tom rescued Rich from a life situation that would have gone nowhere but bad. He dusted him off and said, ‘Your job is to write songs. I’ll make sure you have a roof over your head and food and all the things you need to live, and you’ll write songs.’ ”[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]That arrangement detonated on April 26, 2008, when an argument led to a brawl. Fagan says it was the only time they had ever had a physical fight. Fagan was full of Patron and antidepressants, Oteri high and low on the painkiller Fentanyl, which had been prescribed after he broke a rib. Wounded by Fagan’s knife, Oteri yelled at his friend to leave, perhaps out of anger and perhaps for protection. Fagan drove off, drunk, and was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol. He spent the night in jail, and was on his way home on bail, hoping to make apologies and amends with Oteri, when he was called back to the Harding precinct.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]“The detective said, ‘Your friend’s dead. Murder one,’ ” Fagan recalled. “My best friend of 32 years. The next day, Tom’s son and his daughter and sister came to visit. They said I was crying my eyes out, saying, ‘It should have been me.’ I did wish I was dead. But I wasn’t dead, so what do I do?”[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The answer came back from Tom Oteri Jr.: You’ll write songs.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]“My dad believed in Rich’s music,” said Oteri Jr., who is now publishing Fagan’s songs through his Broadminded Music company. “I can’t let all the work they did go to waste. I grew up around Rich, and I’ve known him all my life, and I know that what happened was an accident. I have to let Rich keep going. It’s what my dad would want.”[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Fagan died in Nashville of liver cancer.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Indie band Viola Beach scored a UK No.1 album, six months after they were killed in a car crash. The self-titled debut was compiled by the band's families, using live sessions and studio recordings, many of which were originally bound for an EP. All four members of the Warrington band and their manager Craig Tarry died when their car plunged into a canal in Sweden in February 2016.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – English indie pop band Blossoms from Stockport, Greater Manchester released their self-titled debut studio which peaked at No.1 on the UK chart. The band take their name from The Blossoms public house at the corner of Bramhall Lane and Buxton Road in Stockport.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 - There are spectacular fireworks, awe-inspiring acrobats, and sensational dancers at the opening ceremony of the Summer Olympics in Rio, but supermodel Gisele Bundchen gets the biggest reaction when she takes a long walk across the stage to "The Girl From Ipanema," performed by the composer's grandson Daniel Jobim.[/FONT]
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5 August
page 5 of 5[/FONT]
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]6 August[/FONT][FONT=&quot]……………………………………………………………………………………………………..[/FONT][FONT=&quot] total views 671,260
page 1 of 4

in 1548 - Georg Rhau/Rhaw, German cantor/composer/music publisher, dies at age 60.
He was one of the most significant music printers in Germany in the first half of the 16th century, during the early period of the Protestant Reformation. He was principally active in Wittenberg, Saxony, the town where Martin Luther famously nailed the Ninety-five Theses to the door of the Castle Church, initiating the Reformation, and Rhau's support as a printer was critical to Luther's success.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Born in the Thuringian town of Eisfeld, then part of Ernestine Saxony, Rhau from 1513 onwards studied philosophy at the newly established University of Wittenberg. From 1518 he continued his studies at the University of Leipzig where he also worked as a tutor. He was the cantor of Leipzig Thomanerchor from 1518 to 1520. During Luther's Leipzig Debate, he performed his mass Missa de Sancto Spiritu for twelve voices on 27 June 1519.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]In 1520 Rhau had to leave Leipzig, due to his favourable attitude towards the Reformation, and went on to serve as a schoolmaster in the Mansfeld town of Eisleben and in Hildburghausen. From 1522 he worked as a printer in Wittenberg, where he established his own printing shop and publishing house. In 1528, he is again documented as Thomanerchor organist.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Rhau published methodbooks and various significant prints of music by contemporary composers, such as Heinrich Finck, Thomas Stoltzer, Arnold von Bruck, and Ludwig Senfl. His collection is an important document for the development of Lutheran church music.[/FONT]

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in 1619 - Barbara Strozzi, Italian singer and composer, adopted daughter of Giulio Strozzi, is born at Venice. She was adopted about 1628 and received musical training from Cavalli. She played a prominent role at the gatherings of the Accademia degli Unisoni at the Strozzi residence, where she was active as a singer and composer. It is also possible that she was active as a courtesan, but her musical gifts were undeniable and she was highly esteemed as a composer. Her adoptive father wrote the texts for her first book of madrigals (Venice, 1644). In all, she published 8 vols. of music, including many fine cantatas, arias, and duets. - probably died at Venice, c. 1664.

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in 1651 - Johann Michael Zächer, Austrian composer is born.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Zächer was born in Vienna. He was Domkapellmeister of St Stephan's Cathedral from 1679 and Kapellmeister to Eleonor Magdalene of Neuburg the dowager empress on the death of Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor in 1705.[/FONT]

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in 1664 - Johann Christoph Schmidt, German organist and composer, is born at Hohnstein, near Pirna. He entered the Dresden court chapel as a chorister in 1676, where he received training from Christoph Bernhard. After serving as an instrumentalist in the Court Orchestra, he became master of the choristers in 1687 and second organist in 1692. In 1694 he went to Italy to complete his training. Upon his return to Dresden, he was made deputy Kapellmeister and chamber organist (1696). In 1698 he was promoted to principal Kapellmeister, pursuing his duties in Krakow and Warsaw as well as in Dresden, since he was responsible for the music for both the Saxon electoral and Polish courts. He also served as Kapellmeister for the Protestant and Catholic church music at the court, turning over his duties for the Catholic church music to J.D. Heinichen in 1717. Under Schmidt's leadership, the Dresden Court Orchestra became one of the most celebrated in Europe. He wrote an opera seria, Latona in Delo (n.d.), a divertissement, Les Quatre Saisons (Dresden, Sept. 23, 1719), 4 overture-suites, 4 masses, 7 cantatas, and 4 motets. – Died at Dresden, April 13, 1728.

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in 1665 - Jean-Baptiste Lully fils, a French musician and the second son of the composer Jean-Baptiste Lully, is born. He was also known as Baptiste Lully, Lully fils, and Monsieur Baptiste. He was born and died in Paris.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]In 1678 at the age of 12, he was given a post by the king, Louis XIV, at the abbey of Saint-Hilaire. Six years later, he exchanged it for a post at Saint-Georges-sur-Loire.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]In 1696 he became surintendant de la musique du roi (Superintendent of the Music of the King), a position he shared with Michel-Richard de Lalande until 1719.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]With his brother Louis he composed Orphée (a lyric tragedy, 1690) that was badly received when it was performed, although historians of music today find it important for the prominence given in it to the accompanied recitative (La Gorce 2001). On his own, he also composed Le Triomphe des brunes (a divertissement, 1695).[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]in 1686 - Paul Hainlein, German composer and trumpet maker of the Baroque era, dies at 60.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Paul Hainlein came from a well-respected Nuremberg instrument maker family. Already at the age of twelve, he was known as Studiosus musicus and composed a mourning music. In 1646, at the instigation of his father, Sebastian Hainlein II, he undertook a study trip to Linz and Munich. A year later, in the years 1647 and 1648, he traveled to Upper Italy, from there he wrote several travel reports, in which he described the music life there. He especially mentioned the composer Giovanni Rovetta . After his return, he was employed as a trumpet maker. He received the master title at the latest in 1651. Instruments from his workshop can now be found in instrument collections in Bad Säckingen, Nuremberg, Berlin, Copenhagen and Brussels.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]His main profession must have been that of a musician, for in the book of marriage of 1651 he is only a musician and organist. From 1655 he was organist at St. Egidien , in 1658 he received the important office of the organist at St. Sebald.

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in 1700 - Johann Beer, Austrian-born German music theorist and polemicist, died (accidentally shot while watching a shooting contest) at Weissenfels, Aug. 6, 1700. He studied music at the Benedictine monastery in Lambach, then attended classes at Reichersberg, Passau, and the Gymnasium Poeticum in Regensburg. In 1676 he became a student in theology at the University of Leipzig. In 1685 he was appointed Konzertmeister of the court orchestra in Weissenfels. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]His writings are of interest as a curiosity reflecting the musical mores of his time; he published polemical pamphlets directed against contemporary writers who deprecated music as dangerous for morals. In such pamphlets he used the pseudonym Ursus, Latin for the German Bar (which is a homonym of his real name, Beer), i.e., Bear, the ursine animal. One such publication opens with the words "Ursus murmurat" ("The Bear growls"), and another, "Ursus vulpinatur," i.e.,"Bear leads a fox hunt." Both assail a certain Gottfried Vockerodt, who claimed that the depravity of Nero and Caligula was the result of their immoderate love of music. Beer also published Bellum musicum (Nuremberg, 1719). - Born at St. Georg, Upper Austria, Feb. 28, 1655.

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in 1748 - Bernhard Haltenberger, composer is born.[/FONT]
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in 1775 - Heinrich Nikolaus Gerber, German composer and organist, dies at 72.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Gerber was born in Wenigenehrich , Germany and was was temporarily taught by Johann Sebastian Bach.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Heinrich Nikolaus Gerber received his first music lessons from the organist's errand in Bellstedt. In 1717 he came to the school in Mühlhausen, where the play of the organist Johann Friedrich Bach (* c. 1682, † 1730) greatly impressed him. He completed his school education in 1721 in special houses. There, the organist Johann Valentin Eckelt (1673-1732) taught him, under whose guidance first compositions developed. In 1724 Gerber went to Leipzig to study law. In the same year, he became a pupil of Johann Sebastian Bach , who taught him the piano playing and the general bass. During this time he produced copies of numerous works by Bach.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]In 1726 or 1727, Gerber returned to his hometown in order to establish a position as an organist in herring in 1728. After a devastating fire, he gave up his position there and from 1731 onwards worked as a court organist in special houses and harpsichordist of the Hofkapelle. He also worked there as a piano and composition instructor, and also met with Johann Adolf Scheibe and Johann Philipp Kirnberger . Up to the age of 35, Gerber had to repeatedly fight for recruiters, who wanted to force him to serve in the Prussian army . In 1749 he became court secretary in special houses. His son, Ernst Ludwig Gerber , who became known as a music lexicographer, followed him shortly before his death in the office of the court organist.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Work[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Gerber composed numerous works for keyboard instruments (piano and organ concertos, preludes and fugues, sonatas, suites, etc.), as well as spiritual music (motets and cantatas). He also constructed a straw-fiddle with keyboard and worked on technical improvements to the clavichord and the organ.[/FONT]

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in 1784 - Karl Kohaut, composer, dies at 57.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Karl Ignaz Augustin Kohaut (Carolus Ignatius Augustinus) (baptised August 26, 1726) was an Austrian lutenist and composer of Czech descent. He is considered (along with Bernhard Joachim Hagen) to be one of the last important composers of music for Baroque Lute.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Born in Vienna, Karl Kohaut pursued a dual career as a diplomat and musician. He entered the Austrian civil service in 1756 or 1757 as a minor official in the state chancellery, but by 1778 he had reached the position of court secretary.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]He was active as a violinist in performances organized by Gottfried van Swieten (in quartets by Haydn and Mozart), but he was most widely admired as a lutenist. He is recorded to have appeared as the soloist in a performance of one of his own lute concertos at the Tonkünstler-Societät on 17 March 1777, during which one of his symphonies was also performed.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Kohaut wrote seven lute concertos, which are fine examples of this rare genre. The concerto in F major is probably most well known, having been recorded at least four times: by Julian Bream, Alirio Díaz, John Schneiderman and Hopkinson Smith. Kohaut's eight masses were frequently performed at the monasteries of Melk and Göttweig, especially the Missa Sancti Willibaldi, which was performed at Göttweig on 24 occasions, the last time as late as 1798. Kohaut's Symphony in F minor was his best known work during the 20th century, recorded on LP on the Supraphon label.[/FONT]

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in 1799 - Joseph Friebert, Austrian opera singer and composer, dies at 74.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Amongst his compositions were four singspiels, six operas, and several pieces of church music. As a singer, he was known for his lyrical tenor voice and sensitive interpretations. He created the roles of Silango in Gluck's Le cinesi and Tirso in Gluck's La danza.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Friebert was born in Gnadendorf in Lower Austria. He received his initial musical training from his father who was an organist in the local church and then at Melk Abbey where he was a chorister. From 1748 he studied in Vienna with Giuseppe Bonno and was subsequently engaged as a singer at the Hoftheater in Vienna. On his retirement from the stage, he served as the Kapellmeister at St. Stephen's Cathedral, Passau. Friebert died in Passau. His younger brother Karl (with whom he is often confused) was also a tenor singer, composer, and librettist.[/FONT]

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in 1816 - Karl Frieberth, composer, dies at 80.[/FONT]
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in 1820 - Antonin Vranicky, composer, dies at 59.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Antonín Vranický, Germanized as Anton Wranitzky, and also seen as Wranizky, was a famous Czech violinist and composer of the 18th century. He was the half brother of Pavel Vranický.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]He was a pupil of Mozart, Haydn and Albrechtsberger, as mentioned in a letter from Pavel Vranický to the music publisher André.[/FONT]

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in 1821 - Antonio Bartolomeo Bruni, Italian violinist, composer and conductor, dies at 64.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Bruni was born and died in Cuneo, Italy. During most of his life he resided, played and composed in Paris. c.1791 (at the height of the French 'terror'). [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]He is the author of 'Un Inventaire sous la terreur' which lists musical instruments recovered from noble households. This inventory was published: J. Gallay, ed. (Paris: Georges Chamerot, 1890). According to the scholarly work 'The Hurdy-Gurdy in Eighteenth-Century France' by Robert E. Green ( Indiana University Press, 1995) where the Bruni text is footnoted, the author says of Bruni inventory " from 111 noble households ( it ) lists six which possessed vielles (hurdy-gurdies)." p. 17. More light is (perhaps) shed in the fictional novel The Piano Tuner by Daniel Mason where this affair is again referred to thus: "A Temporary Commission of Arts was set up and ... Bruni ... was named Director of the Inventory. For fourteen months he collected the instruments of the condemmed [sic?]. In all, over three hundred were gathered, and each carries its own tragic tale." He goes on to say that 64 were pianofortes.

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in 1834 - Hermann Mendel, German music lexicographer, is born at Halle. He was a pupil of Mendelssohn and Moscheles in Leipzig, and of Wieprecht in Berlin. In 1870 he founded and edited the Deutsche Musiker-Zeitung. He also edited Mode's Opernbiliothek (about 90 librettos, with commentaries and biographies of composers) and a Volksliederbuch. He published small books on Meyerbeer (1868, 1869). His great work was the Musikalisches Conversations-Lexikon, which he began to publishe in 1870, but was able to continue only to the letter M. The rest was completed by August Reissmann, with the entire edition running 11 vols. A supplementary vol. was publ. in 1883. – Died at Berlin, Oct. 26,1876.

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in 1834 - (Francois-Auguste-) Arthur Pougin (Paroisse-Pougin), French writer on music, is born at Chateauroux, Indre. He studied with Alard (violin) and Reber (harmony) at the Paris Conservatory and began playing violin in theater orchestras when he was 13. He became conductor of the Theatre Beaumarchais (1855), then was asst. conductor and repetiteur of the Folies-Nouvelles (1856-59) and a member of the Opera-Comique orchestra (1860-63). He then devoted himself to writing on music, contributing articles and reviews to leading music periodicals. He was musical feuilletonist for the Journal Offidel (from 1878) and chief editor of Le Menestrel (from 1885), and also wrote the articles on music for Larousse's Grand dictionnaire universel du XIXe siecle (1866-76). He edited the supplement to Fetis's Biographic universelle (1878-80) and revised Clement and Larousse's Dictionnaire lyrique, ou Histoire des operas (1898; suppl. to 1904). - Died at Paris, Aug. 8,1921.

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in 1848 - Nicola Vaccai, Italian composer, particularly of operas, and a singing teacher, dies at 58.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Born at Tolentino, he grew up in Pesaro, and studied music there until his parents sent him to Rome to study law. Having no intention of becoming a lawyer, he took voice lessons and eventually studied counterpoint with Giuseppe Jannaconi, an important Roman composer. When Vaccai turned twenty one, he went to Naples and became a disciple of Paisiello, whose Barber of Seville was considered a comic masterpiece until Rossini's Barber swept it from the stage 35 years later.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Vaccai launched his career in Venice, initially earning his living by writing ballets and teaching voice. He had his first operatic success with I solitari di Scozia in Naples in 1815. In Parma he was commissioned to write Pietro il grande, where he was also one of the soloists in the first performance. This was followed by Zadig e Astartea (Naples, 1825) and then his best known opera Giulietta e Romeo (Milan, 1825).[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Vaccai's sojourn in London began with a production of his most successful opera, Romeo and Juliet, at Kings Theatre in April, 1832. His charm and continental reputation ingratiated him to society and soon he was much sought after as a teacher.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Ending his wanderings with a return to Italy, Vaccai became a director and professor of composition at the Milan Conservatory in 1838. After six years he retired on account of poor health to his boyhood home, Pesaro, where he wrote his sixteenth opera. He died there in 1848.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Work as a teacher of singing: his Metodo pratico de canto[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Later eclipsed by his rival Bellini, Vaccai is now chiefly remembered as a voice teacher. One of his notable students was soprano Marianna Barbieri-Nini. Vaccai wrote many books, one of which is his 1832 Metodo pratico de canto (Practical Vocal Method), which has been transposed to accommodate different voice types such as alto or low ranges such as bass in order to instruct students in the method of singing in the Italian legato style. It is still in print and may be used as a teaching tool.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]In his introduction, Vaccai notes that only the voice of a master demonstrating his exercises accurately can instruct a student in the correct techniques of true legato singing. The book is also an important source of information about the performance of early 19th-century opera.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Voice teacher Elio Battaglia edited a new teacher’s edition of the "Metodo practico" or “Practical Method of Italian Singing” which was published by Ricordi in 1990 and which was accompanied by a CD of examples.[/FONT]
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in 1853 - Josif Josifovich Genishta, composer, dies at 57.
Genishta, who wrote music for orchestra, chamber and vocal music, was born in Mosca on the 24th November 1795, the same year of the composers Albeniz (Albéniz) y Basanta, Gordigiani, Marschner, Marx, Mercadante. He died in Mosca on the 6th August 1853.[/FONT]
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in 1858 - Albert Fuchs, (Leonard Johann Heinrich), German composer and pedagogue, is born at Basel. He studied with Selmar Bagge in Basel, and later at the Leipzig Conservatory with Reinecke and Jadassohn (1876-79). He conducted in Trier (1880-83), then was director of the Wiesbaden Conservatory (1889-98). In 1898 he joined the staff of the Dresden Conservatory; was also conductor at the Schumann Singakademie (from 1901). He was a prolific composer, and published. a number of choral works and songs. His works include 2 oratorios, Selig sind, die in dem Herrn sterben (1906) and Das tausendjiihriges Reich (1908), and several instrumental concertos. He published Taxe der Sireichinstrumente (1907;many reprints). - Died at Dresden, Feb. 15, 1910.

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in 1860 - Francesco Paolo Frontini, Italian composer, is born at Catania. He was a pupil of his father, Martino Frontini, who was also an opera composer, and of Lauro Rossi at Naples. He was director of the Catania Conservatory until 1923. Ricordi published his collection of Sicilian songs, Eco di Sicilia (1883), and of Sicilian dances, Antiche danzedi Sicilia (3 vols., 1936). - Died at Catania, July 26, 1939.
. [/FONT]
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in 1862 - Francisco Acuña de Figueroa, Uruguay national anthem, dies at 71.
Francisco Esteban Acuña de Figueroa was an Uruguayan poet and writer. He was born in Montevideo, on 3 September 1791 and died on 6 October 1862. He was the son of the Treasurer of the Royal Treasury, Jacinto Acuña de Figueroa.

Acuña's father sent him to study in Buenos Aires, Argentina. His early education was at the Convent of San Bernardino, and he completed his studies in Buenos Aires at the Royal College of San Carlos, from which returned in 1810, prompted by the invasion of the city, having pursued studies in Arts. He returned to Montevideo, where he wrote poems while working for his father. There was no printing press in Montevideo, so none of his works were published at that time.

He went on to become the author of the words of the national anthems of Uruguay and Paraguay. He did not not subscribe to the independence cause, but remained loyal to the colonial governments of Francisco Javier Elío and Gaspar de Vigodet, and after Montevideo fell in 1814, at 25 years old, he was exiled to the Portuguese Court in Rio de Janeiro, where he performed diplomatic functions for Spain. His father, on the other hand, remained in Montevideo, where he was confirmed in office by the new government because of his capacity for the job.

He returned to Montevideo in 1818, after the fall of José Artigas, the city falling under Portuguese rule, under which it would remain. Besides his literary work, he occupied posts such as State Treasurer (succeeding his father), a member of the Committee on the censorship of theatrical works (in 1846), and Director of the Public Library and Museum (1840 - 1847).

In 1857, Acuña's poems were published in a book, and the national anthem of Uruguay, which dates from 1833, appeared. Acuña also had an extensive literary work, compiled by himself in 1848 and published posthumously in 1890 in 12 volumes under the general title of "Complete Works". It consists of numerous poems, stories, etc.. Many of his works have a strong satirical tone.

An anthology of his poems was published in 1965 in the collection of Uruguayan classics by the Artigas Library. One of his most curious poems is the Salve Multiforme (Multiform Salve), about which the author says: Salve Multiforme has two applications, two different objectives. The first, most essential and specific objective is purely religious, the second has a secular or political application. Under that first aspect it is a tribute of veneration and applause inexhaustible to the divine queen of heaven, it is the prayer of the Salve presented and reproducible in almost infinite ways: so many that many millions of years of continuous and incessant reading would not be enough to complete all possible paraphrases of this more or less diverse prayer,which, according to this method, can be formed. The author has divided the salve into 44 fragments, placed successively in as many columns, numbered from 1 to 44.

Each fragment has, in its own column, 26 paraphrases of itself, or at least similar related words, and combined with any of the 27 fragments of the preceeding and subsequent columns, without breaking the sense of the Salve, which always maintains its grammatical syntax, without repeating, in an entire Salve, a fragment already used in it. A result, therefore, taking at random any fragment from the 1st column, another one from the 2nd, another from the 3rd., etc.., continuing that way up to column 44, a complete paraphrase of the salve will always be formed, perhaps elegant, perhaps weak, but never inappropriate or incoherent in its meaning.

Having, therefore, 27 fragments in the 1st column, freely combined with any of the following 27 and these with the successive column, and so progressively and mutually with the other columns, it is evident that millions upon millions of Salves can be combined and merged, more or less differently, ie, with more or fewer differences among fragments. On reaching column 44 the word amen is added, which is in the last or supplementary column, to properly end each of the prayers.

Acuña also wrote the lyrics for the national anthem of Paraguay (or not?). He died in Montevideo on 6 October 1862.

Paraguayos, República o Muerte is the national anthem of Paraguay. The lyrics were written by Francisco Acuña de Figueroa (who also wrote Orientales, la Patria o la tumba, the national anthem of Uruguay) under the presidency of Carlos Antonio López, who at the time delegated Bernardo Jovellanos and Anastasio González to ask Figueroa to write the anthem (Jovellanos and González were commissioners of the Paraguayan government in Uruguay). The anthem was officially finished by Figueroa on May 20, 1846.
It still remains unclear who was responsible for the music. Some sources claim that Frenchman Francisco de Dupuis was the composer, while others cite Francisco Acuña de Figueroa as the composer. Other sources claim that the music was composed by Francisco José Debali, repeating the theme of the Uruguayan national anthem. What it is known for sure is that in 1933, the Paraguayan composer Remberto Giménez re-arranged and developed the final version of the anthem.[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]in 1873 - Mary (Louise) Carr Moore, American composer and teacher, is born at Memphis, Tenn. Her father was a cavalry officer in the U.S. Army who sang; her mother authored several theater dramas; her uncle, John Harraden Pratt, was an organist. After the family went to Calif. (1885), she studied composition with her uncle and singing with H.B. Pasmore in San Francisco. She began her career as a teacher, composer, and singer; sang the lead role in her first operetta, The Oracle (San Francisco, March 19, 1894), but soon devoted herself fully to teaching and composition. She taught in Lemoore, Calif. (1895-1901), and in Seattle (1901-15), where she founded the American Music Center (1909); after teaching in San Francisco (1915-26), she went to Los Angeles as an instructor at the Olga Steeb Piano School (1926-43) and was professor of theory and composition at Chapman College (1928-47); was a founder of the Calif. Society of Composers (1936-38) and the Society of Native Composers (1938-44). As a composer, she devoted herself mainly to writing vocal works, particularly operas on American themes. Her most important score was Narcissa, or The Cost of Empire (Seattle, April 22, 1912), which was awarded the David Bispham Memorial Medal. - Died at Inglewood, Calif., Jan. 9,1957.

in 1873 - John Wesley Work, composer is born.

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in 1875 - Marcel Labey, French conductor and composer is born at Le Vesinet, Seine-et-Oise. He studied law in Paris, receiving his degree in 1898, then turned his attention to music, studying piano with Delaborde, harmony with Lenormand, and composition with d'Indy at the Paris Schola Cantorum. He taught piano there, and at d'Indy's death (1931), became director; was also director of the Cesar Franck School (from 1935). He wrote music in a late Romantic style. - Died at Nancy, Nov. 25,1968.

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in 1875 - Mary Louise Curtis Bok, munificent American music patroness, is born at Boston. She inherited her fortune from Cyrus H.K. Curtis, founder of the Curtis Publishing Co. In 1917 she founded the Settlement School of Music in Philadelphia. In 1924 she established in Philadelphia the Curtis Institute of Music and endowed it initially with a gift of $12.5 million in memory of her mother. The school had a faculty of the most distinguished American and European musicians, and it provided tuition exclusively on a scholarship basis; many talented composers and performers were among its students, including Bernstein, Barber, and Foss. She was first married to Edward W. Bok, in 1896, who died in 1930; in 1943 she married the eminent Russian-born American violinist and pedagogue Efrem Zimbalist (b. Rostov-na-Donu, April 21, 1889; d. Reno, Nev., Feb. 22,1985), who was director of the Curtis Institute from 1941 until 1968. In 1932 she received an honorary doctorate from the University of Pa., and, in 1934, an honorary doctorate from Williams College. - Died at Philadelphia, Jan. 4,1970.

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in 1883 - Francesco Santoliquido, Italian composer, is born at San Giorgio a Cremano, Naples. He studied at the Liceo di Santa Cecilia in Rome, graduating in 1908. In 1912 he went to live in Hammamet, a village in Tunisia, spending part of each year in Rome; in 1933 he made his home in Anacapri. Many of his compositions contain melodic inflections of Arabian popular music. He published 17 Dopo- Wagner, Claudio Debussy e Richard Strauss (Rome, 1909; second ed., 1922); also books of verse; wrote short stories in English. His third wife was the pianist and teacher Ornella (nee Puliti) Santoliquido (b. Florence, Sept. 4, 1906; d. there, Nov. 11,1977). She studied with Brugnoli, and, after receiving her diploma at the Florence Cons., she continued her training with Casella in Rome and Cortot in Paris. She was a teacher at the Rome Cons. (1939-71); played in chamber-music concerts; became an advocate of contemporary music. - Died at Anacapri, Aug. 26, 1971.

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in 1886 - Edward Ballantine, composer and teacher is born at Oberlin, Ohio. He studied with Walter Spalding at Harvard University, graduating with highest honors in 1907; took piano courses with Schnabel and Ganz in Berlin (1907-09). In 1912 he was appointed instructor at Harvard, becoming asst. professor in 1926, and assoc. professor in 1932; he retired in 1947. His first published work was a musical play, The Lotos Eaters (1907); three of his orchestra pieces were performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra: Prelude to The Delectable Forest (Dec. 10,1914), The Eve of St. Agnes Jan. 19,1917), and From the Garden of Hellas (Feb. 9,1923); and one, By a Lake in Russia, by the Boston Pops (June 27,1922). He also wrote a Violin Sonata and songs. His most striking work is a set of piano variations on Mary Had a Little Lamb (1924) in the styles of 10 composers; a second series of variations on the same tune (1943) includes stylizations of Stravinsky, Gershwin, and others. - Died at Oak Bluffs, Mass., July 2, 1971.

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in 1888 - Heinrich Schlusnus (German baritone) is born at Braubach am Rhein. He studied voice in Frankfurt am Main and Berlin. He made his operatic debut as the Herald in Lohengrin at the Hamburg Opera on Jan. 1, 1914, and then was on its roster for the 1914-15 season. After singing in Nuremberg (1915-17), he was a leading member of the Berlin Royal (later State) Opera, remaining there until 1945; also appeared in Chicago (1927-28), Bayreuth (1933), and Paris (1937). He was renowned as a lieder artist. - Died at Frankfurt am Main, June 18, 1952.

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in 1895 - George Frederick Root, American songwriter / composer, dies at 74.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Root found particular fame during the American Civil War, with songs such as Tramp! Tramp! Tramp! and The Battle Cry of Freedom.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Root was born at Sheffield, Massachusetts, and was named after the German-born British composer George Frideric Handel. Root left his farming community for Boston at 18, flute in hand, intending to join an orchestra. He worked for a while as a church organist in Boston, and from 1845 taught music at the New York Institute for the Blind, where he met Fanny Crosby, with whom he would compose fifty to sixty popular secular songs.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]In 1850 he made a study tour of Europe, staying in Vienna, Paris, and London. He returned to teach music in Boston, Massachusetts as an associate of Lowell Mason, and later Bangor, Maine, where he was director of the Penobscot Musical Association and presided over their convention at Norumbega Hall in 1856.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Root would spend most of his career (when not writing, or helping to manage his publishing company) traveling and teaching at Musical Institutes that move from town to town.[citation needed] He applied a version of Pestalozzi's teaching (although misunderstood by both Root and Mason) and was instrumental in developing mid- and late-19th century American musical education. He was a follower of the teachings of Emanuel Swedenborg. [/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]On his return from Europe, Root began composing and publishing sentimental popular songs, a number of which achieved fame as sheet-music, including those with Fanny Crosby: Hazel Dell, Rosalie the Prairie Flower, There's Music in the Air and others, which were, according to Root's New York Times obituary, known throughout the country in the antebellum period.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Root chose to employ a pseudonym George Wurzel (German for Root) to capitalize on the popularity of German composers during the 1850s. Besides his popular songs, he also composed gospel songs in the Ira Sankey vein, and collected and edited volumes of choral music for singing schools, Sunday schools, church choirs and musical institutes. He also composed various sacred and secular cantatas including the popular The Haymakers in 1854. Root's cantatas were popular on both sides of the Atlantic throughout the 19th century.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Building on his talent for song-writing, Root moved to Chicago, Illinois in 1859 to work for his brother's music publishing house of Root & Cady. He became particularly successful during the American Civil War, as the composer of martial songs such as Tramp! Tramp! Tramp! (The Prisoner's Hope), The Vacant Chair (with lyrics by Henry S. Washburn, about the death of John William Grout), Just before the Battle, Mother, and "The Battle Cry of Freedom". He wrote the first song concerning the war, The First Gun is Fired, only two days after the conflict began with the bombardment of Fort Sumter. He ultimately had at least 35 war-time "hits", in tone from the bellicose to the ethereal. His songs were played and sung at both the home front and the real front. Tramp, Tramp, Tramp became popular on troop marches, and "Battle Cry of Freedom" became well-known even in England.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]After the war, he was elected as a 3rd Class (honorary) Companion of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Root's songs, particularly "The Battle Cry of Freedom", were popular among Union soldiers during the war. According to Henry Stone, a Union war veteran recalling in the late 1880s:[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot] A glee club came down from Chicago, bringing with them the new song, 'We'll rally 'round the flag, boys', and it ran through the camp like wildfire. The effect was little short of miraculous. It put as much spirit and cheer into the army as a victory. Day and night one could hear it by every camp fire and in every tent. I never shall forget how the men rolled out the line, 'And although he may be poor, he shall never be a slave.' I do not know whether Mr. Root knows what good work his song did for us there, but I hope so.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] —[/FONT][FONT=&quot] [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Henry Stone, 1887[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Root was awarded the degree of Musical Doctor by the first University of Chicago in 1872. He died at his summer home in Bailey Island, Maine, at the age of 74.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Root was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the Boys are Marching provided the tune for the later Jesus Loves the Little Children, with lyrics by C. Herbert Woolston, and also for the later God Save Ireland. The Vacant Chair provided a tune reused in Life's Railway to Heaven, and sometimes reused in To Jesus' Heart All Burning.[/FONT]

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in 1895 - Ernesto Lecuona (Cuban pianist, composer) is born.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He composed over six hundred pieces, mostly in the Cuban vein, and was a pianist of exceptional skill. His father was Canarian and his mother was Cuban.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Lecuona was born in Guanabacoa, Havana, Cuba. He started studying piano at an early age, under his sister Ernestina Lecuona, a famed composer in her own right. As a child prodigy, he composed his first song at the age of 11. He later studied at the Peyrellade Conservatoire under Antonio Saavedra and the famous Joaquín Nin. Lecuona graduated from the National Conservatory of Havana with a Gold Medal for interpretation when he was sixteen. He performed outside of Cuba at the Aeolian Hall (New York) in 1916.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]In 1918 he collaborated with Luis Casas Romero, Moisés Simons, Jaime Prats, Nilo Menéndez and Vicente Lanz in setting up a successful player piano music roll factory in Cuba producing Cuban music and also copies from masters made by QRS in the USA. The brand label was "Rollo Autógrafo"[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]He first travelled to Spain in 1924 on a concert tour with violinist Marta de la Torre; his successful piano recitals in 1928 at Paris coincided with a rise in interest in Cuban music.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]María la O, Lecuona's zarzuela, premiered in Havana on March 1, 1930. He was a prolific composer of songs and music for stage and film. His works consisted of zarzuela, Afro-Cuban and Cuban rhythms, suites and many songs which are still very famous. They include Siboney (Canto Siboney), Malagueña and The Breeze And I (Andalucía). In 1942, his great hit, Always in my heart (Siempre en mi Corazón) was nominated for an Oscar for Best Song; however, it lost to White Christmas. Lecuona was a master of the symphonic form and conducted the Ernesto Lecuona Symphonic Orchestra, employing soloists including Cuban pianist and composer Carmelina Delfín. The Orchestra performed in the Cuban Liberation Day Concert at Carnegie Hall on October 10, 1943. The concert included the world premiere of Lecuona's Black Rhapsody. Lecuona gave help and the use of his name to the popular touring group, the Lecuona Cuban Boys, though he did not play as a member of the band. He did sometimes play piano solos as the first item on the bill.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]In 1960, thoroughly unhappy with Castro's new régime, Lecuona moved to Tampa and lived on West Orient Street with his relative, singer Esperanza Chediak. Lecuona lived his final years in the US. Three years later, on November 29, 1963 he died at the age of 68 in Santa Cruz de Tenerife, in the Canary Islands, as a result of an attack of asthma, a disorder which had persecuted him his entire life. He was interred at Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Hawthorne, New York, but his will instructs that his remains be repatriated once the current régime runs its course. A great deal of Lecuona's music was first introduced to mass American audiences by Desi Arnaz, a fellow Cuban and Lucille Ball's spouse.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Lecuona's talent for composition has influenced the Latin American world in a way quite similar to George Gershwin in the United States, in his case raising Cuban music to classical status.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Ernesto and Ernestina's cousin Margarita Lecuona was another accomplished musician and composer. She was the author of the song "Babalú", made popular in the Latin American world by Miguelito Valdés, and in the United States by Desi Arnaz (who, contrary to popular folklore, did not write the song).[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Lecuona was included as a character in the novel The Island of Eternal Love, by Miami-based Cuban writer Daína Chaviano, together with other important names in Cuban music.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]6 August[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]page 1 of 4[/FONT]
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]6 August[/FONT][FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]page 2 of 4[/FONT]
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in 1896 - Cyril Mockridge, composer is born.
in 1900 - Willie Brown (US delta blues guitarist, singer) is born.

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in 1900 - Tony (actually, Anthony) Parenti, jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, uncle of August Schellang, is born at New Orleans, La. Both parents were from Sicily. He played in an Italian band in New Orleans, then gigged in theater orchestras, and with Papa Laine, Nick LaRocca, and drummer Johnny Stein, Johnny De Droit (c. 1916), and led his own successful band (record debut: January 1925). He moved to N.Y. in the late 1920s, and worked through the mid-1930s as a CBS staff musician; during this period, he led his own saxophone quartet on radio and in short Warner Bros, film. He spent four years with Radio City Symphony Orchestra (1935-39), and then left to join Ted Lewis until the summer of 1945. In the late 1940s, he worked with several Dixieland-style revivalists, including Eddie Condon (January-June 1946) and Georg Brunis (June 1946), and, in Chicago, with Muggsy Spanier (late 1947) and Miff Mole (January 1948-June 1949). During the early 1950s, he worked for four years in Fla., mainly with Preacher Rollo Laylan's Five Saints, briefly with the Dukes of Dixieland in 1952. He moved back to N.Y in 1954, toured with his own band in N.Y State, Boston, and Canada. He led his own group at Jimmy Ryan's from late 1963 until 1969, and appeared at the first New Orleans Jazz Fest in June 1969. Parenti remained active in N.Y. area until his death. - Died at N.Y, April 17, 1972.

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in 1902 - Michal Vilec, composer is born.

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in 1902 - Luis (Carl) Russell, Panamanian-born jazz band leader, arranger, pianist, is born at Careening Clay. His father, Felix Alexander Russell, was a pianist, organist, and music teacher. Luis studied guitar, violin, organ, and piano. He first worked accompanying silent films in a Panama cinema (1917), then played in the Casino Club, Colon, Panama. In 1919 he won $3,000 in a lottery and moved with his mother and sister to New Orleans. He gigged in various clubs and took lessons from Steve Lewis, and then joined Arnold Du Pas Orchestra (late 1921-22). Beginning in 1923, he worked at Tom Anderson's Cabaret in Albert Nicholas's Band (1923); when Nicholas left, Luis Russell became the band's leader until late 1924 when he accepted an offer to join Doc Cooke in Chicago; while waiting for union clearance he gigged with King Oliver.

Russell worked with Doc Cooke for several months (on piano and organ), then joined King Oliver (1925) with whom he remained until summer 1927 when the band was resident in N.Y. Russell joined drummer George Howe's Band at the Nest Club, N.Y; in October 1927: he was appointed leader of the band and they remained resident there for a year. In 1929 the band also accompanied Louais Armstrong for several months. By this time his ten-piece band (which included several former Oliver sidemen) boasted major soloists in Red Allen, J. C. Higginbotham, Charlie Holmes, and Albert Nicholas; the rhythm section included New Orleanians Pops Foster and Paul Barbarin. During the early 1930s the band continued to play long residencies in N.Y, and also did extensive touring.

They backed Louis Armstrong for two days at the Savoy in September 1935 after which Armstrong's manager, Joe Glaser, hired them as the regular accompanying unit for Louis Armstrong; from then on, it was billed as Louis Armstrong's Orchestra. During the late 1930s, Luis Russell occasionally doubled on trombone. Though most of the original Russell Band had left by 1940, Luis continued working for Louis Armstrong until 1943. He then formed his own big band which did widespread touring as well as residencies in N.Y. He left full-time music in 1948 and opened a small stationery store. He occasionally gigged with his own small bands and continued to teach piano and organ. In 1959 he made his first return visit to Panama (after an absence of almost 40 years); while in Bocas del Toro he gave a classical piano recital. During the early 1960s he worked as a chauffeur, but continued teaching until shortly before his death. He died of cancer. – Died at N.Y., Dec. 11, 1963.

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in 1902 – Margarete Klose, esteemed German contralto, is born at Berlin. She studied at the Klindworth-Scharwenka Conservatory in Berlin and received vocal training from Biiltemann and Marschalk. She made her operatic debut in Ulm in 1927, then sang in Kassel (1928-29) and Mannheim (1929-31). She was a leading member of the Berlin State Opera (1931-49; 1955-61); also sang at the Bayreuth Festivals (1936-42) and London's Covent Garden (1935, 1937), and was a member of the Berlin Stadtische Opera (1949-58). She was particularly praised for her Wagner and Verdi portrayals. – Died at Berin, Dec. 14, 1968.

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in 1906 - Franz Allers, Czech-born American conductor, is born at Karlsbad. He studied violin at the Prague Conservatory, violin, piano, conducting, and composition at the Berlin Hochschule fur Musik (diploma, 1926), and musicology at the University of Berlin (1926). After playing in the Berlin Philharmonic (1924-26), he conducted at the Wuppertal Theater (1926-33), in Usti nad Labem (1933-38), and with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. He then settled in the U.S. and became a naturalized American citizen. He was active as a guest conductor with various orchestras and on Broadway. On Oct. 13,1957, he made his N.Y.C. Opera debut conducting Die Fledermaus, which score he also chose for his Metropolitan Opera debut in N.Y. on Nov. 30,1963. He conducted at the Metropolitan until 1969; returned for the 1970-72 seasons and again in 1975-76. He was chief conductor of the Gartnerplatz State Theater in Munich (1973-76). - Died at Las Vegas, Jan. 26, 1995.

in 1906 - Vic Dickenson (African-American jazz trombonist) is born.


in 1908 - George Singer, Czech-born Israeli conductor and composer, is born at Prague. He studied piano at the Prague Academy of Music with Schulhoff and composition with Zemlinsky. He made his first appearance as an opera conductor in Prague in 1926. In 1930 he received an engagement at the Hamburg Opera, returning to Prague in 1934. When the Nazis invaded Czechoslovakia in 1939, he, being Jewish, was compelled to take refuge in Tel Aviv, where he established himself favorably as a conductor. He also accepted engagements as a conductor in Russia and in the U.S., where he led the N.Y.C. Opera in 1968. Back in Israel, he gave performances of several works of local composers. He was known for his phenomenal facility in sight- reading, performing works perfectly at first reading on the piano and conducting every nuance of an orchestra score. He composed some orchestra pieces. - Died at Tel Aviv, Sept. 30, 1980.


in 1908 - Svend Erik Tarp, composer is born. Tarp was among those Danish composers who were closer to French musical culture than to the dominant influence from Germany. In a string of sparkling, diverting works, not least the popular Piano Concerto in C major, he spoke up in the 1930s for a different modernist direction than the German-inspired one that dominated the new Danish music of the period. Tarp composed a total of ten symphonies. While maintaining a certain connection with Carl Nielsen, Tarp's music exhibits striking rhythms and linearity, but usually with a determination to appeal to the wider audience. In the late orchestral works the lines are longer and the seriousness greater than in the early, more chamber-music-like works. Tarp also wrote operas, piano music, didactic pieces and in particular much chamber music and film music. Svend Erik Tarp held a number of administrative posts in the musical world, and for many years this stole time from his creative activities. On the other hand he continued to compose at an advanced age, although because of his weakened sight he had to have practical assistance with his last symphony. – Died 1994.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1908 - Lem(uel Charles) Johnson, jazz tenor saxophonist, clarinetist, singer, is born at Oklahoma City, Okla. He attended Douglass H.S., started on clarinet, gigged with local bands, and played in Oklahoma City in The Jolly Harmony Boys led by Charlie Christian's brother, Edward. He switched to sax in 1928, and received instruction from Walter Page while working a summer season (1928) with The Blue Devils in Shawnee, Okla. In 1929, he did regular radio work in Okla. and then played with various bands in Milwaukee. During the mid-1930s, he spent three years with Eli Rice (mainly in Minneapolis). In April 1937, he moved to N.Y., working with various leaders until he formed his own trio in late 1939. He led his own sextet during the early 1940s, but also worked brief spells with others. After the war, he reformed his sextet and played local gigs. For many years, he worked during the day for the N.Y. post office, but through the 1950s and 1960s continued to lead own highly successful band, which regularly featured many well-known musicians. He retired in the 1970s. - Died at N.Y., April 1, 1989.

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in 1909 - Karl Ulrich Schnabel, German-American pianist, teacher, and composer, son of Artur Schnabel, is born at Berlin. He was a student of Leonid Kreutzer (piano) and Paul Juon (composition) at the Prussian State Academy of Music in Berlin (1922-26). After making his debut in Berlin in 1926, he toured in Europe. From 1935 to 1940 he made duo appearances with his father. On Feb. 23,1937, he made his U.S. debut in N.Y., where he settled in 1939. With his wife, Helen (nee Fogel) Schnabel, he toured extensively in duo recitals from 1940 until her death in 1974. From 1980 he appeared in duo recitals with Joan Rowland. In addition to his many tours around the globe, he devoted much time to teaching. He was the author of Modern Technique of the Pedal (N.Y., 1950). He also composed pieces for Piano, 4-Hands.

in 1910 - Friedrich Schroder, composer is born.

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in 1911 - Hellmut Federhofer, eminent Austrian musicologist, is born at Graz. He studied piano and theory in Craz, and then continued his studies at the Vienna Academy of Music with Stohr and Kabasta, graduating in 1936 with a diploma in conducting. He also took private lessons in composition with Berg, Sauer, and Jonas. He took courses in musicology with Orel and Lach at the University of Vienna, receiving his Ph.D. in 1936 with the dissertation Akkordik und Harmonik in fruhen Motetten der Trienter Codices. From 1937 to 1944 he was State Librarian. He completed his Habilitation in 1944 at the University of Graz with his Musikalische Form als Ganzheit (published as Beitriige zur musikalischen GestaItanalyse, Graz, 1950). He became Privatdozent at the University of Graz in 1945, and in 1951 professpr of musicology. In 1962he became director of the Musicological Institute at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz. That same year he became editor of Acta Musicologica. In 1986 he became editorial director of the new critical edition of the works of Fux. His books include Musikpflege und Musiker am Grazer Habsburgerhof der Erzherzoge Karl und Ferdinand von lnneriisterreich (1564-1619; Mainz, 1967), Neue Musik: Ein Literaturbericht (Tutzing, 1977), Akkord und Stimmfuhrung in denMusiktheoretischen Systemen von HugoRiemann, Ernst Kurth und Heinrich Schenker (Vienna, 1981), Musikwissen-schaft und Musikpraxis (Vienna, 1985), and Motivtechnik von Johannes Brahms und Arnold Schonbergs Dodekaphonie (Vienna, 1989). He also edited Heinrich Schenker als Essayist und Kritiker: Gesammelte Aujsiitze, Rezensionen und kleine Berichte aus den Jahren 1891-1901 (Hildesheim, 1990). In 2001, he received an honorary doctorate from the Philosophy department of the University of Graz. He turned 100 in August 2011.

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in 1916 - David P(ark) McAllester, American ethnomusicologist, is born at Everett, Mass. He studied anthropology at Harvard University (B.A., 1934) and Columbia University (Ph.D., 1939). He taught anthropology at Wesleyan University from 1947, and from 1972 until his retirement in 1986 he served as professor of anthropology and music there. He devoted much time to the study of American Indian culture.

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in 1918 - Ernest Glenn McClain, American music scholar, is born at Canton, Ohio. He studied at Oberlin (Ohio) College (B.Mus., 1940), Northwestern University (M.Mus., 1946), and Columbia University (Ed.D., 1959). He was band director at Denison University (1946-47) and the University of Hawaii (1947-50), and then taught at Brooklyn College, City Universotu of N.Y., from 1950 until his retirement in 1981. He developed an effective way of teaching tuning systems using the monochord. His articles and books are sophisticated explorations of the interface between acoustics, mathematics, philosophy, and religion in ancient and medieval cultures.

in 1918 - Norman Granz (US record producer) is born.
in 1919 - Hugh Mendl (UK record producer, A&R representative, and manager) is born.

in 1921 - Buddy Collette, American jazz musician, is born at Los Angeles, Calif. A pillar of the Los Angeles jazz scene since the early 1940s, he is a fine improvisor on alto and tenor sax, clarinet and especially flute, an instrument on which he was an early innovator. Though best known for his long-time friendship and musical association with Charles Mingus, he also played an important role breaking down the color barrier in L.A. studios in the early 1950s. He took piano lessons as a youth before moving on to various wind instruments.

He played with a number of bands, including Les Hite, in the early 1940s, and then led a dance band in the Navy. He founded the short-lived Stars of Swing with Lucky Thompson, Britt Woodman, and Mingus in 1946, then became a busy freelancer, working for such leading West Coast bandleaders as Benny Carter, Gerald Wilson, Johnny Otis, Louis Jordan, and Edgar Hayes. He became the first black musician to hold a staff position in a Los Angeles studio band, playing on Groucho Marx's TV and radio shows (1951-55), among others.

He gained widespread exposure with the original edition of drummer Chico Hamilton's popular "cello" quintet (the group was featured in the 1958 film, Jazz on a Summer's Day, about the Newport Jazz Festival) and made a number of strong recordings of his own for Contemporary in the late 1950s. In 1964 he gained attention for organizing the band Mingus triumphed with at Monterey, and two years later he assembled a big band for Dizzy Gillespie's Monterey appearance. He continues to work and teach around L.A., and though he has never achieved national attention commensurate with his talents, a number of his students—including flutist James Newton, who can be heard with Collette on Flute Talk —have gone on to become major figures. In 1994 Issues Records released a two-CD "audio biography," a fascinating, episodic oral history covering his career and his relationships with Mingus, Eric Dolphy, Groucho, and the racial and Cold War politics of the 1950s.

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in 1923 - Jack Parnell/John Russell Parnell (UK bandleader, drummer, pianist, music director) is born.
in 1924 - John Henry Roberts, composer, dies at 76.

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in 1924 - Jimmy Ricks is born. The leader and bass singer for The Ravens, Jimmy “Ricky” Ricks aided in the transition of the pop-vocal sound of The Ink Spots to modern Fifties doo-wop. Born in Florida but raised in New York City, he formed The Ravens in 1946 while employed as a nightclub waiter. Adding tenor singer Maithe Marshall in 1947, the group achieved its classic sound with Ricks’ booming bass lead playing off Marshall’s falsetto vocals. Signing with Herb Abramson’s National Records, The Ravens dominated the R&B chart with hits such as ‘Write Me A Letter’ and ‘Send For Me If You Need Me’. Simultaneously attempting a solo career, Ricks released ‘Oh Babe’ (1950), with musical backing from Benny Goodman’s group. Moving to Mercury, The Ravens continued their hit run with ‘Rock Me All Night Long’; by this time, the group’s sound was dominated by Ricks’ lead vocals. But experiencing frequent personnel changes, The Ravens lost much of their fan base. Leaving the group in 1956 to pursue a solo career, Rick fared poorly with his releases at Josie Records. Landing at Atlantic Records in 1960, Ricks teamed with LaVern Baker for a minor hit with the Leiber & Stoller composition, ‘You’re The Boss’. Ricks remained active in the music industry until shortly before his death. (Heart attack). He died in New York City, July 2, 1974.

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in 1925 - Leland Smith, American bassoonist, clarinetist, teacher, computer music publisher, and composer, is born at Oakland, Calif. He was a student of Milhaud (composition) at Mills College in Oakland, Calif. (1941-43; 1946-47), of Sessions (composition) and Bukofzer (musicology) at the University of Calif, at Berkeley (M.A., 1948), and of Messiaen at the Paris Conservatory (1948-49).

After teaching at the University of Calif, at Berkeley (1950-51), Mills College (1951-52), and the University of Chicago (1952-58), he joined the faculty of Stanford University in 1958 and was a professor there from 1968 until his retirement in 1992. He was one of the founders and director of Stanford's computer music center, and he also served as an advisor to IRC AM in Paris.

He pioneered in the development of a computer music publishing system he named SCORE. In 1971 he published what is believed to have been the first score ever printed entirely by a computer without added hand work. Since that time, he has perfected his system to such a high level of excellence that most of the principal music publishers of the world have chosen his SCORE system for their prestige publications.

He later worked on projects to use his SCORE system and the Internet for complete music distribution systems. In addition to his lectures on the use of computers in both composing and printing, he published the Handbook of Harmonic Analysis (1963). In his compositions, Smith has traversed a modern course in which serial procedures are often utilized with occasional excursions into explorations of computer-generated sounds.

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in 1928 - William Henry Grattan Flood, noted Irish author, composer, musicologist, and historian, dies at 68.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]As a writer and ecclesiastical composer, his personal contributions to Irish music produced enduring works, although he is regarded today as a very controversial figure. As an historian, his output was prolific on topics of local and national historical or biographical interest.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1917, Flood was awarded the papal cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice by Pope Benedict XV and in 1922 was elevated by Pope Leo XIII to the Order of St Gregory with the title Chevalier, thereafter he was often called "Chevalier Flood". He is not to be confused with the unrelated Irish statesmen Henry Flood or Henry Grattan.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Flood was born in Lismore, County Waterford, Ireland. His family had a great influence on his education. He was born to William and Catherine (FitzSimon) Flood, the Master and Matron of the Lismore Union Workhouse. He had one older sister (Maria), and five brothers (Francis (his twin brother), Patrick, Frederick, George and James (who died in infancy). Flood received his elementary education at his grandfather's (Andrew FitzSimon) boys academy in Lismore, and was given music lessons by his aunt, Elizabeth FitzSimon. He quickly became an accomplished pianist and, at the age of nine, was invited to give a recital for the Duke of Devonshire at Lismore Castle. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He entered Mount Melleray in 1872 and graduated in 1876. During this time, he received private tuition in music from Sir Robert Prescott Stewart (1825–1894) and developed proficiency on other musical instruments. He was organist of St. Peter's Pro-Cathedral in Belfast (1878–82), the Cathedral of the Assumption in Thurles, Co. Tipperary (1882–8), Monaghan Cathedral (1888–94) and St. Aidan's Cathedral, Enniscorthy (from September 1895). A devout Catholic, Flood entered St. Patrick's in Carlow, Co. Carlow and spent several years studying for the priesthood. He taught music at the Jesuit Colleges of Tullabeg, Co. Offaly (1882–4), Clongowes Wood College (from 1884), St MacCartan's College, Monaghan (from 1888), and St. Kieran's College in Kilkenny. During his long residency at Enniscorthy (1895–1928) Flood authored the majority of his musical compositions and historical publications. Flood was awarded an honorary Doctor of Music (DMus) from the Royal University of Ireland in 1907.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In December 1898, he was wed to Margaret Delaney and, over the next 12 years, the couple had six children, including Catherine (Kathleen), Mollie, Agnes, William, Patrick and Margaret (Rita). Following his death, his daughter, Kathleen, assumed the position of organist at St. Aidan's until her death in 1956.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Flood is a highly controversial figure in Irish musicology. He has undoubtedly inspired a lot of more recent research, but "his appreciation of detail was enthusiastic rather than thorough, and the contents of his books were often distorted by his national and religious commitment". Although he is known to have had access to sources in the Public Record Office which burnt down in the Irish Civil War in 1922, "he renders himself untrustworthy by the fact that, where his sources can be checked, he sometimes misquotes or misinterprets them; and he is too ready to jump to conclusions which are presented as if they were facts." On the other hand, he wrote "at a time when it [i.e. Irish music] was either scorned or ignored, except by a few enthusiasts."[9] Flood's most adventurous claims included an "Irish Ancestry of Garland, Dowland, Campion and Purcell". Therefore, his writings on Irish musical history must be treated with extreme caution.[/FONT]
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in 1928 - Andy Warhol (US pop artist, producer, manager of Velvet Underground) is born.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1928 - Andy Warhol, who made his mark on the music world as manager for the The Velvet Underground and designer of the Rolling Stones lips logo, is born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.[/FONT]
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in 1929 - Sandra Warfield, American mezzo-soprano, is born at Kansas City, Mo. After training at the Kansas City Conservatory, she began her career singing in operettas. She then pursued her studies in N.Y. with Fritz Lehmann. In 1953 she won the Metropolitan Opera Auditions of the Air and made her debut with the company in N.Y.as a peasant girl in Le nozze di Figaro on Nov. 20, 1953. By 1955 she was singing major roles there, most notably Ulrica. When her husband, James McCracken, left the Metropolitan Opera in 1957, Warfield did likewise and made her debut at the Vienna State Opera as Ulrica. In 1961 she created the role of Katerina in Martina's Greek Passion at the Zurich Opera. She sang Dalila at the San Francisco Opera in 1963. She was again on the roster of the Metropolitan Opera in 1965-66, 1967-68, and 1971-72. As a guest artist, she sang with various American and European opera houses. She also toured extensively as a concert artist, frequently appearing with her husband. Warfield was especially admired for her dramatic vocal gifts. Among her best roles were Dalila, Amneris, Carmen, Ulrica, Marcellina, and Fricka. With her husband, she published the autobiographical vol. A Star in the Family (N.Y., 1971).

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in 1929 - Saxophonist Mike Elliott (of The Foundations) is born in Jamaica, West Indies.[/FONT]
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in 1930 - Abbey Lincoln/Anna Marie Wooldridge, talented jazz singer, composer, actress, is born at Chicago, Ill. Lincoln is an intuitive and often compelling singer who is able to overcome her occasional problems with intonation and range. Her delivery makes her one of the most striking singers ever, and few can match her way with lyrics and moods. Her repertory is consistently nontraditional and provocative. The tenth child in her family, she could pick out melodies on the piano at age five and eventually learned to sing accompaniment to her piano playing.

At 19 she got her first job, playing piano and singing in the basement of the A.M.E. Church in Jackson, Mich., for which she was paid five dollars per week. She began singing in dance bands in Chicago, then moved to the West Coast in 1951. In L.A. in 1954, she allowed the producers at the famous Moulin Rouge to change her name. Her first mentor, lyricist Bob Russell, named her Abbey Lincoln and produced her first recording with Benny Carter and Marty Paitch.

He was also instrumental in securing Lincoln a featured performance in the Jayne Mansfield movie, The Girl Cant Help It (1957), where her sultry looks earned her some brief notoriety as the "Black Marilyn Monroe/' After meeting Max Roach that year, Lincoln changed her image and became a serious singer and political activist. Their "Freedom Now Suite” released in 1960, was one of the harbingers of changing sentiments in the Black community.

Her album Straight Ahead was criticized by Ira Gitler for being too overtly political, leading to a published panel discussion on jazz and race in Down Beat (March 1962). In her debut as a lead actress in the independently produced Nothing But a Man (1964; dir. Michael Roehmer), her performance is sensitive and luminous. In 1968 she played the title role with Sidney Poitier in For Love of Ivy. She changed her name to Aminata Moseka in 1975, following a trip to Africa. She had a period of inactivity in the early 1980s, but resurfaced in the 1990s. She writes more of her own songs now, and they are poetic and haunting. In 1992 her band was Rodney Kendrick, Michael Bowie, and Aaron Walker (a fine D.C.-based drummer); by 1996 the only change was Marc Cary replacing Kendrick on piano. She has performed on BET-TV, and is the subject of a documentary, You Gotta Pay the Band. - Died August 14, 2010.

in 1931 - Jean Louis Chautemps (French tenor saxophone player) is born.

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in 1931 - Leon 'Bix' Beiderbecke (actually Leon Bix, not Bismarck as is sometimes reported) widely admired early jazz cornetist, composer, pianist and a unique dies at age 28 at Queens, N.Y., Aug. 6, 1931. Beiderbecke's parents, German immigrants, were amateur musicians, and he began to play as a small child. His mother was an amateur pianist, and his father had his own merchant's business in Davenport. (He later sent copies of all his records home to his Midwestern German-Protestant family, but they didn't even open the parcels.) His brother brought home records by the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and Bix slowed down the turntable so that he could learn to play the correct solos. He began playing piano at the age of three, and cornet at 14—which, for at least the first eight years, he played left-handed.

During his highschool days (1919-21), Beiderbecke began gigging and sitting-in with various bands in the greater Davenport area. In September 1921, he enrolled at Lake Forest Military Academy, near Chicago. While at the Academy, he formed the Cy-Bix Orchestra with drummer Walter "Cy" Welge, and also played in the Ten Foot Band in Chicago. Uninterested in his studies, he was expelled from the Academy on May 22, 1922. He briefly returned to Davenport, but then quickly moved back to Chicago to join The Cascades Band. Beiderbecke played on Lake Michigan excursion boats and worked in a quintet at White Lake, Mich., during the summer of 1922. For the next year or so, he worked with various bands in Chicago and, briefly, Syracuse, N.Y., while returning in the summer of 1923 to excursion-boat work in the Chicago area. In October 1923, Beiderbecke joined The Wolverines, a semi-pro band popular on college campuses.

The band was mostly working in the Ind.-Ohio area, with an occasional date in Chicago. He first recorded with the Wolverines, and soon became friends with songwriter Hoagy Carmichael. During this time, Bix also played briefly with Mezz Mezzrow. The Wolverines came to N.Y. in autumn 1924, to begin a residency at the Cinderella Ballroom on Sept. 12th. However, Bix left The Wolverines in November. He was hired on a try-out basis by bandleader Jean Goldkette, but then returned to Chicago to work for four weeks for Charlie Straight. After being fired by Straight, he gigged in Chicago before spending 18 days as a student at the State Univ. of Iowa from Feb. 2-20, 1925.

In September 1925, Beiderbecke joined Frank Trumbauer in Detroit, who was then leading a band under the auspices of Jean Goldkette. A year later, the pair joined Jean Goldkette's Band until Goldkette temporarily disbanded in September 1927. Through recordings and radio broadcasts with the band, Beiderbecke's initial reputation was made. Beiderbecke also recorded with various accompanists, both under his own name, and with Trumbauer, from summer 1927 on. After a short position in Adrian Rollini Big Band in September 1927, Beiderbecke joined Paul Whiteman's orch. at the Ind. Theatre, Indianapolis on Oct. 31st; he would continue to work with the band on the road and in N.Y.through 1930, except for brief periods of illness.

Beiderbecke was a featured soloist in the band, and could be heard on recordings, radio, and in concrts. Beiderbecke also began to make his mark as a composer of advanced music that combined jazz with modern classical influences. Together with Lennie Hayton and Roy Bargy, Beiderbecke played a three-piano version of own composition In a Mist at Carnegie Hall on Oct. 7, 1928. The piece showed the influence of European Impressionism. However, Beiderbecke's health was beginning to fail, and he was absent from Paul Whiteman from November 1928 until March 1929 due to illness. He rejoined the band for a trip to Calif, in May 1929, and then returned to N.Y Beiderbecke continued to work with Whiteman until suffering another breakdown in health in mid- September.

He returned to recuperate in Davenport, and was back to N.Y in spring of 1930. He did gigs and freelance recordings, including a four- day try-out with the Casa Loma Band in summer of 1930. Except for a brief period from November 1930-January 1931 when he was back in his hometown, Beiderbecke freelanced in N.Y. until his death. He briefly held a regular job on the Camel Hour radio show (orch. directed by Charles Previn) that spring, and also played a few university dates. Sometime during the summer of 1931 Bix moved from his 44th Street Hotel apartment to rent the groundfloor apartment of a block in Queens.

He had become a serious alcoholic and his death was attributed to that, though the direct cause was pneumonia. He was treated by a doctor during the last few days of his life; he died in the presence of the owner of the apartment, a bass-playing attorney named George Kraslow.

Bix was buried at Oakdale Cemetery, Davenport. Beiderbecke was one of the unique stylists, widely admired by black and white musicians alike for his lyrical reach, unexpected melodic directions, and controlled ("cool," they would later say) and expressive tone. (Armstrong said "He was the only one as serious about his horn as I was” He and Louis admired each other and Louis allegedly once lent him his horn so Bix could sit in.) Not an isolated phenomenon, Beiderbecke was part of a circle of musicians who experimented with wide melodic leaps, a kind of uninflected eighth-note pulse, and compositions using the whole-tone scale.

This school, and Beiderbecke himself, had a tremendous impact on musicians growing up in the late 1920s, including Lester Young, Budd Johnson, Eddie Durham, Eddie Barefield, and of course cornetists Jimmy McPartland, Bunny Berigan, Bobby Hackett, and, through Hackett, Miles Davis. Among white musicians he developed a cult following, exemplified to this day in a annual Beiderbecke festival held in Davenport. His early death made him a candidate for legend, exemplified in Dorothy Baker's rather fictional biography, Young Man with a Horn (N.Y., 1938), made into a Hollywood film starring Kirk Douglas in 1956. - Born Davenport, Iowa, March 10, 1903.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1935 - Alexander Gustav Adolfovich Winkler, dies at 70.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Alexander (Gustav) Adolfovich Winkler, also Alexandre Adolfovitch Winkler (Russian: Александр Адольфович (Густав) Винклер; born 3 March 1865 in Kharkiv – died 6 August 1935 in Besançon), was a Russian pianist, composer and music educator of German descent.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Winkler completed his studies in law at the University of Kharkiv in 1887 and also studied piano at the Kharkiv Music School of the Russian Musical Society, graduating in 1889. He continued to study piano with Alphonse Duvernoy in Paris, and in Vienna with Theodor Leschetizky, where he was also a composition student of Karel Navrátil.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Winkler returned to the music school in Kharkiv as Professor of Piano from 1890 to 1896. On the recommendation of Leschetizky, Winkler was invited to Saint Petersburg to teach at the Conservatory, where he had piano classes from 1896 to 1924, becoming Professor of Piano in 1909. The young Sergei Prokofiev was one of his pupils from 1905. From 1907, Winkler was music critic for the German-language newspaper St. Petersburgische Zeitung. Like many professors of the Saint Petersburg Conservatory, he was a member of the Belyayev circle, a creative group of musicians led by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, which certainly affected his compositional work.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1924, Winkler emigrated to France, where from 1925 he taught at the University of Franche-Comté in Besançon.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Apart from a few songs, Winkler composed only instrumental music, notably his compositions for piano and chamber music. He made piano transcriptions for a number of works by Mikhail Glinka, Alexander Glazunov and Rimsky-Korsakov including Capriccio Espagnol and the ballet Raymonda.[/FONT]
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in 1937 - Baden Powell de Aquino (Brazilian guitar virtuoso) is born.

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in 1938 - Liviu Glodeanu, Romanian composer, is born at Daria, He studied at the Cluj Conservatory and the Bucharest Conservatory, his principal teachers being Comes, Negrea, and Mendelsohn. In his music, he respected Romanian musical tradition while subtly employing modern means of expression. - Died at Bucharest, March 31,1978.

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in 1939 - William "Sonny" Sanders, US singer (Rayber Voices) is born.

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in 1941 - Sorrel Hays (actually, Doris Ernestine Hays), American composer, pianist, and mixed-media artist, is born at Memphis, Tenn., Aug. 6, 1941. She was educated at the University of Chattanooga (B.M., 1963), the Munich Hochschule fur Musik (piano and harpsichord diploma, 1966), the University of Wisc. (M.M., 1968), and the University of Iowa (composition and electronic music, 1969). In 1971 she won 1st prize in the International Competition for Interpreters of New Music in Rotterdam, and subsequently toured as a performer of contemporary music. Hays has become well known for her championship of cluster piano music, especially the works of Hemy Cowell. She was professor of theory at Queens College of the City University of N.Y. (1974-75), and a guest lecturer and performer at various institutions. In 1984 she adopted Sorrel as her first name.

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in 1945 - Micky Cooke (UK trombone player) is born.

in 1946 - Allan Holdsworth (UK guitarist for Soft Machine) is born in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.

in 1948 - Faith Esham, American soprano, is born at Vanceburg, Ky. Following training with Vasile Venettozzi in Ky., she pursued vocal studies at the Juilliard School of Music in N.Y. with Adele Addison, Beverly Johnson, and Jennie Tourel. She made her formal operatic debut in 1977 as Cherubino at the N.Y.C.Opera, and then her European operatic debut in 1980 as Nedda in Nancy. In 1981 she won the Concours International de Chant in Paris, and sang Cherubino at the Glyndebourne Festival. After appearing in the same role at Milan's La Scala in 1982, she sang Micaela at the Vienna State Opera and Melisande at the Geneva Opera in 1984. On Dec. 27, 1986, she made her Metropolitan Opera debut in N.Y. as Marzelline. She appeared as Desdemona at the Welsh National Opera in Cardiff in 1990, and then as Musetta at the Cologne Opera and as Pamina at the Washington (D.C.) Opera. In 1992 she sang Micaela at the Cincinnati Opera, Cio-Cio-San at the Opera Theatre of St. Louis, and Cherubino at the Dallas Opera. She also pursued an active concert career and sang with major American orchestras. [/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]6 August[/FONT][FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]page 2 of 4[/FONT]
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]6 August[/FONT][FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]page 3 of 4[/FONT]
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in 1949 - Carol Pope (Canadian singer-songwriter) is born.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1952 - Ton Scherpenzeel, Dutch rock keyboardist (Earth and Fire) is born.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1951 - Singer/songwriter/musician Pat MacDonald (co-founder of Timbuk3) is born in Green Bay, Wisconsin.[/FONT]
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in 1952 - Vinnie Vincent/Vincent John Cusano (US guitarist, songwriter; Kiss/Vinnie Vincent Invasion) is born.
in 1953 - Pat MacDonald, rocker (Timbuk 3) is born.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1955 - Elvis Presley releases "Mystery Train" as the B-side of "I Forgot To Remember To Forget."
in 1955 - R.B. Hudman is born. An R&B artist and songwriter, Georgia-born R.B. Hudman charted with several minor hits in the late Seventies, his biggest in 1977 being ‘Whatever Makes You Happy’. - Died August 25, 1995. (Cancer).

in 1955 - Benjamin "Rusty" Magee (US composer-lyricist for theatre, TV, film, commercials) is born.
in 1956 - Vinnie Vincent, heavy metal rocker (Solo-Ashes to Ashes) is born.
in 1957 - Hendrik Meurkins (German vibraphonist, harmonica player) is born.
in 1958 - Randy DeBarge, Grand Rapids Mich, rock vocalist/bassist (Debarge) is born.
in 1958 - Simon Francken, Dutch bassist (Ivy Green) is born.
in 1959 - Joyce Sims, rocker (All and All) is born.
in 1959 - Sigurd Køhn (Norwegian jazz saxophonist, composer) is born.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1959 - Ferdinando Farao (Italian percussionist) is born.

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in 1960 - Chubby Checker appeared on US TV show American Bandstand and performed ‘The Twist.’ The song went to No.1 on the US chart and again 18 months later in 1962. It is the only song to go to the top of the charts on two separate occasions.

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[FONT=&quot]
in 1962 - Marc Lavoine (French singer, actor) is born.
in 1963 - Jamie Kensit (UK keyboardist; Eighth Wonder) is born.
in 1964 - Gary Valenciano (Filipino singer) is born.
in 1964 - Patsy Lynn (US country western singer) is born. [twin]
in 1964 - Peggy Lynn (US country western singer) is born. [twin].

in 1964 - Rod Stewart made his TV debut on 'The Beat Room' as a member of The Hoochie Coochie Men.

in 1965 - The Beatles released their fifth album and soundtrack to their second film ‘Help!’ which included the title track, ‘The Night Before’, ‘You've Got to Hide Your Love Away’, ‘You're Going to Lose That Girl’, ‘Ticket to Ride’ and ‘Yesterday’.

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in 1965 - Decca records released The Small Faces debut single 'Whatcha Gonna Do About It.' It peaked at No.14 on the UK chart.

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in 1965 - Ravi (John) Coltrane, jazz tenor and soprano saxophonist, son of John and Alice Coltrane, is born at Huntington, N.Y. He started on clarinet, and began working on tenor saxophone in earnest while attending the Calif. Institute of the Arts (1986). He was in a student band there that won a Down Beat award, and his piece "Dear Alice/' a tribute to his mother, is on their CD. Since 1991, he has performed and recorded with such artists as Elvin Jones, Steve Coleman, Geri Allen, Jack Dejohnette, Joanne Brackeen, and Art Davis. His mother's association with Terry Gibbs has been continued in his close friendship and musical association with Terry's son, Gerry.

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in 1965 - Beatles release "Help" album in UK.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]
in 1965 - Peter Ronnefeld, German composer and conductor, dies at 30.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Peter Ronnefeld came from a family of musicians: his father was a violist in the Dresden Staatskapelle , his mother's brother played the violin in the RIAS orchestral orchestra. In 1950, Ronnefeld completed a visit to the Waldorf school in Dresden.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]After early piano and composition lessons in Dresden, he studied piano with Hans-Erich Riebensahm and composition with Boris Blacher from 1950 to 1954 at the Musikhochschule Berlin , where Aribert Reimann was a fellow student. In the time of Berlin Ronnefeld lived with his cousin Matthias Koeppel . Already in 1949 he wrote a Kleine Suite for orchestra, which was premiered a year later in Berlin. In 1954 Ronnefeld continued his studies at the Paris Conservatoire with the pianist Yvonne Lefébure and the composer Olivier Messiaen . He also took part in conducting courses in Siena and in Hilversum with Paul van Kempen .[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1956, Ronnefeld taught at the Mozarteum in Salzburg , where the writer Thomas Bernhard studied and directed. In the short opera specially composed for the students of Ronnefeld, the night edition Bernhard took the speaking role of a watchmaker. In 1958, Ronnefeld was first assistant to Herbert von Karajan at the Viennese Staatsoper and then as Kapellmeister from October 1959. Ronnefeld became chief conductor in Bonn in 1961 and general director of the Kiel Opera in 1963.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]As a composer, Ronnefeld wrote about twenty works, his most extensive and well-known is the three-act opera Die Ant (1959-61). The libretto is by Richard Bletschacher. The premiere on 21 October 1961 at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein in Duesseldorf under the direction of Wolfgang Liebeneiner conducted Ronnefeld himself. The performance of a second version took place post-September 18, 1965 in Kiel under the direction of Gerd Albrecht . From the opera, Ronnefeld worked on a four-movement suite , which he premiered on 7 April 1965 in Frankfurt am Main with the Symphony Orchestra of Hessian Rundfunk.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Ronnefeld was a conductor especially for New Music , among others he conducted the premiere of the fluctuations of Isang Yun and also played them for the record . For Bernd Alois Zimmermann's opera Die Soldaten , he was intended as conductor of the premiere. On May 9, 1965, he conducted the world premiere of the Oratorium Wohin Op. 41 by Heinz Friedrich Hartig with Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau as a soloist. He played Mozart's works with the Vienna Symphonic Orchestra , and he took over a recording of Zar and Zimmermann from Albert Lortzing at the Vienna Volksoper .[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In the summer of 1965, he was engaged in the repertoire for Aribert Reimann's Opernstring Ein Traumspiel , when he fell seriously ill and died a little later.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Peter Ronnefeld's works were first published in Edition Modern Wewerka and were taken over by G. Ricordi & Co. Munich, the stage and music publisher. The estate and archive have been with the Berlin Academy of Arts since 2005.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]His son Matthias Ronnefeld (* 1959; † 1986) was also a composer. The tombs of Peter and Matthias Ronnefeld can be found at Grinzinger Friedhof (1B-40) in Vienna. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1965 - Yuki Kajiura (Japanese composer) is born.

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in 1969 - Elliot Smith (STEVEN PAUL SMITH) (Folk-punk singer, songwriter; Heatmiser/solo) is born. An introspective and moody singer-songwriter, Elliott Smith was on the verge of a commercial breakthrough at the time of his death. Born in Omaha, Nebraska, Smith was raised in Dallas before relocating to Portland, Oregon, at age 14. After earning a college degree in philosophy and legal theory, he returned to Portland and launched a punk band, Heatmiser.

As a side project, Smith released a series of moody, low-key albums, and garnered national attention when Portland-based film director Gus Van Sant used several of Smith’s songs, including the Oscar-nominated ‘Miss Misery’, for the soundtrack of the 1997 film, Good Will Hunting. After signing with Dreamworks Records, Smith failed to find mainstream success with XO and Figure 8. At the time of his death Smith had nearly completed the tracks for another album, From A Basement, which was posthumously released in 2004. Although police called the death a suicide, a coroner’s report concluded that Smith died from two stab wounds to the chest, which could have been inflicted by his own hand or by somebody else. He died in Los Angeles. - Died October 21, 2003.

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in 1969 - Martin Hathaway (British tenor saxophone player) is born.

in 1969 - During a North American tour Led Zeppelin appeared at the Memorial Auditorium in Sacramento, California.

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in 1969 - Theodor Adorno (real name, Wiesengrund) significant German social philosopher, music sociologist, and composer, dies at Visp, Switzerland. He studied with Sekles (composition) and Eduard Jung ('piano) at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt am Main. He also took courses in philosophy, sociology, psychology, and musicology at the University of Frankfurt am Main (Ph.D., 1925). Following further training with Berg (composition) and Steuermann (piano) in Vienna, he completed his Habilitation at the University of Frankfurt am Main (1931). From 1928 to 1931 he ed. the journal Anbruch, and also was Privatdozent at the University of Frankfurt am Main until being dismissed by the Nazis in 1933. In 1934 he went to Oxford, and in 1938 to N.Y., where he joined the Institut fur Sozialforschung. He also was music director of the Princeton Radio Research Project (until 1940). After living in Los Angeles (from 1941), he returned to Frankfurt am Main (1949). In 1950 he became an honorary professor and in 1956 a professor of philosophy and sociology at the University there. Adorno exercised a deep influence on the trends in musical philosophy and general aesthetics, applying the sociological tenets of Karl Marx and the psychoanalytic techniques of Sigmund Freud. In his speculative writings, he introduced the concept of "cultural industry” embracing all types of music, from dodecaphonic to jazz. His compositions, mainly vocal, were reflective of modern trends. - Born at Frankfurt am Main, Sept. 11, 1903.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1970 - On the 25th anniversary of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, a Concert For Peace at Shea Stadium in New York features Janis Joplin, Paul Simon, Steppenwolf and Johnny Winter.[/FONT]
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in 1970 - The 10th National Jazz, Blues and Pop four day Festival was held at Plumpton Racecourse in Sussex, England. Featuring, Family, Groundhogs, Cat Stevens, Deep Purple, Fat Mattress, Yes, Caravan, The Strawbs, Black Sabbath, Wild Angles, Wishbone Ash and Daddy Longlegs.

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[FONT=&quot]
in 1970 - Steppenwolf, Janis Joplin, Paul Simon, Poco and Johnny Winter all appeared at the Concert For Peace at New York's Shea Stadium. The concert date coincided with the 25th anniversary of dropping an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan.

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[FONT=&quot]
in 1970 - Ingolf Dahl dies at age 58. German-born American composer, pianist, conductor, and educator born in Hamburg, Germany. After Switzerland became hostile to Jewish refugees and his role at the Opera was restricted to playing in the orchestra, he emigrated to the United States in 1939. Settling in he had a varied musical career as a solo pianist, keyboard, piano and harpsichordperformer, accompanist, conductor, coach, composer, and critic. He also worked in the entertainment industry, touring as pianist to Edgar Bergen and his puppets in 1941 and later for comedian Gracie Fields in 1942 and 1956. He produced musical arrangements for Tommy Dorsey and served as arranger/conductor to Victor Borge. He gave private lessons in the classical repertoire to Benny Goodman. He performed on keyboard instruments in the soundtrack orchestras for many films at Fox, Goldwyn Studios, Columbia, Universal, MGM, and Warner Bros, as well as the post-production company Todd-AO. He also worked on the television show The Twilight Zone. He conducted the soundtrack to The Abductors-1957 by his pupil Paul Glass and performed the second movement of Beethoven's Pathétique Sonata in the 1969 animated film A Boy Named Charlie Brown. The West Coast chapters of the American Musicological Society present the Ingolf Dahl Memorial Award in Musicology annually.
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in 1972 - Geri Estelle Halliwell, "Ginger Spice" singer (Spice Girls) is born.
in 1972 - Procol Harum records "Conquistador" (live with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra).[/FONT]
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in 1973 - Stevie Wonder was seriously injured when the car he was riding in crashed into a truck on I-85 near Winston-Salem, North Carolina leaving him in a coma for four days. The accident also left him without any sense of smell.

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in 1973 - Memphis Minnie / Lizzie Douglas dies at age 76. American blues singer, songwriter and guitar virtuoso, born in Algiers, Louisiana; Minnie was one of the most influential and pioneering female blues musicians and guitarists of all time. She recorded for forty years, almost unheard of for any woman in show business at the time and unique among female blues artists. A flamboyant character who wore bracelets made of silver dollars, she was a very popular blues recording artist from the early Depression years through World War II. One of the first generation of blues artists to take up the electric guitar, in 1942, she combined her Louisiana-country roots with Memphis blues to produce her own unique country-blues sound; along with Big Bill Broonzy and Tampa Red, she took country blues into electric urban blues, paving the way for Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, Little Walter, and Jimmy Rogers to travel from the small towns of the south to the big cities of the north. Some of her many songs include "When the Levee Breaks", "Bumble Bee Blues", "Hoodoo Lady", "I'm Gonna Bake My Biscuit" and "I Want Something For You" (Minnie died from a stroke in a Memphis nursing home. A headstone paid for by Bonnie Raitt was erected by the Mt. Zion Memorial Fund on 13 October 1996)

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in 1974 - Abba scored their first US top 10 hit when ‘Waterloo’ went to No.6. The Swedish group were also on their first American tour.

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in 1974 - Eugene "Jug" Ammons dies at age 49. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American jazz tenor saxophone player, and the son of boogie-woogie pianist Albert Ammon. He began to gain recognition when he went on the road with trumpeter King Kolax in '43, at the age of 18. He became a member of the Billy Eckstine and Woody Herman bands in 1944 and 1949, and in 1950 formed a duet with Sonny Stitt. His later career was interrupted by two prison sentences for narcotics possession, the first from 1958 to 1960, the second from 1962 to 1969. He and Von Freeman were the founders of the Chicago School of tenor saxophone. The "Soul Jazz" movement of the mid-1950s, often using the combination of tenor saxophone and Hammond B3 electric organ, counts him as a founder. He used a thinner, drier tone and could exploit a vast range of textures on the instrument (died of pneumonia)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1976 - Gregor Piatigorsky dies at age 73. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Russian naturalized American cellist, born in Ekaterinoslav, now in Ukraine; he studied violin and piano before given his first cello when he was seven. He won a scholarship to the Moscow Conservatory, and playing in the Lenin Quartet. At 15, he was hired as the principal cellist for the Bolshoi Theatre. At 18 he smuggled himself out of Russia and soon after Wilhelm Furtwängler hired him as the principal cellist of the Berlin Philharmonic. In 1929, he first visited the US, playing with the Philadelphia Orchestra under Leopold Stokowski and the New York Philharmonic under Willem Mengelberg. From 1941 to 1949, he was head of the cello department at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, and he also taught at Tanglewood, Boston University, and the University of Southern California, where he remained until his death. Gregor among many other projects and engagements participated in a chamber group along with Artur Rubinstein on piano, William Primrose playing viola and violinist Jascha Heifetz, referred to in some circles as the "Million Dollar Trio" (lung cancer)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1977 - This week's UK Top 5 singles: No.5 'Fanfare For The Common Man', ELP. No.4, 'Pretty Vacant', The Sex Pistols. No.3, 'Angelo' Brotherhood Of Man'. No.2, 'Ma Baker', Boney M and No.1, 'I Feel Love' Donna Summer.

in 1977 - The Police appeared at The Red Cow, Hammersmith Road in London, admission was 60p.
in 1978 - Brian Maillard (Swiss guitarist; Dominici) is born.
in 1980 - Wilber Pan (US-Taiwanese singer) is born.
in 1981 - Travis "Travie" McCoy (lead singer of Gym Class Heroes) is born in Geneva, New York.[/FONT]
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in 1981 - Stevie Nicks released her first solo album Bella Donna which contained four top 40 US hits. ‘Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around’, (with Tom Petty), ‘Leather and Lace’, (with Don Henley), ‘Edge of Seventeen’ and ‘After the Glitter Fades.’

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in 1982 - Pink Floyd’s ‘The Wall’ starring Bob Geldof opened in movie theatres in New York. The film was conceived alongside the double album by Pink Floyd’s, Roger Waters.

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in 1983 - Avant-garde musician and former backing singer with David Bowie Klaus Nomi died at the age of 39 of Aids in New York City aged 38. Nomi was one of the first celebrities to contract AIDS.

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in 1983 - 'The Very Best Of The Beach Boys' went to No.1 on the UK album chart.

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in 1983 - Klaus Nomi /Klaus Sperber dies at age 38. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]An androgynous German-born, opera-trained, new wave artist, Klaus Nomi performed idiosyncratic, falsetto versions of mostly rock oldies. Drawn to opera in his youth, he was a frequent stage extra, and then an usher at the Deutsche Opera in Berlin. Amusing his co-workers with his Maria Callas impersonation, Nomi was frustrated by his inability to be taken seriously as an opera singer. Landing in New York City in 1972, he took a day job as a pastry chef at the World Trade Center and, by night, he began developing his musical act in the East Village clubs. Discovered by David Bowie, Nomi was invited to sing back-up for a Saturday Night Live appearance in 1979. Thanks to Bowie’s influence he was signed to RCA Records. Nomi (an anagram of the magazine Omni) incorporated elements of science-fiction, classical opera, and Japanese kabuki into his stage act, which for a time featured two male dancers. Donning his signature white-face make-up, black lipstick and Bauhaus-style costumes, Nomi had limited commercial appeal. The compilation album Eclipsed was issued by Razor & Tie Records in 1999. (AIDS). He was diagnosed with the disease only a few months before his death. - Born January 24, 1944.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1984 - Eric Roberts (bassist for Gym Class Heroes) is born in Edmeston, New York.[/FONT]
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in 1986 - Michael Rudetski dies at age 27. A keyboard player from New York City, who had previously worked with a number of East Coast bands, Michael Rudetski performed on the 1986 Culture Club album, From Luxury To Heartache. CAUSE: He overdosed on heroin at the London home of singer Boy George. A week earlier, Boy George had been fined for heroin possession. Rudetski’s parents were unsuccessful in their wrongful death lawsuit against Boy George. - Born 1959.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1987 - Nike takes out a full-page ad in the Los Angeles Times responding to the controversy over their use of The Beatles song "Revolution" in a commercial.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]After the commercial began airing on March 26, Beatles fans blasted the company for appropriating the group's music. Paul McCartney made it clear he was not pleased, but he had no recourse: Michael Jackson controlled the publishing rights to the song after outbidding him for the catalog of 251 Beatles tunes in 1985, and EMI/Capitol Records owned the rights to the actual recording. The sticky wicket in the deal was John Lennon's vocal, since a company generally needs permission from a song's singer before putting their voice in a commercial. But apparently, Yoko Ono granted that permission.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The Beatles (along with Yoko), sued, claiming their "personna and goodwill" had been exploited. This created a PR problem for Nike, which had sunk millions into the ad and had no intention of pulling it. Their response reads:[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Can we talk? You may have heard that Nike is being sued by the Beatles. That's not exactly true. Nike, along with our ad agency and EMI Capitol Records, is being sued by Apple Records. The fact is, we negotiated and paid for all of the legal rights to use "Revolution" in our ads. And we did so with the active support of Yoko Ono Lennon. We also believe we've shown a good deal of sensitivity and respect in our use of "Revolution" and in how we've conducted the entire campaign. So why are we being sued? We believe it's because we make good press. "Beatles Sue Nike" is a much stronger headline than "Apple Sues EMI-America for the Third Time." Frankly, we feel we're a publicity pawn in a long-standing legal battle between two record companies.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The lawsuit is later settled, and the ad continues to run. The ordeal does get Yoko and the remaining Beatles on the same page when it comes to use of their songs in commercials, and also scares away any companies considering a hostile takeover - original Beatles songs are never again used in ads.[/FONT]
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in 1988 - 'Appetite For Destruction' Guns N' Roses debut album went to No.1 in the US, after spending 57 weeks on the chart and selling over 5 million copies. Singles from the album, ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine,’ ‘Welcome to the Jungle’ and ‘Paradise City’ were all US top 10 hits. Worldwide sales now stand in excess of 28 million and the album is the best-selling debut album of all-time in the US, beating Boston's debut album Boston, which has gone 17x platinum.

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in 1988 - Yazz and the Plastic Population started a five week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'The Only Way Is Up'. The song was originally released as the title track to the 1982 album by soul singer Otis Clay.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1988 - Yo! MTV Raps premieres on MTV, with Run-DMC hosting the pilot episode.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1988 - Thanks to its inclusion on the Dirty Dancing soundtrack, the Contours' 1962 hit "Do You Love Me" makes another chart run, peaking at #11.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1989 - With their song "F--k tha Police" causing an uproar, Detroit police stop N.W.A's performance before they can perform the song, and escort them back to their hotel. No charges are filed, and officers tell the rappers that they just "wanted to show the kids that you can't say 'F--k the police' in Detroit."[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]
in 1989 - Adam Clayton of U2 was arrested in The Blue Light Inn car park in Dublin for marijuana possession and intent to supply the drug to another person. His conviction was waived in exchange for paying £25,000 to the Dublin Woman's Aid Centre.

in 1990 - Ace Of Base made the live debut when they played in Gothenburg, Sweden

in 1992 - Fereydoun Farrokhzad dies at age 55. Iranian singer, actor, poet, TV and radio host, and writer, born in Tehran; He was one of the Great Iranian Entertainers of his time who truly revolutionized the Iranian Entertainment Scene and Television Shows. Deeply attached to his country and countrymen maybe more than any other artist and compatriot of his generation, he spent his personal fortune and energy to rally Iranians against the Islamic Republic by performing worldwide in any major European or American place where there was an Iranian community, be it London, Toronto, LA, New York or Paris. Fereydoun was quite openly a Constitutional Monarchist when singing in London to honor the death of the Imperial Army officers who died during the failed Nojeh Coup, that ultimately set him on the Top of the Blacklist of the Islamic Republic’s Death Squads. He made his home in Germany and had been involved in producing a radio programme critical of the Islamic Republic of Iran and its founder and reportedly he had received death threats (brutally murdered, Fereydoun was stabbed 40 times and had been beheaded at his home in Bonn, Germany)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1994 - Lisa Loeb started a three week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Stay (I Missed You), a No.6 hit in the UK. Actor and friend Ethan Hawke had asked her to provide a song for the upcoming movie Reality Bites and 'Stay' was featured in the film.[/FONT]
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in 1994 - Manic Street Preachers guitarist Richey Edwards booked into a private clinic to be treated for nervous exhaustion.


in 1994 - Domenico Modugno dies at age 66. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Italian singer, songwriter, actor; he became one of the first Italian artists in the popular music field able to achieve an international star status, touring worldwide and selling a million records released in different languages. Self taught guitarist, he began composing at the age of 15, starting a career devoted to acting, singing and songwriting. He made his debut in 1951 playing a role in Eduardo de Filippo's Filomena Marturano. In 1958, Domenico joined San Remo's Festival with a song called "Nel Blue Dipinto Di Blu," also known as "Volare." that song allowed him to achieve two Grammy awards for Album of the Year and Song of the Year. In 1959, Modugno won the Sanremo Music Festival for the second time in a row, with "Piove" (also known as "Ciao, ciao bambina"), and received second place in 1960 with "Libero." This was a successful period of time for Modugno who again represented Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest of 1959. Later his hit song "Io" was sung by Elvis Presley in English with the title "Ask Me." In 1962, Domenico won the Sanremo Music Festival a third time with "Addio, addio.". Then in 1966, he again represents Italy at Eurovision with "Dio, come ti amo". After acting on television and in lead singing roles of modern operas Domenico pursued a career in politics (heart attack)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]6 August[/FONT][FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]page 3 of 4[/FONT]
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]6 August[/FONT][FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]page 4 of 4[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1995 - Youly Algaroff, ballet dancer, dies at 77.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1996 - At a show in Hollywood, the Ramones play their final concert.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Always more famous than successful, the Ramones travel by van on their final tour, which takes them to places like the state fairgrounds in Des Moines and the Rockingham Dragway in North Carolina. The last show is at the Palace, with several special guests - Lemmy Kilmister, Chris Cornell and Eddie Vedder among them - joining the band on stage to pay their respects and play some tunes. Dee Dee Ramone, their original bass player who left in 1989, is welcomed back to play on the track "Love Kills." Their last song is a cover: "Anyway You Want It" by The Dave Clark Five (with Vedder).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The band are on their last legs, plagued by health issues and internecine tensions. "Afterwards, nobody said goodbye," drummer Marky later says.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The show is recorded and released as a live album called We're Outta Here! the following year. In 2001, Joey Ramone dies, followed by Dee Dee in 2002 and Johnny in 2004. When Tommy Ramone dies in 2014, it leaves Marky as the only surviving member.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1997 - In a Spinal Tap moment, U2's giant lemon they are supposed to emerge from onstage doesn't open at a show in Oslo.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1998 - Jazz performer Nat Gonella, founder of the big band The Georgians, dies in Gosport, Hampshire, England at age 90.[/FONT]
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in 1998 - During his 137-date Faith World Tour, George Michael appeared at the Capital Centre, Washington D.C.

in 1999 - Dick Latvala died aged 56 after being in a coma caused by a heart attack. Latvala worked with The Grateful Dead since the early 80’s looking after their archives of live performances which became a series of 'Dick’s Picks' albums.

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in 1999 - Rita Sakellariou dies at age 64. Greek singer, from the most impoverish beginnings on the streets of Crete, to shimmering success of the world. Rita is regarded as one of the most prominent singers of the 'laika' music genre. Amongst her fans were Andreas Papandreou, Melina Merkouri, Aristotle Onasis, Anthony Quinn and others and she worked with some of the greater Greek musicians like Vassilis Tsitsanis and Giannis Papaioannou. She had numerous hits, including, Istoria mou, amartia mou, An kano atakti zoi, Aftos o anthropos, Paranomi mou agapi, Ena tragoudi (cancer)

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in 2000 - Former Boyzone member Ronan Keating started a two-week run at No.1 on the UK album chart with his debut release 'Ronan'.

in 2000 - Robbie Williams went to No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Rock DJ'.

in 2001 - Whitney Houston became one of the highest-paid musicians in the world after signing a new deal with Arista records, said to be worth more than $100m.

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[FONT=&quot]
in 2004 - Rick James /James Ambrose Johnson, Jr dies at age 56. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]A flamboyant singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Rick James dominated the R&B charts for nearly a decade beginning in the late Seventies. Raised in Buffalo by his mother after his father deserted the family, James had a chaotic childhood. Joining the US Naval Reserves while in his teens, he went AWOL and fled to Toronto, and under the stage name Ricky Matthews, he formed The Mynah Birds, which for a time included future Buffalo Springfield members Neil Young and Bruce Palmer. Although he recorded an album’s worth of material for Motown Records, none of the tracks were released once the label discovered James’ AWOL military status.

After passing through a series of bands over the next decade, James signed with Motown in 1978 as a songwriter and producer but was far more successful as a performer, selling a million copies of his début album Come Get It! which spawned the hit ‘You And I’. Labelling his music “punk funk,” James continued his hit run of rock-flavoured dance songs with ‘Mary Jane’, ‘Bustin’ Out’, ‘Give It To Me Baby’ and the enduring ‘Super Freak (Part 1)’. As a producer, James worked with Teena Marie on her début album Wild And Peaceful; oversaw the R&B trio Mary Jane Girls, who scored a Top 10 hit in 1985 with the James composition, ‘In My House’; and produced Eddie Murphy’s first musical album How Could It Be, which spawned the unlikely dance hit ‘Party All The Time’. Meanwhile, James’ solo hit run continued with a duet with The Temptations on ‘Standing On The Top – Part 1’, ‘Dance With Me – Part 1’, a Smokey Robinson duet on ‘Ebony Eyes’, ‘17’, ‘Glow’, ‘Sweet And Sexy Thing’ and R&B chart topper ‘Loosey’s Rap’, featuring rapper Roxanne Shante. James topped the pop charts in 1990 via M.C. Hammer’s ‘U Can’t Touch This’, a reworked version of ‘Super Freak’.

However, amid mounting personal problems – a protracted lawsuit against Motown over unpaid royalties, heavy drug use and an assault conviction which led to jail time – James quickly hit rock bottom. After his release from prison in 1996, he suffered a severe stroke and underwent hip replacement surgery. At the time of his death, James had just finished recording an album and was in negotiations regarding a movie about his life.

He was found dead at his home in Los Angeles by his personal assistant. Although an autopsy revealed nine drugs in his system, including prescriptions for a host of ailments including diabetes and heart disease, the coroner’s report insisted that “none of the drugs or drug combinations were found to be at levels that were life-threatening in and of themselves”. James had suffered a severe stroke in 1998 and had a pacemaker implanted in his heart. The official cause of death was listed as a heart attack and the death was ruled accidental. - Born February 1, 1948.

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[FONT=&quot]
in 2004 - Pete Strange dies at age 66. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]English jazz trombonist; his first major gig was with Eric Silk when he was 18 years old. In 1957, Silk's clarinetist Teddy Layton split off and formed his own band, and Pete went with him. Following this he played with Sonny Morris, Charlie Gall, and Ken Sims, then joined Bruce Turner from '61-'64. He returned to play with Turner again in '74, and in 1978 co-founded the Midnite Follies Orchestra with Alan Elsdon. In 1980 he founded the five-trombone ensemble Five-A-Slide which featured Roy Williams and Campbell Burnap. Pete joined Humphrey Lyttelton's band in 1983, and remained with him up until his death. He also played with his own side group, the Great British Jazz Band, alongside his time with Lyttelton.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2005 - William "Keter" Betts dies at age 77. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American jazz double bassist, born in Port Chester, New York; early in his career he had played with Earl Bostic's rhythm and blues band. In 1962, together with Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd, he was instrumental in introducing the bossa nova style to American audiences via their Jazz Samba recording. In the mid-1960s, Keter began a nearly quarter-century relationship, as a bassist, with Ella Fitzgerald. Over his career he also played with Dinah Washington, Oscar Peterson, Nat Adderley, Stan Getz, Charlie Byrd and among others (?) b. July 22nd 1928.

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[FONT=&quot]
in 2005 - Ibrahim Ferrer dies at age 78. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Cuban singer; he performed with many musical groups including the Afro-Cuban All Stars. A veteran Cuban soneros whose music career had languished for 30 years when he was invited to perform on the 1997 album Buena Vista Social Club and found himself rediscovered by a whole new generation of music lovers around the world (died of multiple organ failure).

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[FONT=&quot]
in 2005 - Little Milton (MILTON CAMPBELL) dies at age 70. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Straddling urban blues and Southern soul, singer-guitarist Little Milton never achieved the success that was his due. Born into a sharecropping family in Mississippi, he was a self-taught player who emulated his guitarist father and other local bluesmen at informal venues such as house parties. First recording in 1951, Milton backed Willie Love as a member of The Three Aces and worked with Ike Turner, who would become his lifelong mentor. On the recommendation of Turner, Little Milton recorded for Sam Phillips at Sun Records in 1953, followed by stints for Meteor and Bobbin Records, where he began to cultivate a reputation as a talented guitarist who understood the tonal intricacies of the instrument.

Landing at Chess subsidiary Checker, he finally entered the charts with ‘So Mean To Me’ (1962). His only crossover hit ‘We’re Gonna Make It’ (1965) was followed by a string of R&B hits over the next decade, including ‘Feel So Bad’, ‘Grits Ain’t Groceries’, ‘If Walls Could Talk’, ‘Baby I Love’ and, after switching to Stax Records in 1971, ‘That’s What Love Will Make You Do’. Milton found renewed fame after he appeared in the 1973 concert film, Wattstax. In 1999, he was joined by guests Dave Alvin, Gov’t Mule and Susan Tedeschi for a duets album, Welcome To Little Milton. He suffered a stroke and died a week later in Memphis. - Born September 7, 1934.

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[FONT=&quot]
in 2005 - Carlo Little /Carl O'Neil Little dies at age 66. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]English drummer; an influential rock n roll drummer based on the London scene in the 60s. After being demobbed from British National service in 1960, he met David Sutch and formed The Savages with amongst others Nicky Hopkins. Screaming Lord Sutch and The Savages toured the UK and became known for their unique British rock and roll shows. After which in 1962 he joined the Cyril Davies All Stars and cut a single 'Country Line Special', an instrumental track which influenced Keith Richard and Ray Davies. He played a few gigs with the young Rolling Stones and was asked by Brian Jones to join permanently before they hired Charlie Watts as their official drummer in January 1963. Carlo continued to work as a session drummer throughout the 1960s having further success with The Flowerpot Men, as drummer on their hit single, 'Let's Go To San Francisco'. Carlo played in pub bands throughout the 1970s and 1980s, until he reformed the All Stars in 2000 (lung cancer)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2007 - Zsolt Daczi dies at age 38. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Hungarian guitarist, born in Kiskunhalas; he was a member of Hungarian rock band Bikini and heavy metal band Omen. He also founded the project Carpathia Project, and he also played in a heavy metal band called Tirana Rockers. Zsolt carried on playing until until he became too ill to perform (cancer)

in 2006 - ‘Hips Don't Lie’ by Shakira featuring Wyclef Jean was at No.1 on the UK and Australian singles chart, ‘Promiscuous’ by Nelly Furtado & Timbaland was at No.1 on the US chart.

in 2006 - UK singer songwriter James Morrison started a two week run at No.1 on the UK album chart with his debut album 'Undiscovered.'

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[FONT=&quot]
in 2007 - Marilyn Manson was being sued by a former band member who said he was owed $20m (£9.8m) in shared profits. Stephen Bier, who played keyboards under the stage name Madonna Wayne Gacy, claimed he was not paid properly over a period of almost two decades. In legal papers filed in Los Angeles, Bier claimed Manson falsely told him the band was not making much money and used band money to buy a $2m (£980,000) home and collect Nazi memorabilia, including coat hangers used by Adolf Hitler.

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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2008 - Radiohead, Rage Against The Machine, Nine Inch Nails and Kanye West take over the Windy City as yet another Lollapalooza weekend sweeps into Chicago.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]
in 2009 - Steven Tyler was airlifted to hospital after falling off stage during a gig at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in South Dakota. The 61-year-old Aerosmith singer fell from a catwalk onto a couple of fans, he suffered neck and shoulder injuries. About 30 minutes after the accident, guitarist Joe Perry came out to tell the crowd that the remainder of the show had been cancelled.

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in 2009 - Willy DeVille /William Borsey dies at age 58. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American singer–songwriter; in his 35-year career he created songs that are wholly original yet rooted in traditional American musical styles. Willy worked with collaborators from across the spectrum of contemporary music, including Jack Nitzsche, Doc Pomus, Dr. John, Mark Knopfler, Allen Toussaint, and Eddie Bo. Latin rhythms, blues riffs, doo-wop, Cajun music, strains of French cabaret, and echoes of early-1960s uptown soul can be heard in DeVille's work. He founded the rock band Mink DeVille in 1974 and they recorded six albums in the years 1977 to 1985. Over the next decades he worked out of New Orleans, LA and New Mexico, soaking up the local culture in each location. He also toured Europe frequently. In the summer of 1992, he toured Europe with Dr John, Johnny Adams, Zachary Richard, and The Wild Magnolias as part of his "New Orleans Revue" tour. Willy released 10 solo albums the last to be released being Pistola in 2008. ( died battling pancreatic cancer)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2009 - Bahadir Akkuzu dies at age 54. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Turkish guitarist and singer; he began gigging at the age of 15 and at of 17 joined the rock and roll group "4 Adam". This was followed by a stint in "The Signal" and then a long career as a member of the Turkish/Anatolian psychedelic-progressive rock band Kurtalan Ekspres, which he joined in 1980. He was a contemporary of and worked with the famous Turkish musicians Edip Akbayram, Cem Karaca and Erkin Koray (sadly died of a heart attack)

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in 2009 - Otha Young /Robert O. Young dies at age 66. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American singer, songwriter, guitarist, producer and the very longtime musical partner of Grammy-Award winning country-pop artist Juice Newton. The two first teamed as the folk duo Sweet Jubal and later called themselves Dixie Peach. Their brand of progressive country rock developed as they went on to form the band Juice Newton and Silver Spur. Otha wrote, played and produced primarily for Juice, although other artists recorded his songs. He worked with her regularly until his death. As a songwriter, he was best known for Juice's 1982 hit, "The Sweetest Thing (I've Ever Known)", which reached #1 on Billboard's Adult Contemporary and Country charts as well as reaching #7 on the Hot 100. Other Young-penned top-ten hits include: 1978's "Sweet, Sweet Smile" (The Carpenters), 1987's "Don't You" (Forrester Sisters) and Juice's 1986 hit "What Can I Do With My Heart?". A Christmas album of standards and originals recently was completed on which Otha served as lead guitarist, writer, producer and vocalist. He was touring until March this year 2009 (cancer)

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[FONT=&quot]
in 2010 - Catfish Collins /Phelps Collins dies at age 66. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American rhythm guitarist known mostly for his work in the P-Funk collective. Although frequently overshadowed by his younger brother, Bootsy Collins, Catfish played on many important and influential records by Parliament, Funkadelic, Bootsy's Rubber Band and James Brown, Catfish was the jovial guitar player with a huge smile, a mentor who helped shape his brother’s musical career as well as his life. On his early work with James Brown and Funkadelic, Catfish played a Vox Ultrasonic guitar with built-in effects. In 1968, the Collins brothers, along with Kash Waddy and Philippe Wynne, formed a group called The Pacemakers. Later the Pacemakers were hired by James Brown to accompany his vocals, at this they became known as The J.B.'s. During their tenure in the J.B.'s, they recorded such classics as "Super Bad", "Get Up (I Feel Like Being A) Sex Machine", "Soul Power", and "Give It Up or Turnit a Loose". By 1971, Catfish and the rest of the J.B.'s had left James Brown. The Collins brothers and Kash Waddy formed House Guests and shortly after joined Funkadelic and contributed to the Funkadelic album America Eats Its Young. Four years later, he joined Bootsy's Rubber Band, which included Waddy, Joel "Razor Sharp" Johnson, Gary "Muddbone" Cooper, and Robert "P-Nut" Johnson, along with The Horny Horns. Catfish is credited with playing the most widely known rhythm guitar part in R&B with his work on the 1978 Parliament classic "Flash Light". He has also played on albums by Deee-Lite, Freekbass, and H-Bomb. Bernie Worrell - “He was a hell of a musician. He taught me a lot about rhythms. People seem to forget that the rhythm guitar behind James Brown was Catfish’s creative genius, and that was the rhythm besides Bootsy’s bass.” (cancer).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2012 - Celso Blues Boy / Ricardo Celso Furtado de Carvalho dies at age 56. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Brazilian singer, songwriter and guitarist born in Rio de Janeiro. He began playing professionally in the 1970s , following Raul Seixas and Sa & Guarabyra. He assembled the band Foreign Legion in 1976, with whom he had in bars and nightclubs. Became more known from 1980 , when he sent a tape to the Radio Fluminense in Rio, facing the repertoire rocker . Recorded the first album in 1984 , "Sound on Guitar," which included his biggest hit: "Here's That Increases to Rock'n Roll". One of the first blues singers singing in Portuguese , he chose the stage name in homage to the idol BB King , one of the fathers of the genre (throat cancer) - Born January 5th 1956.

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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2012 - Forbes declares Beyoncé and Jay-Z the highest-paid celebrity couple, with earnings of $78 million ($40 million for her, $38 for him). At #2 is Gisele Bundchen and Tom Brady with $72 million.[/FONT]
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in 2012 - Ruggiero Ricci dies at age 94. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American violinist, teacher and author born in San Bruno, California; he gave his first public performance in 1928 at the age of 10 in San Francisco where he played works by Wieniawski and Vieuxtemps. He performed over 6,000 concerts in 65 countries during his 70 year solo career and made over 500 recordings on every major label and taught violin at Indiana University, the Juilliard School and the University of Michigan. He also taught at the University Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria, as well as holding master classes in the United States and Europe. He also wrote Left Hand Technique, a pedagogical volume for violin published by G. Schirmer (heart failure) - Born July 24th 1918.

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[FONT=&quot]
in 2012 - Marvin Hamlisch dies at age 68. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American composer, born in New York City; his first job was as a rehearsal pianist for Funny Girl with Barbra Streisand. Shortly after that, he was hired by producer Sam Spiegel to play piano at Spiegel's parties, which led to his first film score, The Swimmer. He was the composer of many motion picture scores, including his Oscar-winning score and song for The Way We Were and his adaptation of Scott Joplin’s music for The Sting, for which he received a third Oscar. His prolific output of scores for 45 films include original compositions and/or musical adaptations for Sophie's Choice, Ordinary People, The Swimmer, Three Men And A Baby, Ice Castles, Take The Money And Run, Bananas, Save The Tiger and his latest effort The Informant! He held the position of Principal Pops Conductor for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the San Diego Symphony, the Seattle Symphony, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, and The Pasadena Symphony and Pops. He is one of only eleven people to have been awarded Emmys, Grammys, Oscars, and a Tony. He is also one of only two people to have won those four prizes and also a Pulitzer Prize, he also won two Golden Globes (died after a brief illness) - Born June 2nd 1944.

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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2014 – Frank Edwin Shipway British conductor, dies of injuries sustained in a car accident in Wedhampton, England. He was 79.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Shipway was born in 1935 in Birmingham. He studied piano first with his father and then with Alisa Verity. He earned a scholarship to The Royal College of Music to study piano and later switched to conducting.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1963 he became music director of the South-West Essex Symphony Orchestra, which was soon renamed the Forest Philharmonic Society (FPS). He remained at the FPS until 1991.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Shipway was further trained in conducting by John Barbirolli and helped by Herbert von Karajan. His first professional conducting position was with the Berlin Opera in 1973 as assistant conductor to Lorin Maazel. He also worked with the Glyndebourne Festival Opera and the English National Opera in this period and developed an operatic repertoire largely from the Classical and Romantic periods.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1991, Shipway formed the Orchestra Sinfonica Nazionale della RAI in Italy and served as its chief conductor for four years. From 1996 to 1999 he was chief conductor and artistic director of BRT Philharmonic Orchestra in Brussels, and then of the Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra. He also served as guest conductor with the Cleveland Orchestra, Teatro alla Scala Orchestra, and the Moscow, Helsinki and Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestras.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In addition to conducting, Shipway gave master classes and served on the juries of a number of international competitions including the Nikolai Malko and Arturo Toscanini conducting competitions.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]For several years prior to his death, Shipway was a frequent guest conductor with the São Paulo State Symphony. BIS Records issued a recording of Shipway conducting Richard Strauss's Alpine Symphony with that orchestra in late 2012. Another BIS recording with Shipway leading the same orchestra in the Walton and Hindemith Cello Concertos is planned for release in late 2014.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Shipway contributed to several classical music compilations. He also conducted four significant recorded performances that are highly regarded in the classical music community:[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] Mahler, Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp minor. Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. Royal Philharmonic label[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] Shostakovich, Symphony No. 10 in E minor. Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. Royal Philharmonic label[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] Strauss, Alpine Symphony. São Paulo State Symphony. BIS label.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] Tchaikovsky, Symphony No. 5 in E minor, The Voyevoda. Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. Royal Philharmonic label[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The Strauss recording was a finalist for BBC Music Magazine's Best Orchestral Recording of 2014.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2015 - Hamilton, a hip-hop-infused musical based on the life of Alexander Hamilton, opens on Broadway at the Richard Rodgers Theatre six months after a sold-out Off-Broadway debut.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Hamilton was a Founding Father of the United States and was the country's first Secretary of the Treasury, not to mention the long-appointed frontman of the ten-dollar bill. The musical is inspired by historian Ron Chernow's 2004 biography of Hamilton's storied life and was adapted for the stage by Lin-Manuel Miranda, also known for the 2008 Tony Award-winning Broadway hit In the Heights.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Led by a multiracial cast with Miranda in the lead role, the story unfolds with an orphaned Hamilton arriving in New York City ("Alexander Hamilton") and quickly becoming the leader of a group of revolutionaries ("My Shot") and continues with his roles as George Washington's right-hand man during the American Revolution ("Right Hand Man"), an advocate of the US Constitution ("Non-Stop") and a mastermind behind the national bank ("Cabinet Battle #1).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The musical is hailed as the must-see show of 2015 by critics, celebrities, and politicians alike, also making tickets a coveted item among eager theatergoers. The accompanying album by the original cast is a chart success, debuting at #12 on the Billboard 200 albums chart, topping the Billboard Rap Albums chart, and peaking at #2 on the Billboard Best Albums of 2015 chart. It will also earns a Grammy nomination for Best Musical Theater Album.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Temple Painter, American harpsichordist and organist, dies at age 83.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He was born in 1933 in Pulaski, Virginia.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Temple Painter performed as solo organist with members of the New York Philharmonic at Lincoln Center under Hermann Scherchen, as harpsichord soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy, and as solo harpsichordist for the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. He performed as solo pianist, harpsichordist and organist with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, and concertized extensively in the United States, Europe and Israel.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]His 1962 critically acclaimed recording "Temple Painter-Harpsichord Recital" on the Artia-Parliament label was cited by The New York Times in 1964 as "the most satisfying" of the five harpsichord recordings reviewed that year. He also recorded the harpsichord music of American composer Harold Boatrite and can be heard as harpsichord soloist and continuo player in Handel's "Roman Vespers" recorded by the Philadelphia Singers and the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia on RCA Red Seal Records.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Painter was a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music and the recipient of several honors and awards including the Martha Baird Rockefeller Grant and an honorary Doctorate from the Combs College of Music. In addition, he was a National Arts Associate of the Sigma Alpha Iota International Music Fraternity.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He was for 40 years the permanent harpsichordist for the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, and for 45 years the organist at Congregation Adath Jeshurun, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania. Additionally, he was associate professor of music at Haverford College for 13 years, and was lecturer in music at both Immaculata University and Temple University.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Temple Painter's recording of the Two- and Three-part Inventions of Johann Sebastian Bach was unfinished at the time of his death.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He died at Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Pierre Dewey LaFontaine, Jr. better known as Pete Fountain, American jazz clarinetist, dies at age 86. He played in traditional and contemporary genres of jazz, such as Dixieland, pop jazz, honky-tonk jazz, as well as pop, and Creole music.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Pierre Dewey Fountain, Jr., was born on White Street, in New Orleans, between Dumaine and St. Ann, in a small Creole cottage-style frame house, to Pierre, Sr. and Madeline. Pete was the great-grandson of a French immigrant, François Fontaine, who was born in Toulon, circa 1796, and came to the U.S. in the early 19th century, and died on the Mississippi Gulf Coast circa 1885. Pete's father, a truck driver and a part-time musician, changed the family name to Fountain.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He started playing clarinet as a child at the McDonogh 28 school located on Esplanade Avenue. As a child, young Pete was very sickly, frequently battling respiratory infections due to weakened lungs. He was given expensive medication but it proved to be not very effective. During a pharmacy visit, Pete's father began a discussion with a neighborhood doctor who was also there shopping and talked with him about his son's condition. The doctor agreed to see the boy the following day. After a short exam, the doctor confirmed the weak lung condition and advised the father to try an unorthodox treatment: purchase the child a musical instrument, anything he has to blow into. The same day, they went to a local music store and, given his choice of instruments, Pete chose the clarinet (after first wanting the drums, which his father declined per the doctor's orders). At first, Pete was unable to produce a sound from the instrument, but he continued to practice and eventually not only made sounds and eventually music, but greatly improved the health of his lungs.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He took private lessons but also learned to play jazz by playing along with phonograph records of first Benny Goodman and then Irving Fazola. By the time he reached his teens, he was playing regular gigs in the nightclubs on Bourbon Street. According to Fountain:[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] When I was a high school senior, my history teacher asked me why I didn’t study more... I answered that I was too busy playing clarinet every night, and when I told him I was making scale — about $125 a week — he said that was more than he made and I should play full time. I guess I was a professional from that point on.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]One of Fountain's early engagements were with the bands of Monk Hazel. Fountain founded the Basin Street Six in 1950 with his longtime friend, trumpeter George Girard. In 1954, after the Basin Street Six folded, Fountain briefly went to Chicago to play with the Dukes of Dixieland, then returned to New Orleans and teamed up with Al Hirt to lead a band, playing an extended residence at Dan Levy’s Pier 600.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]A talent scout for Lawrence Welk, who saw Fountain performing at the Pier 600, invited him to join Welk's orchestra in Los Angeles, where he relocated and lived for two years. Fountain became well known for his many solos on Welk's ABC television show, The Lawrence Welk Show. He was rumored to have quit when Welk refused to let him "jazz up" a Christmas carol on the 1958 Christmas show. Other accounts, including one in Fountain's autobiography A Closer Walk With Pete Fountain, indicate he in fact played a jazzy rendition of "Silver Bells" on the show which upset Welk, leading to Fountain's departure in early 1959. In an interview, Fountain said he left The Lawrence Welk Show because "champagne and bourbon don't mix." Fountain was hired by Decca Records A&R head Charles "Bud" Dant and went on to produce 42 hit albums with Dant. After Welk's death, Fountain would occasionally join with the Welk musical family for reunion shows.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fountain returned to New Orleans, played with the Dukes of Dixieland, then began leading bands under his own name. He owned his own club in the French Quarter in the 1960s and 1970s. He later acquired "Pete Fountain's Jazz Club" at the Riverside Hilton in downtown New Orleans.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The New Orleans Jazz Club presented "Pete Fountain Day" on October 19, 1959, with celebrations honoring the pride of their city, concluding with a packed concert that evening. His Quintett was made up of his studio recording musicians, Stan Kenton's bassist Don Bagley, vibeist Godfrey Hirsch, pianist Merle Koch, and the double bass drummer Jack Sperling. Fountain brought these same players together in 1963 when they played the Hollywood Bowl. Pete would make the trek to Hollywood many times, appearing on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 56 times.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fountain opened his club, the French Quarter Inn, located in the heart of the famed French Quarter district, at 800 Bourbon Street, in the spring of 1960. His group members were Oliver "Stick" Felix on bass, John Probst on piano, Paul Guma on guitar, Godfrey Hirsch on vibes, and Jack Sperling on drums. In no time at all, major entertainers found their way there. Cliff Arquette and Jonathan Winters were there on opening night and performed their comedy routines. Over the next few years Frank Sinatra, Phil Harris, Carol Lawrence and Robert Goulet, Keely Smith, Robert Mitchum, and Brenda Lee, among many others, came to the club. Many would perform with the band, and Brenda Lee's sit-in resulted in a duet record album recorded by her and Pete. Benny Goodman came to the club twice, but without bringing his clarinet.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]His greatest friendly rivalry was with trumpeter Al Hirt, whose club was down the street from Fountain's. They stole musicians from each other, and sometimes came into each other's clubs and played together. They were good friends who came up together and later recorded several albums together.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 2003, Fountain closed his club at the Hilton with a performance before a packed house filled with musical friends and fans. He began performing two nights a week at Casino Magic in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, where he also had a home (later destroyed by Hurricane Katrina).[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]After heart surgery in 2006, he performed at [the] JazzFest and helped reopen the Bay St. Louis casino. It has since been renamed the Hollywood Casino. He performed his last show at Hollywood Casino on December 8, 2010, before returning to help reopen the resort in 2014, by which point he was mostly retired.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fountain was a founder and the most prominent member of the Half-Fast Walking Club, one of the best known freelance marching units that parade in New Orleans on Mardi Gras Day. The original name was "The Half-Assed Walking Club," and it was an excuse to take a "lubricated" musical stroll down the parade route. Pete changed the name under pressure exerted by the parade organizers. On Mardi Gras Day 2007, Pete again joined his Half-Fast Walking Club, having missed the event in 2006 due to illness.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fountain's clarinet work was noted for his sweet fluid tone. He recorded over 100 LPs and CDs under his own name, some in the Dixieland style, many others with only peripheral relevance to any type of jazz.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The distinctive Fountain sound — more woody than most — came from the crystal mouthpieces he played with since 1949. His first crystal mouthpiece was actually Irving Fazola's, given to Pete by Fazola's mother after Faz's death, because she had heard him play and noted how he played like her son. That mouthpiece was shattered on the bandstand one night when Pete had played his solo and was standing by as trumpeter George Girard played his [own solo], and Girard brought his trumpet down suddenly on top of the mouthpiece. Pete kept the shattered mouthpiece, and played other crystal mouthpieces from then on.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fountain led the Pete Fountain Quintett, a New Orleans French Quarter jazz band of Fountain and his Creole-style music. The "Quintett" had many musicians over the years, but primarily recorded with Jack Sperling on drums, bassists Don Bagley or Morty Corb, vibeist Godfrey Hirch, and pianists Merle Kock or Stan Wrightsman.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fountain married Beverly Lang on October 27, 1951; they remained married for sixty-five years until his death. They have two sons and a daughter: Kevin, Jeffrey, and Dahra. Dahra's husband, Benny Harrell, was Fountain's manager in his later years.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fountain died of heart failure in his home town on August 6, 2016, at the age of eighty-six. He had suffered from heart problems and was in hospice care when he died.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]At the time of his death, Fountain was registered to vote in Orleans Parish as an Independent under the name Peter D. Fountain, Jr.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]- [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 2006, Loyola University New Orleans awarded Fountain an honorary degree.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]- [/FONT][FONT=&quot]On March 18, 2007, Pete Fountain was inducted into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]- [/FONT][FONT=&quot]On April 5, 2008, Fountain was inducted at the seventh annual Delta Music Museum Festival in Ferriday in Concordia Parish. An exhibit was dedicated to Fountain, and he received a star on the museum "Walk of Fame" sidewalk.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Guillermo Anderson, one of the best known Honduran musicians, dies at age 54. His music is about the beauty in different forms in Honduras, sometimes talks about social problems, but also personal topics. His music mixes tropical rhythms, garifuna drums and contemporany music. Some of his discs were created to be enjoyed by kids.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Anderson was born in La Ceiba, Atlántida, Honduras, February 26, 1962. He studied primary school Escuela Mazapán, at La Ceiba, and High School at San Isidro School also in La Ceiba.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Guillermo traveled to United States and studied at University of California, Santa Cruz where he studied letters with focus on Hispanoamerican literature, and graduated in 1986. At this time he produced a disc and concert called "Para Los Chiquitos" (a disc album for kids). After this time he worked on teather with "El Teatro De La Esperanza" on San Francisco, California, and El Teatro Campesino with Luis Valdez (producer of La Bamba).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1987 Guillermo returned to Honduras, and created La Ceiba COLECTIVARTES, an artist movement with other group of artists, and invited other artists from Europe and USA to perform different works on La Ceiba. The most popular of these works was "Sabor A Sombra", based on Nelson Merren poetry.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]After this, Guillermo started to make concerts and performances on festivals like "Aires de Abril" on Tegucigalpa and country sides of Honduras. During this era, Anderson made his first records of songs like; "Retratos" and "En Mi País" that recorded on cassettes that sell athis concerts. He often traveled to forest areas of Honduras, among them, La Mosquitia a kind of Central American Amazonia where he recovered their musical traditions.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Swedish music streaming service Spotify reported that 'The Girl From Ipanema' was streamed more than 40,000 times after it was played while supermodel Gisele Bundchen walked onstage during the opening ceremony of the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. The song first became a hit for Astrud Gilberto and Stan Getz in 1964 when it peaked at No.5 on the US chart.[/FONT]
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6 August
page 4 of 4[/FONT]
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]7 August [/FONT][FONT=&quot]………………………………………………………………………………. Total views 671,554
Page 1 of 3

in 1609 - Eustache du Caurroy, French composer of the late Renaissance, dies at 60. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He was a prominent composer of both secular and sacred music at the end of the Renaissance, including musique mesurée, and he was also influential on the foundation of the French school of organ music as exemplified in the work of Jean Titelouze.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]According to Jean-Benjamin de La Borde, writing in 1780, Du Caurroy was born in Gerberoy and was baptised in Beauvais. He probably entered royal service around 1569, and in 1575 is first mentioned in documents from the royal court, when he won a song competition: he was to win two more, in 1576 and 1583, for a motet and a chanson respectively. He became sous-maître de la chapelle royale, a post which he held until 1595, at which time he was appointed to be official composer of the royal chamber; in 1599 he also acquired the post of composer at the royal chapel.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Du Caurroy accumulated wealth and honours in the first decade of the 17th century, including benefices and a large estate in Picardy. In his late years he also held the post of canon at several churches, including Sainte-Croix in Orléans, Sainte-Chapelle in Dijon, as well as others in Passy and Saint-Cyr-en-Bourg.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Du Caurroy was a late practitioner of the style of musique mesurée, the musical method of setting French verse (vers mesurés) in long and short syllables, to long and short note values, in a homophonic texture, as pioneered by Claude Le Jeune under the influence of Jean-Antoine de Baïf and his Académie de musique et de poésie. Many of Du Caurroy's chansons written in this style were not published until 1609, long after the disbanding of the Académie, and they contrast significantly with his otherwise more conservative musical output. According to Du Caurroy, he was initially hostile to writing in the style, but was so moved by a performance of a composition of Le Jeune's, a pseaume mesuré sung by a hundred voices, that he wanted to attempt it himself.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Du Caurroy was primarily interested in counterpoint, and was widely read in the theoretical work of the time, including that of Gioseffe Zarlino, who provided the best available summation of the contrapuntal practice in the 16th century. His contrapuntal interest is best shown in his sacred music, of which the largest collection is the two volumes of motets, 53 in all, entitled Preces ecclesiasticae, published in Paris in 1609. They are from 3 to 7 voices.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]His Missa pro defunctis, first performed at the funeral of Henry IV of France, was the requiem mass which was played at St. Denis for the funerals of French kings for the next several centuries. It is a long composition containing the Libera me responsory, the chant for which is similar to the famous Dies irae.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Du Caurroy also used the musique mesurée technique in his sacred compositions, including seven psalm settings, published in his Meslanges (Paris, posthumously, 1610): one is in Latin, one of the few examples of a musique mesurée setting in a language other than French.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Marin Mersenne's Harmonie universelle contains a setting by Du Caurroy of Pie Jesu, which is a canon for six voices. In this same book, Mersenne held that Du Caurroy was the finest composer of musique mesurée, outranking even the renowned Claude Le Jeune.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Du Caurroy also wrote instrumental music, including contrapuntal fantasies for three to six instruments. The collection of 42 such pieces, published posthumously in 1610, is considered to be a strong influence on the next generation of French keyboard players, especially Jean Titelouze, the founder of the French organ school.[/FONT]

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in 1712 - Friederich Wilhelm Zachow, German musician and composer of vocal and keyboard music, dies at 48.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Zachow probably received his training from his father, the piper Heinrich Zachow, one of Leipzig's town musicians in the Alta capella, and maybe from Johann Schelle, a leading German composer, when the family moved to Eilenburg. As Kantor and organist of Halle's Market Church in 1684 he succeeded Samuel Ebart. During his time at Halle he became particularly renowned as a composer of dramatic cantatas. In 1695 he was criticized by the pietists because of his excessive long and elaborate music, that could be only appreciated by cantors and organists. Zachow was influenced by Johann Theile in Merseburg and the poetry of Erdmann Neumeister, pastor in the nearby Weissenfels, and his criticism on pietism.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Zachow was the teacher of Gottfried Kirchhoff, Johann Philipp Krieger and Johann Gotthilf Ziegler, but is best remembered as George Frideric Handel's first music teacher. He taught Handel how to play the violin, organ, harpsichord, and oboe as well as counterpoint. Zachow's teaching was so effective, that in 1702 at the age of seventeen, Handel accepted a position as organist at the former Dom in Halle. It is said that after Zachow died in 1712, Handel became a benefactor to his widow and children in gratitude for his teacher's instruction. In 1713 J.S. Bach was invited as Zachow's successor.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Handel continued to use Zachow's compositions in his own works, not simply quoting, but also in terms of instrumental colour; for example the cantata Herr, wenn ich nur dich habe, which is unique in having a harp solo in the German cantata repertoire, was copied by Handel, taken to London, and may have influenced the instrumentation of Saul and Esther.[/FONT]

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in 1786 - Friedrich Schwindl, Dutch composer and musician, dies at 49.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Friedrich Schwindl was a violinist , flutist , pianist , lecturer and composer. In 1763 he met the young Mozart in Brussels . Among other things he was concertmaster of the Count of Wied-Runkel , at the court of Colloredo and in 1770 at the court of Wilhelm V in The Hague . In 1776 he settled in Geneva , where he founded a music school. In 1780 he moved to Karlsruhe, where he worked as a concertmaster of the Markgräflich Badischen Hofkapelle until his death and wrote for these two singing games .[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]His works were very fashionable at the time and were edited by Johann Nepomuk Hummel in Amsterdam. He wrote, among other things, symphonies in Mannheim style, chamber music , vocal duets and trio, as well as oratorios and various choral works . The Singspiele The three tenants (1778) and the Liebesgrab (1779) were both performed in Mühlhausen .[/FONT]

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in 1798 - Johann Gottlieb Sollner, German Kantor, pastor and archdeacon (and composer?), dies at 65.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He attended the Thomasschule in Leipzig from 1748 to 1756 (1748-1750 under J.S. Bach). Recommended by Johann Tobias Krebs, jr., he was accepted immediately upon arrival in Leipzig into the primary choir where he became a concertist, eventually a prefect. In 1756 he enrolled at the University of Leipzig. He served as Kantor in Ernstthal from 1758 to 1770. After 1770 he was Lutheran pastor and archdeacon in Saxony: 1770 Pfarrer (Pastor) in Schlunzig; 1782 Diakon in Glauchau.

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in 1815 - Karl Johann Formes, German bass, brother of Theodor Formes, is born at Millheim. He was a pupil of Basodowa in Vienna. After making his operatic debut as Sarastro in Cologne (jan, 6, 1842), he sang in Mannheim before appearing in Vienna (1843-49). In 1849 he made his London debut at Drury Lane. On March 16, 1850, he made his first appearance at London's Covent Garden as Caspar in Der Preischiitz, returning there regularly until 1868. He also sang at London's Royal Italian Opera (1852-57). In 1857 he made his N.Y. debut as Bertram in Robert Ie diable at the Academy of Music, where he sang for some 20 years. After his retirement, he settled in San Francisco as a voice teacher. He published a Method of Singing (3 vols., 1865; 2n d ed., 1885) and an autobiography, Aus meinem Kunst- und Biihnenleben: Erinnerungen des Baseisten (Cologne, 1888; Eng. tr., 1891, as My Memoirs). Among his best known roles were Leporello, Rocco, Nicolai's Falstaff, and Flotow's Plunkett. His vocal compass was from low C to F above the staff. - Died at San Francisco, Dec. 15, 1889.

in 1818 - Henry Charles Litolff, French composer/pianist is born.
in 1823 - Faustina Hasse Hodges, composer is born.

in 1832 - Julius Epstein, Austrian pianist and pedagogue, father of Richard Epstein, is born at Agram, Croatia. He was a pupil at Agram of Ignaz Lichtenegger, and at Vienna of Anton Halm (piano) and Johann Rufinatscha (composition). From 1867 to 1901 he was a professor of piano at the Vienna Conservatory. Among his pupils were Gustav Mahler and Ignaz Briill. – Died at Vienna, March 1, 1926.

in 1835 - Allan James Foli (real name, Foley), Irish bass, is born at Cahir, Tipperary. He was a pupil of Bisaccia in Naples. Following a Widespread fashion among aspiring English opera singers, he changed his name to an Italian sounding homonym, Foli, and made a career as "Signor Foil" He made his professional debut as Elmiro in Rossini's Otello in Catania in 1862, then sang throughout Italy. He appeared in London at Her Majesty's Theatre in 1865, and later at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. He toured the U.S. with Mapleson's opera company (1878-79), and also traveled in South Africa, Australia, and Russia. - Died at Southport, Oct. 20, 1899.

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in 1846 - Johann Christian Heinrich Rinck, German composer and organist of the late classical and early romantic eras, dies at 76.

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[FONT=&quot]Rinck was born in Elgersburg (in present-day Thuringia), and died in Darmstadt.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]He studied with Johann Christian Kittel (1732–1809), (a pupil of Johann Sebastian Bach), and eventually became Kantor at the music school in Darmstadt, where he was also a court organist from 1813. He composed prolifically, and an organ primer of his enjoyed wide popularity.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Among his works is a set of Variations on ‘Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman’, Opus 90, published by Simrock in 1828. It is based on a tune made familiar by Mozart (K265) (and generally associated with the words Twinkle Twinkle Little Star). Notable students include composer Georg Vierling.[/FONT]

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in 1868 - Granville Bantock, English composer/conductor (Hebridean Symphony) and pedagogue is born at London. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He was a student of Frederick Corder at the Royal Academy of Music in London (1889-93), where he won the first Macfarren Scholarship. From 1893 to 1896 he was the editor of the New Quarterly Musical Review. In 1894-95 he made a world tour as conductor of the musical comedy The Gaiety Girl. From 1897 to 1900 he was director of music of the Tower Orchestra in New Brighton, where he won notice as a conductor of contemporary works. From 1900 to 1914 he was principal of the Birmingham and Midland Institute School of Music. He served as the Peyton Professor of Music at the University of Birmingham from 1908 to 1934. He subsequently was a teacher and examiner at the Trinity College of Music in London. He was knighted in 1930. Bantock was a prolific composer who often wrote works on a vast scale. Many of his scores were of a programmatic nature, and revealed his fascination for exotic and heroic subjects. An Oriental and Celtic bent was particularly pronounced. His works were brilliantly scored and highly effective in performance, but they are rarely heard today. - Died at London, Oct. 16, 1946.

in 1887 - Reinald Werrenrath, American baritone, is born at Brooklyn. He was a pupil of his father, a tenor, then of David Bispham and Herbert Witherspoon. He began his career as a concert singer he was also in oratorio. He made his operatic debut on Feb. 19, 1919, at the Metropolitan Opera in N.Y., as Silvio in Pagliacci, and remained with the company until 1921; he then devoted himself to teaching and concert singing. He appeared in public for the last time at Carnegie Hall in N.Y. on Oct. 23, 1952. He edited Modern Scandinavian Songs (2 vols., Boston, 1925-26). - Died at Plattsburg, N.Y., Sept. 12, 1953.

in 1887 - Luckeyeth Roberts (US jazz/ragtime/blues composer and pianist) is born.

in 1893 - Alfredo Catalani dies at age 39. Italian operatic composer born in Lucca and trained at the Conservatory of Milan under Antonio Bazzini. He is best remembered for his operas Loreley-1890 and La Wally-1892. La Wally was composed for a libretto by Luigi Illica, and features Alfredo's most famous aria "Ebben? Ne andrò lontana". His symphonies included ''Sinfonia a piena orchestra'', ''Il Mattino, sinfonia romantica'' and ''Ero e Leandro, poema sinfonico'' (tuberculosis).[/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]in 1903 - Saburo Moroi, Japanese composer, teacher, and writer on music, father of Makoto Moroi, is born at Tokyo. He studied literature at the University of Tokyo (1926-28), and later took lessons in composition with Max Trapp, orchestration with Gmeindl, and piano with Robert Schmidt at the Hochschule fur Musik in Berlin (1932-34). Upon returning to Japan, he was active as a music teacher; was inspector of music and adult education for the Ministry of Culture (1946-64) and director of Tokyo's Gakuen Academy of Music (1967-77); among his students, in addition to his son, were Dan and Irino. Among his numerous publications are Junsui tai i ho (Strict Counterpoint; Tokyo, 1949) and Gakushiki no kenkyu (Historical Research on Musical Forms; 5 vols., Tokyo, 1957-67). - Died at Tokyo, March 24, 1977.

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in 1903 - Maria Reining, noted Austrian soprano, is born at Vienna. She studied at a business school, and was employed in the foreign exchange dept. of a Vienna bank before taking up singing. In 1931 she made her debut at the Vienna State Opera, remaining on its roster until 1933; then sang in Darmstadt (1933-35) and at the Bavarian State Opera in Munich (1935-37). In 1937 she rejoined the Vienna State Opera, continuing on its roster, with interruptions, until 1958; also appeared at the Salzburg Festivals (1937-41); Toscanini engaged her to sing Eva in Die Meistersinger von Numberg in Salzburg under his direction in 1937; she also sang the role of the Marschallin in Der Rosenkavalier and the title role in Arabella by Richard Strauss. She was equally successful in soubrette roles and as a dramatic soprano. In 1938 she appeared with the Covent Garden Opera in London and with the Chicago Opera; in 1949, as the Marschallin with the N.Y.C. Opera. She also sang at La Scala in Milan, and toured as a concert singer. In 1962 she became a professor of singing at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. - Died at Vienna, March 11,1991.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1904 -Dave Kapp [/FONT][FONT=&quot]is born in Chicago, Illinois. The man most responsible for building DECCA RECORDS' early hillbilly catalogue was David Kapp, younger brother of label founder JACK KAPP. Together the two owned and ran a Chicago music store from 1921 to 1931. Joining Decca in 1935 (its second year), Dave Kapp and a company engineer traveled several times per year into the South to find and record hillbilly talent. Under Kapp's supervision, MILTON BROWN, CLIFF BRUNER, REX GRIFFIN, ERNEST TUBB, and others made their most important recordings. Kapp left Decca in 1951 and headed RCA VICTOR'S pop department for two years, then in 1954 founded Kapp Records. Years later the label added a country roster—BOB WILLS, MEL TILLIS, and CAL SMITH became the label's best known artists. Also a writer ("160 Acres") and publisher (Garland Music), Kapp was RIAA president in 1966-67. He sold Kapp Records to MCA in 1967. Died March 1,1976.[/FONT]
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in 1906 - Max Rostal, Austrian-born English violinist and pedagogue, is born at Teschen, Silesia. He studied violin with Arnold Rose in Vienna and with Carl Flesch in Berlin, where he also took courses in composition with Emil Bohnke and Matyas Seiber at the Hochschule fur Musik; then was a professor there (1930-33). In 1934 he left Nazi Germany; eventually went to London and became a naturalized British subject. He was a professor at the Guildhall School of Music (1944-58), the Cologne Conservatory (1957), and the Bern Conservatory (1958). In 1977 he was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire. He was especially noted for his performances of contemporary music. - Died at Bern, Aug. 6, 1991.

in 1906 - Gerhard Frommel, composer is born.

in 1907 - Suzanne Bloch, Swiss-American lutenist and harpsichordist, daughter of Ernest Bloch, is born at Geneva. She went to the U.S. with her father; studied there with him and with Sessions; then in Paris with Boulanger. She became interested in early music, which she championed on original instruments. With I. Heskes, she published Ernest Bloch, Creative Spirit: A Program Source Book (N.Y., 1976).

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in 1910 - Freddie Slack (FREDERIC CHARLES SLACK) is born. A popular bandleader in the Forties, the classically trained Freddie Slack mixed boogie-woogie and jazz styles and was an integral cog in the development of jump-blues and R&B. A lively pianist, Slack had previously worked in the big bands of Ben Pollack and Jimmy Dorsey. Joining Bill Bradley’s band in 1939, he took the outfit in a boogie-woogie direction. Leaving to front his own West Coast group in 1941, Slack scored his first major hit with the early crossover entry, ‘Cow Cow Boogie’, with the vocal by his combo’s attractive singer, Ella Mae Morse. One of the first acts signed to the fledgling Capitol Records, Slack hired the then-unknown Texas blues guitarist T-Bone Walker, recording proto-R&B styled hits with ‘Mr. Five By Five’ (1942) and featuring a revolutionary single-string guitar solo, ‘Riffette’ (1942). Slack’s other hits included ‘Strange Cargo’ and in a reunion with Morse, the boogie-woogie styled ‘House Of Blue Lights’ (1946). Abandoning his orchestra for a combo in the early Fifties, Slack was relegated to smaller venues. He died under mysterious circumstances in his Hollywood, California, apartment. - Died August 10, 1965.

in 1913 - David Popper, Bohemian cellist and composer, dies at 70.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Popper was born in Prague, and studied music at the Prague Conservatory. His family was Jewish. He studied the cello under Julius Goltermann (1825–1876), and soon attracted attention. He made his first tour in 1863; in Germany he was praised by Hans von Bülow, son-in-law of Franz Liszt, who recommended him as Chamber Virtuoso in the court of Prince von Hohenzollern-Hechingen in Löwenberg. In 1864, he premiered Robert Volkmann's Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 33, with Hans von Bülow conducting the Berlin Philharmonic. He lost this job a couple of years later due to the prince's death.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]He made his debut in Vienna in 1867, and was made principal cellist at the Hofoper. From 1868 to 1870 he was also a member of the Hellmesberger Quartet. In 1872, he married pianist Sophie Menter, a pupil of Liszt. She later joined the staff at the St. Petersburg Conservatory. In 1873, Popper resigned from his post at the Hofoper so as to continue his tours with his wife on a larger scale, giving concerts throughout Europe. Popper's and Menter's marriage was dissolved in 1886.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]That year, Liszt recommended Popper for a teaching position at the newly opened string department at the Conservatory at Budapest. In Budapest, he participated in the Budapest Quartet with Jenő Hubay. He and Hubay performed chamber music on more than one occasion with Johannes Brahms, including the premiere of Brahms's Piano Trio No. 3 in Budapest, on December 20, 1886.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Popper died in Baden, near Vienna.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Among his notable students were Arnold Földesy, Jenő Kerpely, Mici Lukács, Ludwig Lebell and Adolf Schiffer (teacher of János Starker).[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]David Popper was one of the last great cellists who did not use an endpin. An 1880 drawing of Popper playing in a string quartet shows that although he started his cello career without using an endpin, he adopted it later in his life.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Popper was a prolific composer of cello music, writing four concertos, a Requiem for three cellos and orchestra (1891) and a number of smaller pieces which are still played today, including the solo piece Tarantella. His shorter showpieces were written to highlight the unique sound and style of the cello, extending the instrument's range with pieces such as Spinnlied (Spinning Song), Elfentanz (Dance of the Elves), or the Ungarische Rhapsodie (Hungarian Rhapsody), which was published by the Friedrich Hofmeister Musikverlag. He also wrote instructional pieces. Popper is also known for his High School of Cello Playing (Op. 73), a book of cello études that is widely used by advanced cello students.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]An old edition of the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians described him thus: "His tone is large and full of sentiment; his execution highly finished, and his style classical."

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in 1913 - George Van Eps noted jazz guitarist, son of Fred van Eps, is born at Plainfield, N.J. He had three brothers who were professional musicians: Bobby (piano), Freddy (trumpet), and John (tenor sax); their father, Fred van Eps, who recorded extensively in the 1910s and 1920s, was a noted ragtime banjoist; their mother played piano. George began doing gigs at 13, playing banjo in a band led by his brother, Fred; he did his first solo broadcast at 14 and was teaching at 15. He studied watch-making, but began touring with Harry Reser's Junior Artists and then worked with the Dutch Master Minstrels before joining Smith Ballew from 1929-31.

Van Eps spent six months working with his idol, guitarist Eddie Lang; then, after a two-year spell with Freddy Martin, he worked with Benny Goodman in 1934 and 1935; he left in summer 1935 to work with Ray Noble's Orch., working with him for a year. He then moved to Hollywood for freelance studio work, remaining there until late 1939. He designed a sevenstring guitar (featuring an extra bass string) and wrote a text on guitar playing. Van Eps worked again with Ray Noble from autumn of 1940 until spring of 1941, spent two years in his father's sound laboratory, and then moved to the West Coast to recommence prolific studio work.

He participated in the film Pete Kelly's Blues and in the television series of the same name in the middle and late 1950s. He played various festivals in the 1960s and 1970s. Illness restricted his activities during the early 1970s, however, and from then until his death he performed only occasionally. He worked with Peanuts Hucko in 1986. Van Eps was the seventh recipient of the American Federation of Jazz Societies Benny Carter Award (1997). - Died at Newport Beach, Calif., Nov. 29, 1998.

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in 1914 - Boleslaw Dembinski, Polish composer and organist, and an activist for the singer's societies., dies at 81.

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in 1919 - Kim Borg, Finnish bass, teacher, and composer, is born at Helsinki. He studied voice with Heikki Teittinen in Helsinki (1936-41; 1945-47), where he also received training in theory and composition with Leo Funtek and Aarre Merikanto, and then pursued vocal studies with Andrejewa de Skilondz in Stockholm (1950-59). He also studied biochemistry at the Helsinki Institute of Technology (diploma, 1946). In 1947 he made his formal concert debut in Helsinki, and in 1951 his formal operatic debut in Arhus as Colline in La Boheme. In addition to his concert appearances, he sang regularly in opera in Helsinki and Copenhagen (1952-70), Stockholm (1963-75), and Hamburg (1964- 70). On Oct. 30, 1959, he made his Metropolitan Opera debut in N.Y. as Count Almaviva, remaining on its roster until 1962. In 1961 he appeared as Boris Godunov in Moscow. He retired from the stage in 1980. From 1972 to 1989 he was a professor at the Royal Danish Conservatory of Music in Copenhagen. He published the books Suomalainen laulajanaapinen (ABC for a Finnish Singer; Helsinki, 1972) and Muistelmia (Memoirs; Helsinki, 1992). Among his compositions were 2 symphonies, Sinfonietta for Strings, a Trombone Concerto, a Concerto for Double Bass and Strings, chamber music, a Stabat Mater, and songs. He also prepared orchestrations of Mussorgsky's Songs and Dances of Death and Without Sun, and of Wolf's Michelangelo Lieder. In addition to Boris Godnunov, he also had success in such roles as Osmin, Don Giovanni, King Marke, Hans Sachs, Don Carlos, Pimen, Gremin, Rossini's Don Basilio, and Debussy's Arkel. - Died April 28, 2000.

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in 1921 - Karel Husa, distinguished Czech-born American composer, conductor, and pedagogue, is born at Prague. He studied violin and piano in his youth, and concurrently took courses in engineering. In 1941 he entered the Prague Conservatory, studying composition with ridky. In 1945-46 he attended the Academy of Music; in 1946 he was awarded a French government grant to continue his studies in Paris at the Ecole Normale de Musique and the Conservatory, where his teachers included Honegger and Boulanger. He also studied conducting with Fournet and Cluytens.

In 1954 he emigrated to the U.S., and joined the music dept. of Cornell University as teacher of composition and conductor of the student orchestra, remaining there until his retirement in 1992. He also taught at Ithaca College (1967-86). He became a naturalized American citizen in 1959. He appeared widely as a guest conductor, frequently including his own music in his programs. In his early works, he followed the modem Czech school of composition, making thematic use of folk tunes; later he enlarged his musical resources to include atonal, polytonal, microtonal, and even occasional aleatory procedures, without following doctrinaire prescriptions to the letter.

His music is oxygenated by humanistic Romanticism; as a result, it gains numerous performances. In 1969 Husa received the Pulitzer Prize in Music for his 3rd String Quartet. In 1974 he was elected to membership in the Royal Belgian Academy of the Arts and Sciences. He received honorary doctor of music degrees from Coe College (1976), the Cleveland Institute of Music (1985), Ithaca College (1986), Baldwin-Wallace College (1991), St. Vincent College (1995), Hartwick College (1997), and the New England Conservatory of Music (1998).

In 1983 he received the Friedheim Award for his Recollections for Woodwind Quintet and Piano. He received the Sudley International Award in 1984 for his Concerto for Wind Ensemble. In 1993 he received the Grawemeyer Award of the Univ. of Louisville for his Cello Concerto. He became a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1994. In 1995 President Havel of the Czech Republic bestowed upon him the State Medal Award of Merit, 1st Class, and in 1998 he was awarded the Medal of the City of Prague.

in 1921 - Warren Covington (US trombone player, bandleader) is born.

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in 1921 - Manitas de Plata / Ricardo Baliardo (French gypsy guitarist) is born.
He was born in a Gypsy (Gitano) caravan in Sète in southern France. He became famous by playing each year at the Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer Gypsy pilgrimage in Camargue, where he was recorded live by Deben Bhattacharya. Manitas de Plata only agreed to play in public ten years after the death of Django Reinhardt, unanimously considered the king of gypsy guitarists. One of his recordings earned him a letter by Jean Cocteau acclaiming him as a creator.

Upon hearing him play at Arles in 1964, Pablo Picasso is said to have exclaimed "that man is of greater worth than I am!" and proceeded to draw on the guitar.

Manitas de Plata became really famous only after a photography exhibition in New York, organized by his friend Lucien Clergue. He had recorded his first official album in the chapel of Arles in France, in 1963, for the Phillips label. It was also later re-released, in 1967, by the Connoisseur Society Label and sold through the Book of the Month Club. This was a popular LP that brought him to the attention of an American audience. An American manager obtained a booking for him to play a concert in Carnegie Hall in New York in December 1965.

In New York, Manitas de Plata, who was illiterate, represented Europe at the yearly gala of the United Nations.

Since 1967 Manitas de Plata has been touring the whole world and recording discs. He played with the dancer Nina Corti. In 1968 he played at the Royal Variety Performance in London.

Despite the fact that Manitas de Plata was famous, he was also known for disrespecting certain rhythmic rules (compás) that are essential in flamenco.

Manitas de Plata is the father of Jacques, Maurice, and Tonino Baliardo and also uncle to Nicolas and Andre Reyes (the sons of renowned flamenco artist Jose Reyes), all members of the world-famous Rumba Flamenca musicians, Gipsy Kings.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]in 1922 - Helmut (Max) Kallmann, esteemed German born Canadian librarian, musicologist, and editor, is born at Berlin. He studied music with his father. He left Germany in 1939 for London, where he was interned as a German citizen in 1940, and then was interned in Canada (1940-43); after his release, he became a naturalized Canadian citizen (1946). He took music courses at the University of Toronto (B.Mus., 1949), and then became a music librarian for the CBC in 1950. He was supervisor of its music collection from 1962. From 1970 to 1987 he served as chief of the music division of the National Library of Canada in Ottawa. In 1982 he co-founded and became chair of the Canadian Musical Heritage Soc. Its series of 25 vols., of which he ed. numbers 8 and 22, was completed in 1999. He pub!. a number of useful books, including a Catalogue of Canadian Composers (Toronto, 1952) and A History of Music in Canada 1534-1914 (Toronto, 1960); with G. Potvin and K. Winters, he edited the authoritative Encyclopedia of Music in Canada (Toronto, 1981; 2nd ed., rev., 1992).

in 1923 - Idrees Sulieman (US jazz musician, flugelhorn, trumpet) is born.[/FONT]
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in 1924 - Camille Zeckwer, American composer, dies at 49.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Son of Richard Zeckwer, he was born in Philadelphia, and was educated at that city's Musical Academy. Further study followed with Antonín Dvořák in New York City before he traveled to Berlin to study with Xavier Scharwenka. He then returned to Philadelphia, becoming an instructor at the Academy; with Frederick E. Hahn, he served as its co-director for a number of years. As a composer Zeckwer was active mainly in smaller forms, producing many songs and chamber pieces; in larger forms he composed a symphonic poem, a piano concerto, an opera, and numerous cantatas.

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in 1925 - Julian Orbon De Soto, Spanish-American composer, is born at Aviles. He entered the Oviedo Conservatory, when he was 10. In 1938 he went with his family to Havana, where he continued his training under his father (piano) and Ardevol (composition). After completing his training in composition with Copland at the Berkshire Music Center in Tanglewood (summer, 1945), he returned to Havana and became director of his father's Orbon Conservatory in 1946. In the wake of the Cuban Revolution, he went to Mexico City in 1960 and worked with Chavez at the National Conservatory until 1963. In 1964 he settled in the U.S. In 1964-65 he taught at the State University of N.Y at Purchase and at Washington University in St. Louis. He subsequently concentrated his efforts on composition. In 1959 and 1969 he held Guggenheim fellowships. In 1967 he received an award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. After composing works revealing Spanish and Cuban stylistic traits, he turned to a more expressive Romantic style in his later scores. - Died at Miami Beach, May 20,1991.

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in 1925 - Felice Bryant (US songwriter) is born.
in 1926 - Voice actor/recording artist Stan Freberg is born in Pasadena, California.[/FONT]
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in 1930 - Velio Tormis, Estonian composer, is born at Harjamaa. His musical studies led him to pursue an interest in Estonian folk music. This initial interest prompted him to explore the rich musical heritage of the Baltic-Finnish peoples, which served as an inspiration for his creative work. Tormis has composed many choral works that approach the stature of symphonic scores. Particularly outstanding is his large choral cycle Forgotten Peoples (1970-89). His works have been performed widely abroad, and many have been recorded.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1931 - Herb Reed (founding member of The Platters) is born in Kansas City, Missouri.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]7 August [/FONT]
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Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]7 August [/FONT][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
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in 1932 - Nicholas Temperley, distinguished English born American musicologist, is born at Beaconsfield. He was educated at Eton College (1945-51), the Royal College of Music in London (1951-52), and King's College, Cambridge (B.A., 1955; B.Mus., 1956; Ph.D., 1959, with the dissertation Instrumental Music in England, 1800-1850). From 1959 to 1961 he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Ill. He was an asst. lecturer in music at the University of Cambridge from 1961 to 1966, and also a fellow and director of studies in music (1961-66) and a visiting fellow (1970-71) at Clare Colege, Cambridge. In 1966-67 he was an asst. professor at Yale University. From 1967 to 1972 he was an assoc. professor, from 1972 to 1996 a professor, and from 1996 professor emeritus at the University of Ill., where he also served as chairman of its musicology dept. from 1972 to 1975 and from 1992 to 1996. In 1975-76 he held an NEH fellowship. He became a naturalized American citizen in 1977. From 1978 to 1980 he was editor of the Journal of the American Musicological Society. In 1980 he was honored with the Otto Kindeldey Award of the American Musicological Soc. In 1986 he became general ed. of the Oxford Studies in British Church Music series. In addition to his books and editions, Temperley has also contributed articles to learned journals.

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in 1935 - Rahsaan Roland Kirk (US saxophonist) is born.
in 1936 - Charles Pope, US soul singer (Tams-Hey Girl Don't Bother Me) is born.
in 1937 - Bunny Berigan records "I Can't Get Started."[/FONT]
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in 1937 - Frederick Fisher Hammond, American musicologist and keyboardist, is born at Binghamton, N.Y., He was educated at Yale University (B.A., 1958; Ph.D., 1965, with the dissertation The Summa de Speculatione Musicae of Walter Odington: A Critical Edition and Commentary), where he received training in harpsichord from Kirkpatrick. He taught at the University of Chicago (1962-65) and at Queens College of the City University of N.Y. (1966-68). In 1969 he made his N.Y. recital debut. His engagements took him throughout the U.S., Canada, and Europe. From 1968 to 1992 he taught at the University of Calif. at Los Angeles. He was asst. music director of the Castelfranco Veneto Festival from 1975 to 1980. In 1986 he founded the E. Nakamichi Festival of Baroque Music, serving as its director until 1990. In 1989 he became the Irma Brandeis Professor of Romance Studies at Bard College and in 1995 music director of the Clarion Music Society. His honors include a Rome Prize Fellowship (1965-66), a Harvard Renaissance Center Fellowship (1971), and the Cavaliere al merito della Repubblica of Italy (1986). His research has focused on 17th century Rome. His biography of Frescobaldi (1983) is a standard source.

in 1939 - Ron Holden (ROLAN HOLDEN) (US pop singer is born. A one-hit R&B wonder, Ron Holden landed a Top 10 entry in 1960 with the million-selling, ‘Love You So’. He had written the song with fellow inmates during a brief jail stint at King County Jail in Seattle. He later operated a nightclub. His father was jazz great Oscar Holden. He died in a jail cell in Roarito Beach, Mexico. He had been in town for a performance. (Heart attack). - Died January 20, 1997.

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in 1941 - Howard (Lewis) Johnson, jazz tubist, baritone saxophonist (also trumpet, flugelhorn, four different clarinets, bass saxophone, electric bass, and pennywhistle), is born at Montgomery, Ala. His fluency, range, and skill on the tuba are astonishing. A selftaught musician, Johnson started on baritone sax at age 13 and moved to tuba at 14. After serving in the Navy in the late 1950s, he settled in Boston, living with the family of drummer Tony Williams.

In 1962, he moved to N.Y.C. on the advice of Eric Dolphy, where he met Pharoah Sanders, another recent arrival. From 1964-66, he worked with Charlie Mingus's band. Four days after hearing Johnson at a gig in 1966, Gil Evans called to invite Howard to join him in Monterey. That relationship lasted on and off until Evans's passing in 1988.

Johnson also formed Substructure in 1966, a band that at one point included four tubas and backed Taj Mahal. He wrote arrangements for Maria Muldaur, Paul Butterfield, and B. B. King while working with Mahal. Over the years, Howard has worked with Hank Crawford, Archie Shepp, Buddy Rich, Freddie Hubbard, McCoy Tyner, Marvin Gaye, Miles Davis, Quincy Jones, The Band (with whom he appeared at Woodstock '94), and the Saturday Night Live band (which he founded in 1975 and led in 1979).

In 1971, he formed a second tuba band Gravity. They performed on SNL, in N.Y., and toured Europe. Johnson recorded with Jack DeJohnette's Special Edition, Jimmy Heath, and Crawford again in the 1980s. Through the 1990s, he toured the world with George Gruntz, Dizzy Gillespie, Abdullah Ibrahim's Ekaya, and others. He was heard on film soundtracks for Spike Lee's School Daze, Mo' Better Blues, Malcolm X, and Clockers. After a four-year association (1990-94) with the NDR Big Band in Hamburg, Germany, he returned to N.Y. and continued doing sessions and heading bands into the 1990s.

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[FONT=&quot]
[/FONT][FONT=&quot]in 1942 - B. J. Thomas is born in[/FONT][FONT=&quot] Hugo, Oklahoma. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Billy Joe Thomas began his recording career as a pop singer rendering an old country classic; in later years he moved into country and gospel. Thomas grew up in Rosenberg, Texas, just outside Houston. He recorded the HANK WILLIAMS classic "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" with his group the Triumphs at the Houston studio of Huey Meaux. It was released on the Scepter label in 1966 and became a Top Ten pop hit. Thomas also recorded another Hank Williams song, "I Can't Help It (If I'm Still in Love With You)," which was released in 1967, but it did not have the same degree of success as Thomas's first record. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The success of his first single led to a string of pop hits, including "Billy and Sue," "Eyes of a New York Woman," "Hooked on a Feeling," "I Just Can't Help Believing," and "Mighty Clouds of Joy." His biggest pop hit was "Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" (1969), which was the Academy Award-winning theme song for the movie [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1975 B. J. Thomas had his first country music hit on the ABC label with "(Hey Won't You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song." Produced by CHIPS MOMAN, the song was #1 in both the country and pop fields. A series of personal problems beset Thomas, who emerged as a born-again Christian in 1976 and began recording for the Christian label Myrrh. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1977 he released the album [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Home Where I Belong, [/FONT][FONT=&quot]a commercial success; he also wrote his autobiography, [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Home Where I Belong. [/FONT][FONT=&quot](He later wrote another book, [/FONT][FONT=&quot]In Tune, [/FONT][FONT=&quot]with his wife, Gloria.) In 1978 he returned to country music, first for MCA, then for Cleveland International (a subsidiary of CBS), where he had two #1 country hits, "Whatever Happened to Old Fashioned Love" (1983) and "New Looks from an Old Lover" (1983). [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1981 Thomas joined the GRAND OLE OPRY on his thirty-ninth birthday. Thomas won five Grammys for his gospel recordings, one each year between 1977 and 1981; "(Hey Won't You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song" won the 1975 Grammy for Best Country Song. —[/FONT][FONT=&quot]Don Cusic[/FONT][FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
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in 1942 - Caetano Veloso (Brazilian composer, singer, guitarist, writer) is born.
in 1943 - Lana Cantrell, Sydney, Australia, singer (Those Were the Days) is born.
in 1943 - Dino Valenti/Chester "Chet" Powers (US musician; Quicksilver Messenger Service) is born.

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in 1944 - Agustín Pío Barrios dies at age 59. Paraguayan guitarist and composer born in Misiones; he was famed for his phenomenal performances, both live and on gramophone recordings and for some years, it was his habit to perform in concert in traditional Paraguayan dress. His works were largely late-Romantic in character, despite his having lived well into the 20 century. Many of them are also adaptations of, or are influenced by, South American and Central American folk music. Very many of them are of a virtuosic nature. The Bach-inspired La Catedral-1921 is often considered to be his most impressive work, Agustin is still revered in Paraguay, where he is seen as one of the greatest musicians of all time by many.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1945 - Kerry Chater, rocker (Gary Puckett and Union Gap-Young Girl) is born.
in 1945 - Patrice Mestral, composer is born.
in 1945 - Kerry Chater (US bassist,rhythm guitar,songwriter; Gary Puckett & the Union Gap) is born.
in 1946 - Gail Robinson (US operatic soprano) is born.
in 1949 - Carlo Novi (US vocals, saxophone; Asbury Jukes/freelance) is born.

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in 1949 - Dan (Steven) Locklair, American composer, organist, and teacher, is born at Charlotte, N.C. He studied organ at Mars Hill (N.C.) College (B.M., 1971), took courses with Joseph Goodman (composition), Robert Baker (organ), and Eugenia Earle (harpsichord) at the Union Theological Seminary School of Sacred Music (S.M.M., 1973), and completed his education with Samuel Adler and Joseph Schwantner (composition) and David Craighead (organ) at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y. (D.M.A., 1981). From 1973 to 1982 he was a church musician in Binghamton, N.Y, and an instructor in music at Hartwick College in Oneonta, N.Y. In 1982 he became an asst. professor, in 1988 an assoc. professor, in 1990 composer-in-residence, and in 1996 a professor of music at Wake Forest Universotu in Winston-Salem, N.C. From 1981 he received annual ASCAP awards, in 1989 he won the Barlow International Competition, and in 1996 he was named Composer of the Year by the American Guild of Organists.

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in 1950 - Rodney Crowell, the first of the new wave of country-rock singer- songwriter-guitarists to emerge in the 1980s, gained his earliest recognition as leader of Emmylou Harris's Hot Band in the late 1970s, is born at Houston, Tex., Aug. 7, 1950.

Recognized as a songwriter and producer by the early 1980s, Crowell utilized both rock and country instrumentation and arrangements on his own recordings of songs either joyously amusing or profoundly honest, insightful, and emotive. He inspired countrystyle singer-songwriter-guitarists such as Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Robert Earl Keen, advanced the careers of others such as Guy Clark, produced much of the best work of his then-wife Rosanne Cash, and eventually broke through in the country field with 1988's Diamonds and Dirt.

Rodney Crowell began playing in his father's weekend honky-tonk band around age 11. In 1972 he moved to Nashville, where he met songwriters Guy Clark, Townes Van Zandt, and Steve Young. In 1974 Crowell moved to Los Angeles to join Emmylou Harris's Hot Band with electric guitarist James Burton (and later Albert Lee), pedal steel guitarist Hank DeVito, pianist Glen D. Hardin, and bassist Emory Gordy. He toured and recorded with Harris through 1977, contributing compositions such as '''Til I Gain Control Again," "Tulsa Queen," "Leaving Louisiana in the Broad Daylight," "I Ain't Living Long Like This," "Even Cowgirls Get the Blues," and"Amarillo" (cowritten with Harris). During the late 1970s Jerry Jeff Walker recorded his "Song for the Life" and Bobby Bare recorded his "On a Real Good Night." Crowell also produced albums by Bare and Guy Clark. In 1977 he met singer Rosanne Cash; he married her two years later. The two worked together on Cash's solo albums (and recorded a number of duets) through much of the 1980s.

Rodney Crowell's 1978 debut album for Warner Bros. contained a number of these songs, but other artists made hits out of them: The Oak Ridge Boys and Waylon Jennings scored top country hits with "Leaving Louisiana in the Broad Daylight" and "I Ain't Living Long Like This," respectively, and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band scored a major pop hit with "American Dream," all in 1980. Crowell garnered a cult following with But What Will the Neighbors Think, which included his "It's Only Rock 'n' Roll," "On a Real Good Night," and "Ashes by Now" (a moderate pop hit), plus Guy Clark's "Heartbroke" and Hank DeVito's "Queen of Hearts." Rodney Crowell, from 1981, featured his "Stars on the Water," "Victim or a Fool,"'''Til I Gain Control Again," and "Shame on the Moon." In 1983 Bob Seger scored a major country and smash pop hit with "Shame on the Moon," but Crowell's next album was rejected by Warner Bros.

Crowell switched to Columbia for Street Language, which yielded the minor country hits "When I'm Free Again," "She Loves the Jerk," and "Looking for You." Finally, in 1988 he was established as a country recording artist with Diamonds and Dirt, which produced five hit singles, including the top country hits "It's Such a Small World" (in duet with Rosanne Cash), "I Couldn't Leave You If I Tried," "She's Crazy for Leaving" (cowritten with Guy Clark), and"After All This Time." Still, Crowell remained primarily a fringe figure in country music, with a more eccentric, personal outlook than the hunks in hats who dominated the charts. Keys to the Highway featured "Soul Searchin'," "The Faith Is Mine," and "Tell Me the Truth" and was followed in 1992 with Life Is Messy, which reflected the breakup of his marriage to Rosanne Cash. He left Columbia in 1994 and has since issued an album on MCA.

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in 1952 - Andy Fraser, rock bassist (Free London) is born.
in 1952 - Richard Joswick, rocker (Bo Donaldson and the Heywoods) is born.
in 1952 - Alexei Sayle (US actor, comedian, comedy singer) is born.
in 1952 - Andy Fraser (UK bassist, songwriter; Free/Andy Fraser Band/guest) is born.

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in 1952 - Ian Hobson, English pianist, conductor, and teacher, is born at Wolverhampton. He studied piano and organ at the Royal Academy of Music in London, then pursued academic studies at Magdalene College, Cambridge (B.A., 1972). He subsequently studied piano with Claude Frank and harpsichord with Ralph Kirkpatrick at Yale University (D.M.A., 1978). He made his London debut in 1979. In 1981 he won 1st prize in the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition. He made his U.S. debut in N.Y. in 1983. He has appeared as soloist with major orchestras of Europe and North America. In 1975 he joined the faculty of the University of Ill.

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in 1954 - Johnny Cash married Vivian Liberto at St Ann’s Catholic Church in Memphis. Cash had plans of becoming a Memphis appliance salesman, he instead formed a band with Luther Perkins and Marshall Grant, and was signed to Sun Records a year later.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1954 - The Crew-Cuts' cover of "Sh-Boom" hits #1 in America.[/FONT]
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in 1954 - Elvis Presley appeared at the Eagles Nest in Memphis Tennessee, (the first of 12 shows at the venue in this year). The advertisement in the local paper read; “See and hear Elvis singing That’s All Right and The Blue Moon of Kentucky.”

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in 1956 - Sharon Isbin, American guitarist and teacher, is born at Minneapolis. She studied with Jeffrey Van in Minneapolis, then took courses at Yale University (B.A., 1978; M.A., 1979); she also received instruction from Rosalyn Tureck, from Oscar Ghiglia at the Aspen (Colo.) Music School (1971-75), and from Alirio Diaz at the Banff Music Festival (1972). She won first prizes in the Toronto International Guitar Competition (1975), the Munich International Guitar Competition (1976), and the Queen Sofia Competition in Madrid (1979), subsequently appearing throughout the world as a soloist with orchestras and as a recitalist. She taught at N.Y.'s Manhattan School of Music (from 1979) and Mannes College of Music (from 1984). In 1989 she became head of the guitar dept. at N.Y.'s Juilliard School. Her repertoire ranges from the Classical period to jazz, folk, and beyond. She has commissioned works from a variety of composers, including Leo Brouwer, Joan Tower, and Joseph Schwanter.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1957 - Paul Anka makes his US television debut, singing "Diana" on ABC's American Bandstand.[/FONT]
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in 1957 - The Quarry Men played at the Cavern Club in Liverpool, (without Paul McCartney who was away at Boy Scout summer camp). The Cavern was still a jazz club, but skiffle was tolerated, but when John Lennon dared to play ‘Hound Dog’ and ‘Blue Suede Shoes’, the club owner sent a note to the stage saying, "Cut out the bloody rock!"

in 1958 - Bruce Dickinson, heavy metal rocker (Iron Maiden-Run to Hills) is born.[/FONT]
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in 1959 - Armas Emmanuel Launis, Finnish composer as well as an ethnomusicologist, a professor, a writer and a journalist, dies at 75.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He was born in Hämeenlinna.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Armas Launis was mainly an opera composer. He wrote ten operas (both libretto and music). Several were performed:[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] In Finland: "The Seven Brothers" (1913), the first Finnish opera comique, and "Kullervo" (1917), both in full stage performance, and a concert performance of "Aslak Hetta" in 2004 at Finlandia Hall, Helsinki, directed by Sakari Oramo.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] In France: stage performance of Kullervo (1940, Nice, Palais de la Méditerranée) with radio broadcasts on Paris-Inter and Radio Monte-Carlo (1938–1940). A short version of "Jehudith" was also broadcast in 1954 (Paris-Inter)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Armas Launis also wrote chamber music pieces, cantatas, choruses, suites for orchestra, and the music of the first Finnish ethnographic film "A Wedding in Karelia, the Land of Poetry" (1921).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Launis was one of the first scholars to research and collect folk music. He was very open-minded; passionately fond of travels, which he undertook alone; and eager to meet other people. He travelled to Lapland (1904, 1905, 1922), Kainuu (1902), Ingria (1903, 1906), Karelia (1902, 1905), and Estonia (1930). Everywhere, he was happy to meet local people and had long conversations with them, jotting down popular melodies. Launis also recorded famous singers, hired mourners, and kantele players. He understood the richness and vitality of sung poetry together with the importance of folklore. His numerous publications and the corpus he collected are still recognized and used; they are valuable additions to the common inheritance of the Finnish nation.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Later, Launis travelled in North Africa and became interested in Arabic, Berber, and Bedouin music. This influence can be felt in later works, especially the operas Théodora and Jéhudith.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Professor[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Launis earned a Ph.D (1911) and was full professor at the University of Helsinki where he taught musical analysis and composition. He completed his studies in Berlin with Wilhelm Klatte and in Weimar with Waldemar von Baußnern. Deeply concerned with the availability of musical education for everyone, Launis founded and until 1930 directed the first popular conservatories in Finland, which still exist.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]As early as 1920, Launis received a life pension from the Finnish State, with the permission to live abroad.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Anxious to maintain contact with his homeland, Launis regularly contributed to various Finnish newspapers including Helsingin Sanomat, Uusi Suomi, and Suomen Kuvalehti. He co-founded and was an active member of the Sociéte de la presse étrangère de la Côte d'Azur (Association of Foreign Press of the French Riviera), and he was a journalist for the Association française d'expansion et d'échanges artistiques (French Association for the Development of Artistic Exchanges).[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1930 Launis settled permanently in Nice, France, and lived there the remainder of his life. He took an active part in musical and cultural exchanges between France and Finland.[/FONT]
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in 1960 - Jacquie O'Sullivan, rocker (Bananarama-Venus) is born.[/FONT]
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in 1960 – Väinö Hannikainen, Finnish composer and soloist of the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, dies at 60.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He is PJ Hannikainen 's son and Ilmari , Arvo and Tauno Hannikainen 's brother. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Väinö Hannikainen was born into the family of Pekka Juhani Hannikainen and Alli Hannikainen, who already belonged to the brothers Lauri, Ilmari, Tauno and Arvo, and his sister Toini, who died as a young girl in the wreath. Pekka hoped for musicians from all her boys, and each of them received her elementary music lessons at home from her. Music education began with boys 4-5 years of age.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]As a child, Väinö was sick, which is why he asked for more care for his parents than his other brothers. According to the same estimates, Väinö was also more brutal and cheerful than his brothers. Väinö studied piano at Jyväskylä, but after finishing his studies he switched the piano to the harp. After completing these studies, Väinö became a long-time harpist of Kajanus's orchestra, and during his free time he started composing singing, piano and chamber music. Robert Kajanus was a young friend of Pekka Hannikainen.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In the 1950's, Väinö Hannikainen began to prepare his father Pekan's biography, but the work was never completed.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Väinö Hannikainen studied in Helsinki, Berlin and Paris . Between 1923 and 1957 he was the soloist of the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In addition to the composition, the terapeutic materials and piano, the Helsinki Music Institute, Väinö Hannikainen also studied organ harvesting . In Helsinki, after seeing Aino Kajanus's armpits, he discovered that the harp was his instrument. As a teacher, he initially worked as Aino Kajanus, followed by Lilly Kajanus-Blenner's string instrument at the Music School. As a harpist, Väinö progressed quickly and achieved mastery of technical and artistic management of his instrument. The completion of the studies took place in Berlin from 1921 to 1923 and later on several trips in Paris. Väinö appeared on many tours in Finland as a harpist, but also as a pianist, as his brother Ilmar's accompanist. As a soloist she appeared in Berlin and Paris. As a soloist in Helsinki City Orchestra he worked in 1923-1957.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Väinö Hannikainen's production includes, among others, one ballet, one symphonic poem, Aino chamber opera, harp sonata 1919, the first Finnish harp concerto in 1922, variations on the harp and orchestra, plays and film music, as well as a large number of cantaams and solo songs. Based on his works, Väinö has been analyzed as a melodic and composer of lyrical melodic compositions, and his chore was considered rich and airy and sophisticated and versatile in orchestral works. By whom? Väinö received the director musices honorary title in 1952. He was also an honorary member of the Finnish Dance Artists' Association.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1960 - Jacquie O'Sullivan (UK singer, Bananarama) is born.
in 1962 - Bruno Pelletier (Québécois singer) is born.
in 1963 - Marcus Lewis, Pontiac Mich, singer (Sing me a Song) is born.

in 1963 - Marcus (Marthaniel) Roberts, prodigious young pianist, composer, born at Jacksonville, Fla. Blind from birth, he was a winner in the IAJE Young Talent Program in January 1982. He won the Jacksonville piano competition in 1984 and his set was televised. He distinguished himself in Wynton Marsalis's unit when he replaced Kenny Kirkland in 1985. Roberts has immersed himself in the 1920s music of George Gershwin; his 1995 live versions of "Rhapsody in Blue" included freely improvised cadenzas and additions, and the released album gave solo space to everyone. Though he is also influenced by James P. Johnson and the solo recordings of Thelonious Monk, he seems most free when he plays his own material, which involves unusual phrasing and changing meters. He has led his own trio since the late 1990s. He won the Helen Keller Achievement Award in 1998.

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[FONT=&quot]in 1963 - Beach Party, starring Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, opens in theaters. It's the first of many movies with a beach theme, and it features music by the surf-rock pioneer Dick Dale. Twenty-four years later, Frankie and Annette appear in Back To The Beach, where they are now parents of crazy teenagers.[/FONT]
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in 1963 - This weeks UK Top 5 albums: No.5, Elvis Presley, 'It Happened At The World Fair', No.4, 'West Side Story', Soundtrack, No.3, Cliff Richard, 'Cliff's Hit Album', No.2, The Shadows, 'Greatest Hits', No.1, The Beatles, 'Please Please Me.

in 1964 - Ian Dench (UK guitar, keyboard, EMF) is born.[/FONT]
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in 1964 - The Rolling Stones, Ronnie Scott, Tuby Hayes, Manfred Mann, Yardbirds and Mose Allison all appeared at the fourth Richmond Jazz Festival held over three days in Richmond, England.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 1965 - The Turtles release "It Ain't Me Babe."
in 1965 - The Beatles' Help! LP hits #1.[/FONT]
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in 1965 - Herman's Hermits went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'I'm Henry VIII I Am'. The single was only released in the US. Singer Peter Noone once interviewed Elvis Presley for UK music paper New Musical Express.

in 1965 - Raul Malo (US singer, songwriter, producer; The Mavericks/solo) is born.
in 1966 - Kristen Herch (US singer, guitarist; Throwing Muses/solo) is born.
in 1967 - Max Branch, music/radio commentator, dies at 75.[/FONT]
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in 1968 - James Lynn Strait (US singer, lyricist; metal/punk band Snot) is born. A member of the Nineties heavy metal band Snot, Lynn Strait provided the lead vocals on the group’s Geffen Records release, Get Some (1997). A controversial act, Snot was often targeted by authorities. He died in a three-car crash near Santa Barbara, California. Also killed was Strait’s dog Dobbs, which was pictured on the cover of the group’s first album. - Died December 11, 1998.

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in 1969 - Joseph Kosma, composer, dies at 63. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Kosma was born József Kozma in Budapest, where his parents taught stenography and typing. He had a brother, Ákos. A maternal relative was the avant-guard artist László Moholy-Nagy, and another relative was the conductor Georg Solti. He started to play the piano at age 5, and later took piano lessons. At the age of 11, he wrote his first opera, Christmas in the Trenches. After completing his education at the Gymnasium Franz-Josef, he attended the Academy of Music in Budapest, where he studied with Leo Weiner. He also studied with Béla Bartók at the Liszt Academy, receiving diplomas in composition and conducting. He won a grant to study in Berlin in 1928, where he met Lilli Apel, another musician, whom he later married. Kosma also met and studied with Hanns Eisler in Berlin. He also became acquainted with Bertolt Brecht and Helene Weigel.

Kosma and his wife emigrated to Paris in 1933. Eventually, he met Jacques Prévert, who introduced him to Jean Renoir. During World War II and the Occupation of France, Kosma was placed under house arrest in the Alpes-Maritimes region, and was banned from composition. However, Prévert managed to arrange for Kosma to contribute music for films, with other composers fronting for him. Under this arrangement he wrote the "pantomime" of the music for Les Enfants du Paradis (1945), made under the occupation, but released after the liberation. Among his other credits are the scores to La Grande Illusion (1937), La Bête Humaine (The Human Beast, 1938), La Règle du jeu (The Rules of the Game, 1939) and Le Testament du docteur Cordelier (The Doctor's Horrible Experiment, 1959), the later made for television. He was also known for writing the standard classical-jazz piece "Les feuilles mortes" ("Autumn Leaves"), with French lyrics by Jacques Prévert, and later English lyrics by Johnny Mercer, which was derived from music in Marcel Carné's film Les Portes de la Nuit (1946).

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[FONT=&quot]
in 1969 - Russ Morgan, big band orchestra leader and musical arranger in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s (Welcome Aboard), dies at 65.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He was one of the composers of "You're Nobody till Somebody Loves You" along with Larry Stock and James Cavanaugh. Morgan was the first to record the song.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Born into a Welsh family in Scranton, Pennsylvania, Morgan was encouraged to express himself musically from the age of seven. His father, a coal-mine foreman, was a former musician who played drums in a local band in his spare time. Morgan's mother had been a pianist in a vaudeville act. Morgan began to study piano and also went to work in the mines to earn money to help support his family and pay for his lessons.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]At fourteen, Morgan earned extra money as a pianist in a theater in Scranton. He also purchased a trombone and learned to play it. In 1921, he played trombone with a local band, the Scranton Sirens, which became popular in Pennsylvania during the 1920s. Besides Morgan, several of its members later became famous, including Jimmy Dorsey on sax and clarinet, Billy Lustig on violin and Tommy Dorsey on trombone (who took Morgan's place when Morgan left the band).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1922, Morgan decided to go to New York. Three years later, at the age of twenty-one, he did arrangements for both John Philip Sousa and Victor Herbert. He then joined Paul Specht's orchestra and toured throughout Europe with the orchestra. Colleagues of Morgan in Specht's orchestra included Arthur Schutt, Don Lindley, Chauncey Morehouse, Orville Knapp, Paul Whiteman, Charlie Spivak and Artie Shaw.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]On his return from Europe, Jean Goldkette invited Morgan to Detroit to organize, lead and arrange for his new band. Some members of the all-star Goldkette orchestra were his old associates. The band included Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Chauncey Morehouse, Joe Venuti, Eddie Lang, Bix Beiderbecke and Fuzzy Farrar.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Morgan's first records were made for OKeh in mid 1930 exclusively for their short lived Parlophone PNY and Odeon ONY series, usually under the name "Russell Brown and his Orchestra". During the early 1930s, Morgan joined the group of anonymous studio groups recording pop tunes for the dime store labels, which included Banner, Melotone, Oriole, Perfect, Romeo, Conqueror, Vocalion, and (probably) the rare gold Domino labels.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]For a short time in 1934, Morgan arranged for Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra. In 1935, he played trombone with the Original Dixieland Jazz Band when they recorded four sides for Vocalion. On September 12, 1935, Morgan, playing piano and Joe Venuti on violin cut two sides for Brunswick, “Red Velvet” and “Black Satin.” Most of the songs were written by Morgan and Venuti.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Morgan's biggest success came when he was offered the position of Musical Director for Detroit Radio Station WXYZ. His show, "Music in the Morgan Manner", became one of the most popular radio shows. At one time during his radio run, he was directing nine commercial programs. While in Detroit, he did arranging for the Detroit 102 piece Symphony Orchestra demonstrating his varied musical experience and ability.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In the early 1930s, Morgan was in an automobile accident that almost ended his career. After several months in the hospital he started again in New York City as arranger for bands like the George White Scandals, The Cotton Club Revue and the Capitol Theatre. When not arranging for the Broadway shows, Morgan worked with leading orchestras in New York, such as Phil Spitalny, Eddie Gilligan, Ted Fio Rito and Freddy Martin, as pianist and/or trombonist.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He joined the Freddy Martin Orchestra in 1934 as a piano player, but worked chiefly as trombonist and arranger with the band. While with Martin's orchestra, he also was a musical director at Brunswick Records in New York, where he met Shirley Gray, whom he married in 1939.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Morgan had his own program, the Russ Morgan Show, on Mutual beginning in September 1949. Originating from San Francisco, the show featured Morgan "as master of ceremonies of a program built around guest entertainers."[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]While at Brunswick, Morgan met Rudy Vallee, who was impressed with Morgan's musical ability. He insisted he form an orchestra of his own. He then invited Russ to appear as a guest on his popular Fleishman Yeast radio show. Vallee was also instrumental in getting Morgan his first engagement in New York City, along with his own orchestra, at the Biltmore Hotel. This first engagement was indicative of the audiences' reaction to Morgan's appearances. He started with a four-week contract. The contract was extended and Morgan remained at the hotel for two years. In the next few years, he was able to add musical directorship to the Rinso-Lifebuoy Show on NBC for thirty-nine weeks and the Philip Morris radio series on NBC and CBS for two years to his growing list of achievements.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He had record-breaking runs in famed hotels, ballrooms and theatres across the country. A few of these engagements were at the Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles; Claremont Hotel, Berkeley, California; Edgewater Beach Hotel, Chicago; Aragon and Trianon, Chicago; Strand, Chicago; the Statler Hotel, New York; Orpheum, Los Angeles; Palladium, Hollywood.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1949, four songs he recorded made it big on the charts. They were "So Tired", "Cruising Down the River", "Sunflower" and "Forever and Ever." On the latter he used a vocal quartet that was just starting out and would later become famous as the Ames Brothers. The Decca Records recording of Dogface Soldier, released to coincide with the film version of To Hell and Back, based on the best-selling novel by Audie Murphy, sold over 300,000 copies.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Late career and death[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]During the 1950s, his orchestra continued to be a popular one for dancing and listening music. He continued to set house records with his appearances in California and New York as well as his many tours across the entire nation. During this decade, it was mostly the long-established veteran "sweet bands" that were supplying the music for dancers, and Russ Morgan was one of them. The veterans included Jan Garber, Sammy Kaye, Wayne King, Guy Lombardo, Freddy Martin and Lawrence Welk.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1950, Morgan had a program, In the Morgan Manner, on ABC television. He had another TV program on CBS in 1956, with Helen O'Connell as the featured singer.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1958, Morgan's nineteen-piece band had been reduced to eleven men, with his sons Jack Morgan on trombone and David Morgan on guitar. In 1965, he was booked for an eight-week engagement at the Top O' The Strip at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas. The engagement ended up lasting until 1977, a total of twelve years.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1969, Morgan died at the age of sixty-five in Las Vegas. Morgan’s son, Jack, took over the leadership and has led the band ever since. Morgan has a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his contributions to recording.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Morgan was survived by his wife, Shirley, sons Jack and David, and daughters Judy and Patty.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1969 - During a North American tour Led Zeppelin appeared at the Berkeley Community Theatre, California.
in 1969 - The Beatles record "The End."[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1970 - Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention release Just Another Band From L.A.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1970 - The Goose Lake International Music Festival was held in Leoni, Michigan. Over 200,000 fans attended the three day festival. Acts who appeared included, Jethro Tull, 10 Years After, Mountain, Chicago, Bob Seger, John Sebastian, James Gang, Stooges with Iggy Pop, Brownsville Station, MC5, Rod Stewart and Flying Burrito Brothers.

in 1971 - The Bee Gees started a four week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'How Can You Mend A Broken Heart'. It was the group's tenth US hit and first No.1.

in 1971 - Rachel York (US actress, singer) is born.
in 1973 - Zane Lowe (New Zealander DJ, Radio, TV, presenter) is born.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1973 - The film adaptation of Jesus Christ Superstar is released, based on the 1971 Broadway rock opera of the same name. Jesus is apparently a tenor.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1974 - Sek Loso (Thai singer) is born.
in 1974 - Dana Dawson (US singer and actress) is born.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1974 - J. Geils Band frontman Peter Wolf marries movie star Faye Dunaway in a Beverly Hills courtroom. The couple divorce in 1979.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1974 - Peter Wolf from The J Geils Band married actress Faye Dunaway in Beverly Hills the marriage ended in divorce in 1979.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1975 - Gaahl/Kristian Eivind Espedal (Norwegian frontman; Gorgoroth/Trelldom/Gaahlskagg) is born.
in 1975 - Koray Candemir (Turkish singer) is born.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1976 - Elton John and Kiki Dee were at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Don't Go Breaking My Heart', giving Elton his sixth US No.1. It was written by Elton John without Bernie Taupin under the pseudonym "Ann Orson" and "Carte Blanche."

in 1976 - UK music weekly Melody Maker gave The Sex Pistols their first front cover.
in 1977 - Samantha Ronson (British DJ) is born.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1976 - Elton John & Kiki Dee's "Don't Go Breaking My Heart" hits #1 for the first of four weeks.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]7 August [/FONT][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Page 2 of 4[/FONT]
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]7 August [/FONT][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Page 3 of 4[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1978 - Franz Alphons Wolpert, composer, dies at 60.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Franz Alfons Wolpert, born October 11, 1917 in Wiesentheid, was a sought-after and gifted composer and musicologist. As a master, he studied at the Mozarteum in Salzburg and was a music teacher at the renowned Landschulheim Schloss Salem on Lake Constance. Wolpert, despite his excellent and rigorous training, was an autodidact, whose musical vitality mingled with high spirituality.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The conductor Georg Mais grew up on Lake Constance in the immediate vicinity of Wolpert. He has set himself the task of recalling concerts with these distinguished musicians. Mais is particularly well-known as a Mozart expert who, as the artistic director of the Südwestdeutsche Mozart Gesellschaft e. V. Renowned festivals such as the Mozart Weeks Eifel or the Mozart Summer Palace Salem on Lake Constance from the baptism, made a name. Concerts with various orchestras took him around the world. Productions with all the major broadcasters in Germany show the appreciation of the artist in our classical music scene. Georg Mais has been cooperating with the South-West German Kammerorchester Pforzheim, founded in 1950 by the Hindemith student Friedrich Tilegant. The orchestra soon gained international recognition. Numerous concerts and recordings with renowned soloists such as Maurice André or Dietrich Fischer Dieskau followed. Collaboration with renowned guests was always an important building block in the orchestra's profile.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Jehudi Menuhin, with whom Georg Mais was artistically closely connected, described the conductor as "an artist whose high musicality both the musicians and the public were equally pleased."[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Mozart and Schubert were Wolpert's favorite composers. In the first movement, Mozart is played as Fugentechnik, a great specialty in Wolpert's music.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1978 - Vanness Wu (Taiwanese singer) is born.
in 1978 - Jamey Jasta (US frontman; Hatebreed) is born.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1978 - Eddie Calvert dies at age 56. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]British trumpet player born in Preston, Lancashire. Following his exposure on television with the Stanley Black Orchestra, an enthusiastic announcer introduced him as the 'Man With The Golden Trumpet' - an apt description that remained with him for the rest of his musical career. He went on to have a very busy solo career. He was the first British instrumentalist to achieve two No.1's. The magnificent 'Oh Mein Papa', which also sold well in the USA, topped the UK singles chart for no less than nine weeks, a then British chart record, and was successful enough to provide him with the first ever 'gold disc' awarded for a UK instrumental track. His other No.1 the following year was "Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White". Further chart entries were "John And Julie", taken from the soundtrack of the movie John and Juliet, and "Mandy", his last major hit. Other recordings included "Stranger In Paradise", "The Man with the Golden Arm" and "Jealousy". He also co-wrote "My Son, My Son" in '54, a chart-topper for Vera Lynn. His theme to the film, The Man with the Golden Arm was banned by the BBC, despite this was an instrumental disc, a BBC spokesman said "The ban is due to its connection with a film about drugs" (heart attack) [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1979 - Led Zeppelin make their last live performance in the UK.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1980 - Anomie Belle/Toby Campbell (US multi-musician, producer) is born.

in 1982 - Dexy's Midnight Runners were at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Come On Eileen' their second and last No.1. It was the Best-selling single of 1982 and the song won Best British Single at the 1983 Brit Awards.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1981 - It's "Wolverton Mountain Day" in Arkansas in honor of the Claude King song "Wolverton Mountain," which is named after a real mountain in the state.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1981 - The animated sci-fi film Heavy Metal is released. Although it shares its name with the hard-rock genre, the film isn't intended to have anything to do with music, but instead is an anthology of various stories from the comic magazine Heavy Metal. Almost as an afterthought, an all-star soundtrack is added, featuring songs by Sammy Hagar, Devo, Blue Öyster Cult, Cheap Trick, Journey, and Black Sabbath, to name a few.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The film does only middling business at the box office and is scratched by critics for being deeply flawed, it becomes a cult classic, thanks in large part to its soundtrack.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1982 - Fleetwood Mac started a five-week run at No.1 on the US album chart with 'Mirage'. The bands third US No.1.

in 1982 - 'Kids From Fame' by The Kids From Fame started an eight week run at No.1 on the UK album chart.
in 1983 - Howard Devoto supported by The Smiths appeared at The Lyceum in London, England.
in 1983 - Christian Chavez (Mexican singer, actor; RBD) is born.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1984 - “Little” Esther Phillips/Esther Mae Jones dies at age 48. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]A legendary R&B singer, Texas-born “Little” Esther veered toward jazz and soul in the latter part of her career. Moving to the Watts section of Los Angeles at age nine, she lived in the vicinity of a chicken farm owned by bandleader/nightclub owner Johnny Otis. Invited by Otis in 1950 to watch a recording session by The Robins, Esther sang on a session as a lark; belting out ‘Double Crossing Blues’, it would be her first of many hits. The underage Phillips soon joined Otis’ orchestra for a three year stint and was billed as Little Esther with The Johnny Otis Orchestra.

A large figured girl who was exposed to drugs at an early age, Little Esther could belt out the blues with her streetwise delivery. Although she managed two more R&B hits at Savoy, ‘Mistrustin’ Blues’ (1950) and ‘Cupid’s Boogie’ (1950), she left the label over the underpayment of royalties. After moving to King-Federal Records, where Otis’ orchestra continued to back her, she unsuccessfully sued her old label which had continued to release her material. Recording a series of duets at King-Federal with acts such The Dominoes, Big Al Downing, Little Willie Littlefield, and two noteworthy singles with Bobby Nunn, Phillips landed her final hit at the label in 1952 in a collaboration with Mel Walker, ‘Ring-A-Ding-Doo’.

Parting with Otis and leaving the label in 1953, Phillips switched to Decca in 1954. But with her output affected by her heavy drinking, Little Esther briefly retired from music. Returning to Houston for what would be a two-year respite, she was considered a has-been at age 19. Then after some poorly received sessions at Savoy, Phillips joined Lennox Records in 1962. With her voice maturing, she topped the charts with a cover of the standard, ‘Release Me’ (1962). Then joining Atlantic Records in 1964, she was paired with some of the label’s greatest jazz and blues talents. There her hits continued with a cover of Dinah Washington’s ‘What A Diff’rence A Day Makes’ (1963) and a retitling of The Beatles’ ‘And I Love Him’ (1965).

After entering rehab in 1969, the following year she recorded the King Curtis-produced live album, Burnin’. Switching to Creed Taylor’s Kudel label in 1972, Phillips scored a hit album with From A Whisper To A Scream, and in 1973, landed a surprise pop hit with a Grammy-nominated disco version of ‘What A Diff’rence A Day Makes’; she lost the Grammy to Aretha Franklin who then handed the trophy to Phillips. Phillips continued to record regularly into the Eighties. Her final album, A Way To Say Goodbye, was released shortly before her death. Suffering from heart, liver, and kidney problems, she died at U.C.L.A Harbor Medical Center in Carson, California. - Born December 23, 1935.

in 1985 - Barbra Streisand records "Broadway Album".
in 1990 - David Bowie appeared live at Maine Road Football ground Manchester, England.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1990 - Sam Goody (SAMUEL GUTOWITZ) dies at age 87.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] Sam Goody, a toy-store owner who turned a hugely profitable sideline -- selling scratchy, breakable 78-r.p.m. records -- into one of the world's largest record stores, died yesterday at St. John's Hospital in Far Rockaway, Queens. He was 87 years old and lived in Woodmere, L.I.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He died of heart failure, said his son, Howard.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Mr. Goody's record business boomed in the years after World War II, when long-playing records were just catching on and audiophiles were switching from shellac 10-inch disks to nonbreakable 12-inch ones.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The Sam Goody chain today includes 320 stores across the country. Many of them were not opened until after Mr. Goody sold the business and his name in the 1970's. That was long after his flagship store on West 49th Street had become known as a New York phenomenon. Four thousand customers a day were said to jam the aisles, browsing through bins crammed with38,000 LP's -- a large inventory in the days before chains had hundreds of record stores from coast to coast. In 1955, Mr. Goody's cash registers rang up 7 percent of the total national sales of 33 1/3-r.p.m. disks and a gross income of nearly $4 million. One of First to Cut Prices[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Even though he had a comfortable slice of the market, Mr. Goody was one of the first record sellers to cut prices. In the 1950's, when the average long-playing record had a list price of $3.98, Mr. Goody sold it for $3.25.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Mr. Goody played the role of the number-crunching businessman in his store; he hired people who knew music to advise customers on which was more electrifying, a Eugene Ormandy recording of a symphony or a Leopold Stokowski. "I can't stand listening to anything more highbrow than a Strauss waltz," he said in 1954.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]That may have been why Mr. Goody -- born Samuel Gutowitz on Feb. 25, 1904, but nicknamed "Goody" as a child -- did not get into the record business in the first place. It happened almost by accident one day in 1938, when a customer at his toy-and-novelty store in lower Manhattan asked if he had any records.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]"I said, 'Why records?' " Mr. Goody recalled later. "I thought they went out with the dodo birds. This fellow said he was looking for old records by people like Caruso and Alma Gluck and Paul Reimers and Tomagno and people like that, and that he'd be willing to pay from 50 cents to a dollar for certain records. I told this fellow I knew where there was a stack of old records and that I'd bring them down to the store for him in a day or two." Resold Records for $25[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]A few days earlier, Mr. Goody had stepped on a pile of old 78-r.p.m. records in the basement of his apartment building in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan. He went home and bought the records from the superintendent for either three cigars or a can of beer -- the exact price varied as Mr. Goody told and retold the story over the years.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Mr. Goody cleaned the records and resold them for $25. "I said to myself, this is a beautiful business. What am I doing wasting time with toys and novelties?"[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Soon he was hunting down out-of-print vocal recordings and jazz records. It was a lucrative search: he bought 300 opera records from a family in Brooklyn for $60 and turned a profit of $1,100. After closing his toy store and moving uptown, he gambled on the future of the long-playing record, giving customers who spent $25 a record player that would handle the new, larger, slower-speed disks.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Giving away 40,000 record players was a money-loser, but Mr. Goody was not worried. "That meant 40,000 new customers," he said.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Besides his son Howard, of Far Rockaway, Mr. Goody is survived by his wife, Sadie; another son, Barry, of Kew Gardens, Queens, and two daughters, Mildred Menashe of Far Rockaway, and Frances. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] . . . . . . . . . . . [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Sam Goody, the once-upon-a-time music man, wants to play it again, but to a different tune.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The 85-year-old entrepreneur, who started one of the country's best-known record chains, is precluded from returning to a similar concern by the conditions of its 1978 sale to American Can, now known as the Primerica Corporation. So Mr. Goody wants to emerge from a long retirement in a new type of retail business, one that can be helped by the use of his name and his 40 years of retail experience.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Mr. Goody, who lives in Woodmere, L.I., was at first incensed but eventually resigned to the $330 million sale of his former company, which Primerica had merged with its Musicland chain, to a leveraged buyout group in February. In selling the Sam Goody record business for $5.5 million, Mr. Goody and his family had received about $2.5 million in stock for their 40 percent stake. 'They Got the Company Cheap'[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]''As a businessman, I have to look at that sale as a businessman,'' he said in a recent interview. ''You make a decision at the time and you have to live by it from then on. But let's face it, I do regret selling the business, which has been doing so well since. I feel down deep that they got the company cheap. But I'm not bitter. I just want to see how I can still use my name.''[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He sold his 26-store chain, then producing $60 million in sales, because of dissension between his two sons, Howard and Barry, he said. ''They loved each other then and they still do,'' he added. ''But they competed with each other on everything and soon even the help was taking sides. I could only see them breaking it all apart. So I sold the company.''[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]But his decade in retirement has not been as happy as his days in business. Soon after walking away from his company, the intense, restless man with the hairbrush mustache had a heart attack. And during his hospital convalescence, he came down with a vague strain of virus that was almost fatal. Feeling he would soon die, Mr. Goody told his wife, Sadie, to sell his 50,000 shares of American Can stock so that she would have some security. The Goodys then gave away much of it to their children, leaving themselves only a modest amount.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Mr. Goody largely recovered from the mysterious infection. He drew $35,000 a year as a consultant to American Can for the first five years. But he said he has had no earned income for five years. He and his wife live on the interest from their bank deposits. Frustration and Pride[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]For years, the genial entrepreneur felt lost. He learned from a neighbor, a retired art teacher, how to paint with oils. But Mr. Goody would often walk the quiet streets of Woodmere restlessly, wondering whether he could make something more of his remaining years. Meanwhile, he watched with a mix of frustration and pride as American Can expanded the Sam Goody chain to 250 stores and the Musicland chain to 400.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Two influences have turned him from aimless concern to action at the age of 85.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]One was the example of his mother-in-law, Rose Deutsch, who at 100 has the mental agility and energy of a young woman. ''She's been an inspiration to me,'' he said. The other influence was a request from one of his 13 grandchildren to help pay his way through veterinary school. The grandfather realized that if he did it for one, he would have to help the others too.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]''I'm supposed to be loaded,'' he said, ''but I feel guilty that I can't swing it. But I still felt that if Sam Goody is such an outstanding name in the music field that Primerica can make an empire out of it, maybe there was some way I could get some more mileage out of it.'' Testing the Waters[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He began taking small weekly ads in The New York Times, testing the interest. He received about 25 inquiries, ''mostly from nice people but from a couple of 'crazies,' too.''[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]''I don't want to fund anything myself because I really can't afford it,'' he said. ''But I'd like to be involved as an official of the company, allowing it to use my name, and be a consultant. I want to see whether it can produce anything and then look for some compensation.''[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Mr. Goody, who legally changed his name some years ago from Sam Gutowitz, is convinced that he still has something to offer. ''Too many guys like me retire from a business that they started and are unhappy because they have nothing to do,'' he said. ''Maybe that's why I had that heart attack.''[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He said he had had a creative bent since the early 1940's, when he bought an abandoned stack of old phonograph records from the superintendent of his apartment building in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan and found people willing to pay as much as $5 for each. He started a small store to sell the old records, and then capitalized on the popularity of the new long-playing record. A Flair for Promotions[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He became adept at promotional offers. Once he bought 400,000 old silver dollars for $1.25 to $1.40 and presented them free to customers who bought $15 in merchandise. He also bought 400,000 John F. Kennedy half-dollars, circa 1964, and gave them away with a $10 purchase. The results of each offer were tremendous, he recalled.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]But ''I should have kept the silver dollars and given away the business,'' he said. ''When the silver price jumped like never before, I could have gotten $10 million for my $500,000 purchase.''[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Propositions to use the Sam Goody name include one from a computer retailer and mail-order operator to market a Sam Goody computer. Another is from a travel company that wants to start a Sam Goody tour division. A third is from an apparel producer eager to introduce a Sam Goody line of clothing for older people.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]But the one that interests him most is from a condom producer that would spend $100,000 to start a Sam Goody line. ''I'm seriously considering it,'' Mr. Goody said. ''So many thousands of people have AIDS. The idea may seem funny but it is a serious business. With the disease spreading so rapidly, the condom has been legitimized. It would be very good to help people and still make some money.'' [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1991 - Paul Simon gives a free concert in Central Park, much as he had in 1981 with partner Art Garfunkel. The performance eventually becomes the album Paul Simon's Concert In The Park.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1992 - Titti Sotto, Cuban composer (La Esquina Habanera), dies at age 48.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Sotto, a Cuban composer and performer, died in Miami. Sotto, hospitalized since July 30, died of respiratory failure and liver disorders, said his half-brother, Don Sotto. Sotto's music was performed by a long list of artists who specialized in ballads and tropical melodies. Two of his recent hits were ''La Esquina Habanera'' and ''Latino.'' His last composition, ''La Habana Espera'' has just been recorded by Olga Guillot. Sotto moved to New York City from Cuba in 1963. He came to Miami in 1990.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1993 - Roy Budd, English jazz pianist/composer (Paper Tiger), dies at 46 .
in 1993 - Cypress Hill started a two-week run at No.1 on the US album chart with 'Black Sunday'.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 1996 - A federal appeals court overturns the ruling that original Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers members Jimmy Merchant and Herman Santiago co-wrote the group's biggest hit, 1955's "Why Do Fools Fall In Love?," ruling that copyright claims must be filed within three years of the song's publication.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 1997 - Garth Brooks played to the largest crowd ever in New York's Central Park. An estimated 1 million people attended the live concert with an additional 14.6 million viewing live on HBO. It's the last Central Park show to benefit from highly inflated crowd estimates, which are stated at over 100,000. Hand counts at future shows prove that crowds at these concerts usually top out at 50,000.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2001 - Billy Byrd [/FONT][FONT=&quot]dies at age 80. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]William Lewis "Billy" Byrd is best known for having been ERNEST TUBE'S longtime lead guitarist. A self-taught player enamored of jazz greats Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt, Byrd gained his earliest professional experience in radio and club work with Nashville pop bands, but his earliest recordings were made with Herald Goodman's GRAND OLE OPRY group in 1938. After military service, Byrd worked at the Opry for PAUL HOWARD'S Arkansas Cotton Pickers and WALLY FOWLER'S Oak Ridge Quartet before moving to Shreveport in 1948 to work with Fowler alumnus Curly Kinsey and later with CURLEY WILLIAMS. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Upon returning to Nashville in about early 1949, Byrd backed Opry newcomers JIMMY DICKENS and GEORGE MORGAN and then joined ERNEST TUBE'S Texas Troubadours in mid-1949. For the next ten years Tubb relied on his electric lead guitarist not only for dependable instrumental support but also as one of his limo and bus drivers. Meanwhile, on hit after hit, Tubb immortalized Byrd with his oft-repeated aside of "Aw, Billy Byrd now," which introduced the guitarist's succinct, melodic solos. In 1955 Byrd and HANK GARLAND collaborated to design the Byrdland semi-hollow-body electric guitar for the Gibson company. In 1959 Byrd made his first instrumental recordings (two albums) for WARNER BROS. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]After leaving Tubb that year, Byrd worked briefly in California for Gordon Terry, then returned to Nashville for club work, TV shows, and more recording. Byrd briefly rejoined Ernest Tubb's band, not once but twice—1969-70 and 1973-74. After driving a cab for many years, he retired in Nashville. Born at Nashville, Tennessee, February 17,1920.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 2001 - Lawrence "Larry" Adler dies at age 87. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Lawrence "Larry" Cecil Adler was an American musician, one of the world's most skilled harmonica players. Ralph Vaughan Williams, Malcolm Arnold, Darius Milhaud and Arthur Benjamin composed for him. During his later career he collaborated with Sting, Elton John, Kate Bush and Cerys Matthews.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Adler was born in Baltimore, Maryland, to Sadie Hack and Louis Adler. They were a Jewish family. He graduated from Baltimore City College high school. He taught himself harmonica, which he called a mouth-organ. (actually a generic term for instruments that include the harmonica.) He played professionally at 14. In 1927, he won a contest sponsored by the Baltimore Sun, playing a Beethoven minuet, and a year later he ran away from home to New York. After being referred by Rudy Vallée, Adler got his first theatre work, and caught the attention of orchestra leader Paul Ash, who placed Adler in a vaudeville act as "a ragged urchin, playing for pennies".[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]From there, he was hired by Florenz Ziegfeld and then by Lew Leslie again as an urchin. He broke the typecasting and appeared in a dinner jacket in the 1934 Paramount film Many Happy Returns, and was hired by theatrical producer C. B. Cochran to perform in London. He became a star in the United Kingdom and the Empire, where, it has been written, harmonica sales increased 20-fold and 300,000 people joined fan clubs.".[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Adler was one of the first harmonica players to perform major works written for the instrument, often written for him: these include Jean Berger's Concerto for Harmonica and Orchestra "Caribbean" (1941), Cyril Scott's Serenade (harmonica and piano, 1936), Vaughan Williams' Romance in D-flat for harmonica, piano and string orchestra; premiered New York, 1952, Milhaud's Suite Anglais (Paris, May 28, 1947), Arthur Benjamin's Harmonica Concerto (1953), and Malcolm Arnold's Harmonica Concerto, Op. 46 (1954, written for The Proms). He recorded all except the Scott Serenade, some more than once. Earlier, Adler had performed transcriptions of pieces for other instruments, such as violin concertos by Bach and Vivaldi – he played his arrangement of Vivaldi's Violin Concerto in A minor with the Sydney Symphony. Other works he played in harmonica arrangements were by Bartók, Beethoven (Minuet in G), Debussy, Falla, Gershwin (Rhapsody in Blue), Mozart (slow movement from the Oboe Quartet, K. 470), Poulenc, Ravel (Boléro), Stravinsky and Walton.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]During the 1940s, Adler and the dancer, Paul Draper, formed an act and toured nationally and internationally, performing individually then together in each performance. One popular number was Gershwin's "I Got Rhythm". After the blacklisting and an unsuccessful libel suit decided in 1950, he moved to the United Kingdom in 1951 and settled in London, where he remained the rest of his life. Another source indicates he stayed in London from 1949.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The 1953 film Genevieve brought him an Oscar nomination for his work on the soundtrack, and great wealth. His name was originally removed from the credits in the United States due to blacklisting. His other film scores included A Cry from the Streets (1958), The Hellions (1961), The Hook (1963), King & Country (1964) and A High Wind in Jamaica (1965). He also scored a hit with the theme song of the French Jacques Becker movie Touchez pas au grisbi with Jean Gabin, written by Jean Wiener.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1959, a reviewer from the Village Voice called Adler "a great artist" after watching his twice-nightly performances at the Village Gate.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1994, for his 80th birthday, Adler and George Martin produced an album of George Gershwin songs, The Glory of Gershwin, on which they performed "Rhapsody in Blue." The Glory of Gershwin reached number 2 in the UK albums chart in 1994. Adler was a musician and showman. Concerts to support The Glory of Gershwin showed he was a competent pianist. He opened each performance with Gershwin's "Summertime", playing piano and harmonica simultaneously. The album included Peter Gabriel, Oleta Adams, Elton John, Sting, Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora, Meat Loaf, Sinéad O'Connor, Robert Palmer, Cher, Kate Bush, Elvis Costello, Courtney Pine, Issy Van Randwyck, Lisa Stansfield and Carly Simon, all of whom sang Gershwin tunes with an orchestra and Adler adding harmonica solos.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Adler appeared in five movies, including Sidewalks of London (1938), in which he played a harmonica virtuoso named Constantine. His other film appearances were in Three Daring Daughters (12-Feb-1948) playing himself; Music for Millions (8-Dec-1944) playing Larry; The Singing Marine (3-Jul-1937) playing Larry; and The Big Broadcast of 1937 (6-Oct-1936). He was a prolific letter writer, his correspondence with Private Eye becoming popular in the United Kingdom. Adler wrote an autobiography — entitled It Ain't Necessarily So — in 1985, and was food critic for Harpers & Queen. He appeared on the Jack Benny radio program several times, entertaining disabled soldiers in the USA during World War II. A further biography, Me and My Big Mouth appeared in 1994 but he told The Free-Reed Journal: "That's a lousy book and I don't like it; it's ghosted . ... [It] has a certain amount of factual material but the author completely missed my style and my voice. That's why I hate the book."[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Adler married Eileen Walser in 1952; they had two daughters and one son. They divorced in 1957. He married Sally Kline in 1959; they had one daughter, Marmoset. They divorced in 1963. At his death, in addition to his children, he had two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. His son Peter Adler fronted the band, Action, and others in Dublin, Ireland in the late 1960s. Adler was an atheist. His brother, Jerry Adler (1918–2010) was also an harmonica player.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He died in St Thomas' Hospital, London. He was cremated at Golders Green Crematorium, where his ashes remain.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2002 - Three members of Oasis were injured when the taxi they were travelling in was involved in a crash during a US tour in Indianapolis. Noel Gallagher, Andy Bell and Jay Darlington were all taken to hospital and treated for cuts and bruises.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2002 - Ween drummer Claude Coleman, Jr. breaks his back and pelvis in a car accident. The other members of Ween organize benefit shows to help cover Coleman's medical bills, and in December 2002, Coleman returns to his place behind the drum kit.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2002 - Former Boyzone Keith Duffy made his acting debut in UK TV soap Coronation Street playing the role of Peter Barlow's old Navy mate Ciaran McCarthy.

in 2003 - The Osmonds received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2005 - The Showtime cable TV original series Weeds debuts. The series, about a drug-dealing suburban mom, is notable for using the song "Little Boxes," by folk artist Malvina Reynolds, for its theme song. The folk song, originally released in 1962, enjoys a popular revival.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]7 August [/FONT][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Page 3 of 4[/FONT]
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]7 August [/FONT][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Page 4 of 4[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 2005 - James Blunt was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with ‘You're Beautiful’, Mariah Carey was at No.1 on the US charts with ‘We Belong Together’ and Axel F had ‘Crazy Frog’ at No.1 on the Australian singles charts.

in 2007 - Lily Allen had her US work visa cancelled after arriving at Los Angeles airport. The 22-year-old, who was due to tour America in September, had flown in for the MTV Video Music Awards launch. She was held at the airport for five hours in connection with an arrest for an alleged assault in London in June.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2007 - The Isley Brothers' Ron Isley begins serving a 37-month sentence for tax evasion. His request for a reduced sentence because of his health issues doesn't fly with a judge who calls him a "serial tax avoider." The IRS claims that Isley failed to pay $3.1 million in taxes.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]
in 2007 - Pete Doherty was warned by a judge that he could face jail or a community order over drugs offences. In July, the 28-year-old Babyshambles frontman pleaded guilty to driving illegally while in possession of crack cocaine, heroin, ketamine and cannabis. The judge said: "What I have in mind is a community order or prison... if he does not show his motivation, it's prison - it's as simple as that." The singer volunteered to show the position of an implant in his stomach designed to help him give up drugs.

in 2008 - Elvis Presley's peacock jumpsuit, was sold at auction for $300,000, making it the most expensive piece of Elvis memorabilia ever sold at an auction. The white outfit with a plunging V-neck and high collar featured a blue-and-gold peacock design, hand-embroidered on the front and back and along the pant legs.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2008 - After dating for 10 years, Jewel and rodeo star Ty Murray marry in the Bahamas.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2008 - The Police wrap up their reunion tour at New York's Madison Square Garden. Their first tour since 1986, it lasts 151 shows and finishes as the third highest-grossing of all[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 2009 - Willy DeVille died at the age of 58 following a battle with pancreatic cancer. The band he formed, Mink Deville, appeared at the legendary CBGB club in New York in the 1970s and scored the 1977 hit ‘Spanish Stroll.’ Doctors discovered he had cancer earlier this year as he was preparing to undergo treatment for hepatitis C.

in 2009 - Gulshan Bawra /Gulshan Kumar Mehta dies at age 72. Indian songwriter, born in Sheikhupura he then moved to Delhi (after witnessing his parents death), where he graduated from the Delhi University; during these days he began to write poetry. In 1955, he took a job as a clerk at Mumbai and struggled to get a film break with his song writing. Kalyanji Virji Shah, gave him his first opening in Chandrasena in 1959 with the song ‘Main kya jaanu kahan laage yeh saawan matwala re’ sung by Lata Mangeshkar. He went on to write around 240 songs in a 42-year career (heart failure)[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2009 - Tatiana Stepa dies at age 46. Romanian folk singer (cancer).

in 2009 - Tamás Cseh, Hungarian singer and songwriter, dies at age 66. (cancer).

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He was born in Budapest but lived until the age of 13 in Tordas, Fejér County . He attended the Budapest Teacher Training College , then attended the Eger College of Teacher Education and the Budapest Academy of Fine Arts .[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1964 , he created the so-called "Indian Camp" in Bakonybél . In Indian baptism , he was named " Smoke in his eyes ". Between 1967 and 1974 he taught a drawing at the primary school in Üllői út in Budapest, and in the summer he participated in the camping of children at Lake Balaton. From 1970 he worked with Géza Bereményi , who with a few exceptions was the songwriter of his songs. Between 1972 and 1977 he was a member of the Twenty-fifth Theater (Independent Evenings: Without Song, Letter to My Sister ). Between 1977 and 1978 , individual songs at the New Mirror Cellar Club and at the University Stage.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Married in 1980 ; His wife are Emperor Éva Bíró, their children are András Koppány (1981) and Borbála (1990). Between 1982 and 1998 he was the founding member of Katona József Theater . In 1997 he published a novel entitled " Hadi út " ( ISBN 9630492342 ), which also had an illustrator. Between 1998 and 2005 , he was a member of the Bárka Theater in Budapest, and in 2006 he was awarded the Csokonai Theater in Debrecen. In 2006 , he published the song entitled " Dancing Dancing Coyote " from Indian Tales ( ISBN 9788088837930 ).[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In the same year he was diagnosed with his serious illness - lung cancer - from which he failed to recover. He died on August 7, 2009.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Tamás Cseh's farewell[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]" Sometimes I feel like I'm talking to him and he's asleep. But not. I'm grateful to him. Grateful for letting you sing. If he thought he was a bad man, he would not have given me the songs. It calms me. That's why I'm not afraid. "[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]- Tamás Cseh [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2009 . On August 27th , thousands of people said goodbye to the artist at the Farkasréti cemetery . According to Tamás Cseh, the politician mourning ceremony at Gödék, Bereményi Géza said goodbye. His last journey was accompanied by the music of the Ökrös band. The "strangers" traditionally say goodbye to the " Smoke in his eyes " chief, his coffin covered with a dawn-star blanket.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 2012 he wrote a sculpture design contest for the local government of Újbuda Tamás Cseh singer-songwriter at the Gellért square in Budapest. The statue will be in 2013 . On September 6, he opened XI. District, in the parked part of Budafok Street, opposite the exit of metro line 4 .[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 2010, as part of the Festival of the Day of Painting of DunapArt Art Society, which was also associated with the newbuddled Danube Art Company, a tender was announced, which was won by Andrea Fecsó's portrayal of Tamás Cseh. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 2009 - Mike Seeger dies at age 75. American folk multi-musician, singer, folklorist and banjo player; born in New York he was influenced throughout his early life by his mother, the modernist composer and folk music specialist Ruth Crawford-Seeger and his father Charles Seeger, who worked with musicologists John and Alan Lomax. Mike was a self-taught musician playing autoharp, banjo, fiddle, dulcimer, guitar, mouth harp, mandolin and dobro. In 1958 at 25 years of of age he became a founding member of the highly influencial string band New Lost City Ramblers along with friends John Cohen and Tom Paley. They distinguished themselves by focusing on the traditional playing styles they heard on the old 78rpm records of musicians recorded during the 1920s and 1930s, many of whom would later appear on the Anthology of American Folk Music. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]They debuted on Folkways Records with a self titles album The New Lost City Ramblers in 1958, which was followed by a volume 2 the following year. Mike and the band released 29 albums over their very long career, the last to date being "40 Years of Concert Performances" released in 2001. The Ramblers also pioneered the practice of bringing many older rural musicians onstage with them for collaborative concerts, bridging gaps of culture and time for new audiences. Mike also had a busy solo career, touring the world and guesting with many musicians. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He has recorded and/or appeared on dozens of albums, including more recently Robert Plant and Alison Krauss's 2007 album Raising Sand and Ry Cooder's 2007 album My Name Is Buddy. His influence on the folk scene is described at some length by Bob Dylan in his autobiography, Chronicles: Volume One, and his dedication and great love for the old time music has been rewarded with six Grammy nominations and he was the recipient of four grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and numerous other awards. The New Lost City Ramblers's final concert, was held in West Virginia on August 30th 2009. (cancer). [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2011 - Leo Mattioli dies at age 39. Argentine cumbia singer, born in Santo Tomé, he began his carreer in music in 1992, when he was the lead singer of Trinidad, a popular cumbia group. In 1999 he began his solo career, which quickly established him as one of the most popular cumbia musicians in Argentina (Leo was found dead in his hotel bedroom at the seaside resort of Necochea. Cardiac arrest).

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2011 - Big Boi of OutKast is arrested in Miami on drug charges when police find ecstasy and Viagra in baggage with his name on it.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 2011 - Jirí Traxler dies at age 99. Czech-born Canadian jazz and swing composer, arranger and pianist, born in Tábor, Bohemia; as a high school student he joined his brother's dance orchestra, The Red Ace Players and from 1935 to 1937, he performed and recorded as a member of the Gramoklub Orchestra in Prague. In the late 1930s, he co-worked with Blue Music 1938–39 and Elit Club in 1942. Also, he was engaged as a composer of modern dance music at the Prague's publishing house Mojmír Urbánek. In 1939 he signed a five year contract with a prominent publishing house led by singer and bandleader R. A. Dvorský. In 1949, a year after communist coup d'état, Jiri composed music for the comedy play Moje žena Penelopa. The play was banned by communists after the premiére as "politically undesirable". That same year, he decided to flee the country. In Canada he gradually ended up finding fulfilment as a composer and arranger. In Montreal he worked as a drafter in the company Canadair Ltd, before moving to Edmonton, Alberta. Jiri published his memoires "Já nic, já muzikant" (Don't Blame Me, I'm Just a Musician, 1982) in the Czech Canadian exile publishing house Sixty-Eight Publishers, led by Josef Škvorecký. In 2009, Czech musician Ondrej Havelka made a documentary Poslední mohykán/The Last of the Mohicans, mapping the life story of Jirí Traxler.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 2011 - Joe Yamanaka/Akira Yamanaka dies at age 64. Japanese rock singer, known both for his work with Flower Travellin' Band and as a solo musician. His best known song is "Proof of the Man", which sold more than 500,000 copies in 2 weeks and is a household name throughout Asian countries, it is often called "Old Straw Hat" in Chinese areas. He and his friend Amália Rodrigues composed the song "Sorrow of Florence". He was also close friends with Bob Marley, and later became the lead singer for The Wailers for around 5 years after Marley died. Joe was also an actor appearing in many movies, such as Takashi Miike's Deadly Outlaw: Rekka and the 1989 version of Zatoichi. He was known as one of the three "real tough guys" in the Japanese movie industry, along with Tsunehiko Watase and Jerry Fujio. The trio were known for being good-natured and kind, but with a rebellious past and noted fighting prowess (lung cancer)

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 2011 - Marshall Grant dies at age 83. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]American upright bassist and electric bassist of singer Johnny Cash's original backing duo, the Tennessee Two, along with electric guitarist Luther Perkins. The group became known as The Tennessee Three in 1960, with drummer W. S. Holland. Marshall also served as road manager for Cash and his touring show company. Following his career with Cash, he managed the Statler Brothers until their retirement in 2002. His autobiograpical book I Was There When It Happened: My Life With Johnny Cash was published in October, 2006. It is a behind-the-scenes story of their beginnings and rise to fame. In the 2005 biographical drama film Walk the Line, Marshall is played by Larry Bagby. Marshall "laid down bass for the last time" at the Brooks Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, in August, 2010. Luther Perkins and Marshall, as The Tennessee Two, were inducted into the Musicians Hall of Fame.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2012 - Madonna plays a concert in Moscow during which she expresses support for the group Pussy Riot, who have been jailed for performing their song "Mother Of God, Putin's Run" in a Moscow cathederal.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]
in 2012 - Ranking Trevor / Maxwell Grant dies at age 60. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Jamaican pioneer of rap reggae during the 1970s, he was one of the leading "toasters" in Jamaica during the 1970s, recording mainly for the Channel One studio. Toasting is a form of Jamaican rapping that directly inspired hip-hop. Songs like "Caveman Skank" and "Three Piece Chicken and Chips" made the charts in England, where he lived more than 20 years. His career declined in the 1980s and he returned to Jamaica a decade later. (crushed by a car after being knocked off his motorcycle in Kingston.- Born May 10th 1952.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2012 - Grayson County, Texas, police respond to a call and discover country singer Randy Travis lying naked in the road and smelling of alcohol. Travis had crashed his vehicle into a construction zone just previously. In fact, there was an earlier call the same day from a convenience store owner, who said Travis had entered his store - still naked - and tried to buy cigarettes, but left when he realized he had no money. Travis is booked for DWI and resisting arrest, tying on another in a string of run-ins with the law.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2013 – Zev Asher, Canadian experimental musician and documentary film maker, dies at age 50.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Born in Montreal to a Jewish family. His father Stanley was an compulsive collector of popular cultural artefacts. A mountain of it occupied the basement of the family home. Zev would mine the ephemera; from the pile he found a frame of reference for the media critique implicit in his pioneering noise and multimedia performance group Roughage. He attended M.I.N.D. high school and in 1986 entered the film studies program at Concordia University. He dropped out after being given his first assignment; an essay on Les Unes et Les Autres by Claude Lelouch. Fronting several bands in the city's no wave/punk scene of the early 1980s that he, along with Tim Olive, later revisited in the early 1990s as Nimrod.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Living in Japan with Leah Singer from 1985 to 1987 he became acquainted with the denizens of Tokyo's burgeoning noise scene. Through friendships and collaborations with the artist John Duncan and the noise musician Masami Akita he performed in several noise super groups that were spin offs from Akita's Merzbow project – these included Bustmonsters and Flying Testicle. His Roughage project began here, using a four-track tape recorder he developed techniques for collaging sound recordings. He produced micro editions of these audio cassette collages that were distributed through friends and specialty record stores in Tokyo, a hand made collage was included with each cassette copy. Working with the experimental filmmaker, Mark Nugent, Zev enlarged the scope of Roughage into the multimedia performance unit that included contributions and collaborations with other artists, including Willy Le Maitre, Eric Vasseur. Roughage performances took place throughout Canada, Japan and Europe from the late 80's to the late 90's[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]During one Roughage tour of the newly minted state of Croatia in 1995 he documented and interviewed artists that he met. These interviews provided the basis for his first documentary 'Rat Art: Croatian Independents'. The video looked at artists making art in the context of a society at war.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]His second feature was called 'What About Me: The Rise of The Nihilist Spasm Band'. The documentary premièred at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2000. Drawing from the inspiration of finding a copy of the Nihilist Spasm Band's first L.P. No Canada in the pile of 1970's ephemera in his family's basement; the documentary explores the legacy of the Canadian noise music pioneers.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The controversy surrounding an art student, Jesse Powers and his infamous act of killing a cat as an art project formed the basis of his third feature documentary Casuistry: The Art of Killing a Cat. The 2004 work, made in collaboration with experimental filmmaker Linda Feesey, explored the limits of what can constitute an artwork. The video also had its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2004. The first screening was almost shut down by street protesters alleging that the video condoned cruelty to animals.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]His sound collaboration with Norway's Lasse Marhaug materialized as a CD release entitled 'The Romance is Over' by The Sleazy Listeners'.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]After receiving a diagnosis of CLL in 2003 (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and going through an ordeal of chemotherapy in Montreal, Zev relocated to Shanghai to work on his documentary on the noise band Torturing Nurse. The work became Subcultural Revolution: Shanghai. Using the social context of the day to day lives of the band members; their collective underground project was revealed to be decidedly contrary to the prevailing notions of progress and success that the country was enjoying at the time.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]After a relapse of CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia), Zev was obliged to return to Montreal for more treatment. Eventually undergoing a stem cell transplant there at Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont . For his final five years Zev struggled with Graft-versus-host disease. His constant ordeal and medical treatments were the subject of his final and incomplete documentary video work Zev Asher:GVH.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]in 2014 – Henry Stone, born Henry David Epstein, he was an American record company executive and producer whose career spanned the era from R&B in the early 1950s through the disco boom of the 1970s to the 2010s. He was best known as co-owner and president of TK Records, but reportedly set up more than 100 record labels, and generated more than 100 million dollars in record sales across the world. Stone was described as "an acute businessman who always made sure that contracts and publishing agreements were written in his favor." Stone died of natural causes in Miami on August 7, 2014 at age 93.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Born in the Bronx as Henry David Epstein, Stone began playing the trumpet in his teens while at an orphanage in Pleasantville, New York. In 1943 he joined the US Army, playing in a racially integrated band and developing an appreciation of what were then called "race records". After being discharged in 1947, he changed his last name to Stone, moved to Los Angeles, and started working on sales and promotion for Jewel Records and then Modern Records, and traveling around the country.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1948, Stone settled in Miami, Florida, setting up his own distribution company, Seminole, and shortly afterwards the Crystal recording studio. In 1951 he recorded Ray Charles’ "St. Pete Florida Blues", among others. In 1952 he started two record labels, Rockin' (for blues) with artists including Earl Hooker, and Glory (for gospel), and soon had success in both styles.[3] In association with King Records, Stone released The Charms’ "Hearts of Stone" on King's De Luxe Records subsidiary, and it became an R&B chart #1 hit in 1954. He was also instrumental in signing James Brown to King, and in recording Brown’s first hit "Please, Please, Please".[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1955, he established his own independent publishing companies and several record labels, including Chart and Dade, mainly recording local blues artists. In 1960, Stone cut "(Do The) Mashed Potatoes" by "Nat Kendrick and the Swans" – actually James Brown's backing band - for the Dade label. He also set up Tone Distribution (originally Tru-Tone), which became one of the most successful record distribution companies, working with Atlantic, Motown, Stax and many more independent labels. Stone's distribution expertise was instrumental in spreading the music produced by those labels around the world. At its height, Tone occupied a full city block and a large warehouse in Hialeah, Florida, and employed over 100 people.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]While he focused on the distribution business during the 1960s, Stone also continued to record R&B artists. These included Betty Wright, whose "Clean Up Woman" was a major hit in 1971 on his and Steve Alaimo's Alston label. Alaimo had previously recorded for Stone and been a Tone employee. Stone also set up the Glades label, recording the million selling hit "Why Can’t We Live Together" by Timmy Thomas. Stone established many different labels on the basis, he said, that it was easier to get records played if the radio stations did not realize they came from the same source.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1972, Stone heard from Jerry Wexler that Atlantic was going to merge with Warner Bros. Records and Elektra, handle its own distribution, and no longer use Tone. At that point, he decided to concentrate on recording and manufacturing his own records, forming another new record company, TK Records with Alaimo (named after the studio's recording console designer Terry Kane), based in Hialeah, with which he had his greatest success.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1973, Stone’s warehouse worker and occasional front desk receptionist, Harry Wayne “KC” Casey and TK's budding recording studio engineer Richard Finch were introduced by Stone and began collaborating on writing and performing songs, with Stone allowing them to experiment in the recording studio after hours. As KC and the Sunshine Band, they released a string of hits including "Get Down Tonight", "That's The Way I Like It" and "Shake Your Booty", all on Stone's TK label. The band had five number one pop singles, platinum albums, won three Grammys and one American Music Award. Prior to the success of KC and the Sunshine Band, Casey and Finch wrote and produced the number one hit, "Rock Your Baby" by George McCrae, and his follow-ups. "Rock Your Baby" is credited as being the very first disco hit record.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Stone’s companies produced numerous other hits during the 1970s, including Beginning of the End's "Funky Nassau" (on Alston), Latimore's "Let's Straighten It Out" (on Glades), Anita Ward's "Ring My Bell" (on Juana), Little Beaver's "Party Down" and Gwen McCrae's "Rockin’ Chair" (both on Cat), Peter Brown's "Do Ya Wanna Get Funky With Me" (on Drive), and Bobby Caldwell's "What You Won't Do for Love" (on Clouds).[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]By the late 1970s, the TK Records and its sister labels became pre-eminent in the dance and pop music scene, but suffered badly from the anti-disco movement which followed. TK Records ceased operating by 1981, and Stone went into partnership with Morris Levy of Roulette Records to form the Sunnyview label, issuing records by funk and rap artists such as Newcleus. Stone later became involved with Hot Productions in the reissue of dance classics on CD. Recently, he continued reissuing R&B and dance tracks on his own label, The Legendary Henry Stone Presents...[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 2004, Henry Stone was awarded the first ever Pioneer Award for the Dance Music Hall of Fame, which was presented in New York City. When he was invited on stage to receive his award and give a speech he received a lengthy standing ovation.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He's buried in Riverside-Gordon Memorial Gardens in North Miami Beach.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2014 – Cristina Deutekom, a Dutch soprano noted for her performance as the Queen of the Night in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte, a role that brought her fame on both sides of the Atlantic, dies aged 82.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]She also sang many of the great bel canto characters by Puccini, Rossini and Bellini, notably the title role in the latter’s Norma, a part she said she enjoyed because of its “warm character”. She was later heard in Verdi’s early operas, such as Macbeth and Nabucco; although she was quick to reject a role if she felt it did not suit either her voice or her personality, and regretted singing Donna Anna in Don Giovanni, adding: “That’s the kind of woman I really don’t like.” [/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]After first appearing as the Queen of the Night with the Dutch Opera in 1963 she sang the role in several European houses, including in Peter Hall’s production at the Royal Opera, Covent Garden, in 1968, alongside Margaret Price as Pamina. According to one critic, Cristina Deutekom “brought strength and crisp, firm attack, as well as excellent rhythm to the Queen of the Night’s fearsomely florid and high-pitched arias”. She also recorded it with Georg Solti in 1971. [/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Cristina Deutekom enjoyed a particularly successful career in Italy where, from the time of her first appearance there, in Così fan tutte in Venice in 1968, she was known as “L’usignolo d’Olanda” (the Dutch nightingale). She always felt a responsibility to those who had paid to hear her, wanting them to feel that parting with their ticket money had bought them an escape from the real world. “ I want to have all of the attention of the audience so they are sitting on the edge of their seats,” she told the Los Angeles Times in 1986.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]She was born Stientje Engel in Amsterdam on August 28 1931. Her father worked in a sugar factory, and both parents sang in a local choir. She was appearing in musical productions by the age of five, and in her teens took music lessons with the conductor Jan Smit and sang in a cabaret group with her brother. [/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Aged 20 she married Jaap Deutekom, a talented boxer who also sang with the Netherlands Opera’s “reserve chorus”; three years later they had a daughter. Her agent recommended that she change her first name to one that Italian audiences would be able to pronounce. Meanwhile, Felix Hupka, her vocal coach, encouraged her to embark slowly on her career. “He said, 'Wait, wait. Don’t start on the big parts. Start with smaller parts.’ That’s the way to save the voice,” she told the journalist Bruce Duffie. In the meantime she studied with Coby Riemersma at the Amsterdam Conservatory. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]It was not until she was in her thirties that, after several minor roles, her international career took off. For example, at the Met in 1974 she opened the season with Plácido Domingo in Verdi’s I vespri siciliani. Even so, she found the separation from her family — especially when in New York — difficult: once, after a tearful telephone call with her daughter in Amsterdam, she had to be persuaded not to pull out of the production altogether. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]She was baffled by what she saw as the demotion of singers within the opera world, claiming that too often on promotional material “you won’t find the name of the singers, but rather the names of the conductor and the stage director.” [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In 1985, while in Bilbao singing Amaya, an opera in Basque by Jesús Guridi, she suffered a heart attack, and subsequently retired from the stage. She became a sought-after teacher at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague and also ran the Cristina Deutekom Competition in Enschede. She withdrew from public life after a stroke in 2004. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Cristina Deutekom is survived by her husband and their daughter.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Ruby Winters (née Forehand) American soul singer whose records made the singles charts in both the US and UK in the 1960s and 1970s, dies at age 74.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Winters was born in Louisville, Kentucky to Charles Forehand, Jr. and Lucille Inez Forehand. When Ruby was five, her mother died. From that moment on, Ruby was raised by her grandmother in Cincinnati, Ohio. She had her first minor hit in 1967, a duet with pop singer Johnny Thunder on the song "Make Love To Me", which had previously been a hit in 1954 for Jo Stafford. Recording on the Diamond label, she had several further minor hits in the US in the late 1960s and early 1970s, including "I Don't Want To Cry", "Guess Who" and her cover of the Dick Glasser standard, "I Will". Just as her US chart career was ending, her version of "I Will" became an unexpected hit in Britain on the independent Creole label, where it rose to no. 4 on the UK Singles Chart in late 1977. She followed up its success in Britain with several more hits, "Come to Me", "I Won't Mention It Again" and "Baby Lay Down".[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1979, K-Tel International issued a compilation LP of her songs titled Songbird (#NE 1045).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Ruby Winters Jenkins, a resident of Missouri City, Texas. She was preceded in death by her husband, Will Jenkins.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – María Dolores Castellón Vargas, Spanish singer, dies at age 80. When she was young she went to sing to the theatre Teatro Calderón of Madrid. She sang alongside her brother, Enrique. Later she appeared on television, notably A la española, directed by Valerio Lazarov (1971).[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Her real popularity came with the song Achilipú.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]When her husband died in 1987 she retired. She died in Valencia on 7 August 2016 from complications of leukemia.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – William Edward "B. E." Taylor, lead singer of the pop rock band B. E. Taylor Group and a solo artistdies at age 65. The group's 1983 single, "Vitamin L", reached No. 66 on the Billboard 100 singles chart.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Hailing from Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, he was the eldest of three sons of Bill and Betty Taylor. Born William Edward, he was called 'Billy Eddie' by his mother, which he eventually shortened to B. E. While in high school, he formed B.E. Taylor and The Establishment.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Taylor moved to Wheeling, West Virginia in the mid-1980s.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In 1991, Taylor, a dedicated Christian, contributed a reworking of “Silent Night” to a local station’s Christmas compilation, launching his second career as a holiday performer.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Taylor went on to record five solo albums and developed a following in the adult contemporary market with his annual Christmas tours. He had also performed for many popular television programs in the 1990s, including the award-winning LightMusic, for which he was the music director, Nickelodeon, and its night-time programming block, Nick At Nite. In 1984, the B. E. Taylor Group scored MTV video rotation and a Billboard regional No. 1 hit with the song "Vitamin L."[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Taylor's longtime guitarist and collaborator, Rick Witkowski, is also a member of the progressive rock band, Crack the Sky. In 2008, Taylor was awarded the Duquesne University Lifetime Achievement Award.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]In March 2007, Taylor was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. During the years of treatment, he released the album B. E. Taylor Christmas 3 and a concert DVD, completed eight Christmas tours, took part in Valentine and summer concerts.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]He died from complications of the tumor. He was survived by his wife Veronica (Née DeBlasis) Taylor and two children, B.C. and Tahnee.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]in 2016 – Anđelko Klobučar, Croatian composer, organist, and professor of music, dies at age 85.[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]Born in Zagreb, Klobučar studied at the Zagreb Academy of Music and later in Salzburg and Paris. He was organist of the Zagreb Cathedral and remained an active teacher and composer. He was awarded the Vladimir Nazor Award for Life Achievement in Music in 1995 and the Porin Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002. Klobučar was a full member of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts since 1992.[/FONT]
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7 August
Page 4 of 4[/FONT]
 

Pedro

Forum Staff
Mar 2008
17,260
On a mountain top in Costa Rica. yeah...I win!!
[FONT=&quot]8 August [/FONT][FONT=&quot]……………………………………………………………………. Total views 671,934
page 1 of 4

in 1571 - John Ward, composer is born.

in 1640 - Catharina Amalia, Countess of Erbach, German composer is born at Arolsen. She was the daughter of Count von Waldeck. In 1664 she married Count Georg Ludwig von Erbach. Among her works were several sacred anthems. - Died at Cuylenburg, the Netherlands, Jan. 4,1697.

in 1693 - Laurent Belissen, composer is born.[/FONT]
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in 1700 - Matthias Henriksen Schacht, Danish music historian, composer, dies at 40.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]He was the son of Henric Schacht. After graduating from 1678 he visited several German universities, but also Stockholm and Uppsala and became 1682 teachers in Visby. However, he traveled abroad soon, to Germany and Holland, then became 1683 offices and associate professor at Odense School of Education, 1686 Rector of Kerteminde, as well as musician for this city and Hindsholm . He dedicated himself to inventions , literature and music , "attended school by day and the violin at night". Has left a musical history handwriting, Musician Danicus or Danish Songwriter (1687), which is available at The Royal Library and was published in 1928 by Godtfred Skjerne .

in 1754 - Luigi (Lodovico) Marchesi, celebrated Italian castrate soprano, known as "Marchesini", is born at Milan. He studied horn with his father. After having himself castrated, he pursued vocal training with Alluzzi and Caironi. At age 11, he joined the choir at the Milan Cathedral, where he studied composition with its director Fioroni. He made his debut as Giannetta in Anfossi's L'lncognita perseguitata in Rome (1773); also sang in Treviso (1775), and then was a member of the Munich court (1776-78). He subsequently gained renown as a member of the Teatro San Carlo in Naples (1778-79); appeared in Florence (1780) and then again in Naples (1780-81).

He sang in Milan and also in Turin, where he held the title of musico di corte (1782-98). In 1785 he was engaged by the court of Catherine the Great; on his way to St. Petersburg, he appeared in Sarti's Giulio Sabino in Vienna before Emperor Joseph II (Aug. 4, 1785), who ordered a medal be struck in his honor. He made his Russian debut as Rinaldo in Sarti's Armida e Rinaldo at the inaugural performance of the Hermitage Theater in St. Petersburg (Jan. 15, 1786). The soprano Luiza-Rosa Todi intrigued against him, however, and despite his successes, he left Russia before the expiration of his contract. He then appeared in Berlin on March 9, 1787, and subsequently scored a London triumph in Giulio Sabino on April 5,1788.

He made his last appearance in London on July 17, 1790, and then pursued his career mainly in Italy; also sang in Vienna again (1798, 1801). He sang in the premiere of Mayr's Ginevra di Scozia at the dedicatory performance of the Teatro Nuovo in Trieste on April 21, 1801. He made his farewell stage appearance in Mayr's Lodoiska in Milan in May 1805, but sang in public as late as 1820 in Naples. Blessed with a range of 2 1/2 octaves, Marchesi was unsurpassed in the opera seria genre of his era. - Died at Inzago, Dec. 14, 1829.

in 1755 - Luigi Marchesi, composer is born.[/FONT]
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in 1759 - Karl Heinrich Graun, German composer and tenor singer, dies at 55.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Along with Johann Adolph Hasse, he is considered to be the most important German composer of Italian opera of his time.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Graun was born in Wahrenbrück in the Margraviate of Brandenburg. In 1714, he followed his brother, Johann Gottlieb Graun, to the school of the Kreuzkirche, Dresden, and sang in the Dresdner Kreuzchor and the chorus of the Dresden Opera. He studied singing with Christian Petzold and composition with Johann Christoph Schmidt. In 1724, Graun moved to Braunschweig, singing at the opera house and writing six operas for the company. In 1735, Graun moved to Rheinsberg in Brandenburg, after he had written the opera Lo specchio della fedeltà for the marriage of the then crown prince Frederick (the Great) and Elisabeth Christine in Schloss Salzdahlum in 1733. He was Kapellmeister to Frederick the Great from his ascension to the throne in 1740 until Graun's death nineteen years later in Berlin.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Graun wrote a number of operas. His opera Cesare e Cleopatra inaugurated the opening of the Berlin State Opera (Königliche Hofoper) in 1742. Montezuma (1755) was written to a libretto by King Frederick. His works are rarely played today, though his passion cantata Der Tod Jesu (The Death of Jesus, 1755) was frequently performed in Germany for many years after his death. His other works include concertos and trio sonatas.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]He married twice and had a daughter, who became a singer, from his first marriage and four sons from his second. His great-great-great-great-grandson, Vladimir Nabokov, became an eminent 20th-century novelist.[/FONT]
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in 1802 - Friedrich Wilhelm Wieprecht, German trombonist and inventor, is born at Aschersleben. He studied in Dresden and Leipzig, where he was already famous as a trombonist. He invented the bass tuba (1835, with the instrument maker Moritz), the bathyphon, a contrabass clarinet (1839,with Skorra), the "piangendo" on brass instruments with pistons, and an improved contrabass bassoon. His claim of priority over Sax, in the invention of the saxhorns, remains moot. – Died at Berlin, Aug. 4, 1872.

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in 1816 - Blas de Laserna, Spanish composer, dies at 65.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Laserna was one of the most prolific and popular songwriters of late eighteenth and early nineteenth century Spain.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]As an educator, he championed traditional Spanish musical forms, but as a theatrical impresario gave in to the public taste for Italian forms.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]He composed several operas and concertos, as well as incidental music for several comedies in the popular Spanish theater. A prolific songwriter, his creative oeuvre contains more than five hundred songs (tonadillas), many with lyrics by Ramón de la Cruz.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]While Conductor of the orchestra of the Teatro de la Cruz, he premiered his operetta, La Gitanilla Por Amor (The Gypsy Girl For Love), in 1791.

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in 1830 - Julius Stern, eminent German music pedagogue, is born at Breslau. He studied violin with Lustner, and later took courses with Maurer, Ganz, and Rungenhagen in Berlin; then studied singing in Dresden (1843) and subsequently in Paris, where he conducted the German Gesangverein. In 1846 he settled in Berlin, where he was founder-conductor of the Sternscher Gesangverein (1847-74); also conducted the Sinfonie-Kapelle (1869-71) and the Reichshalle concerts (1873-75). In 1850 he founded the Berlin Conservatory with Kullak and Marx; Kullak withdrew in 1855, and Marx in 1857; thenceforth Stern became the sole head of the institution, now known as the Julius Stern Staatliche Hochschule fur Musik; it prospered and acquired the reputation of one of the greatest music schools in Europe. Stern was also a composer, and received commendation from Mendelssohn for his songs. He published Barcarolle for Voice, Cello, and Piano, Les Adieux for Violin and Piano, men's choruses, and songs. His opera, Ismene, was not produced. He also wrote singing exercises which were long in use. - Died at Berlin, Feb. 27, 1883.

in 1830 - Julius von Bemuth, German conductor, is born at Rees. He was a practicing lawyer. He studied music with Taubert and Dehn in Berlin, and at the Leipzig Conservatory, where he founded a chamber music society, Aufschwung (1857), and the Dilettanten-Orchester-Verein (1859). From 1867 to 1894 he was conductor of the Hamburg Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1873 he founded a conservatory in Hamburg. - Died at Hamburg, Dec. 24, 1902.

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in 1845 - Thomas Koschat, Austrian bass and composer, is born at Viktring, near Klagenfurt. He sang in church choirs. He published his first vocal quartets in the Carinthian dialect in 1871, which became so successful that he published some 100 more. In 1875 he organized the famous Kurnthner Quintett with 4 other singers; their performances were exceedingly popular. His "Liederspiel" Am Worthersee (Vienna, March 22, 1880), containing many of his favorite vocal numbers, had great vogue. He also produced a 4-act "Volksstiick mit Gesang," Die Rosenthaler Nachtigall, and the Singspiel Der Burgermeister von St. Anna (Vienna, May 1, 1884; given in Italian as Un colpo di fuoco). - Died at Vienna, May 19, 1914.

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in 1857 - Cecile (Louise Stephanie) Chaminade, French composer and pianist, is born at Paris. She was a pupil of Lecouppey, Savard, and Marsick; later studied composition with Godard. She became successful as a concert pianist, and also wrote a great number of agreeable piano pieces, in the salon style, which acquired enormous popularity in France, England, and America. She made her American debut playing the piano part of her Concertstuck with the Philadelphia Orchestra (Nov. 7, 1908). She also wrote a lyric symphony, Les Amazones (Antwerp, April 18, 1888), two orchestra suites, two piano trios, and more than 200 piano pieces in a Romantic style. – Died at Monte Carlo, April 13, 1944.

in 1871 - William Henry Squire, composer is born.

in 1877 - Edgar Refardt, eminent Swiss musicologist and bibliographer, is born at Basel. He studied law and obtained the degree of Dr.Jur. in 1901. In 1915 he was appointed librarian and cataloguer of the musical collection of the Municipal Library of Basel. From 1921 to 1948 he was director of the Basel Orchestra Society. He published valuable bibliographical works on Swiss music as well as essays on various literary and musical subjects. - Died at Basel, March 3, 1968.

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in 1882 - Olga Samaroff, (nee Hickenlooper), American pianist and educator, is born at San Antonio. She studied as a child with her mother and grandmother (Mrs. L. Griinewald, a former concert pianist), and subsequently studied in Paris (with Delaborde), Baltimore (with Ernest Hutcheson), and Berlin (with Ernst Jedliczka). She made her concert debut in N.Y. (Jan. 18, 1905) with the N.Y. Symphony Society; appeared with other orchestras in the U.S. and Europe; gave joint recitals with Kreisler, Zimbalist, and other violinists. She was music critic for the N.Y. Evening Post (1927-29); was on the faculties of the Philadelphia Conseratory, and the Juilliard School of Music in N.Y. (1924-48); among her outstanding students were Eugene List, Rosalyn Tureck, William Kapell, and Alexis Weissenberg. In 1911 she married Leopold Stokowski; they divorced in 1923. Her autobiography was published as An American Musician's Story (N.Y, 1939). She also published The Layman's Music Book (N.Y, 1935; second ed., rev., 1947, as The Listener's Music Book), The Magic World of Music (N.Y, 1936), and A Music Manual (N.Y, 1937). – Died at N.Y., May 17, 1948.

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in 1886 - Daniel Ruyneman, Dutch composer is born at Amsterdam. He began his study of music relatively late. He received training in piano from De John and in composition from Zweers at the Amsterdam Cons. (1913-16). In 1918 he was a co-founder of the Nederlansche Vereeniging voor Moderne Scheppende Toonkunst, which became the Dutch section of the ISCM in 1922. In 1930 he organized the Netherlands Soc. for Contemporary Music, serving as president until 1962; ed. its journal, Maandblad voor Hedendaagse Muziek (1930-40), until it was suppressed during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands; was general secretary of the ISCM (1947-51). Ruyneman made a special study of Javanese instruments and introduced them in some of his works. He was naturally attracted to exotic subjects with mystic connotations and coloristic effects; also worked on restoration of early music. In 1930 he orchestrated fragments of Mussorgsky's unfinished opera The Marriage, and added his own music for the missing acts of the score. – Died at Amsterdam, July 25, 1963.

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in 1886 - Pietro Alessandro Yon, American organist, composer, and teacher, is born at Settimo Vittone. He studied with Fumagalli at the Milan Conservatory, then at the Turin Conservatory (1901-04), and at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia in Rome with Remigio Renzi (organ) and Sgambati (piano), graduating in 1905. He subsequently served as organist at St. Peter's in Rome (1905-07). In 1907 he emigrated to the U.S.; from 1907 to 1919, and again from 1921 to 1926, was organist at St. FrancisXavier's in N.Y.; then was appointed organist of St. Patrick's Cathedral in N.Y., a post he held until his death. He became a naturalized American citizen in 1921. He was greatly esteemed as an organist and teacher; composed numerous organ pieces, of which Gesu Bambino (1917) became popular and was published in various instrumental and vocal arrangements; he also wrote an oratorio, TheTriumph of St. Patrick (N.Y.,April 29,1934); several masses and other religious services. A novel based on his life, The Heavens Heard Him, written by V.B. Hammann and M.E. Yon, was published in N.Y. in 1963. - Died at Huntington, N.Y., Nov. 22, 1943.

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in 1888 - Friedrich Wilhelm Jahns, German music scholar, voice teacher, and composer, dies at 79.
He is best known for his thematic catalog of the works of Carl Maria von Weber.[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot]Jähns was born and died in Berlin. His grave is preserved in the Protestant Friedhof I der Jerusalems- und Neuen Kirchengemeinde (Cemetery No. I of the congregations of Jerusalem's Church and New Church) in Berlin-Kreuzberg, south of Hallesches Tor.[/FONT]

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in 1891 - Adolf Georg Wilhelm Busch (German violinist, composer) is born.
Busch was born in Siegen in Westphalia. He studied at the Cologne Conservatory with Willy Hess and Bram Eldering. His composition teacher was Fritz Steinbach but he also learned much from his future father-in-law Hugo Grüters in Bonn.

In 1912, Busch founded the Vienna Konzertverein Quartet, consisting of the principals from the Konzertverein orchestra, which made its debut at the 1913 Salzburg Festival. After World War I, he founded the Busch Quartet, which from the 1920–21 season included Gösta Andreasson, violin, Karl Doktor, viola, and Paul Grümmer, cello. The quartet was in existence with varying personnel until 1951.

The additional member of the circle was Rudolf Serkin, who became Busch's duo partner at 18 and eventually married Busch's daughter, Irene. The Busch Quartet and Serkin became the nucleus of the Busch Chamber Players, a forerunner of modern chamber orchestras.

In 1927, with the rise of Adolf Hitler, Busch decided he could not in good conscience stay in Germany, so he emigrated to Basel, Switzerland. (Busch was not Jewish and was popular in Germany, but firmly opposed Nazism from the beginning.) On 1 April 1933 he repudiated Germany altogether and in 1938 he boycotted Italy. On the outbreak of World War II, Busch emigrated from Basel to the United States, where he eventually settled in Vermont. There, he was one of the founders with Rudolf Serkin of the Marlboro Music School and Festival.

The Busch Quartet was particularly admired for its interpretations of Brahms, Schubert, and above all Beethoven. It made a series of recordings in the 1930s that included many of these composers' works for string quartet. In 1941, it set down three Beethoven quartets that it had not previously recorded, including Opus 130. The Busch Quartet never recorded the Grosse Fuge, Opus 133; an arrangement was recorded by the Busch Chamber Players, with Busch leading from the first violin desk.

Busch was a great soloist, as well as a chamber musician, and live recordings exist of him playing the Beethoven, Brahms, Dvorák and Busoni Concertos, as well as the Brahms Double Concerto. In the studio he recorded concertos by Bach and Mozart, as well as the Brandenburg Concertos by Bach and the Concerti grossi, op.6, by Handel. He had a highly individual tone and great technique. Among his students were Stefi Geyer, Erica Morini and Yehudi Menuhin.

As a composer, Busch was influenced by Max Reger. He was among the first to compose a Concerto for Orchestra, in 1929. A number of his compositions have been recorded, including the Violin Concerto (A minor, opus 20, published 1922), String Sextet (G major, opus 40), Quintet for Saxophone and String Quartet, and several large scale works for Organ. Regarding the latter, Busch once remarked that if he could come back after his death he would like to return as an organist.

He was the son of the luthier Wilhelm Busch; brother of the conductor Fritz Busch, the cellist Hermann Busch, the pianist Heinrich Busch and the actor Willi Busch, and grandfather of the pianist Peter Serkin. An exhaustive two-volume biography of Busch by Tully Potter was published in 2010 by Toccata Press [/FONT]


[FONT=&quot]in 1896 - Jaromir Weinberger, Czech-born American composer, is born at Prague. He was a student of Kticka and Hoffmeister in Prague and of Reger in Leipzig. In 1922 he became a teacher of composition at Ithaca (N.Y.) College. Returning to his homeland, he scored a remarkable success with his opera Svanda dudak (Schwanda the Bagpiper; Prague, April 27, 1927). It subsequently was performed throughout Europe to critical acclaim. With the dismemberment of his homeland by the Nazis in 1939, Weinberger fled to the U.S. and later became a naturalized citizen. Weinberger's success with Svanda dudak was a signal one. Even though the opera eventually went unperformed, its "Polka and Fugue" became a popular concert piece. He committed suicide, despondent over the lack of interest in his works. - Died (suicide) St. Petersburg, Fla., Aug. 8, 1967.

in 1900 - Victor Young, Chicago, Ill, orchestra leader (Milton Berle Show, In Old Calif) is born.

in 1900 - Lucky Millinder (LUCIOUS VANABLE MILLINDER) is born. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]A popular jump-blues and R&B bandleader who discovered dozens of R&B acts, Lucky Millinder could not play an instrument and rarely sang. Born in Alabama but raised in Chicago, he broke into show business as an M.C. at a Chicago speakeasy, The Grand Terrace Club. Leading a series of jazz groups in the Thirties in both Chicago and New York, he first gained fame in 1934 as the leader of The Miss Blue Rhythm Band which landed a residency at Harlem’s Cotton Club. After briefly taking over Bill Doggett’s band in 1938, Millinder formed his own jazz/jump R&B group in 1940.

Signed with Decca Records, Millinder enjoyed several pop and R&B hits including ‘When The Lights Go On Again (All Over The World)’ (1942), ‘Apollo Jump’ (1943), ‘Sweet Slumber’ (1943), and featuring the vocals of Wynonie Harris, ‘Who Threw The Whiskey In The Well’ (1945). Millinder hired a who’s who of musical talent, including Sam “The Man” Taylor, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, and even gospel singer, Rosetta Tharpe; and after discovering a young Ruth Brown, he fired her after only a few dates.

Millinder’s band backed another of his sidemen, Bull Moose Jackson, at his early King-Queen sessions; recording for King Records, Millinder landed his final hit with ‘I’m Waiting Just For You’. A catalyst who transformed jump blues into rock’n’roll, Millinder disbanded his group in 1952. Then except for a deejay stint at WNEW in New York, he would later work outside the music industry. He died at Harlem Hospital in New York City. (Liver problems). - Died September 28, 1966.

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in 1902 - Hans Schouwman, Dutch pianist, singer, and composer, is born at Gorinchem. After training from Peter van Anrooy, he was active as a recitalist accompanying himself at the piano. He also devoted much time to composition. - Died at The Hague, April 8, 1967.

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in 1904 - Istvan Szelenyi, Hungarian composer and musicologist, is born at Zolyom. He studied at the Budapest Academy of Music with Kodaly, He toured as a concert pianist (1928-30); returning to Budapest, he taught at the Cons. (from 1945), later serving as its director; also taught at the Academy of Music (1956-72); ed. the journal Uj Zenei Szemle (1951-56). In 1969 he was awarded the Erkel Prize. – Died at Budapest, Jan. 31, 1972.

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in 1905 - Carleton Sprague Smith, distinguished American musicologist, is born at N.Y. He was educated at Harvard University (M.A., 1928) and at the University of Vienna (Ph.D., 1930, with the dissertation Die Beziehungen zwischen Spanien und Oesterreich im 17. Jahrhundert). Returning to the U.S., he was an instructor in history at Columbia University (1931-35), then at N.Y.U. (1939-67); he also served as chief of the Music Division at the N.Y. Public Library (1931-43; 1946-59). A linguist, he lectured in South America, in Spanish and Portuguese, on the social history of the U.S. Smith was also a skillful flutist, and often took part in concerts of early and new music. – Died at Washington, Conn., Sept. 19,1994.

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in 1905 - Andre‚ Jolivet, prominent French composer (L'Eunuque) is born at Paris.. A son of artistically inclined parents, he took an interest in the fine arts, wrote poetry, and improvised at the piano. He studied cello with Louis Feuillard and theory with Aime Theodas at Notre Dame de Clignancourt. At the age of 15, he wrote a ballet and designed a set for it, and then undertook a prolonged study of musical techniques with Le Flem (1928-33). Of decisive importance to the maturation of his creative consciousness was his meeting in 1930 with Varese, then living in Paris, who gave him a sense of direction in composition. In 1935 he organized in Paris the progressive group La Spirale. In 1936, in association with Baudrier, Messiaen, and Daniel-Lesur, he founded La Jeune France, dedicated to the promotion of new music in a national French style. He served as conductor and music director of the Comedie Fran~aise (1943-59); was technical adviser of the Direction Generale des Arts et des Lettres (1959-62), and president of the Concerts Lamoureux (1963-68); he also was prof. of composition at the Paris Cons. (1965-70). He toured throughout the world as a conductor of his own music. Jolivet injected an empiric spirit into his music, making free use of modernistic technical resources, including the electronic sounds of the Ondes Martenot. Despite these esoteric preoccupations, and even a peripheral deployment of serialism, his music was designed mainly to provide aural stimulation and aesthetic satisfaction. - Died at Paris, Dec. 20, 1974

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in 1907 - Benny Carter, (actually, Bennett Lester; aka "The King"), musician/composer (Easy Money, King Carter) long-careered jazz alto and tenor saxophonist, trumpeter, clarinetist, bandleader, arranger, composer, trombonist, pianist, clarinetist, is born at N.Y.

His father, Norell Carter (b. in or near Clarksburg, W. Va., c. 1877), a janitor and later a postal clerk, was a self-taught guitarist, his mother Sadie Bennett (b. Richmond, Va., c. 1877; d. N.Y. 1926) played piano and organ. He had two older sisters, Edna (b. c. 1900) and Alice (b. c. 1904). When he was perhaps one year old, the family moved to the San Juan Hill area of Manhattan. He sang in the choir at an Episcopal church. On July 4, 1917 or 1918, he accidentally shot a girl in the back with a BB gun and was sent to a reformatory for a few weeks, after which his mother sent him to live for a year or two with her relatives near Pittsburgh. He then returned to school in N.Y.; he was later expelled for punching a teacher who called him a "nigger." Carter studied piano with his mother from age ten, then with a neighborhood teacher.

Inspired by his cousin, Theodore "Cuban" Bennett, an accomplished trumpet player, he saved up for eight months and at age 13 paid $33 for a second-hand trumpet; after one weekend of abortive blowing, he returned to the shop and after some difficulty got the owner to exchange it for a saxophone on the advice of local musician Harold Proctor. He took lessons from Arthur Reeves (a particular inspiration), and also taught himself from books. By age 15, Carter was sitting in at Harlem night spots, despite parental objections. When his family moved to Harlem in 1923, he became even more involved in the jazz scene. Probably his first regular paying job was in 1923 when Miley invited him to sub for Ben Whittet at John O'Connors' Club in Harlem. He joined June Clark's Band (August 1924) and switched to alto sax. Soon afterwards, he worked with Billy Paige's Broadway Syncopators at the Capitol, N.Y.; they quickly disbanded and Benny played with Lois Deppe's Serenaders, then on baritone with Earl Hines at the Grape Arbor in Pittsburgh (late 1924).

He also worked with Willie "the Lion" Smith in a trio and sat in with William (later Count) Basie. Carter began to teach himself composition and arranging by taking published stock arrangements and studying the parts spread out on the floor without a score. Initially, he wrote without a score as well. In summer 1925 he met Rosa Lee Jackson and they were married a few weeks later; she died of pneumonia in 1928. In 1925 he went to Wilberforce Coll., Ohio, to join Horace Henderson's (Wilberforce) Collegians (he never enrolled there despite what has often been stated). He left Henderson in 1926 and during that summer worked with Billy Fowler's Band in Baltimore and N.Y. After a brief stint with James P. Johnson, he worked two weeks in Duke Ellington's Band, then spent a short spell with Fletcher Henderson, producing his first recorded arrangement, "P.D.Q. Blues," written in 1927, the same year he published his first composition, "Nobody Knows," co-written with Fats Waller.

Carter then spent over a year with Charlie Johnson, with whom he made his first surviving recordings (1928), including two of his arrangements ("Charleston is the Best Dance After All"). He rejoined Horace Henderson in Detroit, then toured briefly with Fletcher Henderson (autumn 1928) before forming his own band (late 1928) in N.Y. and on tour. He worked again with Fletcher Henderson (from January 1930), writing many arrangements. Carter joined Chick Webb (c. March 1931) and left during summer 1931 to spend a year as the musical director of McKinney's Cotton Pickers. From this period onward, he regularly doubled on trumpet. While working with McKinney, he also played dates with Don Redman and Fletcher Henderson.

Carter began rehearsing his own band in the summer of 1932, with Dicky Wells, Chu Berry, and Sid Catlett (Teddy Wilson joined in 1933); he led this band in N.Y. (from c. September 1932), including benefits for the Scottsboro Nine defense fund on Oct. 7, 1932 and March 8, 1933, touring, and local residencies at Lafayette Theatre and Savoy Ballroom. In January 1934, his band opened the Apollo Theater in Harlem. He recorded with Fletcher Henderson (September 1934), and arranged for Duke Ellington and Benny Goodman. Carter disbanded his group and worked on trumpet with Willie Bryant (spring 1935), and then with Charlie Barnet, before receiving an invitation to Europe. After emigration delays, Carter joined Willie Lewis's Band in Paris (summer 1935). At Leonard Feather's suggestion, he took an appointment as staff arranger for the radio BBC Dance Orch. (1936) in London.

He frequently toured Europe, playing Scandinavia (autumn 1936), Amsterdam (March 1937), France, and led the first International (and interracial) Band at Scheveningen, Holland (summer 1937); he led a band at Boeuf sur le Toit in Paris before returning to the U.S. in May 1938. He organized his own big band (November 1938), which was frequently resident at the Savoy Ballroom, N.Y. (March 1939-January 1941). In the fall of 1941, he led a sextet that included Dizzy Gillespie and Kenny Clarke and performed at clubs on 52nd Street. During this period, his arrangements were featured on recordings by Goodman, Glenn Miller, Gene Krupa, and Tommy Dorsey; his well known "When Lights Are Low" was first recorded in London with singer Elizabeth Welch (1936), then done as an instrumental by Lionel Hampton (1939).

In February 1942 Carter re-formed a big band; on tour in Hollywood, he decided to settle in the L.A. area, where he has lived ever since. He played on and helped to orchestrate the soundtrack of Stormy Weather (1943), leading to other soundtrack work; he was one of the first African-Americans to work in this area. Carter led his own band at Billy Berg's Club, Los Angeles, followed by residencies at the Hollywood and Casa Manana. He started a residency at the Apollo, N.Y. (1944); he was billed as "The Amazing Man of Music/7 In 1945 he had residencies at the Trocadero, Hollywood, Plantation Club. During this period, his band included (at times) Miles Davis, J. J. Johnson, Art Pepper, and Max Roach; the band broke up in 1946. He reorganized a new seven-piece band (1947) and continued to do occasional tours, but from the late 1940s through the early 1970s he worked mainly as a composer-arranger for the film and later TV industry.

In 1950, he chaired the committee that negotiated the successful effort to combine the black musicians local 767 of Los Angeles with the white local 47. He led his own bands in and around Hollywood during the 1950s. In the 1950s and 1960s, he also did brief overseas tours with Norman Grant's Jazz at the Philharmonic. In the late 1950s and 1960s, he did arrangements for various singers, including Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Lou Rawls, Ray Charles, Peggy Lee, Louis Armstrong, Pearl Bailey, Billy Eckstine, and Mel Torme; he also played trombone on Capitol records by Julia Lee. Carter restricted his playing to the alto sax during the 1960s. He subbed with Duke Ellington as a favor for a few nights early in 1968, and later that year played solo dates in the U.K.

During the past 25 years, Carter has arranged and composed music for dozens of important films, among them The Snows of Kilimanjaro, The View from Pompey's Head, As Thousands Cheer, and Clash by Night. He also wrote music for more than two dozen theatrical films, including An American in Paris, The Sun Also Rises, and The Guns ofNavarone. In 1975 he traveled throughout the Middle East on a tour sponsored by the U.S. State Department, and around 1976 he resumed an extremely busy full-time jazz career including frequent visits to Europe and Japan. He played at President Jimmy Carter's White House Jazz Party (June 1978). In the 1970s, he became involved in education, conducting seminars and workshops at many universities.

He has received honorary doctorates from Harvard, Princeton, New England Cons., and Rutgers Univ. Other honors include induction into the Black Film Makers Hall of Fame (1978), the coveted Golden Score award of the American Society of Music Arrangers (1980), and appointment to the music advisory panel of the NEA. He also led an orch. for the 1984 inaugural of President Reagan and played at the White House in 1989 as a guest of President Bush. In 1987 Carter received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. That year he recorded Central City Sketches with the American Jazz Orch., nominated for a Grammy in 1988. Carter placed first in the 1989 Down Beat International Critics Poll in the arranger's category. Carter celebrated his 82nd birthday with a concert in Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall. Summer 1991 saw the premiere of a suite called "Good Vibes," which Lincoln Center had commissioned from Carter for this occasion. He wrote the "Peaceful Warrior Suite" for Martin Luther King, commissioned by the Library of Congress for a big band, strings, and Joe Williams and Marlena Shaw. In 1990 Carter was named Jazz Artist of the Year in both the Down Beat and Jazz Times International Critics' polls. He received a Kennedy Center honor on Dec. 8, 1996.


in 1913 - Axel Stordahl, Staten Island NY, orch leader (Frank Sinatra Show) is born.
in 1918 - Gertrude E Durden Rush, US composer/playwright, dies at 38.
in 1920 - Leo Chiosso (Italian lyricist) is born.
in 1920 - Jimmy Witherspoon (US singer) is born.

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in 1921 - Roger Nixon, American composer and teacher, is born at Tulare, Calif. He studied clarinet with a local teacher, and in 1940 attended a seminar in composition with Bliss at the University of Calif, at Berkeley, and in 1941, with Bloch. From 1942 to 1946 he was in the U.S. Army. He then returned in 1947 to Berkeley, where he studied with Sessions (M.A., 1949; Ph.D., 1952); in the summer of 1948 he took private lessons with Schoenberg. In 1960 he joined the faculty of San Francisco State College (later Univ.), where he retired as professor emeritus in 1991. A prolific composer, Nixon writes in a consistent modern idiom anchored in fluctuating tonality and diversified by atonal protuberances. His music is marked by distinctly American melorhythms; his miniature opera, The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky, is an exemplar of adroit modernistic Westernism fashioned in a non-ethnomusicological manner.

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in 1921 - Webb Pierce, American country singer, songwriter, and guitarist, is born near West Monroe, La. Pierce was the most successful recording artist in country music during the 1950s. He employed a hard-edged honky-tonk style in his music, pioneering the use of the electric pedal steel guitar, and the subject matter of his songs frequently dwelled on such honky-tonk themes as drinking and infidelity, notably in the hits "There Stands the Glass" and "Back Street Affair." He scored 96 country chart entries between 1952 and 1982, including 53 that hit the Top Ten and 13 that hit #1. His biggest hits were "Slowly," "In the Jailhouse Now," and "Love, Love, Love."

Pierce was the son of Webb Mite and Florine Pierce. His father died when he was an infant. He was raised on a farm by his mother and stepfather and began playing guitar before his teens. Local performances led to his own weekly radio show, Songs by Webb Pierce on KMLB in Monroe, La., when he was a teenager. With the U.S. entry into World War II, his budding career was interrupted by army service. He married singer Betty Jane Lewis in June 1942. Upon his discharge in 1945, he and his wife settled in Shreveport, La., where he got a job at a department store while attempting to further his career as a singer. By 1947 he and his wife were appearing together on local radio. In 1949 he signed to the independent 4-Star Records label and secured a berth on the KWKH radio show Louisiana Hay ride. He and KWKH program director Horace Logan founded Pacemaker Records and a publishing company. In 1950 he and his wife divorced.

In 1951, Pierce signed to Decca Records. His first success with the major label came with a revival of the 1937 song "Wondering" (music and lyrics by Jack Werner), which entered the country charts in January 1952 and hit #1 in March. His follow-up single, the self-written "That Heart Belongs to Me," hit #1 in the country charts in July. In September he was invited to join the radio show the Grand Ole Opry and moved to Nashville to do so. In November he married Audrey Greisham, with whom he had two children, one of whom, Debbie Pierce, became a country singer. He scored his third straight country #1 in December with "Back Street Affair" (music and lyrics by Billy Wallace). Pierce had seven Top Ten hits on the country charts in 1953, including the chart-toppers "It's Been So Long" (music and lyrics by Autry Inman) and "There Stands the Glass" (music and lyrics by Mary Jean Schurz, Russ Hill, and Audrey Greisham).

Among his six country Top Ten hits in 1954 were the #1 songs "Slowly" (music and lyrics by Webb Pierce and Tommy Hill), "Even Tho" (music and lyrics by Webb Pierce, Willie Jones, and Curt Peeples), and "More and More" (music and lyrics by Webb Pierce and Merle Kilgore), which was enough chart success to make him the top country recording artist of the year. He repeated that ranking in 1955 with five Top Ten country hits, including the top three songs of the year: "In the Jailhouse Now" (music and lyrics by Jimmie Rodgers), "Love, Love, Love" (music and lyrics by Ted Jarrett), and "I Don't Care" (music and lyrics by Webb Pierce and Cindy Walker).

Due to the touring demands created by his enormous record success, Pierce ended his regular appearances on the Grand Ole Opry, though he returned to the program occasionally. In 1955 and 1956 he was one of the hosts of the weekly network television series Ozark Jubilee, and in 1955 he had his own syndicated T program, The Webb Pierce Show. He scored six country Top Ten hits in 1956, including the #1 record "Why Baby Why" (music and lyrics by George Jones and Darrell Edwards), a duet with Red Sovine. There were another six country Top Ten hits in 1957, among them the chart-topping "Honky Tonk Song" (music and lyrics by Mel Tillis and A. R. Peddy). Four of his recordings made the country Top Ten in 1958, the most successful of which was "Cryin' Over You."

Among his three country Top Ten hits in 1959, the most popular was "I Ain't Never" (music and lyrics by Mel Tillis and Webb Pierce), which also was his only pop Top 40 hit. Pierce's record sales diminished after the end of the 1950s, although he scored 13 country Top Ten hits between 1960 and 1964, the most successful of which was "Memory #1" (music and lyrics by Wayne P. Walker and Max Powell). An album with the same title reached the country Top ten in 1965. During this period he toured and made occasional film appearances as himself, notably in Buffalo Gun (1961) and Second Fiddle to a Steel Guitar (1965). His records continued to reach the country charts regularly through 1972, when he left Decca. He signed to the independent Plantation Records label and made some recordings in the mid-1970s, but by this time he was semiretired from performing, concentrating instead on his business interests in country radio and music publishing. He died of cancer at 69 in 1991. - Died at Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 24, 1991.

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