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Albert I, Margrave of Meissen

Index Albert I, Margrave of Meissen

Albert I (1158 – 24 June 1195), called the Proud (Albrecht der Stolze), a member of the House of Wettin, was the Margrave of Meissen from 1190 until his death. [1]

37 relations: Adalbert II, Count of Ballenstedt, Agnes of Waiblingen, Albert the Bear, Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, Altzella Abbey, Ústí nad Labem, Cistercians, Conrad, Margrave of Meissen, Eilika of Saxony, Frederick I, Duke of Swabia, Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick, Duke of Bohemia, Halsbrücke, Hedwig of Brandenburg, Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor, Herman I, Count of Winzenburg, Hermann I, Landgrave of Thuringia, Hohenstaufen, House of Ascania, House of Wettin, Imperial Estate, Kingdom of Sicily, Leipzig, List of margraves of Meissen, Magnus, Duke of Saxony, Margravate of Meissen, Otto II, Margrave of Meissen, Otto of Nordheim, Otto, Count of Ballenstedt, Přemyslid dynasty, Röblingen am See, Richenza of Swabia, Sophia of Hungary, Sophie of Winzenburg, Theodoric I, Margrave of Meissen, Theodoric II, Margrave of Lower Lusatia, Thimo the Brave, Count of Wettin.

Adalbert II, Count of Ballenstedt

Adalbert II of Ballenstedt (– 1076/1083), an early member of the House of Ascania, was Graf (count) in Saxony and Vogt of Nienburg Abbey.

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Agnes of Waiblingen

Agnes of Waiblingen (1072/73 – 24 September 1143), also known as Agnes of Germany, Agnes of Poitou and Agnes of Saarbrücken, was a member of the Salian imperial family.

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Albert the Bear

Albert the Bear (Albrecht der Bär; Adelbertus, Adalbertus, Albertus; 1100 – 18 November 1170) was the first Margrave of Brandenburg (as Albert I) from 1157 to his death and was briefly Duke of Saxony between 1138 and 1142.

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Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie

Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (Universal German Biography) is one of the most important and most comprehensive biographical reference works in the German language.

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Altzella Abbey

Altzella Abbey, also Altzelle Abbey (Kloster Altzella or Altzelle, previously Cella or Cella Sanctae Mariae) is a former Cistercian monastery near Nossen in Saxony, Germany.

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Ústí nad Labem

Ústí nad Labem, formerly known by its German name Aussig, is the 7th-most populous city of the Czech Republic.

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Cistercians

A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (abbreviated as OCist, SOCist ((Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), or ‘’’OCSO’’’ (Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae), which are religious orders of monks and nuns. They are also known as “Trappists”; as Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux (though that term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland and Lithuania); or as White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales. Over the centuries, however, education and academic pursuits came to dominate the life of many monasteries. A reform movement seeking to restore the simpler lifestyle of the original Cistercians began in 17th-century France at La Trappe Abbey, leading eventually to the Holy See’s reorganization in 1892 of reformed houses into a single order Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (OCSO), commonly called the Trappists. Cistercians who did not observe these reforms became known as the Cistercians of the Original Observance. The term Cistercian (French Cistercien), derives from Cistercium, the Latin name for the village of Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France. It was in this village that a group of Benedictine monks from the monastery of Molesme founded Cîteaux Abbey in 1098, with the goal of following more closely the Rule of Saint Benedict. The best known of them were Robert of Molesme, Alberic of Cîteaux and the English monk Stephen Harding, who were the first three abbots. Bernard of Clairvaux entered the monastery in the early 1110s with 30 companions and helped the rapid proliferation of the order. By the end of the 12th century, the order had spread throughout France and into England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Eastern Europe. The keynote of Cistercian life was a return to literal observance of the Rule of St Benedict. Rejecting the developments the Benedictines had undergone, the monks tried to replicate monastic life exactly as it had been in Saint Benedict's time; indeed in various points they went beyond it in austerity. The most striking feature in the reform was the return to manual labour, especially agricultural work in the fields, a special characteristic of Cistercian life. Cistercian architecture is considered one of the most beautiful styles of medieval architecture. Additionally, in relation to fields such as agriculture, hydraulic engineering and metallurgy, the Cistercians became the main force of technological diffusion in medieval Europe. The Cistercians were adversely affected in England by the Protestant Reformation, the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII, the French Revolution in continental Europe, and the revolutions of the 18th century, but some survived and the order recovered in the 19th century.

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Conrad, Margrave of Meissen

Conrad I (– 5 February 1157), called the Great (Konrad der Große), a member of the House of Wettin, was Margrave of Meissen from 1123 and Margrave of Lusatia from 1136 until his retirement in 1156.

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Eilika of Saxony

Eilika of Saxony (– 16 January 1142) was the younger daughter of Magnus, Duke of Saxony and Sophia (married 1071), a daughter of Béla I of Hungary.

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Frederick I, Duke of Swabia

Frederick I (c. 1050 – before 21 July 1105) was Duke of Swabia from 1079 to his death, the first ruler from the House of Hohenstaufen (Staufer).

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Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor

Frederick I (Friedrich I, Federico I; 1122 – 10 June 1190), also known as Frederick Barbarossa (Federico Barbarossa), was the Holy Roman Emperor from 2 January 1155 until his death.

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Frederick, Duke of Bohemia

Frederick (Bedřich) (– 25 March 1189), a member of the Přemyslid dynasty, was Duke of Bohemia from 1172 to 1173 and again from 1178 to his death.

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Halsbrücke

Halsbrücke is a municipality in the district of Mittelsachsen, in Saxony, Germany.

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Hedwig of Brandenburg

Hedwig of Brandenburg, also called Hedwig of Ballenstedt (– end of March 1203), a member of the House of Ascania, was Margravine of Meissen from 1156 until 1190 by her marriage with Margrave Otto II.

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Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor

Henry VI (Heinrich VI) (November 1165 – 28 September 1197), a member of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was King of Germany (King of the Romans) from 1190 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1191 until his death.

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Herman I, Count of Winzenburg

Herman I, Count of Winzenburg (also known as Herman of Windberg; – 1137 or 1138) was count of Formbach and Radelberg.

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Hermann I, Landgrave of Thuringia

Hermann I (died 25 April 1217), Landgrave of Thuringia and (as Hermann III) Count Palatine of Saxony, was the second son of Louis II, Landgrave of Thuringia (the Iron), and Judith of Hohenstaufen, the sister of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa..

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Hohenstaufen

The Staufer, also known as the House of Staufen, or of Hohenstaufen, were a dynasty of German kings (1138–1254) during the Middle Ages.

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House of Ascania

The House of Ascania (Askanier) is a dynasty of German rulers.

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House of Wettin

The House of Wettin is a dynasty of German counts, dukes, prince-electors and kings that once ruled territories in the present-day German states of Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia.

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Imperial Estate

An Imperial State or Imperial Estate (Status Imperii; Reichsstand, plural: Reichsstände) was a part of the Holy Roman Empire with representation and the right to vote in the Imperial Diet (Reichstag).

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Kingdom of Sicily

The Kingdom of Sicily (Regnum Siciliae, Regno di Sicilia, Regnu di Sicilia, Regne de Sicília, Reino de Sicilia) was a state that existed in the south of the Italian peninsula and for a time Africa from its founding by Roger II in 1130 until 1816.

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Leipzig

Leipzig is the most populous city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany.

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List of margraves of Meissen

This article lists the margraves of Meissen, a march and territorial state on the eastern border of the Holy Roman Empire.

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Magnus, Duke of Saxony

Magnus (– 23 August 1106) was the duke of Saxony from 1072 to 1106.

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Margravate of Meissen

The Margravate of Meissen (Markgrafschaft Meißen) was a medieval principality in the area of the modern German state of Saxony.

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Otto II, Margrave of Meissen

Otto II, the Rich (Otto der Reiche; 1125 – 18 February 1190), a member of the House of Wettin, was Margrave of Meissen from 1156 until his death.

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Otto of Nordheim

Otto of Nordheim (c. 1020 – 11 January 1083) was Duke of Bavaria (as Otto II) from 1061 until 1070.

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Otto, Count of Ballenstedt

Otto, Count of Ballenstedt, called Otto the Rich (– 9 February 1123), was the first Ascanian prince to call himself count of Anhalt, and was also briefly named duke of Saxony.

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Přemyslid dynasty

The Přemyslid dynasty or House of Přemyslid (Přemyslovci, Premysliden, Przemyślidzi) was a Czech royal dynasty which reigned in the Duchy of Bohemia and later Kingdom of Bohemia and Margraviate of Moravia (9th century–1306), as well as in parts of Poland (including Silesia), Hungary, and Austria.

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Röblingen am See

Röblingen am See is a village and a former municipality in the Mansfeld-Südharz district, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany.

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Richenza of Swabia

Richenza (also spelled as Richeza or Richza) (– before 1083) was a German noblewoman.

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Sophia of Hungary

Sophia of Hungary (– 18 June 1095), a member of the royal Árpád dynasty, was a Margravine of Istria and Carniola from about 1062 until 1070, by her first marriage with Margrave Ulric I, as well as Duchess of Saxony from 1072 until her death, by her second marriage with Duke Magnus Billung.

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Sophie of Winzenburg

Sophie of Winzenburg (1105 in Winzenburg, near Hanover – 6 or 7 July 1160 in Brandenburg an der Havel) was the first Margravine of Brandenburg.

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Theodoric I, Margrave of Meissen

Theodoric I (11 March 1162 – 18 January 1221), called the Oppressed, was the Margrave of Meissen from 1198 until his death.

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Theodoric II, Margrave of Lower Lusatia

Theodoric II (Dietrich; – 19 November 1034) was Margrave of Lusatia from 1032 to 1034, the first of the Wettin dynasty.

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Thimo the Brave, Count of Wettin

Thimo I, Count of Wettin (9 March 1090/1091 or c. 1100), a member of the Wettin dynasty, was Count of Wettin and Brehna.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_I,_Margrave_of_Meissen

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