GENEALOGÍA CASA REAL ESPAÑOLA: 2015

martes, 22 de diciembre de 2015

16 tatarabuelos IV

Duke Stephen II of Bavaria (1319 – 13 May 1375, Landshut) (German: Stephan II mit der Hafte, Herzog von Bayern), after 1347 Duke of Bavaria. He was the second son of Emperor Louis IV the Bavarian by his first wife Beatrix of Świdnica and a member of theWittelsbach dynasty.
Stephan II. (Bayern).jpg
Elisabeth of Sicily (1310–1349) was a daughter of Frederick III of Sicily and Eleanor of Anjou. Her siblings included: Peter II of Sicily and Manfred of Athens. She is also known as Isabel of Aragon.


Albert III of Austria (9 September 1349 – 29 August 1395), known as Albert with the Braid (GermanAlbrecht mit dem Zopf), a member of the House of Habsburg, was Duke of Austria from 1365 until his death.
Albert III was born in the ducal residence of Vienna, the third son of the Habsburg duke Albert II of Austria and his wife Joanna of Pfirt. Even though his father had determined a house law, whereby the four sons were obliged to rule jointly and equally, the eldest brother Rudolf IV assumed the reins of government after his father's death in 1358. He reaffirmed his supremacy issuing thePrivilegium Maius, however, as his marriage remained childless he again had to share his power with his younger brothers. In 1365 Rudolf IV, Albert III, and Leopold III together signed the foundation certificate of the Vienna University (Alma Mater Rudolphina Vindobonensis); Rudolf died a few months later at the age of 25.
Albrecht Dritte Habsburg1.jpg
Beatrix of Nuremberg (c. 1362Nuremberg – 10 June 1414, Perchtoldsdorf) was a daughter of Frederick V, Burgrave of Nuremberg and his wife Elisabeth of Meissen
Beatrix of Nuremberg.jpg

Duke Albert I (GermanAlbrecht; 25 July 1336, Munich – 13 December 1404, The HagueKG, was a feudal ruler of the counties ofHollandHainaut, and Zeeland in the Low Countries. Additionally, he held a portion of the Bavarian province of Straubing, his Bavarian ducal line's appanage and seat.

Albert was the third son of Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor from his second wife Empress Margaret, who was the daughter of William III, Count of Holland and Hainaut. Albert was originally a younger son, apportioned at best an appanage. He was only 10 years old when his father died, leaving most of his Bavarian inheritance to his eldest half-brother, Louis V, Duke of Bavaria, but also some appanages to the younger sons.
Margaret of Brieg (1342–1386) was a daughter of Ludwik I the Fair and his wife, Agnes of Sagan. She was Duchess consort of Bavaria by her marriage to Albert I, Duke of Bavaria.
Margaret was the eldest of six siblings, her brother was Henryk VIII with a Scar and her sister, Hedwig was married to Jan II of Oświęcim.

Henry IX of Lubin (PolishHenryk IX lubiński ; 1369 – between 9 January 1419 and 10 July 1420), was a Duke of Brzeg (Brieg) during 1399–1400 with his brother and since 1400, Duke of Lubin (Lüben)Chojnów (Haynau) and Oława (Ohlau).
He was the eldest son of Henry VIII with a Scar, Duke of Brzeg, by his first wife Helena, the daughter of Otto V, Count of Orlamünde.
 Anna (bef. 1374 – 8 July bef. 1405/1420?), daughter of Przemysław I Noszak, Duke of Cieszyn

Bolko IV of Opole (PolishBolko IV Opolski; 1363/67 – 6 May 1437), was a Duke of Strzelce and Niemodlin during 1382–1400 (with his brothers as co-rulers), Duke of Opolefrom 1396 (until 1400 with his brother as co-ruler, except Olesno).
He was the second son of Duke Bolko III of Strzelce by his wife Anna, probably daughter of Duke Jan I of Oświęcim.
Margareta (ca. 1375? – 6 December 1437), probably a member of the House of Görz.

Henry VII with a Scar also known as the Courageous or of Brzeg (PolishHenryk VII z BliznąWaleczny or brzeski; 1343/45 – 11 July 1399), was a Duke of Brzeg (Brieg) since 1361 (as co-regent of his father until 1398) and ruler of Niemcza since 1395.
He was the eldest son of Louis I the Fair, Duke of Brzeg by his wife Agnes, daughter of Henry IV of Głogów-Żagań. The death of his younger brother Wenceslaus in 1358 left him as the only male heir of his father.
Margaret of Masovia PolishMałgorzata (before 1358 – 14 May 1388/4 April 1396[1]) was Duchess of Pomerania and Brzeg, by her marriages to Casimir IV, Duke of Pomeraniaand then to Henryk VIII with a Scar. She was a member of the House of Piast.
Margaret was a daughter of Siemowit III of Masovia and his wife Euphemia of Opawa. Her paternal grandparents were Trojden I of Masovia and his wife Maria, daughter of Yuri I of Galicia and Euphemia of Kuyavia.

Rudolf III (c. 1373 – 11 June 1419), a member of the House of Ascania, was Duke of Saxe-Wittenberg and Elector of Saxony from 1388 until his death.
He was probably born at the Saxon Wittenberg residence, the eldest son of Duke Wenceslaus I of Saxe-Wittenberg and his wife Cecilia, daughter of Francesco I da Carrara, Lord of Padua.
RudolfIIISachsenWittenberg.jpg
Anna of Meissen (d. 4 July 1395), a daughter of the Wettin landgrave Balthasar of Thuringia and secondly in March 1396 with Barbara (d. 17 May 1435), daughter of the Piast duke Rupert I of Legnica.

Henry of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Latin Henricus, died 14 October 1416), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, called Henry the Mild, was prince of Lüneburg from 1388 to 1409 jointly with his brother Bernard I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, from 1400 to 1409 also ofWolfenbüttel, and from 1409 until his death sole prince of Lüneburg.
Henry was the fourth son of Magnus with the Necklace, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. He participated in the prosecution of the murderers of his brother Frederick, elected King of the Romans, after 1400. Henry ravaged the Eichsfeld, a possession of thearchbishop of Mainz, who was suspected to be involved in the murder. Only in 1405, a peace was ratified between Brunswick-Lüneburg and the Archbishopric.
Sophie (died 1406), daughter of Wartislaw VI, Duke of Pomerania,

Barnim VI, Duke of Pomerania (c. 1365 – 22 September 1405 in Pütnitz, near Ribnitz-Damgarten) was duke of Pomerania-Wolgast from 1394 to 1405. He was the son of Wartislaw VI of Pomerania-Wolgast.
Epitaph Barnim VI Büste.png
Veronica of Hohenzollern








Albert, duke of Saxe-Lauenburg-Ratzeburg 

Albrecht, Herzog von Sachsen-Lauenburg-Ratzeburg

* 1300 1344

Sophie von Ziegenheim


Bogislaw VIII (c. 1364 – 11 February 1418)[1] was Duke of Pomerania in Pomerania-Stolp from 1395 until 1418. 
 Sophie of Holstein, the daughter of Henry II, Count of Holstein-Rendsburg. Bogislaw had two children, Bogislaw IX and Adelheid of Pomerania (1410–after 1444/45) who married Bernard II, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg in 1429.


Siemowit IV (Ziemowit IV), also known as Siemowit IV the Younger (pl: Siemowit IV Młodszy; ca. 1353/1356[1] – 21 January 1426[2]), was a Polish prince member of the House of Piast from the Masovian branch, from 1373/74 Duke of Rawa, and after the division of the paternal inheritance between him and his brother in 1381, ruler over Rawa, PłockSochaczewGostyninPłońsk and Wizna, since 1386 hereditary Polish vassal, since 1388 ruler over Belz, during 1382-1401 he loss Wizna and during 1384-1399 and 1407-1411 he loss Zawkrze, during 1384-1399 he loss Płońsk, taken by the Teutonic Order.
He was the second son of Siemowit III, Duke of Masovia and his first wife Euphemia, daughter of Nicholas II of Opava.
Alexandra PolishAleksandra (died 20 April 1434 in Płock)[1] was the youngest daughter of AlgirdasGrand Duke of Lithuania, and his second wife, Uliana of Tver.[2] Though Alexandra's exact date of birth is not known, it is thought that she was born in the late 1360s or early 1370s.

Jobst Nikolaus I, Count of Hohenzollern (also known as Jost Nikolaus I or Jos Nikolaus I; 1433 – 9 February 1488) was a German nobleman from the Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern. He was the ruling Count of Hohenzollern from shortly after his birth until his death.
Jobst Nikolaus I became the nominal ruler of the County of Hohenzollern shortly after his birth. Initially, he stood under the regency and guardianship of his father Eitel Friedrich I(c. 1384 – 1439). Under a succession treaty of 1429 with the House of Württemberg, the County would fall to the Counts of Württemberg if the Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern were to die out in the male line. With Jobst Nikolaus's birth, this risk was averted.
 Countess Agnes of Werdenberg-Heiligenberg (1434–1467)

Frederick III of Brandenburg, nicknamed the Fat, also the Younger (born: c. 1424; died: 6 October 1463 in Tangermünde) wasMargrave of the Brandenburg and Lord of the Altmark.
Frederick was the youngest son of the Elector Frederick I of Brandenburg (1371–1440) from his marriage to Elizabeth (1383–1442 ), daughter of the Duke Frederick of Bavaria-Landshut.
Agnes (1436–1512), a daughter of the Duke Barnim VIII of Pomerania

Charles I of Baden (1427 – 24 February 1475, Pforzheim) was a Margrave of Baden-Baden during 1454–1475.
Charles was the elder son of Jacob, Margrave of Baden-Baden and his wife Catherine, daughter of Charles II, Duke of Lorraine. In 1462 he became involved in the Bavarian War (1459–63) against Frederick I, Elector Palatine. This war finished in the same year with Charles' defeat and capture at the Battle of Seckenheim.
Catherine of Austria (1424 in Wiener Neustadt – 11 September 1493 at Hohenbaden Castle in Baden-Baden) was a member of the House of Habsburg and through marriage Margravine of Baden.
Catherine was a daughter of the Duke Ernest I of Austria and Styria, nicknamed "the Iron" (1377-1424) from his marriage toCymburgis (1394-1429), a daughter of Duke Siemowit IV of Masovia. Catherine's older brother Frederick III was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 1452. She grew up in Wiener Neustadt, together with her brothers Frederick III and Albert 

Philipp II the Younger of Katzenelnbogen  son Philipp I of Katzenelnbogen (1402–1479) and Anna of Württemberg (1408–1471), daughter of Eberhard IV "the Younger" of Württemberg. 

Ottilie von Nassau-Dillenburg Hija de Hendrik II van Nassau, heer van Loon op Zand y Genoveva von Virneburg








Juan Hurtado de Mendoza, 2. señor de Almazán 

* c. 1340






María Téllez de Castilla 

* c. 1360






Juan Ramírez de Guzmán 

* c. 1370

Aires Gomes da Silva, o Velho ijo de Martim Gomes da Silva y Teresa García de Sanabria

Urraca Tenório Hija de Juan Tenorio, comendador de Estepa yJuana 


Bernard Ier de Bade (Bernhard I von Baden), né en 1364, décédé le 5 avril 1431 à Baden-Baden.
Il fut margrave de Bade de 1372 à 1431.
Image illustrative de l'article Bernard Ier de Bade
Anne d'Oettingen (1380-1436), fille de Louis XI d'Oettingen

Charles II1 de Lorraine, dit le Hardi, né en 1364, mort à Nancy le , fut duc de Lorraine de 1390 à 1431. Il était le fils du duc Jean Ier et de Sophie de Wurtemberg.
Effigie de Charles II, se trouvant sur la Porte de la Craffe, à Nancy
Marguerite de Wittelsbach, née en 1376, morte le 26 août 1434 était la fille ainée de Robert de Wittelsbach, comte palatin du Rhin, puis empereur germanique, et d'Élisabeth de Nuremberg.

Anund Algotsson Sture, även kallad Sture Algotssonriddare i GrönskogFliserydriksråd, son till Algot Magnusson (Sture) och Märta Bosdotter, dotter till Bo Bosson (Natt och Dag).
Gift med Kristina (Lejonansikte).
Sten Turesson (Bielke), nacido alrededor de 1380, fallecido 1431, era un sueco Privado Consejo, Señor de Örby en Vendel. Él era el hijo de Ture Bengtsson (Bielke) yMargareta Arvidsdotter (Chevron). Fomentar padre, Karl Knutsson (Bonde)
Casado primera vez en 1414 con Margaret Karlsdotter (Sparre Tofta), y tuvo con ella, incluyendo a su hija Bridget Stensdotter (Bielke). Sr. Stone enviudó en 1428 y al año siguiente se casó con Agneta Eriksdotter (Krummedige). El matrimonio no tuvo hijos y Agneta se hizo cargo, entre otras cosas orby retrogusto.

Federico V di Norimberga (1333 – 21 gennaio 1398) fu Burgravio di Norimberga, Bayreuth-Kulmbach e Ansbach e Principe dell'Impero della dinastia degli Hohenzollern.

Figlio di Giovanni II e di Elisabetta di Henneberg.

 Elisabetta di Meissen (Wartburg22 novembre 1329 – 21 aprile 1375) era figlia di Federico II di Meissen e Matilde di Baviera. Fu un membro della Casata di Wettin.

Federico di Wittelsbach (1339 – Budweis4 dicembre 1393) fu Duca di Baviera-Landshut dal 1375.
Era il secondo figlio di Stefano II e di Isabella di Sicilia.

Enrico di Brunswick-Lüneburg, detto Enrico il Mite (... – 3 dicembre 1416), duca di Brunswick-Lüneburg, fu principe di Lüneburg dal 1388 al 1409 assieme al fratelloBernardo I di Brunswick-Lüneburg, dal 1400 al 1409 in coreggenza nel principato di Wolfenbüttel, e dal 1409 alla sua morte come solo principe di Lüneburg.

Era il quarto figlio di Magnus II di Brunswick-Lüneburg.

 Sofia di Pomerania, figlia di Vratislavo VI di Pomerania

Guglielmo III di Sassonia, detto il Valoroso (Meißen30 aprile 1425 – Weimar17 settembre 1482), era un principe della casa dei Wettin.
Egli era il figlio più giovane del duca e principe elettore di Sassonia Federico I e della di lui consorte principessa Caterina di Braunschweig-Lüneburg, figlia del duca Enrico I di Brunswick-Lüneburg.
Anna d'Asburgo (Vienna12 aprile 1432 – Eckartsberga13 novembre 1462) era la figlia primogenita del duca d'Austria Alberto V, in seguito divenuto imperatore del Sacro Romano Impero con il nome di Alberto II, e di Elisabetta di Lussemburgo, figlia dell'imperatore Sigismondo e diBarbara di Cilli, e ultima rappresentante dell'estinta Casata di Lussemburgo.

Federico II di Sassonia, detto il Mansueto (Dresda22 agosto 1412 – Lipsia7 settembre 1464), fu Principe elettore di Sassonia, marchese di Meißen e conte di Turingia.
Era il figlio maggiore del duca e principe elettore di Sassonia Federico I e di sua moglie, la principessa Caterina di Brunswick-Lüneburg (1395 – 1442), figlia del duca Enrico di Brunswick-Lüneburg.
Saxonia Museum für saechsische Vaterlandskunde I 23.jpg
Margherita d'Austria (Innsbruck1416 – Altenburg12 febbraio 1486) è stata un'arciduchessa austriaca e un'elettrice di Sassonia.
Figlia del duca Ernesto I d'Asburgo e della sua seconda moglie Cimburga di Masovia e sorella dell'imperatore Federico III d'Asburgo, nel1428 venne fidanzata al duca Federico II di Sassonia, non molto tempo dopo la sua acesa al trono; le nozze furono celebrate a Lipsia il 3 giugno del 1431.

Ladislao II di Polonia, anche noto come Ladislao V Jagellone (in Lituania), Re Jagellone o ancora Ladislao V di Lituania. (polaccoWładysław II Jagiełło, in lituano Jogaila1362 – 1º giugno 1434), fu Granduca di Lituania dal 1377, e diventò Re di Polonia nel1386 dopo essersi convertito al Cristianesimo, aver cambiato il suo nome da Jogaila a Władysław Jagiełło e aver sposato Jadwiga, seconda dei sovrani angioini della Polonia. Con l'era dei Jagelloni inizia l'età d'oro della Polonia e il paese diventa la maggiore potenza europea ed estende i suoi confini a nord e a est.
Jogaila apparteneva alla dinastia Gediminide di duchi e granduchi di Lituania. Suo padre era Algirdas (o Olgierd, che regno dall'1345 al 1377), granduca di Lituania, figlio di Gediminas. Nacque a Vilnius in Lituania.
Wladyslaw Jagiello.jpg
Edvige di Polonia, nota anche come Edvige d'Angiò o Jadwiga (Buda18 febbraio 1374 – Cracovia17 luglio 1399), fu regina (ufficialmente, però, il suo titolo era "re" anziché "regina", per indicare che regnava per suo diritto e non in quanto consorte di re) di Polonia di origine ungherese.
Edvige fu la minore delle figlie di Luigi I d'Ungheria ed Elisabetta Kotromanic di Bosnia. Sia la madre di Edvige che quella di Luigi,Elisabetta (figlia di Ladislao I Lokietek), erano discendenti della Casa Reale dei Piasti, un'antica dinastia nativa della Polonia. Edvige era dunque bisnipote di Ladislao I, che aveva riunificato il regno polacco nel 1320Regina di Polonia dal 1384 e Granduchessa di Lituania dal 1386, è venerata dalla Chiesa cattolica come "Santa Edvige Regina" ed è Patrona delle Regine e dell'Unione europea, nonché Santa Patrona di Polonia.[1]
Jadwiga Jan Matejko (Poczet).jpg

Alberto d'Asburgo (Vienna16 agosto 1397 – Neszmély27 ottobre 1439) fu arciduca d'Austria col nome di Alberto V (dal 1404),Re di Ungheria e di Boemia (dal 1437) e Re di Germania come Alberto II (dal 1438).
Alberto era figlio del duca Alberto IV d'Asburgo (morto nel 1404) e della duchessa Giovanna di Baviera-Straubing. Durante la sua minorità furono i suoi tre zii, dapprima Guglielmo I, detto il Docile, quindi Leopoldo IV, detto il Superbo ed infine Ernesto I di Stiria, ad occuparsi del governo, tra tensioni e liti crescenti. Solamente l'improvvisa morte di Leopoldo fece sì che Alberto potesse iniziare a prendere in mano le redini del potere. I suoi precettori erano stati Andreas Blank, che in seguito divenne vescovo di Frisinga, e Reinprecht von Walse.
Albrecht II. von Habsburg.jpg
Elisabetta di Lussemburgo (1409 – 1442) fu l'unica figlia ed erede dell'imperatore Sigismondo di Lussemburgo, quindi l'ultima esponente della sua Casata.

Divenne moglie di Alberto II d'Austria (della linea degli Asburgo albertini) portandogli in dote i regni di Ungheria e di Boemia e quindi l'elezione a Re di Germania. Il suo unico figlio maschio fu Ladislao il Postumo d'Asburgo, che tentò di raggruppare l'eredità trasmessagli dalla madre e dal padre, ma morì giovane in circostanze poco chiare, senza lasciare eredi; perciò l'eredità sulle corone un tempo dominate dalla Casata di Lussemburgo venne passata alle casate degli Asburgo e degli Jagelloni, attraverso un'altra figlia di Elisabetta di Lussemburgo e di Alberto II, vale a dire Elisabetta d'Asburgo.


Adolph I of Cleves (2 August 1373 – 23 September 1448) was the second Count of Cleves and the fourth Count of Mark.
He was the son of Adolph III, Count of Mark, and Margaret of Jülich (and thus the brother of Margaret of Cleves).
Adolf IV van Kleef-Mark.jpg
Marie of Burgundy, Duchess of Cleves (1393 – 30 October 1466) was the second child of John the Fearless and Margaret of Bavaria,[1] and an elder sister of Philip the Good.[2] Born in Dijon, she became the second wife of Adolph, Count of Mark in May 1406.[3] He was made the 1st Duke of Cleves in 1417. They were the grandparents of King Louis XII of France and the great-grandparents of John III, Duke of Cleves, father of Anne of Cleves, who was fourth Queen consort of Henry VIII of England. By their daughter, Catherine, they were ancestors of Mary, Queen of Scots.
The Duke and Duchess of Cleves lived at Wijnendale Castle in West Flanders. She died in Cleves in present-day Monterberg,Kalkar.

John II, Count of Nevers (known as Jean de Clamecy, prior to acquiring title of "Count of Nevers"; 1415–1491) was a French noble.
He was the son of Philip II, Count of Nevers by his wife, Bonne of Artois, daughter of Philip of Artois, Count of Eu. John's elder brother, Charles ICount of Nevers and Rethel, had no legitimate children, and so on his death in 1464 his titles passed to John. In 1472, his uncle Charles of Artois, Count of Eu, died, and having no legitimate children, his title also passed to John.
SOAOTO - Jean de Bourgogne (1415-1491).jpg
 Jacqueline d'Ailly, Dame d'Engelmuenster (died 1470)

Louis I of Hesse (GermanLudwig) (6 February 1402, Spangenberg - 17 January 1458), called "the Peaceful" was Landgrave ofLower Hesse (Hesse) from 1413-1458.
He was the son of Hermann II, Landgrave of Hesse and Margaret, the daughter of Frederick V of Nuremberg
Anna of Saxony (5 June 1420 – 17 September 1462, Spangenberg) was a princess of Saxony and by marriage landgravine ofHesse.

Anna was the eldest daughter of the elector Frederick I of Saxony (1370–1428) from his marriage to Catherine (1395–1442), daughter of Duke Henry I "the Wild" of Brunswick-Lüneburg.


Philipp I of Katzenelnbogen (1402–1479), also known "Philipp the Elder" was Count of Katzenelnbogen from 1444 to 1479 and was the last male descendant of the Counts of Katzenelnbogen (his two sons died before him). His parents were Johann IV, Count of Katzenelnbogen (younger line) and Anne of Katzenelnbogen (older line), who merged the two lines of the family back together in 1402.
 Anna of Württemberg (1408–1471), daughter of Eberhard IV "the Younger" of Württemberg. In 1456, 

William VIII of Jülich, Count of Ravensberg (c. 1380 – 22 November 1428) was the youngest son of William VII of Jülich, 1st Duke of Berg and Anna of the Palatinate.[1]
Adelheid of Tecklenburg, daughter of Nicholas II, Count of Tecklenburg and Elisabeth of Moers


Bernard II of Saxe-Lauenburg (GermanBernhard II.; ca. 1385/1392–16 July 1463) was a member of the House of Ascania and Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg from 1426 to 1463. His full title was Duke of Saxony, Angria and Westphalia, however only ruling the branch duchy of Saxe-Lauenburg between 1426 and 1463.
He was a son of Eric IV, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg and Sophia of Brunswick-Lüneburg. Since long Bernard urged his ruling brotherEric V to share his reign. Failed in his fight for the Saxon electorate Eric finally agreed and made Bernard the co-duke of Saxe-Lauenburg in 1426.[1] When Eric V died in 1435 Bernard continued the reign alone.
 Adelheid of Pomerania-Stolp (1410 – after 1445), daughter of Bogislaw VIII, Duke of Pomerania.

Henry IV, Duke of Mecklenburg (1417 – 9 March 1477) was from 1422 to 1477 Duke of Mecklenburg.

Henry IV of Mecklenburg, because of his obesity and lavish lifestyle also called the "Henry the Fat", was the son of the Duke John IVof Mecklenburg and Catherine of Saxe-Lauenburg.

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Dorothea of Brandenburg (9 February 1420, Berlin – 19 January 1491, Benedictine monastery at Rehna) was a princess ofBrandenburg by birth and by marriage Duchess of Mecklenburg.
Dorothea was a daughter of the Elector Frederick I of Brandenburg (1371–1440) from his marriage to Elisabeth (1383–1442), daughter of Duke Frederick of Bayern-Landshut. Elizabeth's brothers were Electors Frederick II and Albert Achilles, who successively ruled Brandenburg.

Eric II or Erich II (between 1418 and 1425 – 5 July 1474) was a member of the House of Pomerania (also known as the House of Griffins) and was the ruling Duke of Duke of Pomerania-Wolgast from 1457 to 1474. He was the son of Wartislaw IX of Pomerania-Wolgast and Sophia, daughter of Eric IV of Saxe-Lauenburg.
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Sophia of Pomerania-Stolp (1435 – 24 August 1497), was a Duchess of Pomerania by birth, and married to Eric II, Duke of Pomerania.
Sophia was the daughter of Bogislaw IX, Duke of Pomerania and Maria of Masovia. In 1446, her father died and was succeeded by his cousin, Eric of Pomerania, former King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Sophia became the heir of Eric of Pomerania's private fortune. In 1451, Sophia was married to Eric of Pomerania-Wolgast, making her spouse the heir of Eric of Pomerania's territories, while Sophia remained the heir of Eric of Pomerania's private fortune. At the death of Eric of Pomerania in 1459, Sophia's husband united Pomerania through the inheritance of Pomerania-Stolp and Pomerania-Rügenwalde by his marriage, while Sophia became the sole possessor of the vast fortune brought by Eric of Pomerania from his former kingdoms's in Scandinavia, as well as the one he had acquired by his piracy activity on Gotland.

John I, Duke of Cleves, Count of Mark (16 February 1419 – 5 September 1481) was Duke of Cleves and Count of Mark.
He was the son of Adolph I, Duke of Cleves and Mary of Burgundy. He was raised in Brussels at the Burgundian court of his unclePhilip the Good He ruled Cleves from 1448 from 1481, and Mark since 1461 after the death of his uncle Gerhard, who had waged war on his own brother
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Elizabeth of Nevers (born: after 24 August 1439 in Nevers; died: 21 June 1483)[1] was Duchess of Cleves from 1455 until her death, due to her marriage with John I of Cleves-Mark. She was the matriarch of the house of Cleves-Nevers, and thus the Cleves line of the Counts and dukes of Nevers. Because the territory was part of her inheritance, it fell to her son Engelbert after her death.
Elizabeth was the oldest child of John IICount of ÉtampesNeversRethel and Eu, and his first wife Jacqueline d'Ailly. Since Elizabeth's younger brother died at the age of five years and her father thus had no sons, he appointed his eldest daughter to the heir of the counties of Nevers and Eu.
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Henry III, Landgrave of Upper Hesse, called "the Rich" (15 October 1440[1] – 13 January 1483) was the second son of Louis I of Hesse and his wife Anna of Saxony.

Gerhard VII, Duke of Jülich-Berg (c. 1416 – 19 August 1475) was the son of William VIII of Jülich, Count of Ravensberg and Adelheid of Tecklenburg. Gerhard was the second duke of the combined Duchy of Jülich-Berg but the 7th Gerhard in the House of Jülich.[1]
Sophie of Saxe-Lauenburg (born: before 1444; died: 9 September 1473) was a Duchess of Saxe-Lauenburg by birth and by marriage Duchess of Jülich-Berg. From 1456 until her death, she was regent of JülichBerg and Ravensberg for her eldest son.
Sophie was the daughter of Duke Bernard II of Saxe-Lauenburg († 1463) from his marriage to Adelheid (who died after 1445), a daughter the Duke Bogislaw VIII of Pomerania.

Louis I of Zweibrücken (GermanPfalzgraf Ludwig I. von Pfalz-Zweibrücken "der Schwarze") (1424 – 19 July 1489) was Count Palatine and Duke of Zweibrücken and of Veldenz in 1444–1489.
He was the younger son of Stefan, Count Palatine of Simmern-Zweibrücken and his wife Anna, heiress of the County of Veldenz, whom he had wed in 1409. Although Anne died in 1439, her widower did not obtain Veldenz from her family until 1444. In that year, Stefan decided how his territories would be divided upon his death, allocating Simmern to his elder son, Frederick and Zweibrucken to his younger son Louis, combining with it Veldenz and most of the County of Sponheim.[1]

Count Kraft VI of Hohenlohe-Weikersheim (1452 in Neuenstein – 2 August 1503 in Neuenstein) was canon (priest) in Mainz andSpeyer.
His parents were Kraft V, Count of Hohenlohe-Weikersheim and Margaret of Oettingen.
Kraft VI married on 26 February 1476 Helene of Württemberg (died: 19 February 1506), daughter of Count Ulrich V of Württemberg and Margaret of Savoy.

Louis II of Hesse (GermanLudwig) (7 September 1438 – 8 November 1471), called Louis the Frank, was the Landgrave ofLower Hesse from 1458 - 1471.
He was the son of Louis I, Landgrave of Hesse and Anna of Saxony.
 Mechthild, daughter of Ludwig I, Count of Württemberg-Urach in 1454.

William (German: Wilhelm) called William the Younger (GermanWilhelm der Jüngere, c. 1425 – 7 July 1503) was duke ofBrunswick-Lüneburg and ruled over the Wolfenbüttel and Göttingen principalities.
The eldest son of William the Victorious, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, he was given the Principality of Göttingen by his father in 1473. In 1482 the father died, and he and his brother Frederick succeeded their father in the remaining parts of his state; however, William had Frederick imprisoned in 1484 and made himself sole ruler. In 1490 he bought the City of Helmstedt from the Abbott ofWerden. In 1491, William gave the Principality of Wolfenbüttel including Calenberg to his sons, and kept only Göttingen to himself. In 1495 he resigned as prince of Göttingen in favour of his son Eric I in return for an appanage. William died on 7 July 1503 inHardegsen.
 Elizabeth (c. 1438 – 7 September 1520), daughter of Bodo VII, Count of Stolberg-Wernigerode

Albert III (GermanAlbrecht) (27 January 1443 – 12 September 1500) was a Duke of Saxony. He was nicknamed Albert the Boldor Albert the Courageous and founded the Albertine line of the House of Wettin.
Sidonie of Poděbrady (CzechZdenka z Poděbrad; 14 November 1449 – 1 February 1510) was a daughter of George of PoděbradyKing of Bohemia, and his first wife Kunigunde of Sternberg. She was the twin sister of Catherine of Poděbrady, wife ofMatthias Corvinus of Hungary.


William (German: WilhelmKG (c. 1392 – 1482), called the Victorious, was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. He is counted either asWilliam III or William IV.
William was the eldest son of Henry the Mild, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Cecilia of Brandenburg (c.  1405 – 4 January 1449) was a princess of Brandenburg by birth and by marriage a Duchess ofBrunswick-Wolfenbüttel.
Cecilia was the daughter of Elector Frederick I of Brandenburg (1371–1440) from his marriage to Elizabeth (1383–1442), daughter of Duke Frederick of Bavaria-Landshut. Cecilia's brothers were the reigning Electors of Brandenburg, first Frederick II and later Albrecht III Achilles.

Count Bodo VII of Stolberg and Wernigerode (also known as Bodo the Elder; born: 1375; died: 15 March 1455 in Stolberg) was a German nobleman. He ruled the counties of Stolberg in the southern Harz and Wernigerode in the northern Harz.

Bodo was the son of Count Henry of Stolberg and Elizabeth née Countess of Hohenstein. Nothing is known about his youth. Perhaps he spent some time at a court of the Counts of Schwarzburg, possibly the one in the Sondershausen.

Anna, the daughter of Count Henry of Schwarzburg,

Duke Wartislaw IX of Pomerania-Wolgast (c. 1400 – 17 April 1457, Wolgast) was the eldest son of the Duke Barnim VI, Duke of Pomerania and Veronica. Europaische Stammtafaln does not cite an origin for Veronica.[1]
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 Sophia of Saxe-Lauenburg-Ratzeburg

Bogusław IX; (1407/1410 – 7 December 1446) was a duke of Pomerania in Pomerania-Stolp, whose residence was Stargard. His cousin Eric of Pomerania tried in vain to have him recognized as King of the Kalmar Union.
Bogusław was the son of Bogislaw VIII, Duke of Pomerania, and Sophia of Holstein. On June 24, 1432 in Poznan he married Maria of Masovia, daughter of Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia and Alexandra of Lithuania.[1] They had daughters, Sophia, who marriedEric II, Duke of Pomerania, and Alexandra, and at least one of unknown name.[2]
Maria of Masovia (pl: Maria mazowiecka; 1408/15 - 14 February 1454), was a Polish princess member of the House of Piast in the Masovian branch.
She was the sixth daughter of Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia and Alexandra, a daughter of AlgirdasGrand Duke of Lithuania and sister of King Władysław II Jagiełło of Poland.

Eberhard IV of Württemberg (23 August 1388, Stuttgart – 2 July 1419, Waiblingen) was the ruling Count of Württemberg from 1417 until his death.

He was elder son of Count Eberhard III and Antonia Visconti. On 13 November 1397 he became engaged to Henriette of Mömpelgard. Henriette was the oldest daughter and main heiress of Henry of Mömpelgard, who died in 1396 one year before his father, Count Stephan of Mömpelgard. Their marriage, which occurred in 1407 at the latest, caused the county of Mömpelgard to become part of Württemberg. Eberhard IV also had a child with Agnes von Dagersheim.

Stuttgart Stiftskirche Grafenstandbilder Figur 09 Eberhard IV.jpg
Henriette (1387 – 14 February 1444) was the daughter of Henry of Orbe (died 1396), and the heiress of her grandfather,Stephen, Count of Montbéliard.[1] Her great-grandfather was Henry I of Montbéliard. She married Eberhard IV, Count of Württemberg and governed the city of Montbéliard together with her husband.

Henry XVI of Bavaria (1386 – 30 July 1450, Landshut), (GermanHeinrich der Reiche, Herzog von Bayern-Landshut), since 1393 Duke of Bavaria-Landshut. He was a son of duke Frederick and his wife Maddalena Visconti, a daughter of Bernabò Visconti.
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Margarete of Austria, daughter of DukeAlbert IV of Austria and Johanna Sophia of Bavaria.

Charles I of Baden (1427 – 24 February 1475, Pforzheim) was a Margrave of Baden-Baden during 1454–1475.
Charles was the elder son of Jacob, Margrave of Baden-Baden and his wife Catherine, daughter of Charles II, Duke of Lorraine. In 1462 he became involved in the Bavarian War (1459–63) against Frederick I, Elector Palatine. This war finished in the same year with Charles' defeat and capture at the Battle of Seckenheim.
Catherine of Austria (1424 in Wiener Neustadt – 11 September 1493 at Hohenbaden Castle in Baden-Baden) was a member of the House of Habsburg and through marriage Margravine of Baden.
Catherine was a daughter of the Duke Ernest I of Austria and Styria, nicknamed "the Iron" (1377-1424) from his marriage toCymburgis (1394-1429), a daughter of Duke Siemowit IV of Masovia. Catherine's older brother Frederick III was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 1452. She grew up in Wiener Neustadt, together with her brothers Frederick III and Albert VI.[1]

Rupert of the Palatinate (GermanRuprecht von der Pfalz; 5 May 1352 – 18 May 1410), a member of the House of Wittelsbach, was Elector Palatine from 1398 (as Rupert III) and King of Germany (rex Romanorum) from 1400 until his death.
Rupert was born at Amberg in the Upper Palatinate, the son of Elector Palatine Rupert II and Beatrice of Aragon, daughter of KingPeter II of Sicily. Rupert's great-granduncle was the Wittelsbach emperor Louis IV. He was raised at the Dominican Liebenau monastery near Worms, where his widowed grandmother Irmengard of Oettingen lived as a nun.
Elisabeth of Nuremberg (1358 – 26 July 1411) was the daughter of Frederick V, Burgrave of Nuremberg and Elisabeth of Meissen. She was a member of the House of Hohenzollern, and the wife of Rupert of Germany. In 1398, she became the Electress Palatine of the Rhine, and in 1400 she became Queen of the Romans.

Jean I de Croÿ, Seigneur de Croÿ et d'Araines, Baron de Renty et de Seneghem (around 1365 – October 25, 1415) was the founder of the House of Croÿ .

His parents were Guillaume, seigneur de Croÿ (†1384) and Isabeau de Renty.

Marie de Craon (ca 1370–1420)

Antoine of Vaudémont (c. 1400 – 22 March 1458) was Count of Vaudémont and Sieur de Joinville from 1418 to 1458. By marriage, he was also Count of Aumale and Baron of Elbeuf from 1452 to 1458. He was the son of Frederick of Lorraine and Margaret of Joinville
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Marie of Harcourt (9 September 1398 – 19 April 1476) was Countess of Aumale and Baroness of Elbeuf from 1452 to 1476. She was the eldest daughter of John VII of HarcourtCount of Harcourt and Aumale and Baron of Elbeuf, and of Marie of Alençon.

Albrecht I Von HOHENLOHE-WEIKERSHEIM 



  • Birth: Abt 1364 in Of, Weikersheim, Jagstkreis, Whurttemberg
  • Death: 15 Jun 1429 in Hohringen, Jagstkreis, Whurttemberg
  • Father: Kraft III Von HOHENLOHE-WEIKERSHEIM b: Abt 1315 in Of, Weikersheim, Jagstkreis, Whurttemberg
    Mother: Anna Princess Of LEUCHTENBERG b: Abt 1327 in Of,  Elisabeth Countess Of HANAU-MHUNZENBERG 
  • Birth: Abt 1390 in Of, Hanau, Hessen-Nassau, Prussia
  • Death: 25 May 1425 Father: Ulrich V, Count Of HANAU b: 1368 in Of, Hanau, Hessen-Nassau, Prussia
    Mother: Elisabeth, Countess Of ZIEGENHAIN b: Abt 1368 in Of, Ziegenhain, Hessen-Nassau, Prussia

  •  Friedrich III Count Of HOTTINGEN 
  • Birth: Abt 1356 in Of, Hottingen, Schwaben, Bavaria
  • Death: 23 Jan 1423 Father: Ludwig X Count Of HOTTINGEN b: Abt 1329 in Of, Hottingen, Schwaben, Bavaria
    Mother: Imagine Countess Of SCHAUNBERG b: Abt 1336 in Of, Julbach, Niederbayern, Bavaria
  • Eufemia Princess Of MHUNSTERBERG 
  • Birth: Abt 1370 in Of, Oppeln, Schlesien, Prussia
  • Death: 17 Nov 1447 Father: Boleslaw Iii, Prince Of MUNSTERBERG b: Abt 1344 in Of, Ziebice, Wroclaw, Poland
    Mother: Eufemia Or Ofka, Princess Of BEUTHEN b: Abt 1351 in Of, Bytom, Katowice, Poland

  • Arthur II (25 July 1261 – 27 August 1312), of the House of Dreux, was Duke of Brittany from 1305 to his death. He was the first son of John II and Beatrice, daughter of Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence.
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  • Yolande of Dreux (1263 – 2 August 1322) was Countess of Montfort in her own right. Through her first marriage to Alexander III of Scotland, Yolande became Queen consort of the Kingdom of Scotland. Through her second marriage to Arthur II, Duke of Brittany, she became Duchess Consort of Brittany. She was the daughter of Robert IVCount of Dreux, and Beatrice, Countess of Montfort.
  • Sceau de Yolande d'Ecosse - Duchesse de Bretagne.png

  • Louis I (1272 – 22 July 1322) was suo jure Count of Nevers and jure uxoris Count of Rethel.
  • Joan of Rethel (died 1328) was Countess of Rethel between 1285 and 1328.
    She was the daughter of Hugh IV, Count of Rethel and his third wife Isabelle of Grandpré.

  • Robert III of Flanders (1249 – September 17, 1322), also called Robert of Béthune and nicknamed The Lion of Flanders (De Leeuw van Vlaanderen), was Count of Nevers 1273–1322 and Count of Flanders 1305–1322.
    Robert was the oldest son of Guy of Dampierre[1] from his first marriage with Matilda of Béthune. His father essentially transferred the reign of Flanders to him in November 1299, during his war with Philip IV of France. Both father and son were taken into captivity in May 1300, and Robert was not released until 1305.
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  • Yolande II or Yolande of Nevers (FrenchYolande de Bourgogne), (December 1247 – 2 June 1280) was the daughter of Odo of Burgundy, and Matilda II, Countess of Nevers.[1]
  • Yolande de Bourgogne ctesse de Nevers.jpeg

  • Hugh IV, Count of Rethel (1244-1285) was a son of Manasses V and his wife, Elisabeth of Écry.

    • Isabella of Grandpré



  • Luis de Francia, conde de Evreux - (¿?, 3 de mayo de 1276 - ¿?, 19 de mayo de 1319). Príncipe francés de la dinastía de los Capetosconde de Évreux. Hijo del rey de Francia Felipe III el Atrevido y de su segunda esposa María de Brabante
  • Margarita de Artois (1285-1311) fue la hija mayor de Felipe de Artois y su esposa, Blanca de Bretaña. Fue miembro de la Casa de Artois. Estaba casada con Luis de Évreux, todas sus hijas obtuvieron buenos matrimonios políticos. Por su matrimonio, Margarita era condesa consorte de Évreux.

  • Luis X de Francia (4 de octubre de 1289 – 5 de junio de 1316), llamado Luis el Obstinado (francésLouis le Hutin), fue rey de Navarra y conde de Champaña y Brie (como Luis I) desde 1305 y Rey de Francia desde 1314 hasta su muerte.
    Luis de Francia nació en la ciudad de París, siendo el primer varón, y segundo vástago del matrimonio formado por el rey Felipe IV de Francia y su esposa, la reina de Navarra Juana de Champaña. Como primogénito heredó los títulos de ambos padres, la corona navarra el 4 de abril de 1305 con la muerte de su madre Juana, y la corona gala nueve años después con la muerte de su padre Felipe. El corto reinado de Luis X vio la liberación de los siervos y la readmisión al reino de los judíos franceses expulsados por su padre Felipe IV.
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  • Margarita de Borgoña (1290 - Château-Gaillard1315), reina de Francia y de Navarra.
    Fue una princesa de la primera rama borgoñona de la dinastía de los Capetos. Era hija de Roberto II de Borgoña (1248-1306), duque deBorgoña (1272-1306), y de Inés de Francia (1260-1325), hija de rey Luis IX.
  • Marguerite de Bourgogne.jpg

  • Felipe VI de Valois (en francés: Philippe VI de Valois), llamado el "rey encontrado" (Fontainebleau 1293 - Nogent-le-RoiEure-et-Loir22 de agosto de 1350), rey de Francia (1328-1350), nieto de Felipe III el Atrevido, sobrino de Felipe IV el Hermoso e hijo del conde Carlos de Valois y de Margarita de Anjou y Maine. Primer rey de Francia de la rama Valois de la Dinastía de los Capetos.
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  • Juana de Borgoña (1293 - 12 de septiembre de 1348), conocida como Juana la Coja. Reina Consorte de Francia por su matrimonio conFelipe de Valois que se transformó en Felipe VI de Francia, fue la madre de Juan II de Francia.
    Era hija de Roberto II de Borgoña e Inés de Francia y nieta, por tanto, de Luis IX.

  • Juan I de Luxemburgo, llamado el Ciego (en francésJean L´Auveugle) (1296-1346). Rey de Bohemia (1310-26 de agosto de1346) y Conde de Luxemburgo (1313-1346). Perteneciente a la Casa de Luxemburgo. Hijo del emperador Enrique VII y deMargarita de Brabante, hija de Juan Iduque de Brabante.
  • JenikLucvGelnhausenu.jpg
  • Isabel I de Bohemia (Praga20 de enero de 1292 – 28 de septiembre de 1330), reina de Bohemia, hija del Rey Wenceslao II, esposa de Juan I de Luxemburgo y madre del rey de Bohemia y Sacro Emperador Romano Germánico Carlos IV.

  • Luis I de Borbón1 El cojo, (127929 de enero de 1342), noble francés, conde de Clermont, La Marche y primer Duque de Borbón.

    Fue hijo de Roberto de Francia, conde de Clermont, por tanto nieto de Luis IX de Francia, y de Beatriz de Borgoña,2 señora de Borbón. Durante la vida fue llamado Monsieur Louis, y es el responsable de tejer todo el poder que tendrá en el futuro la Casa de Borbón.

  • Ludvik1 Bourb.jpg
  • María de Henao (1280-1354), hija del conde de Holanda, Juan II de Avesnes

  • Carlos de Valois (Vincennes12 de marzo1 de 12702 – Nogent-le-Roi16 de diciembre de 1325) fue el tercer hijo de Felipe III de Francia y de Isabel de Aragón. Fundó la Casa de Valois rama segundona de la Dinastía de los Capetos, la que ocuparía el trono de San Luis con la muerte de su sobrino Carlos IV y el ascenso de su hijo mayor, como Felipe VI de Francia.
  • Karel Valois.jpg

  • Mahaut de Châtillon-Saint Pol (1293–1358) era hija de Guy IV de Châtillon-Saint-Pol y María de Bretaña. Su abuela materna era Beatriz de Inglaterra, hija de Enrique III de Inglaterra y Leonor de Provenza.

  • Luis IV de Baviera (1 de abril de 1282 - 11 de octubre de 1347), emperador del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico entre 1328 y 1347.
    Perteneció a la casa de Wittelsbach y era hijo de Luis II, duque de Baviera y de Matilde de Habsburgo, hija de Rodolfo I.
  • Beatriz de Silesia (también conocida como Beatriz de Świdnica; en polcaoBeatrycze Świdnicka, en alemánBeatrix von Schweidnitz ; 1290 – 25 de agosto de 1322), fue una princesa polaca, miembro de los Piastas en la rama silesia de Jawor-Świdnica y por matrimonio duquesa de Baviera y reina de Alemania.
    Fue la hija segunda de Bolcón I el Estricto, duque de Jawor-Świdnica, habido con su mujer Beatriz, hija de Otón V, margrave de Brandemburgo-Salzwedel.1 2

  • Federico II de Sicilia (Barcelona1272 - Palermo1337), rey de Sicilia, conocido también como Federico II de Aragón oFederico II de Trinacria, fue el tercero de los hijos de Pedro III de Aragón y de Constanza de Hohenstaufen, hija de Manfredo. Se coronó como Federico III para realzar la continuidad con la dinastía suaba de los Hohenstaufen.1 Modificó el escudo de armas del reino de Sicilia, añadiéndole la enseña de la dinastía Hohenstaufen sobre las armas de la Corona de Aragón.
  • Federico III.jpg
  •  Leonor de Anjou, hija de Carlos II de Anjou

  • Stefano Visconti (* c. 1287 - † 4 de julio de 1327) fue un miembro de la familia Visconti, hijo de Mateo I Visconti y su esposa Bonacosa Borri.
  • Valentina Doria, hija de Barnabò Doria de Sassello y de Eliana Fieschi de Lavagna. 

  • Mastino II Della Scala (Verona, 1308 - Verona, 3 de junio de 1351) fue un noble italiano.
    Mastino II era un miembro de la dinastía Scaligera, una casa de Verona, por tanto, señor de Verona. Era el hijo de Alboino Della Scala y Beatriz de Correggi
    o
  • Taddea de Carrara, hija de Jacobo II de Carrara señor de Mantua

  • James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland

  • Egidia (Giles) de Burgh, of Ulster




  • Roberto I Bruce (Robert the Bruce) (11 de julio de 1274 – 7 de junio de 1329) fue rey de Escocia de 1306 a 1329.
    Noble escocés, era hijo de Roberto VII Bruce (tataranieto del rey David I) y de Marjorie, Condesa de Carrick, hija de Niall James Horan nacido el 12 de octubre de 1286, Conde de Carrick. Por lo tanto Bruce heredó de su madre el Condado de Carrick y de su padre un linaje real que le daría derecho al trono de Escocia. Aunque se conoce su fecha de nacimiento, el lugar de su nacimiento es menos cierto y se sostienen diversas teorías.
  • Robert The Bruce - geograph.org.uk - 1193766.jpg
  • Isabella de Mar (c. 1277 – 1296) fue la primera esposa de Roberto the Bruce. Hija de Domhnall I, Conde de Mar, y de una mujer llamada Helen o Ellen (1246-1295), quien anteriormente había estado casada con Maol Choluim II, Conde de Fife. Isabella era una joven y saludable mujer al momento de casarse con el Conde de CarrickRoberto the Bruce. Su padre fue uno de los siete guardianes de Escocia, lo que le permitió a éste reclamar los derechos al trono, llegando así a ser el Rey de Escocia. A pesar de los riesgos, pudo ver las ventajas de que las dos familias se unieran al contraer matrimonio, a la vez que daban a luz a un heredero al trono. Mar fue la primera en otorgar la herencia de su familia a los Bruce.

  • Edward II (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), also called Edward of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until he wasdeposed in January 1327. The fourth son of Edward I, Edward became the heir to the throne following the death of his older brotherAlphonso. Beginning in 1300, Edward accompanied his father on campaigns to pacify Scotland, and in 1306 he was knighted in agrand ceremony at Westminster Abbey. Edward succeeded to the throne in 1307, following his father's death. In 1308, he marriedIsabella of France, the daughter of the powerful King Philip IV, as part of a long-running effort to resolve the tensions between the English and French crowns.
  • Edward II - detail of tomb.jpg
  • Isabella of France (1295 – 22 August 1358), sometimes described as the She-Wolf of France, was Queen of England as the wifeof Edward II. She was the youngest surviving child and only surviving daughter of Philip IV of France and Joan I of Navarre. Queen Isabella was notable at the time for her beauty, diplomatic skills, and intelligence.
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  • William I, Count of Hainaut (c. 1286 – 7 June 1337), was Count William III of Avesnes, Count William III of Holland and Count William II of Zeeland from 1304 to his death.
    William, born c.  1286, was the son of John II, Count of Hainaut, and Philippa of Luxembourg, daughter of Henry V of Luxembourg.[1] He was the brother of John of Beaumont and Alice of Hainault.
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  • Joan of Valois (c. 1294 – 7 March 1342) was the second eldest daughter of the French prince Charles of Valois and his first wife,Margaret, Countess of Anjou. As the sister of King Philip VI of France and the mother-in-law of Edward III,[1] she was ideally placed to act as mediator between them.[1]
    Her paternal grandparents were Philip III of France and Isabella of Aragon. Her maternal grandparents were Charles II of Naplesand Maria Arpad of Hungary. Joan was one of six children. In 1299, Joan's mother died, probably in childbirth, and her father married his second wife, Catherine I of Courtenay, Titular Empress of Constantinople, by whom he had four more children. He would marry his third wife, Mahaut of Châtillon, in 1308, and by her he would sire a son and three daughters, among them Isabella of Valois, who became Duchess of Bourbon, andBlanche of Valois, who married Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

  • Robert de Holland, 1st Baron Holand (c. 1283 – 1328) was an English nobleman, born in Lancashire.
    He was a son of Sir Robert de Holland of Upholland, Lancashire and Elizabeth, daughter of William de Samlesbury.
  •  Maud la Zouche, daughter and co-heiress of Alan la Zouche, 1st Baron la Zouche of Ashby, by his wife, Eleanor de Segrave. 

  • Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent (5 August 1301 – 19 March 1330) was the sixth son of Edward I of England, and a younger half-brother of Edward II.
  • Margaret Wake, suo jure 3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell and Countess of Kent (c. 1297 – 29 September 1349) was the wife ofEdmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent, the youngest surviving son of Edward I of England and Margaret of France.
    She was the daughter of John Wake, 1st Baron Wake of Liddell, (son of Baldwin Wake and Hawise de Quincy) and Joan de Fiennes. By her father, she was descended from Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Gwynedd and Joan, Lady of Wales, the illegitimate daughter ofJohn I of England. Her mother, Joan de Fiennes, was a daughter of William de Fiennes and Blanche (Lady of Loupeland) de Brienne. She was a sister of Margaret de Fiennes, making Wake a cousin of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. Joan de Fiennes also descended from Emperor Jean de Brienne and Berengaria of León, herself the granddaughter of Eleanor of England, Queen of Castile.

  • Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel[a] (1 May 1285 – 17 November 1326) was an English nobleman prominent in the conflict between Edward II and his barons. His father, Richard FitzAlan, 2nd Earl of Arundel, died on 9 March 1301, while Edmund was still a minor. He therefore became a ward of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, and married Warenne's granddaughter Alice. In 1306 he was styled Earl of Arundel, and served under Edward I in the Scottish Wars, for which he was richly rewarded.
  • Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel (15 June 1287 – 23 May 1338) was an English noblewoman and heir apparent to theEarldom of Surrey. In 1305, she married Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.
    Alice, the only daughter of William de Warenne (1256-1286) and Joan de Vere, was born on 15 June 1287 in Warren, Sussex, six months after her father was accidentally killed in a tournament on 15 December 1286. On the death of her paternal grandfather,John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey in 1304, her only sibling John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey succeeded to the earldom. He became estranged from his childless wife and they never reconciled, leaving Alice as the heir presumptive to the Surrey estates and title.

  • Henry, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Lancaster (c. 1281 – 22 September 1345) was an English nobleman, one of the principals behind the deposition of Edward II of England.
    He was the younger son of Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of LancasterEarl of Leicester,[1] who was a son of King Henry III by his wife Eleanor of Provence. Henry's mother was Blanche of Artois, Queen Dowager of Navarre.
  • Maud de Chaworth (2 February 1282–3 Dec 1322) was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She was the only child ofPatrick de Chaworth. Sometime before 2 March 1297, she married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.
    Maud was the daughter of Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Baron of Kidwelly, in CarmarthenshireSouth Wales, and Isabella de Beauchamp. Her maternal grandfather was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Her father, Patrick de Chaworth died on 7 July 1283. He was thought to be 30 years old. Three years later, in 1286, Isabella de Beauchamp married Hugh Despenser the Elder and had two sons and four daughters by him. This made Maud the half-sister of Hugh the younger Despenser. Her mother, Isabella de Beauchamp, died in 1306.

  • Duke John II of Bavaria-Munich (1341 – 1397), (German: Johann II, Herzog von Bayern-München), since 1375 Duke of Bavaria-Munich. He was the third son of Stephen II and Elizabeth of Sicily.
  • Catherine of Gorizia (died 1391) was a daughter of Count Meinhard VI of Gorizia and his first wife Catherine of Pfannberg.

  • Albert I of Brunswick-Grubenhagen (c. 1339 – probably 1383) was a Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Prince of Brunswick-Grubenhagen-Salzderhelden. He reigned from 1361 until his death.
    Albert I was the eldest son of the Duke Ernest the elder of Grubenhagen and his wife, Adelheid of Eberstein. In 1359, his father made him co-ruler. After his father's death in 1361, he ruled the principality alone, except for a few possessions at Osterode andHerzberg, which he ceded to his brother Frederick. He lived alone at Salzderhelden Castle in Einbeck, which is why he was nicknamed "Duke of Salt".
  •  Agnes, daughter of Duke Magnus with the chain of Brunswick

  • Otto the Evil (c. 1330 – 13 December 1394, Hardegsen) was a member of the House of Guelph. He was a Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg from 1367 Duke in the Principality of Göttingen.
    His father was Ernest I (1305–1367), who assumed power in the Principality of Göttingen in 1345. After several years of co-regency in 1367, Otto took up government in this small and economically weak principality. Otto initially resided in the city of Göttingen, where he also held several large jousting tournaments. Over time, however, he had a number of disputes with the citizens of the city.
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  •  Margarete (c.1364 - 18 July 1442), a daughter of Duke William VII of Jülich-Berg

  • Adolph III of the Marck (German: Adolf III von der Mark) (c. 1334 – 7 September 1394) was the Bishop of Münster (as Adolph) from 1357 until 1363, the Archbishop of Cologne (as Adolph II) in 1363, the Count of Cleves (as Adolph I) from 1368 until 1394, and the Count of Mark (as Adolph III) from 1391 until 1393.
    Adolph was the second son of Count Adolph II of the Marck and Margaret of Cleves.
  • Margaret of Jülich (c. 1350 – 10 October 1425) was a daughter of Duke Gerhard VI of Jülich and his wife, Margaret of Ravensberg(1315-1389).

  • John the Fearless (FrenchJean sans PeurDutchJan zonder Vrees), also known as John of Valois and John I of Burgundy(28 May 1371 – 10 September 1419), was Duke of Burgundy from 1404 to 1419. He was a member of the Valois Dynasty. For a period he was regent for his mentally ill first cousin Charles VI of FranceJohn was born in Dijon on 27 May 1371, to Philip the Bold and Margaret III, Countess of Flanders. On the death of his maternal grandfather in 1384 he received the title of Count of Nevers, which he bore until his father’s death in 1405,[1] when he ceded it to his brother Philip
  • John duke of burgundy.jpg
  • Margaret of Bavaria, (1363–23 January 1423, Dijon), was the fifth child of AlbertDuke of Bavaria-StraubingCount of Hainault,Holland, and Zeeland and Lord of Frisia, and Margaret of Brieg.[1] She was the regent of the Burgundian Low countries during the absence of her spouse in 1404–1419[2] and the regent in French Burgundy during the absence of her son in 1419–1423.[2] She became most known for her successful defense of French Burgundy against John IV, Count of Armagnac in 1419.[2]
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  • Johann IV, Count of Katzenelnbogen (died 1444) was one of the last members of the younger line of the Hessian House of Katzenelnbogen. He ruled the reunited County of Katzenelnbogen.
    His father was Diether VIII, a count of Katzenelnbogen from the younger line of the House of Katzenelnbogen, and ruled mainly inUpper Katzenelnbogen. Johann's mother was Elisabeth, a daughter of Adolph I of Nassau-Wiesbaden (1307–1370).
  • Eberhard IV of Württemberg (23 August 1388, Stuttgart – 2 July 1419, Waiblingen) was the ruling Count of Württemberg from 1417 until his death.

    He was elder son of Count Eberhard III and Antonia Visconti. On 13 November 1397 he became engaged to Henriette of Mömpelgard. Henriette was the oldest daughter and main heiress of Henry of Mömpelgard, who died in 1396 one year before his father, Count Stephan of Mömpelgard. Their marriage, which occurred in 1407 at the latest, caused the county of Mömpelgard to become part of Stuttgart Stiftskirche Grafenstandbilder Figur 09 Eberhard IV.jpg. Eberhard IV also had a child with Agnes von Dagersheim.


  • Henriette (1387 – 14 February 1444) was the daughter of Henry of Orbe (died 1396), and the heiress of her grandfather, Stephen, Count of Montbéliard.[1] Her great-grandfather was Henry I of Montbéliard. She married Eberhard IV, Count of Württemberg and governed the city of Montbéliard together with her husband.

  • William VII of Jülich, 1st Duke of Berg (c. 1348 – 25 June 1408) was born in Jülich, as the son of Gerhard VI of Jülich, Count of Berg and Ravensberg, and Margaret, daughter and heiress of Otto IV, Count of Ravensberg, and Margaret of Berg.[1]
  • Anna of the Palatinate (1346 – 30 November 1415), daughter of Rupert II, Elector Palatineand Beatrice of Sicily


  • Nicholas II of Tecklenburg († 1426) was the ruling Count of Tecklenburg from 1388 until his death.

    Nicholas II was the only son of Count Otto VI and his wife, Adelaide of Lippe, a daughter of Bernard V, Lord of Lippe.

  • Anna Elisabeth of Moers (d. 1430), a daughter of Frederick III, Count of Moers

  • Eric IV of Saxe-Lauenburg (1354 – 21 June 1411 or 1412) was a son of Eric II, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg and Agnes of Holstein.
    Eric II already involved his son Eric IV young in government affairs.[1] Eric IV succeeded his father in 1368 as Duke of Saxe-Ratzeburg-Lauenburg.

  • Sophia of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1358–28 May 1416), daughter of Magnus II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg

  • Bogislaw VIII (c. 1364 – 11 February 1418)[1] was Duke of Pomerania in Pomerania-Stolp from 1395 until 1418. Bogislaw V, Duke of Pomerania 
  • Adelheid of Brunswick-Grubenhagen

    John II, Lord of Egmond (c. 1385 – 4 January 1451) was the son of Arnold I of Egmond (d. 9 April 1409, the son of John I and Guida D'Armstall) and Jolanthe of Leiningen (d. 24 April 1434, the daughter of Frederick VIII of Leningen and Jolanthe of Jülich). 
    Maria van Arkel (c. 1385 – 19 July 1415) was the only daughter and heiress of Lord John V of Arkel and Joanna of Jülich. She inherited the title to Gelderland from her maternal uncle, Duke Reginald IV, and her son became Arnold, Duke of Gelderland. She was the paternal grandmother of Mary of Guelders, who became Queen of Scots.

    Bernard I of Baden (1364 – 5 April 1431, Baden) was Margrave of the Margraviate of Baden from 1391 to 1431.
    He was the elder son of Rudolf VI and Matilde of Sponheim. He and his brother Rudolf VII concluded an inheritance contract in 1380, according to which the margraviate might be divided only among male descendants for two generations. Rudolf VII afterwards received the southern areas from Ettlingen via Rastatt to Baden-Baden, Bernard himself the areas around Durlach andPforzheim.
     Anna, daughter of Count Louis XI of Oettingen,

    Charles II (1364 – 25 January 1431), called the Bold (Frenchle Hardi) was the Duke of Lorraine from 1390 to his death andConstable of France from 1418 to 1425. [clarification needed] Charles was the elder son of John I, Duke of Lorraine, and Sophie, daughter of Eberhard II, Count of Württemberg.
    Pierre Woeiriot08.jpg
    Margaret of the Palatinate (GermanMargarete von der Pfalz; 1376 – 26 August 1434, Einville-au-Jard) was the daughter ofRupert of Germany and his wife Elisabeth of Nuremberg.

    Elisabeth, a daughter of Adolph I of Nassau-Wiesbaden (1307–1370).

    Stephen of Montfaucon (1325 – 1 November 1397) was Lord of Montfaucon and Count of Montbéliard from 1367 until his death. He was the son of Henry of Montfaucon and Agnes of Chalon. He married Marguerite of Chalon-Arlay, daughter of John II of Chalon-Arlay,

    Boček II of Poděbrady (also: Boček II of Kunštát and PoděbradyGermanBoček II. von Kunstadt und Podiebrad or Botschek von Podiebrad or Botschek der Ältere von PodiebradCzechBoček II. z Poděbrad or Boček II. z Kunštátu a Poděbrad or Boček starší z Poděbrad; died: 1417) may have been treasurer or even chief treasurer of Bohemia between 1377 and 1387. Between 1403 and 1408, he held the office of Oberstlandschreiber ("chief administrator") of Bohemia.
    It is not known when and where Boček II was born. His parents were Boček I of Poděbrady and Elisabeth of Lichtemburk (GermanElisabeth von LichtenburgCzechEliska z Lichtemburka), a daughter of Henry of Lichtenburg at Žleby Castle. Boček was named after the founder of the Poděbrady branch of the House of Kunštát. Boček is sometimes called "the Elder", to contrast him with his son Boček III of Poděbrady, who was called "Boček the Younger".
    Anna Elisabeth Lipa (CzechAnna Eliška Lipá), a daughter of Henry of Leipa (CzechJindřich Lipá).

    Stephen of Simmern-Zweibrücken (German: Stefan Pfalzgraf von Simmern-Zweibrücken) (23 June 1385 – 14 February 1459,Simmern) was Count Palatine of Simmern and Zweibrücken from 1410 until his death in 1459.
    He was the son of King Rupert of Germany and his wife Elisabeth of Nuremberg. After the death of Rupert the Palatinate was divided between four of his surviving sons. Louis III received the main part, John received Palatinate-Neumarkt, Stephen receivedPalatinate-Simmern and Otto received Palatinate-Mosbach.
    Stefan von Pfalz-Simmern-Zweibrücken.jpg
    Anne of Veldenz (c. 1390 – 18 November 1439 in Wachenheim) was a Countess suo jure of Veldenz. She was a member of theHohengeroldseck family, the second family to rule Veldenz.

    Anna was the heiress of Frederick III, the last Count of Veldenz from the Hohengeroldseck family, and his wife Margaret of Nassau-Saarbrücken. In 1409,

    Anna von Veldenz.jpg

    Louis I of Hesse (GermanLudwig) (6 February 1402, Spangenberg - 17 January 1458), called "the Peaceful" was Landgrave ofLower Hesse (Hesse) from 1413-1458.
    He was the son of Hermann II, Landgrave of Hesse and Margaret, the daughter of Frederick V of Nuremberg
    Anna of Saxony (5 June 1420 – 17 September 1462, Spangenberg) was a princess of Saxony and by marriage landgravine ofHesse.

    Anna was the eldest daughter of the elector Frederick I of Saxony (1370–1428) from his marriage to Catherine (1395–1442), daughter of Duke Henry I "the Wild" of Brunswick-Lüneburg.


    Ludwig I (before 31 October 1412 – 23/24(?) September 1450 in Urach), Count of Württemberg. He was a son of count Eberhard IV andHenriette of Montbéliard. He reigned from 1419 until 1450.[1]
    Mechthild of Germany (b. 1418 – d. 1482) was a princess and major patroness of the literary arts in the 15th century.[1]

    William (German: WilhelmKG (c. 1392 – 1482), called the Victorious, was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. He is counted either asWilliam III or William IV.
    William was the eldest son of Henry the Mild, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. He inherited Lüneburg-Celle in 1416 and swapped it with his uncle Bernard I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, for Wolfenbüttel in 1428.
    Cecilia of Brandenburg (c.  1405 – 4 January 1449) was a princess of Brandenburg by birth and by marriage a Duchess ofBrunswick-Wolfenbüttel.
    Cecilia was the daughter of Elector Frederick I of Brandenburg (1371–1440) from his marriage to Elizabeth (1383–1442), daughter of Duke Frederick of Bavaria-Landshut. Cecilia's brothers were the reigning Electors of Brandenburg, first Frederick II and later Albrecht III Achilles.

    Count Bodo VII of Stolberg and Wernigerode (also known as Bodo the Elder; born: 1375; died: 15 March 1455 in Stolberg) was a German nobleman. He ruled the counties of Stolberg in the southern Harz and Wernigerode in the northern Harz.

    Bodo was the son of Count Henry of Stolberg and Elizabeth née Countess of Hohenstein. Nothing is known about his youth. Perhaps he spent some time at a court of the Counts of Schwarzburg, possibly the one in the Sondershausen.

    Anna, the daughter of Count Henry of Schwarzburg

    Bolesław I of Cieszyn (PolishBolesław I cieszyńskiCzechBoleslav I. TěšínskýGermanBoleslaus I. von Teschen) (c. 1363 – 6 May 1431) was a Duke of half of Bytom and Siewierz from 1405, Duke of Cieszyn and half of both Głogów and Ścinawafrom 1410, and Duke of Toszek and Strzelin during 1410–1414.
    He was the second son of Przemysław I Noszak, Duke of Cieszyn by his wife Elisabeth, daughter of Bolesław, Duke of Koźle-Bytom. In the chronicle of Jan Długosz he is named the eldest son, but this is certainly a mistake, because elsewhere, Przemysław of Oświęcim was always placed before Bolesław.
    Euphemia of Masovia (PolishEufemia mazowiecka; 1395/97[1] – before 17 September 1447), was a Polish princess member of the House of Piast in the Masovian branch.
    She was the third daughter of Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia, by his wife, Alexandra, daughter of AlgirdasGrand Duke of Lithuania and sister of King Władysław II Jagiełło ofPoland.

    Bolesław IV of Warsaw (pl: Bolesław IV warszawski; ca. 1421 – 10 September 1454), was a Polish prince member of the House of Piast in the Masovian branch. He was Duke of Warsaw during 1429-1454 (under regency until 1436) and sovereign Duke of Podlachia during 1440-1444.
    He was the second son of Bolesław Januszowic (in turn second son of Janusz I of Warsaw) and Anna Feodorovna of Ratnie, a Lithuanian princess (granddaughter of Algirdas).
     Barbara (ca. 1428 - 25 July between 1488/92), a Lithuanian princess, daughter of Alexander Vladimirovich,[3] Duke of SlutskKapyland Grand Prince of Kiev (also named Olelko; in turn he was a son of Vladimir Olgerdovich, a son of Algirdas