Truth | Definition of Truth by Merriam-Webster

truth

noun
\ ˈtrüth How to pronounce truth (audio) \
plural truths\ ˈtrüt͟hz How to pronounce truths (audio) , ˈtrüths \

Definition of truth

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : the body of real things, events, and facts : actuality
(2) : the state of being the case : fact
(3) often capitalized : a transcendent fundamental or spiritual reality
b : a judgment, proposition, or idea that is true or accepted as true truths of thermodynamics
c : the body of true statements and propositions
2a : the property (as of a statement) of being in accord with fact or reality
b chiefly British : true sense 2
c : fidelity to an original or to a standard
3a : sincerity in action, character, and utterance
b archaic : fidelity, constancy
4 capitalized, Christian Science : god
in truth
: in accordance with fact : actually

Truth

biographical name
\ ˈtrüth How to pronounce Truth (audio) \

Definition of Truth (Entry 2 of 2)

Sojourner circa 1797–1883 American evangelist and reformer

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Synonyms & Antonyms for truth

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Noun

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Examples of truth in a Sentence

Noun At some point you have to face the simple truth that we failed. Their explanation was simpler but came closer to the truth. The article explains the truth about global warming. A reporter soon discovered the truth. Do you swear to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth? Her story contains a grain of truth but also lots of exaggeration.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun When Carraway meets the wealthy Jay Gatsby, he's drawn into the man's intoxicating social circle, while still digging for any clue to the truth of Gatsby's past. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, "Read an excerpt from John Grisham's new introduction to The Great Gatsby — and see the cover," 20 Nov. 2020 Obama only foreshadows Trump’s unlikely ascent by registering his concerns about rising nativism and the tribalism his election seemed to unleash, an implacable opposition party and conservative media increasingly untethered to truth. Dallas News, "Barack Obama’s memoir is a masterful lament over the fragility of hope," 18 Nov. 2020 Obama only foreshadows Trump’s unlikely ascent by registering his concerns about rising nativism and the tribalism his election seemed to unleash, an implacable opposition party and conservative media increasingly untethered to truth. Los Angeles Times, "Review: Barack Obama’s memoir is a masterful lament over the fragility of hope," 16 Nov. 2020 The elements are all too familiar: No necessary adherence to the truth. Washington Post, "Fox News is pulling out all the stops to promote Trump’s twisted logic about ‘corrupt’ voting," 5 Nov. 2020 No matter what happens this week, Rupert and Lachlan Murdoch will have the ultimate responsibility for keeping the network tethered to the truth. Brian Stelter, CNN, "All eyes on the Murdochs as Fox juggles election news and pro-Trump talk shows," 2 Nov. 2020 My focus from the start of the Breonna Taylor case has been to get to the truth — for Breonna, her family and our larger community, which obviously includes the men and women of LMPD. Darcy Costello, The Courier-Journal, "Breonna Taylor shooting 'had nothing to do with race,' officer says in exclusive interview," 21 Oct. 2020 With typical braggadocio, Mr. Trump claimed his tax cuts were the largest in history—which, as a share of gross domestic product, was nowhere close to the truth. Alan S. Blinder, WSJ, "The Trump ‘Jobs Boom’ Is a Convenient Myth," 21 Oct. 2020 My focus from the start of the Breonna Taylor case has been to get to the truth — for Breonna, her family and our larger community, which obviously includes the men and women of LMPD. Darcy Costello, USA TODAY, "Breonna Taylor shooting 'had nothing to do with race,' officer says in exclusive interview," 21 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'truth.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of truth

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3b

History and Etymology for truth

Noun

Middle English trewthe, from Old English trēowth fidelity; akin to Old English trēowe faithful — more at true entry 1

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Time Traveler for truth

Time Traveler

The first known use of truth was before the 12th century

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Statistics for truth

Last Updated

22 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

Truth.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/truth. Accessed 25 Nov. 2020.

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More Definitions for truth

truth

noun
How to pronounce Truth (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of truth

: the real facts about something : the things that are true
: the quality or state of being true
: a statement or idea that is true or accepted as true

truth

noun
\ ˈtrüth How to pronounce truth (audio) \
plural truths\ ˈtrüt͟hz \

Kids Definition of truth

1 : the body of real events or facts He'll keep investigating until he finds the truth.
2 : the quality or state of being true There is no truth in what she told you.
3 : a true or accepted statement or idea I learned some hard truths about life.
in truth
: in actual fact : really

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Comments on truth

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