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« Reply #870 on: October 05, 2021, 11:59:37 AM »

Aleksandar Karađorđević (Serbian Cyrillic: Александар Карађорђевић, romanized: 'Aleksandar Karađorđević; 11 October 1806 – 3 May 1885) was the prince of Serbia between 1842 and 1858. He was a member of the House of Karađorđević. The youngest son of Karageorge Petrović and Jelena Jovanović. On 1 June 1830 in Hotin, Bessarabia, he married Persida Nenadović (15 February 1813 – 29 March 1873), daughter of Voivode Jevrem Nenadović (1793–1867) and Jovanka Milovanović (1792–1880). They had ten children.


Alexander I (Serbian Cyrillic: Александар Обреновић, romanized: Aleksandar Obrenović)(14 August 1876 – 11 June 1903) reigned as the king of Serbia from 1889 to 1903 when he and his wife, Draga Mašin, were assassinated by a group of Royal Serbian Army officers, led by Captain Dragutin Dimitrijević. Alexander was born on 14 August 1876 to King Milan and Queen Natalie of Serbia. He belonged to the Obrenović dynasty. In the summer of 1900, King Alexander suddenly announced his engagement to Draga Mašin, a disreputable widow of an obscure engineer. Alexander had met Draga in 1897 when she was serving as a maid of honor to his mother. Draga was twelve years older than the king, unpopular with Belgrade society, well known for her allegedly numerous sexual liaisons, and widely believed to be infertile.


Alexander I (Serbian Cyrillic: Александар I Карађорђевић, romanized: Aleksandar I Karađorđević, pronounced [aleksǎːndar př̩ʋiː karad͡ʑǒːrd͡ʑeʋit͡ɕ]) (16 December 1888 [O.S. 4 December] – 9 October 1934), also known as Alexander the Unifier, was a prince regent of the Kingdom of Serbia from 1914 and later a king of Yugoslavia from 1921 to 1934 (prior to 1929 the state was known as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes). He was assassinated by the Bulgarian Vlado Chernozemski, during a 1934 state visit to France. Alexander Karađorđević was born on 16 December 1888 in the Principality of Montenegro as the fourth child (second son) of Peter Karađorđević (son of Prince Alexander of Serbia who thirty years earlier in 1858 was forced to abdicate and surrender power in Serbia to the rival House of Obrenović) and Princess Zorka of Montenegro (eldest daughter of Prince Nicholas of Montenegro). A key event for Prince Alexander occurred on 27 March 1909 when his older brother Crown Prince George publicly renounced his claim to the throne after strong pressure from political circles in Serbia. George killed his servant Kolaković by kicking him in the stomach, which served as the final straw. The death caused a huge scandal amongst the Serbian public as well as in the Austro-Hungarian press, which reported extensively on it, and 21-year-old Prince George was forced into renouncing his claim to the throne. On 8 June 1922 he married Princess Maria of Romania, who was a daughter of Ferdinand I of Romania. They had three sons.


Alexandra of Yugoslavia (Greek: Αλεξάνδρα, Serbo-Croatian: Александра/Aleksandra)(25 March 1921 – 30 January 1993) was, by marriage to King Peter II, the last Queen of Yugoslavia. Posthumous daughter of King Alexander of Greece and his morganatic wife Aspasia Manos, Alexandra was not part of the Greek royal family until July 1922, when at the behest of Queen Sophia, a law was passed which retroactively recognized marriages of members of the royal family, although on a non-dynastic basis; in consequence, she obtained the style and name of Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark. The invasion of Greece by the Axis powers in April–May 1941, however, led to their moving to the United Kingdom. Again exiled, Alexandra met in London the young King Peter II of Yugoslavia, who also went into exile after the invasion of his country by the Germans.
Quickly, Alexandra and Peter II fell in love and planned to marry. Opposition from both Peter's mother, Maria, and the Yugoslav government in exile forced the couple to delay their marriage plans until 1944, when they finally celebrated their wedding. A year later, Alexandra gave birth to her only son, Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia. However, the happiness of the family was short-lived: on 29 November 1945, Marshal Tito proclaimed the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and Alexandra, who had never set foot in her adopted country, was left without a crown. The abolition of the Yugoslav monarchy had very serious consequences for the royal couple. Penniless and unable to adapt to the role of citizen, Peter II turned to alcoholism and multiple affairs with other women. Depressed by the behavior of her husband, Alexandra neglected her son and made several suicide attempts. After the death of Peter II in 1970, Alexandra's health continued to deteriorate. She died of cancer in 1993


Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia, also claiming the crowned royal title of Alexander II Karađorđević (Serbian Cyrillic: Александар II Карађорђевић / Aleksandar II Karađorđević)(17 July 1945), is the heir to the defunct throne of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and currently claimant to the abolished throne of the precursor Kingdom of Serbia. He is the head of the House of Karađorđević. Alexander is the only child of King Peter II and his wife, Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark. On 1 July 1972 at Villamanrique de la Condesa, near Seville, Spain, he married Princess Maria da Gloria of Orléans-Braganza, from the Brazilian imperial family. They are 4th cousins once removed as both are descendants of Prince Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1785–1851) and his wife Princess Maria Antonia von Koháry (1797–1862). They have three sons: Peter (born 5 February 1980), and fraternal twins: Philip and Alexander (both born 15 January 1982). Alexander and Maria da Gloria divorced in 1985. Crown Prince Alexander married for the second time, Katherine Clairy Batis, the daughter of Robert Batis and his wife, Anna Dosti, civilly on 20 September 1985, and religiously the following day, at St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Church, Notting Hill, London. Since their marriage, she is known as Crown Princess Katherine, as per the royal family's website. They have no children.


Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia, also known as Alexander III Karađorđević (Serbian Cyrillic: Александар III Карађорђевић / Aleksandar III Karađorđević)( January 15, 1982), is a member of the House of Karađorđević. Alexander is the third son of the last crown prince of Yugoslavia, Alexander, and his first wife, Princess Maria da Gloria. He is the fraternal twin of Prince Philip of Yugoslavia. He is fourth in the line to the former throne, after his elder brothers and nephew.


Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia (Serbian: Александар П. Карађорђевић / Aleksandar P. Karađorđević)(13 August 1924 – 12 May 2016) was the elder son of Prince Paul, who served as Regent of Yugoslavia in the 1930s, and his wife, Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark. On 12 February 1955, Alexander married Princess Maria Pia of Savoy, daughter of King Umberto II of Italy and of his wife, Princess Marie José of Belgium Alexander and Maria Pia have twin sons born in 1958. Another set of twins was born five years later, this time a girl and a boy. Alexander and Maria Pia divorced in 1967, and in 2003 she married Prince Michel of Bourbon-Parma, himself divorced from Princess Yolande de Broglie-Revel.On 2 November 1973, Alexander married in a civil ceremony in Paris Princess Barbara of Liechtenstein (9 July 1942), daughter of Prince Johannes of Liechtenstein (also first cousin once removed to both Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein and Princess Marie) and Countess Caroline of Ledebur-Wicheln. They had 1 son.

Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine, GCB (German: Alexander Ludwig Georg Friedrich Emil)(15 July 1823 – 15 December 1888), was the third son and fourth child of Louis II, Grand Duke of Hesse, and Wilhelmina of Baden. He was a brother of Tsarina Maria Alexandrovna, wife of Tsar Alexander II. The Battenberg / Mountbatten family descends from Alexander and his wife Countess Julia von Hauke, a former lady-in-waiting to his sister. It was openly rumoured that Alexander and his sister Marie were not the children of the Grand Duke, but that their father was actually August von Senarclens de Grancy, their mother's chamberlain. His mother, although married to the grand duke, lived apart from her husband, who eventually divorced her but did not repudiate paternity of any of the four children born during the marriage. His ancestry listed below assumes his legitimacy. Alexander fell in love with Countess Julia von Hauke, lady-in-waiting to his sister (known, since her conversion to Orthodoxy, as Maria Alexandrovna, ranking only after her mother-in-law the Empress Alexandra Feodorovna). The countess was an orphaned German-Polish ward of the Russian Emperor, and daughter of the Emperor's former minister of war, Count Johann Morutz von Hauke, a Polish general of German descent. At that time, the Emperor Nicholas I was considering Alexander as a possible husband for his niece and, when he heard of Alexander's romance, he forbade the couple to marry. Alexander left for England to contemplate his future, but then returned to Russia and eloped with Julia from St. Petersburg, being stricken by the Emperor's orders from the roll of the Russian imperial army for insubordination. The two were married in Breslau in 1851. Alexander's older brother Louis III, Grand Duke of Hesse, allowed him to re-patriate to Hesse with his bride, although he did not recognize their marriage as dynastic. He granted her the new, hereditary title of Gräfin von Battenberg Alexander's wife would deliver his first child barely six months after their elopement. Nonetheless, Julia von Hauke was a countess in her own right, as well as a former ward of the Russian Emperor whose husband retained, despite exile from Russia, the sympathetic support of the tsarevich and tsarevna. Grand Duke Louis III therefore chose to distinguish her from several non-royal wives of other Hessian princes by conferring upon her, along with the Battenberg countship, the style of Erlaucht (Illustrious Highness), usually reserved in Germany for counts of mediatized (i.e., dynastic) rank. Although Prince Alexander retained his own dynastic rights and appanage, his morganatic wife lived a quiet life. Their family lived primarily at Heiligenberg Castle, in southern Hesse. In 1858 Grand Duke Louis III raised his sister-in-law from "Countess" to "Princess" (Prinzessin) von Battenberg, her children sharing in the princely title, and accorded them the style of Serene Highness (Durchlaucht). Alexander of Hesse and Julia of Battenberg had five children.


Alexander Joseph GCB (Bulgarian: Александър I Батенберг)(5 April 1857 – 17 November 1893), known as Alexander of Battenberg, was the first prince (knyaz) of the Principality of Bulgaria from 1879 until his abdication in 1886. Alexander was the second son of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine by the latter's morganatic marriage with Countess Julia von Hauke. The Countess and her descendants gained the title of Princess of Battenberg (derived from an old residence of the Grand Dukes of Hesse) and the style Durchlaucht ("Serene Highness") in 1858. Prince Alexander was a nephew of Russia's Tsar Alexander II, who had married a sister of Prince Alexander of Hesse; his mother, a daughter of Count Moritz von Hauke, had been lady-in-waiting to the Tsaritsa. Alexander was known to his family, and many later biographers, as "Sandro" or "Drino" After his abdication from the Bulgarian throne, Alexander I claimed the title Prince of Tarnovo and used it until his death. Alexander then retired into private life. A few years later he married Johanna Loisinger, an actress, and assumed the style of Count von Hartenau (6 February 1889). There were a son and a daughter from this marriage.


Alexander, Prince of Erbach-Schönberg (German: Alexander Ludwig Alfred Eberhard, Fürst & Graf zu Erbach-Schönberg)( 12 September 1872 –18 October 1944) was the 2nd Prince of Erbach-Schönberg, eldest son of Gustav, 1st Prince of Erbach-Schönberg. Alexander was the eldest child of Gustav, Prince of Erbach-Schönberg (August 17, 1840 – January 29, 1908), and his wife, Princess Marie of Battenberg (1852–1923), daughter of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine and his morganatic wife Countess Julia Hauke. Alexander married on 3 May 1900 in Arolsen, Princess Elisabeth of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1873–1961), seventh child and youngest daughter of George Victor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont and Princess Helena of Nassau. They had four children.


Alexander Mountbatten, 1st Marquess of Carisbrooke, GCB, GCVO, GCStJ (born Prince Alexander Albert of Battenberg)(23 November 1886 – 23 February 1960) was a British Royal Navy officer, a member of the Hessian princely Battenberg family and the last surviving grandson of Queen Victoria. His father was Prince Henry of Battenberg, the son of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine and Julie née Countess of Hauke. His mother was Princess Beatrice of the United Kingdom, the fifth daughter and the youngest child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Anti-German feeling during the First World War led George V to change the name of the Royal House in July 1917 from the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to the House of Windsor. He also relinquished, on behalf of his various relatives who were British subjects, the use of all German titles and styles.The Battenberg family relinquished their titles of Prince and Princess of Battenberg and the styles of Highness and Serene Highness. Under royal warrant, they instead took the surname Mountbatten, an Anglicised form of Battenberg. As such, Prince Alexander became Sir Alexander Mountbatten. On 7 November 1917, he was created Marquess of Carisbrooke, Earl of Berkhamsted and Viscount Launceston. On 19 July 1917, he married Lady Irene Denison (4 July 1890 – 16 July 1956), the only daughter of the 2nd Earl of Londesborough and Lady Grace Adelaide Fane. Lord and Lady Carisbrooke had one child, a daughter.


Prince Alexander Erik Hubertus Bertil of Sweden, Duke of Södermanland (19 April 2016), oldest son of Sofia Hellqvist and Prince Carl Philip of Sweden.


Prince Alexandre of Belgium (French: Alexandre Emmanuel Henri Albert Marie Léopold, Dutch: Alexander Emanuel Hendrik Albert Maria Leopold)( 18 July 1942 – 29 November 2009) was the fourth child of King Leopold III of Belgium, and the eldest for Lilian, Princess of Réthy (Leopold III's 2nd wife). In Debenham, Suffolk, on 14 March 1991 Alexandre married Léa Wolman, who had been twice-divorced. The marriage was kept secret until 1998 because the Prince apparently feared his mother would disapprove. They had no children.


Olav V (born Prince Alexander of Denmark)( 2 July 1903 – 17 January 1991) was King of Norway from 1957 until his death in 1991. Olav was the only child of King Haakon VII of Norway and Maud of Wales. He became heir apparent to the Norwegian throne when his father was elected King of Norway in 1905. On 21 March 1929 in Oslo, he married his first cousin Princess Märtha of Sweden with whom he had two daughters, Ragnhild and Astrid and one son, Harald.


Princess Ingrid Alexandra of Norway (21 January 2004) is the elder child of Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit. She is second in line to succeed her grandfather King Harald V. She has a younger brother, Prince Sverre Magnus, whom she ranks above in the line of succession due to the implementation of absolute primogeniture in 1990.





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« Reply #871 on: October 05, 2021, 12:57:58 PM »

Prince Alexander of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau (William Alexander Frederick Constantine Nicholas Michael, Dutch: Willem Alexander Frederik Constantijn Nicolaas Michiel, Prins der Nederlanden, Prins van Oranje-Nassau)( 2 August 1818 – 20 February 1848) was born at Soestdijk Palace, the second son to King Willem II of The Netherlands and Queen Anna Paulovna, daughter of Tsar Paul I of Russia. He was nicknamed Sasha within his family. In the late 1830s, William IV of the United Kingdom wished to marry Alexander to his niece Princess Alexandrina Victoria of Kent (and future Queen of the United Kingdom). Nothing came of this however, as Victoria remarked to her uncle Leopold I of Belgium, "The Netherlander boys are very plain and have a mixture of Kalmuck (Mongol) and Dutch in their faces, moreover they look heavy, dull, and frightened and are not at all prepossessing. So much for the Oranges, dear Uncle". It was suggested in 1840 that Alexander should eventually marry Isabella II of Spain when she came of age, allowing him to become regent. However, opposition from other crowns and King William’s objection to her religion (she was Catholic) prevented any marriage between the two. Alexander never married, as Princess Sophie wrote to Lady Malet on 4 May 1847, "but I am in pleasant company with Prince Alexander[...]It is not that he courts me, for he does not yet know what a woman is, but he gives me all friendship he is able to give." He had no issue. Alexander suffered from a declining health and died on 20 February 1848 at the age of 29.


Alexander, Prince of Orange (Willem Alexander Karel Hendrik Frederik)(25 August 1851 – 21 June 1884), was heir apparent to his father King Willem III of the Netherlands from 11 June 1879 until his death. Prince Alexander of the Netherlands was born in The Hague on 25 August 1851. He was the third child of King Willem III and Queen Sophie. His second brother, Prince Maurice had died the previous year. After Prince William's death two years later on 11 June 1879, he became heir apparent to the Dutch throne and as such the Prince of Orange. Alexander held the position of heir apparent until his own death, at age 32, on 21 June 1884 in The Hague from typhus. Although he never married, negotiations were held for him to marry, firstly Princess Thyra of Denmark, and supposedly secondly the Infanta Marie Anne of Portugal.


Willem-Alexander (Willem-Alexander Claus George Ferdinand)( born 27 April 1967) is the King of the Netherlands, having acceded to the throne following his mother's abdication in 2013. He is the first child of Princess Beatrix and Prince Claus (née Claus von Amsberg). On 2 February 2002, he married Máxima Zorreguieta Cerruti at the Nieuwe Kerk in Amsterdam. The marriage triggered significant controversy due to the role the bride's father, Jorge Zorreguieta, had in the Argentinian military dictatorship. The couple have three daughters: The Princess of Orange (Princess Amalia), Princess Alexia, and Princess Ariane.


Alexander (Greek: Αλέξανδρος, Aléxandros)( 1 August 1893 – 25 October 1920) was King of Greece from 11 June 1917 until his death three years later, at the age of 27, from the effects of a monkey bite. Alexander was born at Tatoi Palace on 1 August 1893 (20 July in the Julian calendar), the second son of Crown Prince Constantine of Greece of the House of Glücksburg and his wife Princess Sophia of Prussia. In 1915, at a party held in Athens by court marshal Theodore Ypsilantis, Alexander became re-acquainted with one of his childhood friends, Aspasia Manos. She had just returned from education in France and Switzerland, and was reckoned as very beautiful by her acquaintances. She was the daughter of Constantine's Master of the Horse, Colonel Petros Manos, and his wife Maria Argyropoulos. The 21-year-old Alexander was smitten, and was so determined to seduce her that he followed her to the island of Spetses where she holidayed that year. Initially, Aspasia was resistant to his charm; although considered very handsome by his contemporaries, Alexander had a reputation as a ladies' man from numerous past liaisons. Despite this, he finally won her over, and the couple were engaged in secret. However, for King Constantine I, Queen Sophia and much of European society of the time, it was inconceivable for a royal prince to marry someone of a different social rank.On 12 June 1917, the day after his accession, Alexander revealed his liaison with Aspasia Manos to his father and asked for his permission to marry her. Constantine was reluctant to let his son marry a non-royal, and demanded that Alexander wait until the end of the war before considering the engagement, to which Alexander agreed.In the intervening months, Alexander increasingly resented his separation from his family. His regular letters to his parents were intercepted by the government and confiscated. Alexander's only source of comfort was Aspasia, and he decided to marry her despite his father's request. With the help of Aspasia's brother-in-law, Christo Zalocostas, and after three unsuccessful attempts, the couple eventually married in secret before a royal chaplain, Archimandrite Zacharistas, on the evening of 17 November 1919. By marrying Aspasia without the permission of the Archbishop, Alexander caused a major scandal. On 2 October 1920, Alexander was injured while walking through the grounds of the Tatoi estate. A domestic Barbary macaque belonging to the steward of the palace's grapevines attacked or was attacked by the king's German Shepherd Dog, Fritz, and Alexander attempted to separate the two animals. As he did so, another monkey attacked Alexander and bit him deeply on the leg and torso. Eventually servants arrived and chased away the monkeys, and the king's wounds were promptly cleaned and dressed but not cauterized.That evening, his wounds became infected; he suffered a strong fever and sepsis set in. His doctors considered amputating his leg, but none wished to take responsibility for so drastic an act. On 19 October, he became delirious and called out for his mother, but the Greek government refused to allow her to re-enter the country from exile in Switzerland, despite her own protestations. Finally, the queen dowager, Olga, George I's widow and Alexander's grandmother, was allowed to return alone to Athens to tend to the king. She was delayed by rough waters, however, and by the time she arrived, Alexander had already died of sepsis twelve hours previously at a little after 4 p.m. on 25 October 1920. The other members of the royal family received the news by telegram that night Alexander's daughter by Aspasia Manos, Alexandra (1921–1993), was born five months after his death. Initially, the government took the line that since Alexander had married Aspasia without the permission of his father or the church, his marriage was illegal and his posthumous daughter was illegitimate. However, in July 1922, Parliament passed a law which allowed the King to recognize royal marriages retroactively on a non-dynastic basis.That September, Constantine—at Sophia's insistence—recognized his son's marriage to Aspasia and granted her the style of "Princess Alexander". Her daughter (Constantine I's granddaughter) was legitimized as a princess of Greece and Denmark, and later married King Peter II of Yugoslavia in London in 1944.
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« Reply #872 on: October 05, 2021, 02:29:26 PM »

Alexandra of Denmark (Alexandra Caroline Marie Charlotte Louise Julia)(1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925) was Queen of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Empress of India from 1901 to 1910 as the wife of King-Emperor Edward VII.Princess Alexandra Caroline Marie Charlotte Louise Julia, or "Alix", as her immediate family knew her, was born at the Yellow Palace, an 18th-century town house at 18 Amaliegade, immediately adjacent to the Amalienborg Palace complex in Copenhagen. Her father was Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg and her mother was Princess Louise of Hesse-Kassel. She had five siblings: Frederick, George, Dagmar, Thyra and Valdemar. On 10 March 1863 she married then Edward, Prince of Wales of the UK. They had  6 children.


Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy (Alexandra Helen Elizabeth Olga Christabel)( born 25 December 1936) is a member of the British royal family. Alexandra was born to Prince George, Duke of Kent, and Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark. She is a first cousin of the current British monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, and since her mother was a first cousin of the queen's husband, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, she was also his first cousin once removed. On 24 April 1963, she married Angus James Bruce Ogilvy (1928–2004), the second son of the 12th Earl of Airlie and Lady Alexandra Coke, at Westminster Abbey. Princess Alexandra and Sir Angus had two children.


Alexander Charles Ogilvy (12 November 1996) son of James Robert Bruce Ogilvy ( 29 February 1964) and Julia Caroline Rawlinson. A paternal grandson of Princess Alexandra.


Prince Alexander John of Wales (6 April 1871 - 7 April 1871) son of Alexandra and Edward VII. Born prematurely at 2:45 p.m., and died twenty-four hours later


Alexander William George Duff, 1st Duke of Fife (10 November 1849 – 29 January 1912) styled Viscount Macduff between 1857 and 1879 and known as The Earl Fife between 1879 and 1889, was a Scottish peer who married Princess Louise, the third child and eldest daughter of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra.His father was a grandson of the 3rd Earl Fife and heir presumptive to the 4th Earl Fife. His mother was the second daughter of the 18th Earl of Erroll and his wife, Elizabeth FitzClarence, an illegitimate daughter of King William IV. When his father succeeded as 5th Earl Fife in 1857, Duff acquired the courtesy title of "Viscount Macduff" On Saturday 27 July 1889, Lord Fife married Princess Louise, the eldest daughter of the then-Prince and Princess of Wales, at the Private Chapel at Buckingham Palace. The couple were third cousins in descent from George III. The wedding marked the second time a descendant of Queen Victoria married a British subject  On the day of the wedding, the Queen elevated Lord Fife to the further dignity of "Duke of Fife" and "Marquess of Macduff", in the County of Banff, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The marriage of the Duke of Fife and Princess Louise produced three children.


Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife (17 May 1891 – 26 February 1959) Alexandra's father was Alexander Duff, 1st Duke of Fife. Having succeeded his father as the 6th Earl Fife, he was elevated to Duke of Fife and Marquess of Macduff in the Peerage of the United Kingdom on his marriage in 1889 to Princess Louise of Wales, the eldest daughter of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, the future Edward VII.[3] Princess Louise accordingly became the Duchess of Fife Alexandra was born at East Sheen Lodge, Richmond on 17 May 1891. After ten years of marriage and the birth in 1893 of Alexandra's younger sister Maud, no more children would be born to Alexandra's parents and the dukedom and marquessate of Fife were headed toward extinction since only a male heir could inherit those titles. On 24 April 1900 Queen Victoria granted Alexander Duff a second dukedom of Fife, along with the earldom of Macduff, stipulating by special remainder that these two titles would jointly devolve, in default of sons born to him and the Queen's granddaughter, upon their daughters in order of seniority of birth, and upon their respective agnatic male descendants in the same order. As a female-line granddaughter of the British monarch, Alexandra was not entitled to the title of "Princess", nor to the style of Her Royal Highness. Instead she was styled Lady Alexandra Duff, as the daughter of a duke, even though she was born fifth in the line of succession to the British throne. Alexandra and her sister were unique among British princesses in that they were descended from both William IV (through his mistress, Dorothea Jordan), and William IV's niece, Queen Victoria, who succeeded him because he left no legitimate issue. On 15 October 1913, Princess Alexandra married her first cousin, once removed, Prince Arthur of Connaught at the Chapel Royal, St. James's Palace, London. After their marriage, Alexandra was referred to as HRH Princess Arthur of Connaught, in accordance with the tradition that a wife normally shares the title and style of her husband. They had a son, Alastair  2nd Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (9 August 1914 – 26 April 1943).  In 1943, at the age of 28, he died of exposure in Canada.


The Lady Alexandra Clare Carnegie (20 June 1959), daughter of James George Alexander Bannerman Carnegie, 3rd Duke of Fife (23 September 1929 – 22 June 2015)  and The Hon. Caroline Dewar (12 February 1934), the elder daughter of the 3rd Baron Forteviot.She married Mark Fleming Etherington on 11 May 2001. They have one daughter.


Alexandra the Maccabee (63 BC–28 BC) of the Hasmonean Kingdom


Princess Alexandra of Hanover and Cumberland (German: Alexandra Louise Marie Olga Elisabeth Therese Vera Prinzessin von Hannover und Cumberland)( 29 September 1882 – 30 August 1963) was the wife of Frederick Francis IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, the last ruling Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Alexandra was the second eldest daughter and third child of Ernest Augustus, Crown Prince of Hanover (1845–1923) and Princess Thyra of Denmark (1853–1933), the youngest daughter of Christian IX of Denmark (1818–1906) and Louise of Hesse-Kassel (1817–1898). Alexandra was a great-great-granddaughter of George III of the United Kingdom (1738–1820) and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (1744–1818). Alexandra married on 7 June 1904 in Gmunden, Austria-Hungary to Frederick Francis IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1882–1945), son of Frederick Francis III, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and his wife Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia. Alexandra and Frederick Francis had five children.


Alix von Solodkoff (b. 17 March 1992), daughter of Duchess Donata of Mecklenburg (11 March 1956) and Alexander von Solodkoff.


Alexandra Prinzessin von Hannover (née Alexandra Sophie Cecilie Anna Maria Friederike Benigna Dorothea Prinzessin zu Ysenburg und Büdingen)( 23 October 1937 – 1 June 2015) was a German politician, philanthropist, and wife of Prince Welf Henry of Hanover. Hannover lastly served as a councilwoman representing the Niederrad district of Frankfurt on the Frankfurt City Council (German: Frankfurter Stadtverordnetenversammlung) Alexandra Prinzessin von Hannover was born on 23 October 1937 in Frankfurt am Main and was the second eldest child and only daughter of Otto Friedrich III, Prince of Ysenburg und Büdingen zu Wächtersbach and his wife Felicitas Anna Eleonore Cecilie, Princess Reuss of Köstritz. Alexandra married Prince Welf Henry of Hanover, the fourth son of Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick and his wife Princess Victoria Louise of Prussia, in a civil ceremony on 20 September 1960 at Büdingen, Hesse, and in a religious ceremony on the following day at the Marienkirche in Büdingen. The couple had no children.


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« Reply #873 on: October 05, 2021, 02:29:35 PM »

Princess Alexandra of Hanover (1959), daughter of Princess Ortrud of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (1925–1980) and Ernst August, Hereditary Prince of Brunswick, Prince of Hanover (German: Ernst August Prinz von Hannover)(18 March 1914 – 9 December 1987) She married Andreas, 8th Prince of Leiningen and had issue.


Princess Alexandra Charlotte Ulrike Maryam Virginia of Hanover (20 July 1999) is the fourth child of Princess Caroline of Monaco and the third of Ernst August, Prince of Hanover. Her godparents are her paternal aunt Alexandra, Princess of Leiningen, maternal half-sister Charlotte Casiraghi, Ulrike Ulmschneider, Maryam Sachs, Virginia Gallico, George Condo, and Eric Maier. She was named after each of her godmothers. She has half-siblings from her parents' previous marriages. From her father's previous marriage, she has two half-brothers, Hereditary Prince Ernst August and Prince Christian of Hanover. From her mother's previous marriage, she has two half-brothers, Andrea and Pierre Casiraghi, and one half-sister, Charlotte Casiraghi. Her maternal uncle, Albert II, is the sovereign of Monaco. On her father's side she is a descendant of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, Wilhelm II, German Emperor, and King Christian IX of Denmark. Alexandra is the only one of Princess Caroline's four children who bears any royal style or title. While she is formally styled as Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra of Hanover in Monaco, she is afforded the style and title out of courtesy elsewhere.As the Kingdom of Hanover no longer exists, her legally recognized name in Germany is Alexandra Princess of Hanover, with Princess of Hanover forming her surname. She is 13th in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne. Through her father, she was in the line of succession to the British throne until 2018 when she was confirmed into the Catholic Church.


Princess Alexandra of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg, Countess Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille (Alexandra Rosemarie Ingrid Benedikte)(20 November 1970), is the first daughter and second of three children of Prince Richard of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg and Princess Benedikte of Denmark Under the succession rules set by King Frederik IX, since Princess Benedikte and her children, including Princess Alexandra, have not taken up permanent residence in Denmark, they have effectively waived their place in the line of succession to the Danish throne. Since 19 May 1998, Alexandra has been a Danish citizen.Alexandra was married on 6 June 1998 at Gråsten Palace to Count Jefferson von Pfeil und Klein-Ellguth and the couple has two children. The couple announced their intention to divorce in May 2017. On 18 May 2019 she married Count Michael of Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille (26 February 1965), a member of an ancient Ahlefeldt noble family of German and Danish descent.


Alexandra von Fürstenberg (née Alexandra Natasha Miller) is a Hong Kong-born American entrepreneur and furniture designer based in Los Angeles. She is the youngest daughter of American billionaire and DFS Group co-founder Robert Warren Miller. Alexandra von Fürstenberg was born on October 3, 1972, in British Hong Kong to American entrepreneur Robert Warren Miller and his Ecuadorian wife, María Clara "Chantal" (née Pesantes Becerra)On October 28, 1995, at the Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola in New York City, she married Prince Alexander von Fürstenberg, the son of the fashion designer Diane von Fürstenberg and Prince Egon von Fürstenberg.They have two children. The couple divorced in 2002. On July 7, 2015, Alexandra married longtime fiancé, architectural designer and developer Dax Miller. The couple wed on the seventh anniversary of the start of their relationship.


Princess Alexandra of Luxembourg (Alexandra Joséphine Teresa Charlotte Marie Wilhelmine)(16 February 1991) is the fourth child and only daughter of Grand Duke Henri and Grand Duchess Maria Teresa. She has three older brothers: Hereditary Grand Duke Guillaume, Prince Félix, and Prince Louis, and one younger: Prince Sébastien.


Grand Duchess Alexandra Alexandrovna of Russia (30 August 1842 – 10 July 1849) was the eldest child and first daughter of Tsar Alexander II of Russia and his first wife Marie of Hesse and by Rhine. She died from infant meningitis at the age of six and a half.


Alexandra, Countess of Frederiksborg, RE (née Alexandra Christina Manley)(30 June 1964) is the former wife of Prince Joachim of Denmark, the younger son of Margrethe II of Denmark. Of English, Chinese, Czech, Iranian, Armenian and Austrian ancestry, Alexandra Manley was born in Hong Kong, as the eldest of three daughters of Richard Nigel Manley (born in Shanghai, China on 11 August 1924  to a father of English, Armenian, Iranian and Chinese ancestry, died 12 January 2010) and Christa Maria Manley of Czech and Austrian descent (Christa Maria Nowotny (1933). Alexandra met Prince Joachim at a private dinner in Hong Kong in January 1994, where he was working for a Danish shipping company. After a whirlwind courtship, thought to have begun in late 1994, Prince Joachim presented Alexandra with a diamond and ruby engagement ring while on vacation in the Philippines. Their engagement was officially announced in May 1995. They were married on 18 November 1995. The couple had 2 sons. Alexandra became popular with the Danish people. On 16 September 2004, Alexandra and Joachim announced their separation and eventual intention to divorce. It would be the first in the Royal Family since 1846. The Folketing decided to put Alexandra on the civil list for life, independent of her possible future remarriage. Alexandra's payments of her new yearly allowance of 2.1m kroner (US$330,000) started retroactively from 1 October 2004. The couple divorced on 8 April 2005. Alexandra married Martin Jørgensen on 3 March 2007 in a private ceremony at Øster Egede Church near Fakse. She was walked down the aisle by her sons, Nikolai and Felix. Aside from the young princes, no one from the Danish royal family attended the ceremony. In September 2015, it was announced that Jørgensen and the Countess were divorcing after eight and a half years of marriage. The Countess had cited differences in values as the reason for the divorce. The divorce was finalised in 2015. Alexandra still occasionally attends events with her former husband and the rest of the Danish royal family.


Countess Alexandra Tolstoy-Miloslavsky FRGS (14 July 1973) is a British equine adventurer, broadcaster, socialite, and businesswoman. She has made several long distance journeys on horses which have provided the material for television documentaries, books, and talks. Tolstoy is the daughter of Count Nikolai Tolstoy and Georgina Brown. In September 2003, Tolstoy and Shamil Galimzyanov ( an Uzbek show jumper) were married. While living in Moscow, Tolstoy taught English to the families of several "oligarchs" and befriended the billionaire Sergei Pugachev. Tolstoy's marriage to Shamil Galimzyanov broke down in 2009, shortly after the birth of a baby boy, Alexei Tolstoy decided not to return to her former home in Moscow and in April 2009 established herself with her son at a house in Chelsea. In the summer of 2009, Tolstoy was staying with Pugachev at a villa in the South of France and was also helping him to find a country estate in England. In December, she acquired a farmhouse near Malvern in Herefordshire for herself. Her distant cousin Alexander Nekrassov broke the news that Pugachev was the father of Tolstoy's son. By 2011, Tolstoy and Pugachev were reported to be a couple, with homes in Monaco, London, and Moscow, but Pugachev, by then living in exile in London, remained married to Galina, with whom he has children and grandchildren. In 2010, the couple had another son, Ivan, and in 2012 a daughter, Maria. In 2013, Galimzyanov complained that Tolstoy was evicting him from the Moscow flat they had lived in together. In 2015, Pugachev moved to the south of France, after facing severe business difficulties in Russia, while Tolstoy remained in London with their children. In 2017, Tolstoy described Pugachev as controlling and feared that he might kidnap the children. In October 2018, she said in an interview that she was a single mother and stated that Pugachev had not supported her or the children financially for three years.


Countess Alexandra (Sasha) Lvovna Tolstaya (Russian: Александра Львовна Толстая) (18 June 1884 – 26 September 1979), often anglicized to Tolstoy, was the youngest daughter and secretary of the noted Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy The youngest daughter of Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) and of his wife Sophia (1844–1919), Alexandra was close to her father.


Countess Alexandra Schenck von Stauffenberg (?) first wife of Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern (20 April 1952) and mother of his four children.


Alexander Friedrich Antonius Johannes, Hereditary Prince of Hohenzollern (16 March 1987), son of Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern and Countess Alexandra Schenck von Stauffenberg.


Countess Alexandra Alexeevna Belevskya-Zhukovskya (b. 4 March 1899 – 1995), daughter of Count Alexei Alexeevich Belevsky-Zhukovsky (Russian: Алексей Алексеевич Белёвский-Жуковский)( 26 November 1871, Salzburg – c. 1931 ) and Princess Maria Petrovna Troubetskaya (18 June 1872 – 20 March 1954) She married twice and had no children.


Countess Alexandra Branitskaya née von Engelhardt (Russian: Александра Васильевна Браницкая, Polish: Aleksandra Branicka [Braɲit͡ska])(1754 – 15 September 1838), also known as Sanecka and Countess Branicka, was a leading Russian courtier. She was the niece, confidante, and possibly lover, of Grigory Potemkin, and Catherine the Great's lady-in-waiting. She was one of the most notable socialites at the Russian Imperial court during Catherine's reign, and was conspicuously treated as a virtual member of the Imperial family. Through her marriage to Branicki she became administrator of the immense estate of Biała Cerkiew in the Kiev Oblast of Ukraine. Officially, she was the daughter of Vasily von Engelhardt and his wife Yelena Marfa, née Potemkin, a sister of Grigory Potemkin, and thus the latter's niece. However, at least one historian has taken a close interest in the gossip swirling around the imperial court at the time of her birth. One theory was that she was the first-born illegitimate child of Catherine with Grigory Potemkin.According to an alternative account, she was Catherine's daughter by Count Sergey Saltykov and that on learning of her arrival, tsarina Elizabeth had her swiftly substituted for a handy male neonate of Estonian parentage, who eventually grew up to be Tsar Paul, Catherine's son and heir. Other historians are more dismissive of the gossip. Even as Alexandra was rumoured to be Catherine's own daughter, they nevertheless repeat that it was merely a claim that Alexandra was the first-born who had been switched with the son of a Kalmyk woman on account of her sex, since a male heir was preferred. In 1781 she married the Polish noble, Franciszek Ksawery Branicki. The marriage had been strategically arranged to create a Russian bridgehead into Poland. After marriage, she could no longer keep her position as maid of honour, which was reserved for unmarried women, but was promoted to the rank of lady-in-waiting, and thus was able to continue to attend court. Her marriage was described as harmonious. While her spouse lacked any sense of financial restraint and frequently amassed huge and ruinous debts, these were never a problem, since Alexandra was by contrast a shrewd businesswoman. She made millions by trading in wheat and timber from her estates, and so was able to meet her husband's endless debts.She had five children.She was considered the most intimate confidante and friend of Potemkin after Catherine, and his favourite among his nieces. Their alleged sexual relationship ended in 1779 when she was replaced by her sister, Yekaterina, with whom he went on to have an on-and-off relationship for the rest of his life; but the intimate friendship between Aleksandra and Potemkin continued.


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« Reply #874 on: October 05, 2021, 02:30:10 PM »

Countess Alexandra Nikolaevna Ignatieff, Princess of San Stefano (Russian: Александра Николаевна Игнатьева, Aleksandra Nikolayevna Ignatyeva; born 8 February 1939) is the daughter of Count Nikolay Leonidovich Ignatyev and Countess Yolande Durieu de Souzy. She was born in Paris and lived in the Château de Nançay. As the eldest of the elder branch descending from Count Nikolay Pavlovich Ignatyev, she is the current matriarch of the Ignatyev family.


Alexandra Vasilievna Zhukovskaya (11 November 1842– 26 August 1899 ), was a Russian noble and lady in waiting. She was the daughter of Vasily Andreyevich Zhukovsky and Elizabeth von Reutern. Her father was the illegitimate son of a landowner named Afanasi Bunin and his Turkish housekeeper Salkha. She was made lady-in-waiting at the Russian Imperial court. At the age of twenty, Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich, the 4th son of Alexander II, according to the generally accepted opinion, secretly married Zhukovskaya (there is no exact information when and where: according to some sources in Italy, according to others - September 9/21, 1868 in Russian Orthodox Church in Geneva), but the marriage was not approved by the emperor and dissolved by the Synod, since Alexandra was no match for him. According to other sources, the relationship between Alexandra Vasilyevna and the Grand Duke remained only an extramarital affair (although in letters he called her "wife"  ). At the time of the beginning of the novel, he was 19, and she was 27 years old. In the memoirs of E.P. Letkova-Sultanova, the story, about which "all Petersburg" spoke at one time, was recorded from the words of Pavel Zhukovsky and contains an interesting detail: upon learning that his sister was pregnant, he came to the Grand Duke, demanded a duel, and when Alexander II forbade his son to accept the challenge, Zhukovsky openly protested against the emperor's decision. The Grand Duke wanted to marry, but Alexander II did not allow him and sent him on a voyage around the world for two years; Zhukovskaya was exiled abroad, followed by her brother. The State Archives of the Russian Federation has preserved a diary-collection of letters from the Grand Duke, which he kept in separation.

On August 20, 1871, Alexei Alexandrovich was sent on a round-the-world voyage, and on November 26 of the same year, Alexandra gave birth to a son in Salzburg from the Grand Duke, named after her father Alexei. The Grand Duke was at sea for 2 years, during which time Zhukovskaya was subjected to strong pressure from the imperial family and relations were interrupted on her initiative. Alexandra and Alexei had one child, a son, Count Alexei Alexandrovich Belevsky-Zhukovsky (1871–1931), He received the title Count Belevsky on 21 March 1884 from his uncle, Emperor Alexander III. In 1901 he added his name of his grandfather on his mother's side.The Grand Duke tried to get a title for her and her son. However, the Emperor, his father refused. He was however able to secure her a title by the Republic of San Marino. She was made on 24 March 1875 Baroness Seggiano. The same year, on 14 December 1875 she married Baron Christian-Henrich von Wohrmann in Munich/Bavaria. This marriage seem to prove that she did not marry the Grand Duke before. No proof of a divorce exists.


Countess Alexandra Dagmar Frances Marie Margrethe of Rosenborg (5 February 1927 – 5 October 1992), daughter of Lois Frances Booth (2 August 1897 – 26 February 1941) and Prince Erik, Count of Rosenborg (Erik Frederik Christian Alexander)( 8 November 1890 – 10 September 1950). She married in Copenhagen on 2 May 1951 to Ivar Emil Vind-Röj (Everdrup, 5 January 1921 – Odense, 11 February 1977)


Alexandra (Polish: Aleksandra, Lithuanian: Aleksandra)( died 20 April 1434)was the youngest daughter of Algirdas, Grand Duke of Lithuania, and his second wife, Uliana of Tver. Though Alexandra's exact date of birth is not known, it is thought that she was born in the late 1360s or early 1370s. In 1387, she married Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia, and bore him thirteen children.


Alexander of Masovia (pl: Aleksander mazowiecki)( 1400 - 2 June 1444) was a Polish prince member of the House of Piast from the Masovian branch. He was Bishop of Trento since 1425, titular Patriarch of Aquileia since 1439, Cardinal nominated by Antipope Felix V as titular of the diocese of St. Lawrence at Damascus (San Lorenzo in Damaso) since 1440, titular Bishop of Chur since 1442 and rector at St. Stephen's Cathedral, Vienna since 1442, a diplomat. He was the second son of Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia and Alexandra of Lithuania, daughter of Algirdas.


Alexandra of Masovia, she was a daughter of  Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia and Alexandra of Lithuania, daughter of Algirdas.

Prince Alexandre de Merode (May 24, 1934 - November 19, 2002) was a member of the Belgian princely House of Merode and was the head of drug testing policy for the International Olympic Committee (IOC) until his death. He never married.

Prince Alexander von Fürstenberg (Alexandre Egon Prinz zu Fürstenberg)(January 25, 1970) is an American businessman and socialite and the son of fashion designer Diane von Fürstenberg and Prince Egon von Fürstenberg. He married Alexandra Miller on October 28, 1995, in a Catholic ceremony at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in New York City. They had two children. . In 2002, they separated and were later divorced. He later announced his engagement to designer Ali Kay, who gave birth to their son Leon in July 2012.[citation needed] Ali Kay gave birth to a second son Vito in June 2020.


Prince Alexander Ferdinand Albrecht Achilles Wilhelm Joseph Viktor Karl Feodor of Prussia (26 December 1912 – 12 June 1985) was the only son of Prince August Wilhelm of Prussia and his wife Princess Alexandra Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg. Like his father, who became a prominent supporter of the Nazi Party, Alexander became an early supporter. On 19 December 1938 in the Dresden garrison church, Alexander non-dynastically married Armgard Weygand (22 August 1912 – 3 December 2001), daughter of Major Friedrich Weygand and Karla Franziska Oheim. She was the widow of a major in the German Air Force, and was originally from Wiesbaden, where Alexander Ferdinand was stationed. As the marriage had not been dynastically approved, none of his relatives attended the ceremony, but fellow officers served as witnesses. They had 1 son.


Prince Alexander of Georgia (Georgian: ალექსანდრე ბატონიშვილი, Aleksandre Batonishvili) (1770–1844) was a Georgian royal prince of the Bagrationi family, who headed several insurrections against the Russian rule in Georgia. He was known as Eskandar Mīrzā (اسکندرمیرزا) in the Persian Empire, Tsarevich Aleksandr Irakliyevich (Царевич Александр Ираклиевич) in Russia, and as Alexander Mirza in Western Europe.


Prince Alexander-Georg von Auersperg ( June 13, 1959) is the son of Sunny von Bülow and Prince Alfred von Auersperg, as well as the brother of Annie-Laurie von Auersperg and half-brother of Cosima von Bülow. Alexander von Auersperg was born on 13 June 1959 to Sunny von Bülow (1932–2008) and Prince Alfred von Auersperg (d. 1992), of the House of Auersperg. He has one sister, Annie-Laurie "Ala" von Auersperg, and one half-sister, Cosima von Bülow. His parents divorced in 1965 and his mother remarried Claus von Bülow in 1966. His father died in 1992 after lingering in an irreversible coma following a car accident in 1983.In 1995,[3] Prince Auersperg married Nancy Louise Weinberg, an investment banker and the daughter of Jerrold G. Weinberg, a lawyer and partner in the law firm of Weinberg & Stein.Together they had 2 children


Alexander, Prince of Saxe-Gessaphe (German: Alexander Prinz von Sachsen-Gessaphe)(born Alexander Afif)(12 February 1954), is the adopted son and heir of Maria Emanuel, Margrave of Meissen, and a businessman with Lebanese, Mexican and German roots. Born in Munich as Alexander Afif, he is the eldest son of Roberto Afif, Dr. Jur (mentioned as Catholic nobleman of Lebanon) and Princess Anna of Saxony. At birth Alexander did not possess rights to the abolished throne of Saxony (which was regulated by semi-Salic succession) as his parents’ marriage did not meet the equal marriage requirements of the Saxon house law. Alexander legally assumed the surname Prinz von Sachsen-Gessaphe on 25 August 1972. He married Princess Gisela of Bavaria, firstly civilly at Mexico City 3 April 1987 and then religiously at Andechs Abbey 29 August 1987. They have four children. His marriage with Gisela enhanced his dynastical potential in the eyes of his maternal uncle, the childless Margrave who was left without a clearly eligible heir when Alexander's first cousin, the young Prince Johannes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1969–1987), was killed in 1987 in a climbing accident. The headship of the Royal House of Saxony is a matter of dispute in the Saxon Royal Family. The conflict stems from the fact that the last undisputed head of the house Maria Emanuel, Margrave of Meissen, and his brother Albert had no children whereas their first cousin, Prince Timo, had children (including Rüdiger) who were not deemed members of the Royal House of Saxony because of Timo's unequal marriage. The first designated dynastic heir of Maria Emanuel was his and Albert's nephew Prince Johannes of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, only son of their youngest sister Princess Mathilde of Saxony by her marriage to Prince Johannes Heinrich of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, dynast of a ducal branch of the House of Wettin senior patrilineally to the royal branch. After the early death of Prince Johannes, the childless Maria Emanuel then considered as potential heir another nephew, Alexander Afif, the eldest son of his elder sister Princess Anna of Saxony and her husband Roberto Afif, despite the Afif-Saxony marriage being contrary to the traditional laws of the House of Saxony which required equal marriages for descendants to inherit dynastic rights


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« Reply #875 on: October 05, 2021, 02:30:17 PM »

Kamehameha IV (Alekanetero ʻIolani Kalanikualiholiho Maka o ʻIouli Kūnuiākea o Kūkāʻilimoku; anglicized as Alexander Liholiho) (February 9, 1834 – November 30, 1863), reigned as the fourth monarch of Hawaii under the title Ke Aliʻi o ko Hawaiʻi Pae ʻAina of the Kingdom of Hawaii from January 11, 1855 to November 30, 1863. His father was High Chief Mataio Kekūanāoʻa, Royal Governor of Oʻahu. His mother was Princess Elizabeth Kīnaʻu the Kuhina Nui or Prime Minister of the Kingdom. He was the grandson of Kamehameha I, first monarch of all the islands. Only a year after assuming the throne, Alexander took the hand of Emma Rooke, whom he had met in childhood at the Chiefs' Children's School, as his queen. Queen Emma was the granddaughter of John Young, Kamehameha the Great's British royal advisor and companion. She also was Kamehameha's great-grandniece. The marriage was apparently a happy one, as the king and queen shared interests including opera, literature and theatre. After marrying in 1856, the royal couple had their only child on May 20, 1858, named Prince Albert Edward Kauikeaouli Kaleiopapa a Kamehameha. At the age of four, the young prince died on August 27, 1862. The cause of the prince's death is unknown: at the time, it was believed to be "brain fever" or meningitis. Later speculation has included appendicitis.


Prince Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig Alexander of Prussia (21 June 1820 – 4 January 1896) was the eldest child of Prince Frederick of Prussia and his wife, Princess Luise of Anhalt-Bernburg Despite never marrying, another source said Alexander declared marriage to every woman he met, "no matter if she be princess or laundress, octogenarian or young girl, married or single"


Prince Alexander Sergeyevich Menshikov (Russian: Князь Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Ме́ншиков)( 26 August 1787 – 2 May 1869) was a Russian nobleman, military commander and statesman. He was made adjutant general in 1817 and admiral in 1833. A great-grandson of Alexander Danilovich Menshikov, Duke of Ingria, and a cognatic descendant of the Princely House of Golitsyn (another of his great-grandfathers was Prince Mikhail Golitsyn, the military governor of Åbo during the Russian occupation in the Great Northern War). He was created Prince (Fürst) in the Finnish nobility, being the only person of the rank of prince to be registered in the Finnish House of Nobility.


Alexander Konrad Friedrich Heinrich Prince zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn,( 22 November 1943), a German businessman, is head of the Princely House Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn. He was born in Salzburg as the first son of Ludwig, 6th Prince zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn (1915–1962) and his wife Baroness Marianne von Mayr-Melnhof (born 1919) Alexander married Countess Gabriela of Schönborn-Wiesentheid (b. 1950) in 1969 at Schloss Weißenstein, Pommersfelden. They have seven children


Princess Alexandra zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn (1973), daughter of Alexander Prince zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn and Countess Gabriela of Schönborn-Wiesentheid. She married firstly in 1994 Hereditary Prince Carl Eugen zu Oettingen-Wallerstein (divorced in 2002), and married secondly Count Stefano Hunyady de Kéthely in 2006, and has issue from both marriages.


Charles Alexander of Württemberg (24 January 1684 – 12 March 1737) was a Württemberg noble from 1698 who governed the Kingdom of Serbia as regent from 1720 until 1733, when he assumed the position of Duke of Württemberg, which he held until his death.Born in Stuttgart, he was the eldest son of Frederick Charles, Duke of Württemberg-Winnental, and Margravine Eleonore Juliane of Brandenburg-Ansbach He married Princess Marie Auguste of Thurn and Taxis (1706–56) in 1727; they had 6 children.


Alexander Eugen of Württemberg (1733–1734), son of Charles Alexander and Marie Auguste.


Duke Alexander of Württemberg (24 April 1771 – 4 July 1833) was a Duke of Württemberg. The son of Frederick II Eugene, Duke of Württemberg and of Sophia Dorothea of Brandenburg-Schwedt. His sister Sophie Dorothea married Tsar Paul I of Russia. In 1798 he married Antoinette of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (1779 - 1824). They had five children.


Alexandra Nathalie Ernestine von Grünhof (10 August 1861 - 13 April 1933),daughter of Ernest of Württemberg (1807–1868), Duke of Württemberg and Nathalie Eschborn, later ennobled as "von Grünhof" (1829–1905) In 1883 she married Robert von Keudell


Duke Alexander of Württemberg (20 December 1804 – 28 October 1881) was a member of the dynasty which ruled the German kingdom of Württemberg. To marry a daughter of the French king he agreed that their children would be raised in their mother's faith, thereby becoming ancestor of the Roman Catholic branch of his family. He was the son of Duke Alexander of Württemberg and Princess Antoinette of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. He was a first cousin of Queen Victoria and of her husband, Prince Albert. As a young man, Alexander was considered a possible marriage candidate for Victoria. On 17 October 1837 he married Princess Marie of Orléans (1813–1839), daughter of Louis Philippe I, King of the French. They had one child.


Carl Alexander Herzog von Württemberg (Father Odo OSB) (12 March 1896 – 27 December 1964) was a member of the House of Württemberg who became a Benedictine monk. During the Nazi and post-Nazi era, he provided aid to refugees, Jews, and prisoners of war and was reported to Nazi authorities for these activities. He acted as informant of Federal Bureau of Investigation and spied on the wife of the former British King Edward VIII. Carl Alexander was the third son of Albrecht, Duke of Württemberg and his wife, Archduchess Margarete Sophie of Austria. In World War I, he fought on the Western Front in Italy. He resigned from the army at the rank of captain, following the German Revolution of 1918–1919, and within a few months became a postulant at the Abbey of St. Martin in Beuron. He entered the novitiate in 1920 as "Brother Odo,” taking vows in February 1921. His father succeeded King Wilhelm II, a distant cousin, as head of the House of Württemberg in October of that same year. Brother Odo was ordained a priest in 1926. In the summer of 1930, Father Odo was sent to the Abbey of St. Martin, in Weingarten, not far from Castle Altshausen. He held several offices in the monastery and was active with different Catholic youth organizations. Because of his position and his family's conservative Catholic values, he was involved in opposition to National Socialism as early as 1933 and was interrogated by the Gestapo several times.He left the abbey and traveled to Württemberg in 1934. The Nazis expelled Father Odo from Germany in 1936, and he took refuge in monasteries in Switzerland and Italy. In Switzerland, he founded International Catholic Refugees and traveled through Europe. In 1940, after the Swiss government informed him that they could not guarantee his safety, Father Odo decided to emigrate to the United States. Before leaving, he destroyed his personal papers, so his activities could not be traced in detail. From 1941 Father Odo lived in Washington, D. C., continuing his work with refugees and enabling Jews to emigrate from Germany and its conquered territories. From 1943 onward, he was involved in the pastoral care of Germans in American prisoner of war camps. He convinced the Federal Bureau of Investigation that the Duchess of Windsor was sleeping with the German ambassador in London, Joachim von Ribbentrop.


Duke Alexander Eugen of Württemberg (5 March 1933 ), son of Princess Nadezhda of Bulgaria (Bulgarian: Княгиня Надежда; born Nadezhda Klementine Maria Pia Majella (Надежда Клементина Мария Пия Мажелла)); German: Prinzessin Nadeshda von Bulgarien)(30 January 1899 – 15 February 1958) and Duke Albrecht Eugen of Württemberg (8 January 1895 - 24 June 1954).


Duke Alexander Paul Ludwig Konstantin of Württemberg (9 September 1804 – 4 July 1885) was a German nobleman and the father of Francis, Duke of Teck, who married into the British royal family and was the father of Mary of Teck, the wife of George V, and mother of Edward VIII and George VI. He is also an ancestor to Elizabeth II.  He was born on 9 September 1804 the son of Duke Louis of Württemberg (1756–1817), the younger brother of Frederick I of Württemberg, the first king of Württemberg, and the second son of Frederick II Eugene, Duke of Württemberg (1732–1797). His mother was Princess Henriette of Nassau-Weilburg (1780–1857), a daughter of Charles Christian, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg, and great-granddaughter of George II of Great Britain by his eldest daughter Anne, Princess Royal.  In 1835, he married Countess Claudine Rhédey von Kis-Rhéde (1812–1841), a Hungarian noblewoman whose non-royal ancestry resulted in the marriage being considered morganatic, thus depriving her issue of their paternal royal titles, status and inheritance. She was granted the title Countess von Hohenstein in her own right. In 1841, having fallen from her horse, she was trampled by other horses and killed. After his wife's death Alexander suffered a mental breakdown, a condition which lasted for the rest of his life.By his wife, he had issue: one son and two daughters. In 1863, his children were all elevated by Alexander's first cousin William I of Württemberg to the rank of Princes and Princesses of Teck. His eldest son, Francis was elevated to Duke of Teck upon marriage.


Major General Alexander Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone (Alexander Augustus Frederick William Alfred George; born Prince Alexander of Teck)( 14 April 1874 – 16 January 1957), was a British Army commander and major-general who served as Governor-General of the Union of South Africa and as Governor General of Canada. Prince Alexander of Teck was born at Kensington Palace on 14 April 1874, the fourth child and third son of Prince Francis, Duke of Teck, and Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck. Although his mother was a granddaughter of King George III and first cousin to Queen Victoria, Athlone, as the son of a prince of Teck in Württemberg, was styled from birth as His Serene Highness and held the title Prince Alexander of Teck. He was known, however, to his family and friends as Alge, derived from the first two letters of Alexander and George The announcement came on 16 November 1903 that Prince Alexander had become engaged to his second cousin once removed, Princess Alice of Albany, daughter of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany, and thus a granddaughter of Queen Victoria and niece of the then soon-to-be Governor General of Canada, Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn. The two were wed at St. George's Chapel, in Windsor Castle, on 10 February 1904 and, six days later, in celebration of the wedding, the Prince was promoted to the grade of a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order. The couple thereafter had three children: Princess May of Teck, born 1906; Prince Rupert of Teck, born 1907; and Prince Maurice Francis George of Teck. Maurice, however, lived only for less than six months, between 29 March and 14 September 1910.


Prince Alexander of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1857-1891), son of Princess Augusta of Württemberg (4 October 1826  – 3 December 1898) and  Prince Hermann of Saxe-Weimar and Eisenach.


Charles Alexander (Karl Alexander August Johann)(24 June 1818 – 5 January 1901) was the ruler of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach as its grand duke from 1853 until his death. Born in Weimar, he was the second but eldest surviving son of Karl Frederick, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna of Russia. At Kneuterdijk Palace in The Hague, on 8 October 1842, Karl Alexander married with his first cousin, Princess Sophie of the Netherlands, daughter of William II and Grand Duchess Anna Pavlovna of Russia, sister of his mother. They had four children.


Alexander Kyrill Graf von Ostheim ( 7 August 1922); son of Prince Hermann of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (14 February 1886 – 6 June 1964) and his 2nd wife Suzanne Aagot Midling He died unmarried in Stockholm on 28 March 1943


Alexander Christian Frederick, Count of Württemberg (5 November 1801 – 7 July 1844) was a German army officer and poet. He was the eldest surviving son of William Frederick Philip, Duke of Württemberg, who was a younger brother of Frederick I of Württemberg He suffered from chronic headaches and moved to Italy in 1843 in a futile attempt to improve his health. He then moved to Wildbad, Württemberg where he died from a stroke in 1844.


Duchess Alexandrine Mathilde of Württemberg (16 December 1829 – 2 September 1913) daughter of Princess Helene of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1807–1880) and Duke Eugen of Württemberg (1788–1857)


Princess Alexandrine Irene of Prussia (7 April 1915 – 2 October 1980) was the oldest daughter and fifth child of Wilhelm, German Crown Prince, and Cecilie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Her grandparents were Wilhelm II, German Emperor and his wife Augusta Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein, and Frederick Francis III of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia. Alexandrine was a member of the House of Hohenzollern. Alexandrine was known by the nickname of "Adini" within her family. It became clear shortly after Alexandrine's birth that she was affected with Down Syndrome. Unlike other royal children with special needs, Alexandrine was not hidden away. She appeared in official family photographs and at events

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« Reply #876 on: October 06, 2021, 10:03:42 AM »

Vasili, Vasily, Vasilii or Vasiliy (Russian: Василий) is a Russian masculine given name of Greek origin and corresponds to Basil.


Vasili I of Moscow Grand Prince from 1389–1425

Vasili II of Moscow Grand Prince from 1425–1462

Vasili III of Russia Tsar from 1505–1533

Vasili IV of Russia Tsar from 1606–1610

Prince Vasili Alexandrovich of Russia (7 July [O.S. 24 June] 1907 – 24 June 1989) was the sixth son and youngest child of Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovich of Russia and Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna of Russia. He was a nephew of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. Although a grandson of Emperor Alexander III through his mother, he was not entitled to the title Grand Duke of Russia because he was only a great-grandson of Emperor Nicholas I in the male line through his father He was a sickly child and after his birth there was some doubts that he would survive so he was baptized in the nursery. Shortly after his birth his parents started to live separate lives. Prince Vasili married in New York City on 31 July 1931, Princess Natalia Golitsyna (26 October 1907 – 28 March 1989), a fellow Russian exile – they met in the United States. Natalia was a distant cousin of Prince Rostislav's wife. Her sister, Princess Olga Golitsyna, married Geoffrey Tooth, who would become the second husband of Vasili's niece, Princess Xenia Andreevna. rincess Natalia came from one of Russia's most aristocratic families, the noble Golitsyns. Her father, Prince Alexander Golitsyn, the son of the governor of Moscow, was a country doctor. Her mother belonged to the Lyubov family. Princess Natalia escaped revolutionary Russia with her family in 1920 through Siberia to China. In 1927, they moved to the United States. For a time, she pursued a career as an actress playing small parts in the theater and in silent films. Prince Vasili met Princess Natalia Golitsyna in 1931, marrying her a few months later. The couple moved to Northern California in 1934. They lived for the rest of their lives in a house, 30 km. south of San Francisco. Prince Vasili and his wife had one daughter: Princess Marina (22 May 1940).


Vasili (died 1345) was the ruling prince of the principality of Yaroslavl from 1321 to 1345. Some sources refer to him as Vasili Davidovich, others as Vasili Mikhailovich. He was nicknamed "Horrible Eyes" (Russian: Грозные Очи, "Groznye Ochi"). Vasili ruled the principality of Yaroslavl at a time when Moscow was expanding and seeking supremacy over other principalities in northeastern Russia. He succeeded Duke David, who was made a saint of the Russian Orthodox Church. In or around the 1330s, Duke Vasili married Evdokia, a daughter of Ivan Kalita, Grand Prince of Moscow. However, the new son-in-law did not acknowledge the overlordship of Moscow, but instead willfully called himself the Grand Prince of Yaroslavl.From his marriage with Evdokia Ivanovna of Moscow he had three sons: Vasili Vasilievich, prince of Yaroslavl; Hleb Vasilievich and Roman Vasilievich (who became the Duke of Romanov). After the death of Vasili, the principality of Yaroslavl disintegrated into small principalities and completely succumbed to the power of Moscow.


Vasili Vasilievich, prince of Yaroslavl, son of Vasili and Evdokia.


Vasili Simeonovich (12 April 1337 – 1338) son of Simeon of Moscow and Aigusta of Lithuania


Vasilisa Simeonova (died 20 April 1369), daughter of of Simeon of Moscow and Aigusta of Lithuania. She married Prince Mikhail Vasilievich of Kashin


Vasiliy Yuryevich Kosoy (the Squint) (Russian: Василий Юрьевич Косой) (1421–1448) was Grand Prince of Moscow in 1434–35. Vasily Kosoy was the son of Yury Dmitrievich and Anastasia of Smolensk. His grandfather was Dmitry Donskoy who settled the issue of crown inheritance by passing a law according to which his oldest son Vasily I will become Grand Prince after his death and the second in line will be Donskoy's younger son Yury Dmitrievich. After coming to power Kosoy's uncle Vasily I changed these laws so that his sons became crown heirs and not Kosoy's father. This decision resulted in two civil wars between the older and younger Dmitry Donskoy line.


Vasilisa Vasilievna. Daughter of Sophia of Lithuania and Vasily I of Moscow. She married first Alexander Ivanovich "Brukhaty", Prince of Suzdal and secondly his first cousin Alexander Daniilovich "Vzmetenj", Prince of Suzdal. They were both fifth-generation descendants of Andrei II of Vladimir.


Vasilisa Melentyeva (Russian: Васили́са Меле́нтьева) (died 1579) was the legendary sixth wife of Ivan the Terrible. The marriage (not authorized by the Church) may have been celebrated in 1575 or she was simply a concubine. Modern scholars now tend to consider her to be a 19th-century fraud. According to the legend, before her marriage to Ivan, Vasilisa is on record to have been a widow of a dyak, Melentiy Ivanov, serving in the Livonian War. Though the Tsar considered her beautiful and sweet natured, a few months after their marriage, he discovered her having an affair with a prince named Devletev. Ivan forced Vasilisa to watch her lover be impaled, and as further punishment, confined her to life in a cloister.Of all the eight wives of Ivan the Terrible, only Maria Dolgorukaya (who is also considered a 19th-century fraud) and Vasilisa Melentyeva do not have graves or any mentions in official court documents.There is apparently no evidence of her existence in the early modern sources except two minor mentions: the first, cited by Nikolay Karamzin, simply listed her name "as concubine" with Ivan's other spouses. The more extensive second mention, is believed to be the work of Alexander Sulakadzev, a notorious forger of the early 19th century.


Tsarevich Vasili Ivanovich (21 March 1563 – 3 May 1563) son of Ivan the Terrrible and Maria Temryukovna (in 1561–1569, death)


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« Reply #877 on: October 06, 2021, 11:00:07 AM »

Alexis is a given name derived from several saints venerated by the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches, including Saint Alexius of Rome. Like the name Alexander, Alexis derives from the Greek verb ἀλέξειν (aléxein; 'to ward off, avert, defend'). The ending "-is" points at its belonging to the masculine gender (according to Greek grammar); however, many American women are owners of this name, partly based on modern American tendency of giving girls male names. The Russian equivalent of the name is Alexei, which has no female form. However many European languages, including Greek, use the female variant Alexia. Alexia.


Aleksey Mikhaylovich (Russian: Алексе́й Миха́йлович)(19 March [O.S. 9 March] 1629 – 8 February [O.S. 29 January] 1676) was the Tsar of Russia from 1645 until his death in 1676. Born in Moscow on 29 March [O.S. 19 March] 1629, the son of Tsar Michael and Eudoxia Streshneva, the sixteen-year-old Alexei acceded to the throne after his father's death on 12 July 1645. Alexei's first marriage to Maria Ilyinichna Miloslavskaya (Russian: Мария Ильинична Милославская)( 1 April 1624 – 1669)  was harmonious and felicitous. She bore him thirteen children (five sons and eight daughters) in twenty-one years of marriage, and died only weeks after her thirteenth childbirth. Four sons survived her (Alexei, Fyodor, Semyon, and Ivan), but within six months of her death two of these were dead, including Alexei, the 15-year-old heir to the throne.Alexei remarried on 1 February 1671 to Nataliya Kyrillovna Naryshkina (1 September 1651 – 4 February 1694). She had been brought up in the house of Artamon Matveyev, whose wife was the Scottish-descended Mary Hamilton. They had 3 children.


Tsarevich Alexei Alexeyevich (Russian: Алексей Алексеевич, Aleksey Alekseyevich)(15 February 1654 – 17 January 1670) was the second son and heir of Tsar Alexis of Russia and Maria Miloslavskaya, brother of Tsar Feodor III, Tsar Ivan V, and Tsarevna Sophia and half-brother of Tsar Peter the Great.


Alexei Nikolaevich (Russian: Алексе́й Никола́евич) (12 August [O.S. 30 July] 1904 – 17 July 1918) of the House of Romanov, was the last Tsesarevich (heir apparent to the throne of the Russian Empire) He was the youngest child and only son of Emperor Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra Feodorovna. He was born with haemophilia, which his parents tried treating with the methods of faith healer Grigori Rasputin.


Grand Duke Alexei Petrovich of Russia (28 February 1690 – 7 July 1718) was a Russian Tsarevich. He was born in Moscow, the son of Tsar Peter I and his first wife, Eudoxia Lopukhina.   Alexei despised his father and repeatedly thwarted Peter's plans to raise him as successor to the throne. His brief defection to Austria scandalized the Russian government, leading to harsh repressions against Alexei and his associates. Alexei died after interrogation under torture, and his son Peter Alexeyevich became the new heir apparent. The young Alexei was brought up by his mother, who fostered an atmosphere of disdain towards his father, the Tsar. Alexei's relations with his father suffered from the hatred between his father and his mother, as it was very difficult for him to feel affection for his mother's worst persecutor.  After his education, Alexei married Princess Charlotte of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, whose family was connected by marriage to many of the great families of Europe. The marriage contract was signed in September. The wedding was celebrated at Torgau, Germany, on 14 October 1711 (O.S.). One of the terms of the marriage contract agreed to by Alexei was that while any forthcoming children were to be raised in the Orthodox faith, Charlotte herself was allowed to retain her Protestant faith, an agreement opposed by Alexei's followers. As for the marriage itself, the first 6 months went well but quickly became a failure within the next 6 months. Alexei was drunk constantly and Alexei pronounced his bride "pock-marked" and "too thin". He insisted on separate apartments and ignored her in public. He had two children with Charlotte. After the birth of Natalia in 1714, Alexei brought his long-time Finnish serf mistress Afrosinia to live in the palace. Some historians speculate that it was his conservative powerbase's disapproval of his foreign, non-Orthodox bride, more so than her appearance, that caused Alexei to spurn Charlotte. Another influence was Alexander Kikin, a high-placed official who had fallen out with the Tsar and had been deprived of his estates.On 19 June (O.S.), the weak and ailing tsarevich received twenty-five strokes with the knout, and then, on 24 June (O.S.), he was subject to fifteen more. On 26 June (O.S.), Alexei died in the Peter and Paul fortress in Saint Petersburg, two days after the senate had condemned him to death for conspiring rebellion against his father, and for hoping for the cooperation of the common people and the armed intervention of his brother-in-law, the emperor.


Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia (Russian: Алексей Александрович)(14 January [O.S. 2 January] 1850  – 14 November 1908) was the fifth child and the fourth son of Alexander II of Russia and his first wife Maria Alexandrovna (Marie of Hesse).  In 1869/1870, Alexei had an affair with Alexandra Zhukovskaya, daughter of poet Vasily Andreyevich Zhukovsky, who was eight years older than he was. They had a son, Alexei, born on 26 November 1871. Tsar Alexander II was strongly opposed to this relationship. Some historians claim that they were morganatically married and that the marriage was annulled by the Russian Orthodox Church, because, according to the "Fundamental Laws of the Imperial House", this marriage was illegal. However, articles 183 and 188, which prohibited marriages without the consent of the emperor, were included in the Fundamental Laws only by the 1887 revision under Tsar Alexander III. The rules valid in 1870 did not prohibit morganatic marriages, but simply excluded their offspring from the succession to the throne. There is no evidence either to the marriage or to the divorce. There is also no evidence that Alexei even requested the permission to marry. As Alexandra Zhukovskaya was not an aristocrat and, besides, the daughter of an illegitimate son of a Russian landowner and a Turkish slave, such a marriage would have been unthinkable. Upset by his son's affair, Alexander II even refused to grant Alexandra Zhukovskaya a title, which would have officially recognized the Grand Duke's paternity, even if illegitimate. Other European courts also refused to grant her a title. As a solution of last resort, on 25 March 1875 Alexandra was able to secure the title of Baroness Seggiano from the Republic of San Marino, with the right to transmit the title to her son and his firstborn male descendants. It was only in 1883, that Alexander III, Alexei's elder brother, granted the Baron Seggiano the title of Count Belevsky, and in 1893 approved his coat of arms. Around the late 1880s, he started a celebrated affair with the Duchess of Leuchtenberg, the morganatic wife of one of his cousins Eugène von Leuchtenberg. Born Zinaida Skobelyeva, "Zina" was a strikingly beautiful woman who had married Eugeni of Leuchtenberg as his second wife in 1870. Alexander II made her Countess de Beauharnais and Alexander III raised her to Serene Highness and Duchess of Leuchtenberg. Alexei was so besotted with her that he conducted an affair openly, under her husband's roof and in his full knowledge. Eugene Leuchtenberg initially resented that Alexei cuckolded him. One night, Leuchtenberg arrived home late and found his wife's room locked He knocked on the door and insisted that she let him in; Alexei opened the door kicked him downstairs. Later that day, Leuchtenberg complained to Alexander III of Russia, who told him that if he was incapable of managing his wife himself he could not expect others to help him. rom that day forward, Leuchtenberg slept in his study and apparently accepted the situation Leuchtenberg drank away most of his fortune; for years, he and Zinaida lived off his cousin's generosity. Even after his wife's death in 1899, the Duke continued to live under Alexei's roof.


Count Alexei Alexeevich Belevsky-Zhukovsky (Russian: Алексей Алексеевич Белёвский-Жуковский)(26 November 1871 – c. 1931) was the son of Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia and Alexandra Vasilievna, Baroness Seggiano. He was also, being the son of Grand Duke Alexei, a grandson of Alexander II of Russia. Alexei Alexeevich was born to Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia, the son of Czar Alexander II of Russia, and Alexandra Vasilievna Zhukovskaya. His maternal grandfather was the famous poet Vasily Zhukovsky, who was the illegitimate son of a landowner named Afanasi Bunin and his Turkish housekeeper Salkha It is still rumoured that Alexei's parents married, however that has never been proven. But even if they were married, the marriage was morganatic, because Alexandra was born a "commoner," and not of a royal or formerly sovereign family. When Alexei was born in Salzburg, he was known by his mother's family name. While his father tried to get a Russian title for his son, the Emperor Alexander II refused. However he managed to get a title for mother and son from the Republic of San Marino: on 24. March 1875 they were granted the title Baron Seggiano. Alexandra married the same year the Baron Christian-Henrich von Wohrmann. This might be taken as an indication that there was no marriage to the Grand Duke as she could have done so only after a divorce. No records exist of such a divorce.Only after Alexander II had been murdered and Alexander III had become Emperor, the Grand Duke succeed to have his son created a Count. The title granted was on 21. March 1884 was Count Belevsky. The name was chosen from the village of Belyov in the province of Toula where his grandfather poet was born. In 1913 he was granted the right to add his grandfather's family name to his title just becoming Count Belevsky-Zhukovsky. Count Alexei married, on 29 August 1894 in Ilyinskoye manor [ru], Princess Maria Petrovna Troubetskaya (18 June 1872 – 20 March 1954 ), the daughter of Prince Petr Troubetskoy. As Ilyinskoye was the property of his uncle the Grand Duke Serge, Governor of Moscow, it can be taken as a sign that he was quite accepted in Imperial circles (and he served as Serge's orderly since 1904).The marriage did not last and Alexis remarried. His second wife was Baronne Natalia von Schoeppingk.Count Alexei and Princess Maria had four children.


Grand Duke Alexei Mikhailovich of Russia (Russian: Алексей Михайлович) (28 December 1875 – 2 March 1895) was the sixth son and youngest child of Grand Duke Michael Nicolaievich of Russia and a first cousin of Alexander III of Russia. He was destined to follow a career in the Russian Navy, but he died in his youth of tuberculosis Grand Duke Alexei Mikhailovich of Russia was born in Tiflis on 28 December 1875, the sixth son and last child of the seven children of Grand Duke Michael Nicolaievich of Russia and his wife Grand Duchess Olga Feodorovna, born Princess Cecile of Baden. He was the cadet member of the Mikhailovichi branch of the Romanov family and the only Grand Duke to bear the name and patronymic of a Tsar: Alexei Mikhailovich of Russia.


Princess Alexia of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Αλεξία)( 10 July 1965) is the eldest child of Constantine II and Anne-Marie of Denmark, who were King and Queen of Greece from 1964 until the abolition of the monarchy in 1973. Alexia was born on 10 July 1965 at Mon Repos, Corfu, Greece.] Between her own birth and the birth on 20 May 1967 of her brother Pavlos, Alexia was heir presumptive to the throne of the Hellenes, then an extant monarchy. Greece's order of succession to the throne was determined by male-preference primogeniture, similar to the succession laws of Spain, rather than Salic law, prevalent in much of the continent, which precluded the succession of women.On 9 July 1999, Alexia married Carlos Javier Morales Quintana. The couple has four children.


Princess Alexia of the Netherlands, Princess of Orange-Nassau (Alexia Juliana Marcela Laurentien)(26 June 2005) is the second daughter of King Willem-Alexander and Queen Máxima. Princess Alexia is a member of the Dutch Royal House and second in the line of succession to the Dutch throne.


Alexios I Komnenos (1048–1118), Byzantine emperor

Alexios II Komnenos (1167–1183), Byzantine emperor

Alexios III, Byzantine emperor

Alexios IV, Byzantine emperor

Alexios V, Byzantine emperor

Alexios I of Trebizond, Emperor of Trebizond

Alexios II of Trebizond, Emperor of Trebizond

Alexios III of Trebizond, Emperor of Trebizond

Alexios IV of Trebizond, Emperor of Trebizond


Prince Alexis Andreevich Romanov (27 April 1953). Son of Prince Andrew Romanoff (born Andrew Andreevich Romanov)(21 January 1923) and Elena Konstantinovna Dourneva (5 May 1927 – 31 May 1992)He graduated from St. Mary's High School in San Francisco, and then studied at the University of California, Berkeley. Currently, he owns a company which provides accounting and fiduciary services to individuals. He married on 19 September 1987 in Oakland, California, to Zoetta "Zoe" Leisy (born 25 November 1956, Memphis, Tennessee), daughter of Robert Leisy and Ellen Telfer. No issue. Prince Alexis Andreevich is heir to his father as Head of the House of Romanov.


Prince Alexis Karageorgevitch, or Karađorđević (Serbian: Алекса Карађорђевић / Aleksa Karađorđević)(10 June 1859 – 15 February 1920), was the head of the senior branch of the House of Karageorgevitch and a claimant to the Serbian throne. Prince Alexis was born five months after his great uncle Alexander Karageorgevitch had been forced to abdicate as prince of Serbia. His parents were Prince George Karageorgevitch (1827–1884) and Sarka (or Sara) Anastasijević (died 1931), daughter of Senator Miša Anastasijević, one of the richest people in Serbia. With the Karageorgevitch family back on the throne in 1909 King Peter introduced a new statute for the members of the royal house. However the statute made no mention of the members of the senior non reigning branch of the family. In the reigning junior branch the descendants of King Peter were entitled to the style Royal Highness while those of his younger brother Prince Arsen were entitled to that of Highness. Prince Alexis was also completely excluded from the succession which in the event of the extinction of the male lines of King Peter and Prince Arsen would pass to Princess Helen of Serbia Although in 1903 Prince Alexis announced that he was abandoning his claim to the throne he remained in Paris even after his cousin had ascended the throne, and in later years he would still claim that he should be king of Serbia. On 11 June 1913, a month after the First Balkan War had come to an end, Prince Alexis returned to Paris and married Myra Abigail Pratt (née Pankhurst; daughter of John Foster Pankhurst and his wife, Maria Louise Coates. His father was vice-president of Globe Iron Works Company and co-owner of American Ship Building Company of Cleveland; divorcée of Herbert Wright in 1900; and widow of Thomas Huger Pratt) in the Russian Church. She was received in the Eastern Orthodox faith under the Slavic name of Daria. With the death of Prince Alexis in 1920 during the final year of the worldwide Spanish flu pandemic, the male line of the senior branch of the Karageorgevitch dynasty became extinct.
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« Reply #878 on: October 06, 2021, 11:00:16 AM »

Prince Alexis Obolensky Jr. (April 20, 1915 – February 8, 1986), a Russian-American socialite and sometimes called the "father of modern backgammon," was a member of the princely Obolensky family of the Rurik Dynasty. Obolensky was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia, on April 20, 1915. He was the son of Alexey Alexandrovitch Obolensky (1883–1942) and Lubov Petrovna "Luba" (née Troubetzkoy) Obolensky (1888–1980). On January 6, 1939, Obolensky was married to Jane Wheeler Irby (1914–1981) They had 3 children.They divorced in April 1952. On November 22, 1952, he was married to Katherine Taylor "Kappy" (née Pearce) Gennett (1919–1998), the former wife of Carter Tate Gennett and daughter of J. McAlister Pearce, in New York City. His first wife later remarried to Harold H. Lihme in 1953. They also divorced and in 1965, he married Jacqueline Ann Stedman (1939–2002)


Alexis Obolensky Jr. (1944–1999), son of Prince Alexis Obolensky Jr and Jane Wheeler Irby.


Alexis Carl Ernst Louis Ferdinand Eugen Bernhard, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt (German: Alexis Carl Ernst Louis Ferdinand Eugen Bernhard Fürst zu Bentheim und Steinfurt)(17 November 1845 – 21 January 1919) was a Lieutenant General, statesman, and the Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt from 28 September 1890 to 21 January 1919. Alexis was born in Burgsteinfurt, Kingdom of Prussia on 17 November 1845 and was the fourth child and eldest son of Ludwig Wilhelm, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt (1812–1890) and his wife Landgravine Bertha of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld (1818–1888) Alexis succeeded his father Ludwig Wilhelm to the headship of the Princely House of Bentheim and Steinfurt. Alexis married Princess Pauline of Waldeck and Pyrmont, second child and daughter of George Victor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont and his first wife Princess Helena of Nassau, on 7 May 1881. Alexis and Pauline had eight children.


Prince Alexis Rainer of Bentheim and Steinfurt (16 December 1891 – 30 June 1923), son of Prince Alexis and Princess Pauline.


Alexius Frederick, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt (20 January 1781 – 3 November 1866) He descended from the younger branch of the House of Bentheim-Steinfurt. His father was Prince Louis William Geldricus Ernest of Bentheim and Steinfurt; his mother was Juliane Wilhelmine of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg Married to Princess Wilhelmine of Solms-Braunfels (1793–1865). Grandfather of Alexis Carl Ernst Louis Ferdinand Eugen Bernhard, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt (German: Alexis Carl Ernst Louis Ferdinand Eugen Bernhard Fürst zu Bentheim und Steinfurt)(17 November 1845 – 21 January 1919)


Alexis William Ernest Philip of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld (German: Alexis Wilhelm Ernst von Hessen-Philippsthal-Barchfeld)( 13 September 1829 in Burgsteinfurt – 16 August 1905 in Herleshausen) was the last ruling Landgrave of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld. Alexis was a son of the Landgrave Charles of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld (1784-1854) from his second marriage to Sophie (1794-1873), the daughter of Louis William Geldricus Ernest, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt. He succeeded his father in 1854 as Landgrave of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld. On 17 June 1854, Alexis married at Charlottenburg Palace to Louise (1829-1901), the daughter of Prince Charles of Prussia. The marriage remained childless and ended with a divorce on 6 March 1861. Alexis died on 16 August 1905. He was succeeded as titular Landgrave of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld by his nephew Chlodwig (1876-1954), the son of his brother William (1831-1890).


Prince Alexis Ferdinand of Windisch-Graetz (7 December 1991 - 9 February 2010); son of Mariano Hugo, Prince of Windisch-Graetz (27 July 1955) and Archduchess Sophie of Austria (19 January 1959). He died in a car accident.


Alexis Charles Henri Clérel, comte de Tocqueville ( 29 July 1805 – 16 April 1859), colloquially known as Tocqueville, was a French aristocrat, diplomat, political scientist, political philosopher and historian Tocqueville came from an old Norman aristocratic family. He was the great-grandson of the statesman Malesherbes, who had been guillotined in 1794. His parents, Hervé Louis François Jean Bonaventure Clérel, Count of Tocqueville, an officer of the Constitutional Guard of King Louis XVI; and Louise Madeleine Le Peletier de Rosanbo narrowly escaped the guillotine due to the fall of Maximilien Robespierre in 1794. Married Mary Mottley ​in 1835.


Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky (12 November 1901– April 27, 1964) was a Russian-American industrial designer, known principally for his Streamline-style automotive designs. Sakhnoffsky was born in Kiev, Ukraine. The Sakhnovskys were well-known since the Ukrainian cossack period. They are united with other Cossack Hetman families such as the Zabilas, the Lysenkos, the Bezborodkos, and the Polubotkos as well as famous noble families like the Gogol-Yanovskys, the Tereschenkos, and others. Sakhnoffsky came from a wealthy aristocratic family. He was the son of Prince Vladimir Sakhnovsky, who was the new commandant of the station port in the First World War, the port manager of the Petrograd customs office, and chairman of the acceptance of vehicles supplied by Russia's allies. The prince committed suicide in 1917. Sakhnoffsky's mother was M. I. Tereshchenko's (millionaire and sugar industrialist) daughter. The family had a "Mercedes" car, which led to a creative future fate of the artist.


Count Alexei Grigorievich Razumovsky (Russian: Граф Алексе́й Григо́рьевич Разумо́вский, Ukrainian: Граф Олексій Григорович Розумовський)(1709–1771) was a Ukrainian-born Russian Registered Cossack who rose to become the lover, and it was suggested he was the morganatic spouse of the Empress Elizabeth Petrovna of Russia. Alexei Grigorievich Razumovsky was born as Alexei (or Oleksiy) Rozum on 17 March 1709 (NS: 28 March) on Lemeshi, a farm in the area of Chernigov Regiment, Tsardom of Russia (now Ukraine), to the family of a registered Ukrainian-born Cossack, Gregory Rozum. n 1731, Colonel Vyshnevsky, one of empress Anna Ivanovna's courtiers, while passing through the village on his way back to the Russian capital from a mission to Hungary, was impressed with his vocal ability, and took him to Saint Petersburg where he joined the choir of the Russian palace chapel as Alexei Grigoriev. Razumovsky was handsome, which, along with his vocal talents, captivated Elizabeth Petrovna, who brought him to the imperial court in 1732. With the deportation of Elizabeth's then favourite, Alexis Shubin, Razumovsky became her favourite. After losing his voice, he was accepted in the post of the court bandura player, and then the manager of one of Elizabeth's mansions. Razumovsky played an important role in the palace revolution of 25–26 November 1741 (NS 6–7 December), which brought about Elizabeth Petrovna's accession to the throne. In 1744, he received the comital title Reichsgraf (рейхграф in Russian) from the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VII and he was made a count in Russia in the same year. During Elizabeth Petrovna's reign he kept an exclusive position at court (though in his last years he was rivalled by the younger Ivan Shuvalov); in 1744, the empress visited his native village and met members of his family. Razumovsky's apartments in the Summer Palace directly adjoined to Elizabeth's apartments, and he had constant access to her. Before her death, the empress made her successor Peter III promise not to offend her favourites. In 1762, Razumovsky submitted his resignation and moved from the Winter Palace to Anichkov Palace, which had been presented to him by Elizabeth. After Catherine II's accession to the throne, Razumovsky refused the title of highness that was offered to him. At the empress's request, he destroyed all documents about his marriage with Elizabeth. He died on 6 July (NS 17 July) 1771 in St. Petersburg and was buried in the Annunciation Church of the Alexandro-Nevskaya Lavra. The question of Razumovsky and Elizabeth Petrovna's children remains unresolved and subject to many legends. The best known pretenders were two princesses Tarakanova, one of whom (Augusta Tarakanova) became a nun under the name Dosifeya. She died in 1810 and was buried in the Romanov family crypt; another (Elizabeth Tarakanova) was arrested in Livorno, Tuscany by Aleksei Grigoryevich Orlov and returned to Russia in February 1775. She was then imprisoned in the Peter and Paul Fortress, where she died from tuberculosis. The legend of her being drowned during the floods of 1777 served as the plot for a painting by artist Konstantin Flavitsky (1864, Tretyakov Gallery).


Count Alexei Grigoryevich Orlov (Russian: Алексей Григорьевич Орлов)(5 October [O.S. 24 September] 1737 – 5 January [O.S. 24 December 1807] 1808) was a Russian soldier and statesman, who rose to prominence during the reign of Catherine the Great. Alexei was born into the noble Orlov family in Lyubini in Tver Oblast on 5 October [O.S. 24 September] 1737, the son of Grigory Ivanovich Orlov, governor of Novgorod, and brother of Grigory Grigoryevich Orlov. Together with his brother Grigory, Alexei Orlov became involved in the palace coup to overthrow Tsar Peter III and place his wife, Catherine, on the Russian throne. In the coup, carried out in July 1762, Alexei went to meet Catherine at the Peterhof Palace, and finding her in bed, announced 'the time has come for you to reign, madame.' He then drove her to St Petersburg, where the guards regiments there proclaimed their loyalty to her. The Tsar was arrested and imprisoned at Ropsha, under the guard of Alexei Orlov. There Peter died in mysterious circumstances on 17 July [O.S. 6 July] 1762. Orlov is popularly supposed to have murdered him, either on his own initiative or on Catherine's orders The Orlovs were rewarded after Catherine's accession, and Alexei was promoted to the rank of major-general, and given the title of count. Catherine then commissioned Orlov to make contact with Yelizaveta Alekseyevna, a pretender to the throne claiming to be the daughter of Empress Elizabeth of Russia, and deliver her to Russia.[14] Orlov did so by pretending to be a supporter of hers, and successfully seducing her. He then lured her aboard a Russian ship at Livorno in May 1775, where she was arrested by Admiral Samuel Greig and taken to Russia, where she was imprisoned and later died. Shortly after this service, the Orlovs fell from favour at court, and Alexei and Grigory were dismissed from their positions. Orlov retired to the Sans Ennui Palace near Moscow, and gave luxurious balls and dinners, making himself 'the most popular man in Moscow.After Catherine's death in 1796 the new ruler, Tsar Paul I ordered that his father, Peter III, be reburied in a grand ceremony. Alexei Orlov was ordered to carry the Imperial Crown in front of the coffin Orlov was briefly suspected of having been one of the assassins of Paul I. Orlov left Russia during the reign of Paul I, but returned to Moscow after his death and the accession of Tsar Alexander I. Alexei Grigoryevich Orlov died in Moscow on 5 January [O.S. 24 December 1807] 1808. He left an estate worth five million roubles and 30,000 serfs. His marriage with Eudokia Nikolayevna Lopukhina (contracted on 6 May 1782) produced a daughter, Anna Orlova-Tshesmenskaja (1785–1848), and a son, Ivan (1786–1787). Eudokia died while giving birth to Ivan in 1786. Orlov also is believed to have had an illegitimate son named Alexander (1763–1820).


Count Alexis Louis de Wenden (23 December 1902 – 7 July 1976) illegitimate son of Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia (Russian: Анастасия Михайловна)(28 July 1860 – 11 March 1922) and Vladimir Alexandrovich Paltov (1874 – 1944). He married Paulette Seux in 25 January 1929. They had two daughters.


Count Alexis de Limburg Stirum He married, in the Castle of Ussé (France), Béatrix de Blacas d'Aulps, daughter of the 7th Duke and Prince of Blacas d'Aulps. They live in the castle of Walzin (Belgium).


Alexis Mdivani, a self-styled Georgian prince, first husband of Barbara Woolworth Hutton (November 14, 1912 – May 11, 1979) since 1933. Barbara  was an American debutante, socialite, heiress, and philanthropist. She was dubbed the "Poor Little Rich Girl": first when she was given a lavish and expensive debutante ball in 1930 amid the Great Depression, and later due to a notoriously troubled private life Heiress to one-third of the estate of the retail tycoon Frank Winfield Woolworth, Barbara Hutton was one of the wealthiest women in the world. She endured a childhood marked by the early loss of her mother at age four to suicide and the neglect of her father, setting the stage for a life of difficulty forming relationships. Married and divorced seven times, she acquired grand foreign titles but was maliciously treated and often exploited by several of her husbands. Publicly she was much envied for her possessions, her beauty and her apparent life of leisure; privately she remained deeply insecure, often taking refuge in drink, drugs, and playboys. Alexis and Barbara  divorced in 1935


 Count Alexis de Pommereu, who had an affair Marie Bonaparte-Wyse (25 April 1831 – 6 February 1902) in the early 1850s , that produced a son in 1852 In February 1853, French authorities ordered her expulsion from the Empire, after accusations that she had illegally borne the name Bonaparte and had stirred up "scandalous disorders". There were however reports that Emperor Napoleon III had secretly paid his beautiful young cousin a number of visits, that the jealous Empress Eugenie had learned of the visits and told her husband that Marie maintained a salon of subversives, and that he had thereafter ordered her expulsion. In August 1853 Marie settled at Aix-les-Bains in Savoy, then part of the Kingdom of Sardinia, where her lover (Pommereu) built her a chalet that soon became the center of a new literary salon. She went often to Turin, the kingdom's capital, where she established yet another salon at the Hôtel Feder. She maintained friendships with Hugo, Sue, Dumas and others, including Lajos Kossuth, Alphonse de Lamartine, Félicité Robert de Lamennais, Henri Rochefort, Tony Revillon, and the United States minister to Sardinia, John Moncure Daniel. She had one son, Alexis de Solms (1852–1927), fathered by her lover, Count Alexis de Pommereu; one daughter, Romana Rattazzi (1871–1943), by her second husband; and two adopted daughters, Teresa de Rute (1883–89) and Dolores de Rute (1885–88), with her third husband.

Alexis de Solms (1852–1927), son of Marie Bonaparte Wyse and Count Alexis de Pommereu


Alexis "Tschuli" Pantchoulidzew (Russian: Алексей Панчулидзев)(18 September 1888 – 10 April 1968, ) was a Russian-born Dutch nobleman and equestrian. He was a long-term partner of Princess Armgard of Sierstorpff-Cramm and mentor to her son, Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld. As equestrian, he was the only competitor for the Netherlands at the Dutch-boycotted 1956 Summer Olympics; aged 67, he was also the eldest participant at those Olympics and the eldest Dutch Olympian ever. Pantchoulidzew was born into the noble Russian-Georgian Pantchoulidzew family, in Pyatigorsk, a town close to Georgia. After the revolution of 1917 he fled Russia and eventually settled in Germany. There he became a Stable Master of Princess Armgard of Sierstorpff-Cramm and a mentor to her son, Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld, with whom he shared a passion for horse riding. Bernhard learned riding from Pantchoulidzew, and together they took part in international competitions. After the death of her husband Pantchoulidzew became a long-term partner of Princess Armgard and settled with her in the Netherlands, where he was naturalised in 1953.


Alexis Delpech (14 April 2015) son of Countess Adélaïde de Clermont-Tonerre (20 March 1976) and Laurent Delpech


Countess Alexia de Montalambert (30 November 1995), daughter of Princess Laura Murat (20 September 1954) and her 2nd husband Thierry de Montalambert (born 7 September 1949)
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« Reply #879 on: October 06, 2021, 03:41:33 PM »

Amalia is a female given name, derived from the Germanic word amal, meaning "work, activity". Amalia name has several variants, including Amelia in English, Amélie in French, Amalie in German, and Amalka, a diminutive form of the name used in Slavic languages.

Henriëtte Amalia Maria von Anhalt-Dessau (16 August 1666 – 18 April 1726) was a Princess consort of Nassau-Dietz. She was the daughter of John George II, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, and Henriëtte Catharina of Nassau and the granddaughter of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange. She married her cousin Henry Casimir II, Prince of Nassau-Dietz, in 1683, at the age of 17. Hendrik Casimir II and Henriëtte Amalia had nine children.


Maria Amalia (1689–1771), daughter of Henriëtte Amalia & Hendrik Casimir II


Princess Amalia of Nassau-Dietz (Anna Charlotte Amalie)(23 October [O.S. 13 October] 1710 – 18 September 1777) was the wife of Frederick, Hereditary Prince of Baden-Durlach, and mother of Charles Frederick, the first Grand Duke of Baden. Anna Charlotte Amalia was the only daughter of Johan Willem Friso of Nassau-Dietz (after 1702 Prince of Orange) and his wife, Landgravine Marie Louise of Hesse-Kassel. She grew up in Friesland and spoke West Frisian herself. After her marriage to Friedrich of Baden-Durlach in 1727 she moved to Durlach. During her pregnancies, Amalia tyrannized her servants, and because of the princess's many tantrums, rumors circulated at the court of Durlach that she was mentally ill. Friedrich died on 26 March 1732, shortly after the birth of their second child. As further evidence of her alleged mental illness, it was charged that she shed no tears at the sight of her husband's corpse. Her father-in-law, Margrave Karl III Wilhelm, did not want Amalia influencing the new crown prince Karl Friedrich; though mother and son continued to live in Karlsburg Castle in Durlach, Amalia lived the rest of her life in a separate apartment in the castle, shielded from the outside world. The education of her two sons, Karl Friedrich and Wilhelm Ludwig, was taken over by her mother-in-law, Magdalena Wilhelmine of Württemberg.In 1727 Amalia married Frederick, Hereditary Prince of Baden-Durlach (1703–1732). They had two sons.


Princess Amalie of Baden (13 July 1776 – 26 October 1823), daughter of Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden (14 February 1755 – 16 December 1801) & Landgravine Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt (20 June 1754 – 21 July 1832)


Amalie Auguste ( 13 November 1801 – 8 November 1877) was a Princess of Bavaria and Queen of Saxony. Amalie was the fourth child of King Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria and his second wife Caroline of Baden. She was the identical twin sister of Elisabeth Louise, later Queen of Prussia as wife of Frederick William IV of Prussia. Amalie Auguste married on 21 November 1822 Prince John of Saxony, who reigned as King of Saxony between 1854 and 1873. John and Amelia had nine children, of whom six died at young ages and predeceased her.


Duchess Amalie Maria in Bavaria (Full German name: Amalie Maria, Herzogin in Bayern) (24 December 1865 – 26 May 1912) was born in Munich, Kingdom of Bavaria, the only child of Duke Karl-Theodor in Bavaria and his first wife Princess Sophie of Saxony. Amalie married Wilhelm, 2nd Duke of Urach (later Mindaugas II of Lithuania), eldest son of Wilhelm, 1st Duke of Urach and his second wife Princess Florestine of Monaco, on 4 July 1892 in Tegernsee, Kingdom of Bavaria. Amalie and Wilhelm had nine children.


Princess Amelie von Urach (6 April 1949), daughter of Prince Eberhard von Urach & Princess Iniga of Thurn and Taxis. She married Curt-Hildebrand von Einsiedel in 1974. They have eight children.


Princess Amelie Philippa Stephanie Valentine Iniga Isabelle Theodelinde Odile Maria von Urach (11 November 1994), daughter of Prince Eberhard Friedrich Inigo Antonius Maria von Urach (12 April 1965) & Baroness Daniela von und zu Bodman.


Princess Amalia of Sweden (Amalia Maria Charlotta)(22 February 1805 – 31 August 1853) was a Swedish princess, daughter of King Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden and Frederica of Baden. Amalia was born in Stockholm and raised under the supervision of the royal governess Charlotte Stierneld. Amalia left Sweden with her family upon her father's deposition after the Coup of 1809 and was raised in her mother's native country of Baden. She died unmarried.


Princess Louise Amelie Stephanie of Baden (5 June 1811 – 19 July 1854) was a daughter of Charles, Grand Duke of Baden, and his wife, Stéphanie de Beauharnais. Louise Amelia was the eldest of five children born to Karl, Grand Duke of Baden by his wife Stéphanie de Beauharnais (adopted daughter of Napoleon Bonaparte). Her paternal grandparents were Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden and Landgravine Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt. On 9 November 1830 in Karlsruhe, Louise Amelie married her first cousin Gustav, Prince of Vasa in Karlsruhe. He was the only son of the deposed King Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden (who had been overthrown in favor of his uncle Charles in 1808), and thus had a titular claim to the Swedish throne. Prince Gustav took the title Prince of Vasa, making Louise Princess of Vasa upon their marriage. Some still viewed Prince Gustav as the legitimate heir to the Swedish throne, thus referring to Louise as the Crown Princess. Their marriage, like most alliances of the time, was politically arranged and was unhappy. They had two children  before they divorced in 1843.


Princess Marie Amelie of Baden (Marie Amelie Elisabeth Caroline)( 11 October 1817 – 17 October 1888) was the youngest daughter of Charles, Grand Duke of Baden and Stéphanie de Beauharnais. In 1843, she married the Scottish nobleman William Hamilton, Marquess of Douglas and Clydesdale. They became the Duke and Duchess of Hamilton upon the death of William's father in 1852. Their only daughter Mary married the future Albert I, Prince of Monaco and was the mother of Louis II. Princess Marie Amelie was a cousin of Napoleon III of France, as well as a friend of his and his wife's, Empress Eugénie. Princess Marie Amelie was born in Karlsruhe, the youngest daughter of Charles, Grand Duke of Baden, and his wife Stéphanie de Beauharnais, the adopted daughter of Napoleon I of France On 23 February 1843, she married the Scottish nobleman William Hamilton, Marquess of Douglas and Clydesdale, the only son of the 10th Duke of Hamilton. The couple had two sons and one daughter.


Henriëtte Amalia of Nassau (26 October 1628 – December 1628), daughter of Frederik Hendrik, Prince of Orange and Amalia of Solms-Braunfels.


Amalie Ludovika (7 September 1660 -12 November 1660) daughter of John George II, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, and Henriëtte Catharina of Nassau and the granddaughter of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange. She was an elder sister of Henriette Amalie (see above).


Princess Henriette Amalie of Anhalt-Dessau (7 December 1720 – 5 December 1793) was the fifth (fourth surviving) and youngest daughter of Leopold I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, by his morganatic wife, Anna Louise Föhse. In 1741 the 21-year-old princess Henriette Amalie gave birth to an extramarital son. When she refused to marry the father – the son of a court retainer – she was banished from the Dessau court. During the next eleven years she lived as a nun in Herford. Later her father (who had himself fathered two illegitimate children) tried to find a suitable husband for her, but all marriage plans failed. In the meanwhile, she lived openly with the Baron of Rackmann, who was fifteen years her junior. Thanks to her intervention, he was raised to the rank of Imperial Count and Baron of Bangert.


Henriette Amalie (4 January 1662 - 28 January 1662) daughter of John George II, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, and Henriëtte Catharina of Nassau and the granddaughter of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange. She was an elder sister of Henriette Amalie (see above).


Amalie (1664-1664), daughter of Countess Louise Henriette of Nassau and Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg.


Amalia of Nassau-Dietz, daughter of Albertine Agnes of Nassau (April 9, 1634 – May 26, 1696) and William Frederick, Prince of Nassau-Dietz. She married to John William III, Duke of Saxe-Eisenach


Amalia of Solms-Braunfels (31 August 1602– 8 September 1675), was Princess consort of Orange by marriage to Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange. She acted as the political adviser of her spouse during his reign, and acted as his de facto deputy and regent during his infirmity from 1640–47. She also served as chair of the regency council during the minority of her grandson William III, Prince of Orange from 1650 until 1672. She was the daughter of count Johann Albrecht I of Solms-Braunfels (1563-1623) and countess Agnes of Sayn-Wittgenstein (1568-1617). When Maurice of Nassau died, he made his half-brother Frederick Henry promise to wed. Frederick married Amalia on 4 April 1625. When Frederick Henry became stadtholder after the death of his half-brother Prince Maurice, his influence grew substantially, as did Amalia's.


Henriette Amalia of Nassau (1628); daughter of Amalia of Solms-Braunfels and Frederik Hendrik, Prince of Orange.


Archduchess Maria Amalia of Austria (1724–1730)

Maria Amalia (Maria Amalia Josepha Johanna Antonia)(26 February 1746 – 18 June 1804) was the Duchess of Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla by marriage. Maria Amalia was a daughter of Empress Maria Theresa and Emperor Francis I.  Against her will, Amalia was married to Ferdinand of Parma (1751–1802). The marriage was supported by the future Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II, whose first beloved wife had been Ferdinand's sister, Princess Isabella of Parma. The Archduchess's marriage to the Duke of Parma was part of a complicated series of contracts that married off Maria Theresa's daughters to the King of Naples and Sicily and the Dauphin of France. All three sons-in-law were members of the House of Bourbon. Maria Amalia had fallen in love with Prince Charles of Zweibrücken, and she openly expressed her wish to marry him, in the same manner as her sister Maria Christina had been permitted to marry for love. Maria Theresa, however, forbade this and forced her to enter an arranged marriage. This caused a permanent conflict between the Empress and Maria Amalia, who never forgave her mother. Maria Amalia and Ferdinand had ten children, but only four survived childhood.


Maria Amalia (10 August 1794 – 18 September 1870), known as Amalia. Was a German composer writing under the pen name A. Serena, and a dramatist under the name Amalie Heiter. She was the daughter of Prince Maximilian of Saxony and Princess Carolina of Parma. Married to Franciscus de Merendonque in 1817


Archduchess Maria Amalia of Austria (Maria Amalia Josephe Johanna Katharina Theresia)(15 October 1780 - 25 December 1798) was an Archduchess of Austria by birth. Maria Amalia was a daughter of Emperor Leopold II (1747–1792) and his wife Maria Luisa of Spain (1745–1792).  She died unmarried at the age of only 18 years in Vienna.


Princess Amalie Isabella of Bavaria (German: Amalie Isabella Marie Gisela Margarete Prinzessin von Bayern)(15 December 1921 – 28 March 1985) was a member of the Bavarian Royal House of Wittelsbach. Princess Amalie Isabella of Bavaria was born to Prince Konrad of Bavaria and Princess Bona Margherita of Savoy-Genoa on 15 December 1921 Her parents, who were both of royal station, were second cousins On 25 August 1949, in the city of Lugano, Switzerland, Amalie Isabella married Count Umberto Poletti Galimberti, Count di Assandri (21 June 1921  – 18 February 1995). He was the son of Luciano Poletti and Adriana Galimberti. They had 1 son.


Isabella-Amalia de Baviera Poletti Galimberti de Assandri (1991), daughter of Carlo Tomasso Guillermo Poletti Galimberti, Count di Assandri di Bavieria (9 June 1950) and Nobile Loredana Biffi (1957)


Maria Amalia of Austria (Maria Amalie Josefa Anna)( 22 October 1701 – 11 December 1756) was Holy Roman Empress, Queen of the Germans, Queen of Bohemia, Electress and Duchess of Bavaria etc. as the spouse of Emperor Charles VII. By birth, she was an archduchess of Austria, the daughter of Emperor Joseph I and Wilhelmine Amalia of Brunswick-Lüneburg. Maria Amalia had seven children, only four of whom lived through to adulthood, including Maximilian III, Elector of Bavaria.


Maria Amalia of Saxony (26 September 1757 – 20 April 1831) was a Duchess consort of Zweibrücken by her 1774 marriage to Charles II August, Duke of Zweibrücken. Maria Amalia was one of nine children born to Frederick Christian, Elector of Saxony and Maria Antonia Walpurgis of Bavaria in Dresden.As her parents were first cousins, Maria Amalia was also a double great granddaughter of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor through her two grandmothers Maria Josepha of Austria and Maria Amalia, Holy Roman Empress (who were sisters). In Dresden, 1774, Maria Amalia married Charles of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld. Previously, he had been bitterly rejected in 1768 as a husband for Maria Amalia of Austria by her mother Maria Theresa of Austria, who felt he was not suitable enough for her. Maria Amalia was thus Charles' second choice. His sister had already been married to Maria Amalia's brother Frederick since 1769. Charles succeeded as Duke of Zweibrücken in 1775. Maria Amalia and her husband had only one son, who died in childhood. Charles' brother Maximilian inherited his title upon Charles' death in 1795


Princess Amalie Marie Auguste (9 October 1790 – 24 January 1794), died in childhood. Daughter of Princess Augusta Wilhelmine of Hesse-Darmstadt & Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria.


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« Reply #880 on: October 06, 2021, 03:42:03 PM »

Infanta Amalia of Spain (Spanish: Amalia de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias)(12 October 1834 – 27 August 1905) was the youngest daughter of Infante Francisco de Paula of Spain. Her eldest brother, Francisco de Asís married Queen Isabella II of Spain, who was Amalia's first cousin She was born at the royal Palace of Madrid on 12 October 1834 as the eleventh child and sixth daughter of Infante Francisco de Paula of Spain, younger brother of King Fernando VII of Spain, and his wife, Princess Luisa Carlota of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. By the age of twenty Infanta Amalia was the youngest of five unremarkable sisters, who had been almost forgotten at the Spanish court. However, she and her sister Christina were the only ones among the sisters to make a royal marriage In 1856, Prince Adalbert of Bavaria, fourth son and ninth child of King Ludwig I of Bavaria and Princess Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen approached the Spanish court in search of a wife and Amalia was offered in marriage. When Prince Adalbert arrived in Madrid, Amalia was given a considerable dowry by her sister in law Queen Isabella. The marriage was celebrated on 25 August 1856 in Madrid. Upon her marriage Amalia became a Princess of Bavaria At her arrival at the Bavarian court her father in law, King Ludwig I of Bavaria, a great admirer of female beauty, was disappointed when he met his new daughter-in-law, plump and plain Infanta Amalia also shocked the court with her smoking habit. Her husband Prince Adalbert was as stout as she, but very tall. He loved drinking and had affairs, but their marriage endured The couple had five children.


Duchess Marie Amélie of Württemberg (24 December 1865-16 December 1883) died at the age of seventeen. Daughter of   Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria & Duke Philipp of Württemberg.


Duchess Maria Amalia of Württemberg (born 15 August 1897- 13 August 1923), briefly engaged to Crown Prince George of Saxony. Daughter of Archduchess Margarete Sophie of Austria & Albrecht, Duke of Württemberg.


Amalia of Oldenburg (Greek: Αμαλία)( 21 December 1818 – 20 May 1875) was Queen of Greece from 1836 to 1862 as the spouse of King Otto (1815–1867). She acted as Regent of Greece in 1850–1851 when Otto was in Germany, and a second time when he visited Bavaria in 1861–62 As the daughter of Duke Paul Frederick Augustus of Oldenburg (later Grand Duke of Oldenburg) and Princess Adelheid of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym. She was born a Duchess of Oldenburg, though that title was never used in Greece. On 22 December 1836, Duchess Amalia of Oldenburg married King Otto of Greece in Oldenburg. Born as the second son of King Ludwig I of Bavaria, Prince Otto of Bavaria had been appointed king of the newly created Kingdom of Greece in 1833. Otto visited Germany to find a bride after had been declared of legal majority and met Amalia in Marienbad in Bohemia. Amalia was Lutheran and Otto Catholic, and they were wed in both a Lutheran and Catholic wedding ceremony. It was an understanding, that while they were allowed to keep their religion, any child born to them would be raised in the Orthodox religion of Greece. On 14 February 1837, she arrived in Athens in Greece.


Anna Amalia of Baden-Durlach (9 July 1595- 18 November 1651) was a Countess of Nassau-Saarbrücken by marriage to William Louis, Count of Nassau-Saarbrücken, and regent of Nassau-Saarbrücken during the minority of her son from 1640. She was a daughter of Margrave George Frederick of Baden-Durlach and his first wife, Countess Juliana Ursula of Salm-Neuville. She married in 1615 Count William Louis of Nassau-Saarbrücken. They had 12 children.


Anna Amalia (1623–1695) daughter of Anna Amalia of Baden-Durlach & Count William Louis of Nassau-Saarbrücken.


Sophie Amalia (1666–1736), daughter of Gustav Adolph, Count of Nassau-Saarbrücken and Landgravine Eleonore Klara of Hohenlohe-Neuenstein (1632–1709). She  married to Albert Wolfgang, Count of Hohenlohe-Langenburg.


Princess Maria Amalia of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (Italian: Maria Amalia di Borbone, Principessa di Borbone delle Due Sicilie)( 25 February 1818  – 6 November 1857 ) was a Princess of Bourbon-Two Sicilies by birth and an Infanta of Portugal and Spain through her marriage to Infante Sebastian of Portugal and Spain. Maria Amalia was the tenth child of Francis I of the Two Sicilies and his wife Maria Isabella of Spain. Maria Amalia married Infante Sebastian of Portugal and Spain, only son of Infante Pedro Carlos of Spain and Portugal and his wife Teresa, Princess of Beira, on 25 May 1832 in Madrid, Spain. The marriage remained childless.


Amalia Margaretha van Brederode (1625–1663), was a Dutch salon holder and member of the Van Brederode noble family. She has been referred to as the first female to have played an autonomous and leading role in the high society of the Netherlands


Maria Amalia Mniszech (1736–1772), née von Brühl, was a Polish-Saxon noblewoman and lady-in-waiting. She was active as a political Polish agent in the court of Empress Maria Theresa in Vienna, where she was sent to influence the empress in favour of Poland. She was the daughter of Heinrich von Brühl, and married Jerzy August Mniszech, the owner of the Dukla estate. They had 1 daughter.


Józefina Amalia Mniszech (1752–1798) was a Polish noblewoman, amateur painter, and a collector of art Daughter of Court Marshal Jerzy August Mniszech and Countess Maria Amelia Brühl Józefina Amalia married Count Stanisław Szczęsny Potocki on 1 December 1774 in Dukla and had eleven children.


Anna Amalia of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (24 October 1739 – 10 April 1807), was a German princess and composer She became the duchess of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, by marriage, and was also regent of the states of Saxe-Weimar and Saxe-Eisenach from 1758 to 1775. She transformed her court and its surrounding into the most influential cultural center of Germany. She was born in Wolfenbüttel, the ninth child of Karl I, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and Princess Philippine Charlotte of Prussia. In Brunswick on 16 March 1756 she married Ernst August II Konstantin, Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and they had two sons.


Amalia Catharina (8 August 1640 – 4 January 1697), Countess of Erbach-Erbach, was a German poet and composer. She was born in Arolsen to Count Philipp Theodor von Waldeck-Eisenberg and the Countess Marie Magdalene of Nassau-Siegen. In 1664, she married George Louis I, Count of Erbach-Erbach, the son of George Albert I, Count of Erbach-Schönberg.


Amalia of Cleves (German: Amalia von Kleve-Jülich-Berg; 17 October 1517, Düsseldorf – 1 March 1586, Düsseldorf), sometimes spelled as Amelia, was a princess of the House of La Marck. The fourth and youngest child of John III, Duke of Cleves, and his wife Maria of Jülich-Berg, Amalia was born shortly after the birth of her brother William, a future Duke Amalia and her siblings had a grand lineage. She was descended from the kings of England and France and was closely related to Louis XII of France and the Duke of Burgundy.King Henry VIII of England was considering a marital alliance with Cleves, so following negotiations with the duchy, Hans Holbein the Younger, Henry's court painter, was dispatched to paint Amalia and Anne for the freshly widowed king in August 1539. After seeing the paintings, Henry chose Anne. It is probable that he chose the elder sister because of her more favorable hereditary rights in her father's duchy In the following years, Amalia's family attempted to secure her a marriage with as much profit as possible. There were long negotiations with the Margraviate of Baden concerning a possible strategic marriage between the two dynasties. The margrave had two sons; first, Bernard, who had been turned out due to his immoral and raucous behavior, before being welcomed back after his sisters pleaded with the margrave; and second, Charles, who was born in July 1529 and thus, almost twelve years younger than Amalia William, respecting his sister, refused to marry Amalia off to someone like Bernard, who he believed could not have children with Amalia due to his dissolute life. The duke also refused to force Amalia to marry Charles, who was but a child. As a result, Amalia remained unmarried.


Princess Maria Anna Amalia of Courland (12 June 1653 – 16 June 1711) was a landgravine of Hesse-Kassel through her marriage on 21 May 1673 to her first cousin Charles I, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel. She was the child of Jacob Kettler, Duke of Courland and Semigallia and Margravine Louise Charlotte of Brandenburg, eldest daughter of George William, Elector of Brandenburg. Her eldest son became King Frederick of Sweden. Amalia was a daughter of the Duke Jacob of Courland (1610–1681) from his marriage to Louise Charlotte (1617–1676), eldest daughter of the Elector George William of Brandenburg. She was thus a member of the Ketteler family. On 21 May 1673, she married in Kassel her first cousin Landgrave Charles I of Hesse-Kassel (1654–1730). Amalia had previously been engaged with Charles older brother, William VII, but he died during his grand tour at the young age of 19 years. They had 13 children.


Maria Amalia (7 July 1721 – 19 November 1744), daughter of  Dorothea Wilhelmina (20 March 1691 – 17 March 1743) of Saxe Seitz and William VIII, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel


Princess Frederica Amalia of Denmark and Norway (11 April 1649 – 30 October 1704) was the second daughter of King Frederick III of Denmark and Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Duchess of Holstein-Gottorp from 1667 to 1695 as the consort of Duke Christian Albert. Frederica Amalie was a daughter of King Frederick III of Denmark and his wife, Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg. Her father had been crowned king on 23 November 1648, about five months before she was born. She was married at Glücksburg Castle on 24 October 1667 to Duke Christian Albert of Holstein-Gottorp as part of a peace treaty between Denmark and Holstein-Gottorp, but the hostile parties continued to fight. The marriage was unhappy, with Frederica Amalia often tormented by the frequent disagreements between her brother, Christian V of Denmark, and her spouse. She was reportedly well known to be badly treated by Christian Albert, while the Danish royal family gave her all sorts of personal privileges and proofs of affection. With Christian Albert, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp, she had four children


Sophie Amalie (19 January 1670 – 27 February 1710), daughter of  Christian Albert of Holstein-Gottorp & Princess Frederica Amalia of Denmark and Norway  She married on 7 July 1695 to Duke Augustus William of Brunswick-Lüneburg. No issue.


Frederica Amalia of Holstein-Gottorp (12 January 1708 – 19 January 1782), a nun at Quedlinburg. Daughter of Duke Christian August of Holstein -Gottorp and  Margravine Albertina Frederica of Baden-Durlach (3 July 1682 – 26 December 1755)

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Baroness Amalia Frederica Wilhelmina von Dyhrn-Czettritz-Neuhaus née Baroness von Rabenau (30 July 1790– 14 June 1866 ) was a well-known German multi-millionaire heiress and a philanthropist. Baroness Amalia von Dyhrn was born into the Prussian noble family of Rabenau. Her father Baron Friedrich George von Rabenau, a tax officer and a former major in the army, was an impoverished aristocrat, who owned a bankrupted estate in Schwiebus. Her mother Johanna “Jeanette” von Schlichting was an illegitimate daughter of the Prussian general Baron Samuel von Schlichting; because of her opportunistic and promiscuous nature she had a quite bad reputation in the society. Amalia's parents were divorced in 1791. She moved with her mother and her older sister Henrietta to Breslau, where they lived very modestly in a small apartment at a monastery. In 1794 her father Friedrich committed suicide and Amalia never got to know him. As an impecunious divorcée Jeanette von Schlichting, who was a close relative of the Lichnowsky princely family, had to take care of herself and her two daughters. She established a small private tailor school for noble ladies in Breslau and her older daughter Henrietta, who was old enough to work, was sent to the estate of the Counts von Schweinitz-Krain in Niebusch (county of Freystadt in Schlesien), where she worked as a governess of the young Countess Johanna von Schweinitz-Krain, who was a granddaughter of Baroness Helene von Dyhrn (née Countess von Schweinitz). Henrietta stayed unmarried. In 1810 Amalia and her mother attended a high society ball at the family von Berge-Herrndorf's house in Breslau. There she met the young Baron Julius von Dyhrn, with whom she was officially engaged two years later. The Dyhrn family strongly disapproved of this union, because of the bride's trivial background and her low economic status, but Julius was determined to marry the woman he fell in love with. They married in April 1814 in Freystadt. Her mother Jeanette was overjoyed, especially because this marriage meant the end of her family's financial problems. Although she had no children, Amalia and Julius took care of two of their closest relatives. Since 1822 their nephew Alfred von Dyhrn was living at their mansion in Hermsdorf, and later Amalia also took care of her niece Baroness Anette von Dyhrn.


Princess Adelheid Amalie Gallitzin (also known as Amalia Samuilovna Golitsyna or in Russian as Амалия Самуиловна Голицына) (28 August 1748 – 17 April 1806) was a German salonist. She was the daughter of the Prussian Field Marshal Count Samuel von Schmettau and the mother of Prince Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin. Countess Adelheid Amalia von Schmettau was born in Berlin on 28 August 1748, the daughter of Prussian Field Marshall Count Samuel von Schmettau (1684-1751) and his second wife Maria Johanna von Ruffer (1717-1771). Her father died when she was very young, and at the age of four or five On 28 August 1768, her twentieth birthday, she married the Prince in a chapel at Aix-la-Chapelle.  They had 2 children.


Amalia von Hatzfeld (1560 – 23 September 1628), was a Swedish countess. She was the governor of Raseborg in 1600–1607.Amalia von Hatzfeld was born to Vilhelm von Hatzfeld and Sibylla von Rodenhausen. Prior to her marriage, she served as maid of honor to Princess Maria. In 1592, she married count Mauritz Stensson Leijonhufvud. She became the mother of Ebba Mauritzdotter Leijonhufvud. After the death of her spouse in 1600, the crown returned the county of Raseborg in Finland, which had been confiscated from her spouse, to her. She managed it as governor until 1607, when she sold it to the nephew of her late spouse, Sten.


Hedvig Amalia Charlotta Klinckowström (4 June 1777 - 21 April 1810) was a Swedish countess, courtier and artist. She is known for her portraits and illustrations in drawings and miniatures on ivory, which are regarded to provide an historical valuable image of the contemporary Swedish aristocratic life. She was the daughter of baron Thure Leonard Klinckowström and Hedvig Eleonora von Fersen. She married the nobleman colonel lieutenant Otto Reinhard Möllerswärd (1763-1802) in 1798 and count Hans Gabriel Wachtmeister (1782-1871) in 1806. She served as statsfru (Lady of the Bedchamber) to the queen, Frederica of Baden, from 1800. She was active as a non-professional artist.


Amalia "Emilie" Wilhelmina Königsmarck (20 August 1663 – 30 January 1740) was a Swedish noble, known as a dilettante artist (painter), amateur actor, and poet. She was born in Stade, the daughter of Count Kurt Christoph von Königsmarck (1634–1673) and Countess Maria Christina von Wrangel, sister of Philip Christoph Königsmarck, Aurora Königsmarck and Carl Johan Königsmarck, and a paternal niece of Otto Wilhelm Königsmarck. She married count Carl Gustaf Lewenhaupt (1662–1703) in the presence of the royal family on 5 January 1689, and became the mother of Charles Emil Lewenhaupt. Amalia Königsmarck belonged to the royal court-dilettantes among the students of Ehrenstrahl.


Amalia de Llano (29 April 1822 – 6 July 1874) was a Spanish countess and writer. She was an important figure in the cultural life of Madrid in the 19th century. She was also, by marriage, Countess of Vilches and Viscountess of La Cervanta. Amalia de Llano was the daughter of Ramón de Llano y Chávarri and Pilar Dotres y Gibert; she was born in 1822, in Barcelona, into a wealthy family of the commercial bourgeoisie. After the death of her father, her mother married Francisco Falcó y Valcárcel, IX Marquis of Almonacid de los Oteros. This connection meant for the family the opening to life in aristocratic circles Amalia was married on 12 October 1839 to Gonzalo Vilches y Parga (1808–1879). The couple had two children. On 8 December 1848, Queen Isabel II ennobled her husband Gonzalo, elevating him to the dignity of Count of Vilches; prior to ennoblement he had had the title of Viscount of La Cervanta, a nomenclature that made reference to one of their residences in the region of Castilla–La Mancha.


Maria Amalia Teresa of Naples and Sicily (26 April 1782 – 24 March 1866) was a French queen by marriage to Louis Philippe I, King of the French Maria Amalia was born on 26 April 1782 at the Caserta Palace just outside Naples. She was the tenth of eighteen children of Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies and Maria Carolina of Austria While in exile, Maria Amalia encountered her future husband, Louis Philippe d'Orléans, also forced from his home in France The two were married in 1809, three years after they met in Italy, whereupon Marie-Amelie became Duchess of Orléans. The ceremony was celebrated in Palermo 25 November 1809 The marriage was considered controversial, because she was the niece of Marie Antoinette, while he was the son of a man who was considered to have played a part in the execution of her aunt. Her mother was skeptical to the match for the same reason, but she had given her consent after he had convinced her that he was determined to compensate for the mistakes of his father, and after having agreed to answer all her questions regarding his father. The couple had 10 children.


Maria Amelia (1851–1870) daughter of Antoine d'Orléans (Antoine Marie Philippe Louis d'Orléans)( 31 July 1824 – 5 February 1890) and Infanta María Luisa Fernanda of Spain, Duchess of Montpensier (30 January 1832 – 2 February 1897)


Doña Amelia de Orléans-Borbón y Acosta (2017) daughter of Don Alvaro de Orléans-Borbón y Ferrara-Pignatelli ( 4 October 1969 ) and Alice Acosta


Princess Amalie of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Marie Luise Franziska Amalie)( 23 October 1848 – 6 May 1894) was a Princess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha by birth and a Duchess in Bavaria through her marriage to Duke Maximilian Emanuel in Bavaria. Amalie was the fourth child and second eldest daughter of Prince August of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and his wife Princess Clémentine of Orléans.From childhood, Amalie had been intended as the bride of Prince Leopold of Bavaria. However, Duke Maximilian Emanuel in Bavaria, youngest child of Duke Maximilian Joseph in Bavaria and his wife Princess Ludovika of Bavaria, fell in love with her and confided this love in his sister Elisabeth, now Empress of Austria. The Empress became determined to ensure her favorite brother's happiness. She invited Leopold for an extended visit with the imperial family, among whom was her own fifteen-year-old daughter Archduchess Gisela of Austria. There, Leopold was tactfully made aware that a marriage with Gisela would be looked upon with favor by Emperor Franz Joseph. The temptation to become the Emperor's son-in-law was too strong to resist, and Leopold became engaged to Gisela after only a few days. After a sufficient amount of time had passed to enable Amalie to recover, Empress Elisabeth brought Max and Amalie together. They were married on 20 September 1875 in Ebenthal, Lower Austria, Austria-Hungary.Amalie and Maximilian Emanuel had three sons


Princess Amélia Maria de Orleans e Bragança (1984) daughter of Prince Antônio of Orléans-Braganza (24 June 1950) and Princess Christine de Ligne (11 August 1955) She married James Spearman and has issue.


Dona Maria Amélia (French: Marie Amélie Louise Hélène)( 28 September 1865 – 25 October 1951) was the last Queen consort of Portugal as the wife of Carlos I of Portugal. As the eldest daughter of Prince Philippe, Count of Paris, and his wife, Princess Marie Isabelle d'Orléans, she was a "Princess of Orléans" by birth. Amélia's paternal grandparents were Prince Ferdinand Philippe, Duke of Orléans, and Duchess Helena of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Her maternal grandparents were Prince Antoine, Duke of Montpensier, and the Infanta Luisa Fernanda of Spain. The Dukes of Orléans and Montpensier were siblings, both sons of Louis-Philippe I, King of the French, and Maria Amalia of the Two Sicilies. On 22 May 1886, Amélia married Carlos, Prince Royal of Portugal. He was the eldest son of King Luís I of Portugal and Maria Pia of Savoy. He was at the time the heir apparent to the throne. The bride was almost twenty-one years old and the groom about twenty-three. The marriage had been arranged by their families after several attempts to arrange a marriage for her with a member of the Austrian or Spanish dynasties. At first, the marriage was not popular and Queen Maria Pia was expecting to marry Carlos to Archduchess Marie Valerie of Austria, Princess Mathilde of Saxony, Princess Viktoria of Prussia or Princess Victoria of Wales. However, Amélia and Carlos came to live quite harmoniously with each other. They had three children

Charlotte Amalia of Nassau-Dillenburg (1680 in Dillenburg – 1738) was a German regent; regent of Nassau-Usingen from 1718-1732. She was a daughter of Prince Henry of Nassau-Dillenburg and Dorothea Elisabeth, a daughter of George III of Brieg. In 1706 in Dillenburg, she married Prince William Henry of Nassau-Usingen. The couple had ten children; the first child was born on 3 April 1707 and the last one on 6 March 1718. Four children reached adulthood


Maria Amalia (or Amalie), born countess of Nassau-Dillenburg (27 August 1582 – 31 October 1635) was countess of Solms-Greifenstein. In 1600 she married William I, Count of Solms-Braunfels (1570-1635), and their descendants ruled the region for many generations to come. Maria Amalia was born at Dillenburg Castle in 1582 as a daughter of John VI, Count of Nassau-Dillenburg and his second wife, Countess Palatine Kunigunde Jakobäa of Simmern At the age of 18, at August 22, 1600 in Dillenburg, she married her 30 year old cousin William I, Count of Solms-Braunfels (1570-1635). He was a son of Conrad of Solms-Braunfels and Elisabeth of Nassau-Dillenburg, who was Maria Amalia's aunt. This marriage was brought forward on special request of Philipp Ludwig II, Count of Hanau-Münzenberg. William I and Maria Amalia had 10 children.


Amalia (11 September 1607 – 4 November 1608), daughter of Maria Amalia of Nassau-Dillenburg and Wilhelm I of Solms- Braunfels.


Anna Amalia (2 June 1617 – 4 November 1635), married Philip Reinhard II of Solms-Hohensolms Daughter of Maria Amalia of Nassau-Dillenburg and Wilhelm I of Solms- Braunfels.


Amalia of Neuenahr (6 April 1539 – 10 April 1602) was the daughter of Gumprecht of Neuenahr and Cordula of Holstein Schauenburg. After his death in 1568, she married Frederick III, Elector Palatine of the Rhine in 1569. It was in the same year that Emilia, the second daughter of William the Silent and his second wife Anna of Saxony was named after her. This is because she was in charge of Anna's household at the time. Frederick died in 1576.Her first husband was Hendrik van Brederode, who played an important part in the events leading up to the Eighty Years' War. After he became one of the leaders in the resistance against the Spanish Inquisition and Spanish rule in the Netherlands, she helped him collect funds.
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« Reply #882 on: October 06, 2021, 03:42:47 PM »

Countess Emilia of Nassau (10 April 1569 – 16 March 1629) was the third and youngest daughter of William the Silent and his second wife Anna of Saxony. Emilia was born in Cologne. She is named after Amalia of Neuenahr who was in charge of her mother's household at the time of her birth. Emilia's mother had an affair with the father of painter Peter Paul Rubens. Due to this infidelity Emilia and her siblings, Anna and Maurice, were taken out of their mother's care and went to live with their uncle John VI, Count of Nassau-Dillenburg at Dillenburg. Emilia later went to live in Delft with her father and, in Friesland, with her sister, Anna. After her father's death she acted as hostess at the court of her brother, Maurice. It was on one of those occasions that she met Dom Manuel of Portugal, son of the Avis claimant]] of the Portuguese throne, António, Prior of Crato). She secretly married him in 1597 in The Hague Maurice was firmly opposed to the marriage, because the Nassaus were Calvinists and Dom Manuel was a Catholic. Maurice put Emilia under house arrest; Dom Manuel had to flee to Wesel. When Maurice found he could not convince her to divorce her husband, he banished her from court for ten years. They eventually made peace and she and Dom Manuel were at Maurice's deathbed. Emilia and her husband had ten children. The last years of their lives, they lived separately when her husband decided — due to financial concerns — to live in Brussels at the court of Isabella of Spain, archenemy of the House of Orange. Emilia went to Geneva with her daughters, where she died three years later, at the age of 59.


Emilia Catharina Croll, daughter of Colonel Theodor Croll and Maria Belgica of Portugal, also known as Maria Belgica of Crato She married Claude d'Amond in 1653 and had a daughter, Juliana Catharina.


Emilia Louise of Portugal (June 1603 – 29 October 1670), unmarried. Daughter of  Countess Emilia of Nassau and Dom Manuel of Portugal.


Catharina-Amalia, Princess of Orange (Catharina-Amalia Beatrix Carmen Victoria)(7 December 2003), is the heir apparent to the throne of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, consisting of the constituent countries of Aruba, Curaçao, the Netherlands, and Sint Maarten. Catharina-Amalia is the eldest child of King Willem-Alexander and Queen Máxima of the Netherlands. She became heir apparent to the Dutch throne when her father ascended the throne on 30 April 2013. In the public she is known as Amalia.


Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia (9 November 1723 – 30 March 1787) was Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg and a composer. She was one of ten surviving children of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover.


Amalia of Saxony (4 April 1436 – 19 November 1501) was a princess of Saxony and by marriage Duchess of Bavaria-Landshut.Amalia was born in Meissen. She was the oldest of the children of the elector Frederick II of Saxony (1412–1464) from his marriage to Margaret (1416/7–1486), daughter of the Duke Ernest of Austria. Amalia married on 21 March 1452 in Landshut Duke Louis IX of Bavaria-Landshut (1417–1479) They had 4 children.


Amalie of the Palatinate (25 July 1490 – 6 January 1524) was a member of the Wittelsbach family and a Countess Palatine of Simmern by birth and Duchess of Pomerania-Wolgast by marriage.Amalie was a daughter of the Elector Philip of the Palatinate (1448–1508) from his marriage to Margaret (1456–1501), daughter of Duke Louis IX of Bavaria-Landshut. She was married on 22 May 1513 in Stettin to Duke George I of Pomerania-Wolgast (1493–1531). The marriage was arranged by Bogislaw X, Duke of Pomerania, in an attempt to obtain the support of the Palatinate in his dispute over the Electorate of Brandenburg. At the same time, George's cousin, Henry V, Duke of Mecklenburg, married Amelie's sister, Helen of the Palatinate. Amelia, who had been sickly during her whole life, died in 1524, at the age of 33  She had at least 3 children.



Amelia (1547–1580), daughter of Maria of Saxony  & Philip I, Duke of Pomerania


Maria Josepha Amalia of Saxony (Maria Josepha Amalia Beatrix Xaveria Vincentia Aloysia Franziska de Paula Franziska de Chantal Anna Apollonia Johanna Nepomucena Walburga Theresia Ambrosia; 6 December 1803 – 18 May 1829) was Queen consort of Spain as the wife of King Ferdinand VII of Spain. She was the youngest daughter of Prince Maximilian of Saxony (1759–1838) and his first wife, Princess Carolina of Parma (1770–1804), daughter of Duke Ferdinand of Parma. She was a member of the house of Wettin.  Nevertheless, the marriage remained childless


Amalia of Solms-Braunfels (31 August 1602 – 8 September 1675), was Princess consort of Orange by marriage to Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange. She acted as the political adviser of her spouse during his reign, and acted as his de facto deputy and regent during his infirmity from 1640–47. She also served as chair of the regency council during the minority of her grandson William III, Prince of Orange from 1650 until 1672. She was the daughter of count Johann Albrecht I of Solms-Braunfels (1563-1623) and countess Agnes of Sayn-Wittgenstein (1568-1617). They had 9 children.


María Amalia, Infanta of Spain (9 January 1779 – 22 July 1798), was a Spanish princess. She was the second surviving daughter of King Carlos IV of Spain (1748–1819) and his wife Maria Luisa of Parma (1751–1819).Maria Amalia's mother, Queen Maria Luisa, arranged her marriage to her maternal first cousin Louis, hereditary Prince of Parma. The Prince arrived at the Spanish court, in 1794, to finish his education. He was blond, good looking, of amiable character and he had a great interest in science. Five years younger than her cousin, Infanta Maria Amalia was fifteen years old at the time. She was not particularly attractive and was sullen, reserved and shy in character. Louis, who was equally shy, preferred her younger sister, Infanta Maria Luisa, who although only twelve, was of a more cheerful disposition and somewhat better looking. Maria Amalia's parents accepted the unexpected change of brides, but it became a matter of urgency for them to find a husband for the saddened and scorned Maria Amalia. As she was the elder of the two sisters, it would be humiliating for Maria Amalia that her younger sister not only would marry her previous fiance, but that Maria Luisa would marry first.To find a new groom for Maria Amalia of a royal rank in such a short period of time was not an easy affair; thus her parents decided to marry Maria Amalia to her uncle, Antonio Pascual, Infante of Spain, who was twenty-four years older than she was. Infante Antônio was thirty nine years old. Considered of very limited intelligence, his interests were gardening, agriculture and hunting.He had remained unmarried without responsibilities of any kind. Maria Amalia married her uncle on 25 August 1795 at the Royal Palace of La Granja. It was a double wedding; at the same time her sister, 13-year-old Maria Luisa, married Luis, Prince of Parma, Maria Amalia's original intended groom. The two couples continued living at the Spanish royal court. During the fall 1797, Maria Amalia became pregnant with her first child. On 20 July 1798 she went into labour. The delivery was complicated. The baby got stuck by the shoulders in the birth canal and the doctors were unable to extract him. After two days, the surgeon finally intervened. By then the baby, a boy, was dead.While her son was buried at El Escorial, Maria Amalia suffered in agony. She had contracted an infection during the ordeal, and she died on 22 July 1798. She was only nineteen years old


Princess Amelia Sophia Eleanor of Great Britain (10 June 1711 (New Style) – 31 October 1786) was the second daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline. At the time of her birth, her father was Hereditary Prince of Brunswick-Lüneburg, son and heir of the Elector of Hanover. Her mother was Caroline of Ansbach, daughter of Johann Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach. She was known to her family as Emily On 1 August 1714, Queen Anne of Great Britain and Ireland died. Princess Amelia's grandfather succeeded her to become George I of Great Britain, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of Settlement 1701. Amelia's father, now heir apparent to the throne of Great Britain, was made Duke of Cornwall and created Prince of Wales on 27 September 1714. She moved to Great Britain with her family. Amelia may have been the mother of composer Samuel Arnold (1740–1802) through an affair with a commoner of the name Thomas Arnold


Princess Amelia of the United Kingdom (7 August 1783 – 2 November 1810) was the fifteenth and last child and sixth daughter of King George III of the United Kingdom and his wife, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. She was their first daughter to die and third child to die before them. Princess Amelia was born on 7 August 1783, at the Royal Lodge, Windsor, the youngest of George III and Queen Charlotte's 15 children as well as the only one born at Windsor Castle. It is often said that she was her father's favourite; he affectionately called her "Emily".


Princess Amélie Louise d'Arenberg, full German name: Amalie Luise, Prinzessin und Herzogin von Arenberg and full French name: Amélie Louise, princesse et duchesse d'Arenberg, ( 10 April 1789- 4 April 1823) was a member of the House of Arenberg by birth and, through her marriage to Duke Pius August in Bavaria, a member of the Palatinate-Birkenfeld-Gelnhausen line of the House of Wittelsbach. Amélie Louise was a grandmother of Empress Elisabeth of Austria through her son Duke Maximilian Joseph in Bavaria. Born in Brussels, Austrian Netherlands, Amélie Louise was the daughter of Prince Louis Marie d'Arenberg and his first wife, Marie Adélaïde Julie de Mailly, dame d'Ivry-sur-Seine. Amélie Louise married Duke Pius August in Bavaria, son of Duke Wilhelm in Bavaria and his wife Countess Palatine Maria Anna of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld, on 26 May 1807 in Brussels. Pius August and Amélie Louise had one son


Duchess Amalie Maria in Bavaria (Full German name: Amalie Maria, Herzogin in Bayern) (24 December 1865 – 26 May 1912) was born in Munich, Kingdom of Bavaria, the only child of Duke Karl-Theodor in Bavaria and his first wife Princess Sophie of Saxony. She was called by the French version of her name, Amélie, and was lifelong friends with her cousin, Archduchess Marie Valerie of Austria. Amalie married Wilhelm, 2nd Duke of Urach (later Mindaugas II of Lithuania), eldest son of Wilhelm, 1st Duke of Urach and his second wife Princess Florestine of Monaco, on 4 July 1892 in Tegernsee, Kingdom of Bavaria. Amalie and Wilhelm had nine children.


Princess Amelie von Urach (6 April 1949), daugther of  Prince Eberhard von Urach & Princess Iniga of Thurn and Taxis. She married Curt-Hildebrand von Einsiedel in 1974. They have eight children


Princess Amelie Philippa Stephanie Valentine Iniga Isabelle Theodelinde Odile Maria von Urach (11 November 1994), daughter of Prince Eberhard Friedrich Inigo Antonius Maria von Urach (12 April 1965) & Baroness Daniela von und zu Bodman

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« Reply #883 on: October 06, 2021, 03:43:07 PM »

Amalie Auguste (13 November 1801 –  8 November 1877) was a Princess of Bavaria and Queen of Saxony. Amalie was the fourth child of King Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria and his second wife Caroline of Baden. She was the identical twin sister of Elisabeth Louise, later Queen of Prussia as wife of Frederick William IV of Prussia.  Amalie Auguste married on 21 November 1822 Prince John of Saxony, who reigned as King of Saxony between 1854 and 1873. John and Amelia had nine children, of whom six died at young ages and predeceased her


Princess Louise Amelie Stephanie of Baden (5 June 1811 – 19 July 1854) was a daughter of Charles, Grand Duke of Baden, and his wife, Stéphanie de Beauharnais Louise Amelia was the eldest of five children born to Karl, Grand Duke of Baden by his wife Stéphanie de Beauharnais (adopted daughter of Napoleon Bonaparte). Her paternal grandparents were Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden and Landgravine Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt. On 9 November 1830 in Karlsruhe, Louise Amelie married her first cousin Gustav, Prince of Vasa in Karlsruhe He was the only son of the deposed King Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden (who had been overthrown in favor of his uncle Charles in 1808), and thus had a titular claim to the Swedish throne. Prince Gustav took the title Prince of Vasa, making Louise Princess of Vasa upon their marriage. Some still viewed Prince Gustav as the legitimate heir to the Swedish throne, thus referring to Louise as the Crown Princess Their marriage, like most alliances of the time, was politically arranged and was unhappy. They had two children before they divorced in 1843.


Princess Marie Amelie of Baden (Marie Amelie Elisabeth Caroline; 11 October 1817 – 17 October 1888) was the youngest daughter of Charles, Grand Duke of Baden and Stéphanie de Beauharnais. In 1843, she married the Scottish nobleman William Hamilton, Marquess of Douglas and Clydesdale. They became the Duke and Duchess of Hamilton upon the death of William's father in 1852. Their only daughter Mary married the future Albert I, Prince of Monaco and was the mother of Louis II. Princess Marie Amelie was a cousin of Napoleon III of France, as well as a friend of his and his wife's, Empress Eugénie.On 23 February 1843, she married the Scottish nobleman William Hamilton, Marquess of Douglas and Clydesdale, the only son of the 10th Duke of Hamilton. The couple had two sons and one daughter


Amalie Zephyrine of Salm-Kyrburg (French: Amélie Zéphyrine de Salm-Kyrbourg)(6 March 1760 – 17 October 1841), was a German noblewoman by birth member of the House of Salm in the Salm-Kyrburg branch and through her marriage she was Princess of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen.  The eighth child and fifth (but third surviving) daughter of Prince Philip Joseph of Salm-Kyrburg (2nd Prince of Salm-Kyrburg) born from his marriage with his niece Princess Marie Thérèse de Hornes, eldest daughter and heiress of Maximilian, Prince of Hornes, Amalie Zephyrine was born and raised in Paris, although the family seat of the Salm-Kyrburg family was Kirn, which today is part of the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate Following her parents' request, on 29 November 1781 in Strasbourg, on the occasion of the marriage of Frederick III with Johanna Franziska, was announced the betrothal of Amalie Zephyrine with the Erbprinz Anton Aloys Meinrad Franz, heir of the Principality of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen and brother of her sister-in-law The wedding took place on the Piaristenkloster Kirn on 13 August 1782 They had 2 children, of which 1 still born

Princess Amalie Antoinette Karoline Adrienne of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (German: Amalie Antoinette Karoline Adrienne, Prinzessin von Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen)(30 April 1815– 14 January 1841) was a member of the House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen and a Princess of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen by birth.  Amalie was the fourth and youngest child of Charles, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen and his first wife Marie Antoinette Murat. Amalie married Prince Eduard of Saxe-Altenburg, seventh but fourth surviving son of Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen (of Saxe-Altenburg from 1826) and Duchess Charlotte Georgine of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, on 25 July 1835 in Sigmaringen. Amalie and Eduard had four children


Princess Amalia Gabriela Maria Theresa (15 June 2014) eldest child and only daughter of Prince Félix of Luxembourg (Félix Léopold Marie Guillaume)(3 June 1984) and Claire Margareta Lademacher)( 21 March 1985)


Lady Amelia Sophia Theodora Mary Margaret Windsor (24 August 1995) is an English fashion model and a relative of the British royal family. She is currently 43rd in the line of succession to the British throne, as of September 2021.She is the youngest child of George Windsor, Earl of St Andrews, and Sylvana Tomaselli. Her paternal grandfather, Prince Edward, Duke of Kent is a first cousin of Elizabeth II


Amalia Catharina (8 August 1640 – 4 January 1697), Countess of Erbach-Erbach [de], was a German poet and composer. She was born in Arolsen to Count Philipp Theodor von Waldeck-Eisenberg and the Countess Marie Magdalene of Nassau-Siegen. In 1664, she married George Louis I, Count of Erbach-Erbach, the son of George Albert I, Count of Erbach-Schönberg.


Countess Amalia Podstatzky-Lichtenstein


Amalia de Llano (29 April 1822 – 6 July 1874) was a Spanish countess and writer. She was an important figure in the cultural life of Madrid in the 19th century. She was also, by marriage, Countess of Vilches and Viscountess of La Cervanta. Amalia de Llano was the daughter of Ramón de Llano y Chávarri and Pilar Dotres y Gibert; she was born in 1822, in Barcelona, into a wealthy family of the commercial bourgeoisie. After the death of her father, her mother married Francisco Falcó y Valcárcel, IX Marquis of Almonacid de los Oteros. This connection meant for the family the opening to life in aristocratic circles.Amalia was married on 12 October 1839 to Gonzalo Vilches y Parga (1808–1879). The couple had two children


 Countess Amália Batthyány von Német-Újvár (1837–1922), daughter of Count Lajos Batthyány de Németújvár & Countess Antónia Zichy de Zich et Vásonkeő


Countess Amalia von Jenison von Walworth, later also Countess von Westerholt-Gysenberg (1805-1866).

Princess Amalia of Teck (Amalie Josephine Henriette Agnes Sussane)(12 November 1838 – 20 July 1893), known as Countess Amalie of Hohenstein until her marriage in 1863, was an Austrian noblewoman closely related to the royal houses of Württemberg and the United Kingdom.She was the third and last of the children of the marriage formed by Duke Alexander of Württemberg and Countess Claudine de Hohenstein (born Countess Rhédey de Kis-Rhéde). As the latter did not belong to any reigning or mediated house, the marriage was declared morganatic and her mother was granted the title of Countess of Hohenstein by Emperor Ferdinand I of Austria.This last title was the one that both Amalie and her siblings carried from their birth. She was orphaned in 1841, after her mother died as a result of a horseback riding accident. She spent her childhood and youth in Vienna with her father and siblings. On 13 October 1863, she married Count Paul von Hügel, an Austrian officer. On 16 December 1871, her cousin Charles I of Württemberg raised her to princess of Teck, just as his father, William I of Württemberg, had done with her siblings on 1 December 1863.


Countess Amalia Louise Finck von Finckenstein Married, as his 1st wife, Christian Louis Casimir, 2nd Count of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Ludwigsburg-Berleburg.  All of his seven children came from this 1st marriage


Princess Emilie, daughter of Louis Adolf Peter, 1st Prince of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Ludwigsburg-Berleburg & Countess Antonia Cäcilie Snarska


Countess Amalie Luise (1771-1853), daughter of Christian Louis Casimir, 2nd Count of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg-Ludwigsburg & Countess Amalia Louise Finck von Finckenstein. She married in 1790 to Count Dorotheus Ludwig Christoph von Keller. They were maternal grandparents of Princess Leonilla zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn.

Amalia Magdalena, Countess of Nassau-Siegen (1613-1669)

Countess Amalia Sparre (1753-1830)

Countess Amalia Acqua, an Italian aristocrat married to Giorgio Dessy, an Air Force captain.

Archduchess Amalie Theresa (6 April 1807-9 April 1807), daughter of Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor and his 2nd wife Princess Maria Teresa of the Two Sicilies.


Princess Frederica Amalia of Denmark and Norway (11 April 1649 – 30 October 1704) was the second daughter of King Frederick III of Denmark and Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Duchess of Holstein-Gottorp from 1667 to 1695 as the consort of Duke Christian Albert. Frederica Amalie was a daughter of King Frederick III of Denmark and his wife, Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg. Her father had been crowned king on 23 November 1648, about five months before she was born.She was married at Glücksburg Castle on 24 October 1667 to Duke Christian Albert of Holstein-Gottorp as part of a peace treaty between Denmark and Holstein-Gottorp, but the hostile parties continued to fight. The marriage was unhappy, with Frederica Amalia often tormented by the frequent disagreements between her brother, Christian V of Denmark, and her spouse. She was reportedly well known to be badly treated by Christian Albert, while the Danish royal family gave her all sorts of personal privileges and proofs of affection.With Christian Albert, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp, she had four children

Landgravine Elisabeth Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt (Elisabeth Amalie Magdalene)(20 March 1635 – 4 August 1709) was a princess of Hesse-Darmstadt and wife of the Prince-elector of the Palatinate. Born at the New Palace in Gießen, Elisabeth Amalie was the daughter of George II, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt and Sophia Eleonore of Saxony. Her siblings included Louis of Hesse-Darmstadt, future Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt and Anna Sophia, Abbess of Quedlinburg.On 3 September 1653 she was married at Langenschwalbach to Count palatine Philip William of Neuburg, who later became Prince-elector of the Palatinate. Her husband was some twenty years older than she and was the heir to the Electoral Palatinate which was one of the most important states within the Holy Roman Empire. They had 17 children.


Sophie Amalie Moth, Countess of Samsøe (28 March 1654 – 17 January 1719) was the officially acknowledged royal mistress of King Christian V of Denmark. Together they had five acknowledged illegitimate children, all of whom bore the surname Gyldenløve. In 1677 she was elevated to be the first Countess of Samsø. The still-existing Danish noble family of Danneskiold-Samsøe is descended from her.


Amalie Zephyrine of Salm-Kyrburg (French: Amélie Zéphyrine de Salm-Kyrbourg)( 6 March 1760 – , 17 October 1841), was a German noblewoman by birth member of the House of Salm in the Salm-Kyrburg branch and through her marriage she was Princess of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen.


Amalie Sophie Marianne von Wallmoden, Countess of Yarmouth, born Amalie von Wendt (1 April 1704 – 19 or 20 October 1765) was the principal mistress of King George II from the mid-1730s until his death in 1760. Born into a prominent family in the Electorate of Hanover, and married into another, in 1740 she became a naturalised subject of Great Britain and was granted a peerage for life, with the title of "Countess of Yarmouth", becoming the last royal mistress to be so honoured. She remained in England until the death in 1760 of King George II, who is believed to have fathered her second son, Johann Ludwig, Reichsgraf von Wallmoden-Gimborn. She returned to Hanover for the rest of her life, surviving the king for nearly five years.She was born Amalie Sophie Marianne von Wendt on 1 April 1704, the daughter of Hanoverian General Johann Franz Dietrich von Wendt by his marriage to Friderike Charlotte von dem Bussche-Ippenburg, who belonged to one of the branches of von dem Bussche family She entered into the House of Wallmoden in 1727 with her marriage to Gottlieb Adam von Wallmoden, by whom she had a son, Franz Ernst von Wallmoden.George II was first attracted to the Countess Wallmoden in 1735, during a visit to Hanover, where she lived with her husband  In 1736, she bore a son, called Johann Ludwig von Wallmoden, said to be the unacknowledged illegitimate child of the king.By 1738, George II's visits to Hanover to see his mistress were so numerous as to invite satire by Samuel Johnson in the poem "London". The king ended the necessity of those visits after the death of his wife Caroline of Ansbach in November 1737, sending for the Countess Wallmoden to join him in England, but it did not put an end to Johnson's disapproval. In 1739, Johnson wrote scathingly of the king's relationship with Wallmoden, "his tortured sons shall die before his face / While he lies melting in a lewd embrace".In 1739, Amalie von Wallmoden divorced her husband In 1740, she was naturalised and given the non-heritable title of Countess of Yarmouth, the last royal mistress to be so honoured She was officially designated Amalie Sophie von Wallmoden to obscure the question of her marital status Robert Walpole indicated that her primary focus was on pleasing the king, although she was also said to be interested in the bestowing of peerages, reputedly playing a part in the creation of a Barony for Stephen Fox-Strangways in 1741 and in the newly created title of Viscount Folkestone for Jacob des Bouverie in 1747


Amélie of Leuchtenberg (Portuguese: Amélia Augusta Eugénia Napoleona de Leuchtenberg; French: Amélie Auguste Eugénie Napoléonne de Leuchtenberg), (31 July 1812 – 26 January 1873) was Empress of Brazil as the wife of Pedro I of Brazil.She was the granddaughter of Josephine de Beauharnais, Empress of the French. Her father, Eugène de Beauharnais, was the only son of Empress Josephine and her first husband Alexandre, Viscount of Beauharnais. He thus became a stepson of Napoleon Bonaparte when his mother married the future emperor. The mother of Empress Amélie was Princess Augusta, daughter of Maximilian I, King of Bavaria. After the death of his first wife, the Austrian archduchess Maria Leopoldina, in December 1826, Emperor Pedro I of Brazil (and King Pedro IV of Portugal) sent the Marquis of Barbacena to Europe to find him a second wife. His task was not easy; several factors complicated the search. First, Dom Pedro had stipulated four conditions: a good family background, beauty, virtue and culture. Conversely, the emperor of Brazil did not have a particularly good image in Europe: his relationship with the Marchioness of Santos was notorious, and few eligible princesses were expected to be eager to leave the courts of Europe to marry a widower who had a tarnished reputation as a husband, becoming step-mother to his five children. To make matters worse, the former father-in-law of Dom Pedro, Francis I of Austria, had a low opinion of his son-in-law's political views, and apparently acted to prevent a new marriage to ensure that his grandchildren would inherit the throne of Brazil if they survived infancy. After refusals by eight princesses turned the ambassador into an object of scorn in the courts of Europe, Barbacena, in agreement with the Emperor, lowered his requirements, seeking for Dom Pedro a wife merely "good and virtuous." Amélie now became a good possibility, but their encounter was brought about not by Barbacena, but by Domingos Borges de Barros, Viscount of Pedra Branca, minister in Paris, to whom she had been pointed out She came from a distinguished and ancient line on her mother's side, the Wittelsbachs, but her father, an exile who shared in the disgrace of Napoleon Bonaparte's deposition as emperor, was not an optimal marital match. However, that was her sole "defect". The princess was tall, very beautiful, well proportioned, with a delicate face. The marriage contract was signed on 29 May 1829 in England, and ratified on June 30 in Munich by Amélie's mother, the Duchess of Leuchtenberg, who had tutored her daughter personally. On 30 July of that year, in Brazil, a treaty of marriage between Pedro I and Amélie of Leuchtenberg was promulgated. Upon confirming the marriage, Dom Pedro definitively broke his links to the Marchioness of Santos and, as evidence of his good intentions, instituted the Order of the Rose, with the motto "Amor e Fidelidade" ("Love and Fidelity"). A proxy marriage ceremony on 2 August in the chapel of the Palais Leuchtenberg in Munich was a simple affair with few in attendance After Dom Pedro I abdicated the crown, Amélie accompanied her husband back to Europe. They now held the titles of Duke and Duchess of Braganza. Amélie and Pedro had 1 daughter
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« Reply #884 on: October 06, 2021, 03:43:24 PM »

Dona Maria Amélia (1 December 1831 – 4 February 1853) was a princess of the Empire of Brazil and a member of the Brazilian branch of the House of Braganza. Her parents were Emperor Dom Pedro I, the first ruler of Brazil, and Amélie of Leuchtenberg. The only child of her father's second marriage, Maria Amélia was born in France after Pedro I abdicated the Brazilian throne in favor of his son Dom Pedro II. Before Maria Amélia was a month old, Pedro I went to Portugal to restore the crown of the eldest daughter of his first marriage, Dona Maria II. He fought a successful war against his brother Miguel I, who had usurped Maria II's throne. Only a few months after his victory, Pedro I died from tuberculosis. Maria Amélia's mother took her to Portugal, where she remained for most of her life without ever visiting Brazil. The Brazilian government refused to recognize Maria Amélia as a member of Brazil's Imperial House because she was foreign-born, but when her elder half-brother Pedro II was declared of age in 1840, he successfully intervened on her behalf. Maria Amélia became engaged to Archduke Maximilian of Austria in early 1852, but before the marriage could take place she contracted tuberculosis, and was taken to the town of Funchal on the Portuguese island of Madeira. Despite its reputedly healthy climate, her health continued to deteriorate, and she died on 4 February 1853.


Constantina Carolina Amalia "Amelie" von Strussenfelt (1803–1847), was a Swedish writer and poet. Amelie von Strussenfelt was the daughter of the courtier and nobleman Michael von Strussenfelt and Fredrika Beata Lindencrona, and the sister of the writer Ulrika von Strussenfelt. Her mother died in childbirth in 1803 and her father left the country after his remarriage not long after, and she was placed in the care of her paternal grandparents, while her sister was placed in the care of her maternal grandparents. The sisters were to have a bad relationship, and her sister Ulrika placed the blame for her late development as a writer on the fact that her sister Amelie had always been considered the more gifted one. She never married, and like her sister, she worked as a governess (from 1831) and eventually set up a school (1845), at that point the most common and almost only socially acceptable profession for an upper class woman in need of supporting herself.
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