Duchy of Troppau

OpavaDuchy of OpavaTroppauDuke of TroppauDuke of OpavaDuchess of TroppauDukes of Opava (''Troppau'')Dukes of Troppau and JägerndorfSilesian
The Principality of Opava (Opavské knížectví) (Księstwo Opawskie) or Duchy of Troppau (Herzogtum Troppau) was a historic territory split off from the Margraviate of Moravia before 1269 by King Ottokar II of Bohemia to provide for his natural son, Nicholas I. The Opava territory thus had not been part of the original Polish Duchy of Silesia in 1138, and was first ruled by an illegitimate offshoot of the Bohemian Přemyslid dynasty, not by the Silesian Piasts like many of the neighbouring Silesian duchies.wikipedia
119 Related Articles

Duchies of Silesia

Silesian duchiesSilesiaSilesian duchy
The Opava territory thus had not been part of the original Polish Duchy of Silesia in 1138, and was first ruled by an illegitimate offshoot of the Bohemian Přemyslid dynasty, not by the Silesian Piasts like many of the neighbouring Silesian duchies.
Only the Duchy of Teschen, the Duchy of Troppau and the Duchy of Nysa remained under the control of the Bohemian crown and as such were known as the Duchy of Upper and Lower Silesia until 1918.

Opava

TroppauOpava SilesiaOpava (Troppau)
Its capital was Opava (Troppau) in the modern day Czech Republic.
It was capital of the Silesian, Bohemian and finally Austrian Duchy of Opava.

Hans-Adam II, Prince of Liechtenstein

Hans-Adam IIPrince Hans-Adam IIHereditary Prince Hans-Adam
It was dissolved with the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918, but the title of Duke of Troppau and Jägerndorf still exists, belonging to a present-day monarch, Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein.
He also bears the titles Duke of Troppau and Jägerndorf, and Count Rietberg.

Nicholas II, Duke of Opava

Nicholas IINicholas II of OpavaNicholas II, Duke of Troppau
Opava was officially raised to a duchy in 1318 and was confirmed as a fief for Nicholas' son Duke Nicholas II by King John, who soon had to fend off the Hungarian troops of King Casimir III of Poland.
Nicholas II of Opava (also: Nicholas II of Troppau, Nicholas II of Ratibór; ; 1288 – 8 December 1365) was Duke of Opava (Troppau) from 1318 to 1365 and Duke of Ratibór from 1337 to 1365 and Burgrave of Kladsko (Glatz) from 1350 to 1365 and also chamberlain of the Kingdom of Bohemia.

Duchy of Racibórz

RacibórzRatiborDuchy of Ratibor
From 1337 onwards, the Přemyslid dukes also ruled the adjacent former Piast Duchy of Racibórz, whereupon Opava became united with the Upper Silesian lands. In 1377, Duke John I again separated Opava from the duchies of Racibórz and Krnov (Jägerndorf, Krnów) and granted it to his younger brothers Nicholas III (†1394), Wenceslaus I (†1381) and Przemko (†1433).
After Leszek died without issue in 1336, King John seized the duchy and granted it to the Přemyslid Duke Nicolas II of Opava (Troppau), forming the united Duchy of Opava and Racibórz.

Upper Silesia

OberschlesienUpperGórny Śląsk
From 1337 onwards, the Přemyslid dukes also ruled the adjacent former Piast Duchy of Racibórz, whereupon Opava became united with the Upper Silesian lands.
About 1269 the Duchy of Opava was established on adjacent Moravian territory, ruled by the Přemyslid duke Nicholas I, whose descendants inherited the Duchy of Racibórz in 1336.

Přemyslid dynasty

PřemyslidPřemyslidsPremyslid dynasty
The Opava territory thus had not been part of the original Polish Duchy of Silesia in 1138, and was first ruled by an illegitimate offshoot of the Bohemian Přemyslid dynasty, not by the Silesian Piasts like many of the neighbouring Silesian duchies.
In 1269, Nicholas, bastard son of King Ottokar II who was legitimized by pope Alexander IV in 1260, became Duke of Opava.

Duchy of Krnov

KrnovDuchy of JägerndorfJägerndorf
In 1377, Duke John I again separated Opava from the duchies of Racibórz and Krnov (Jägerndorf, Krnów) and granted it to his younger brothers Nicholas III (†1394), Wenceslaus I (†1381) and Przemko (†1433).
The Duchy of Krnov (Ducatus Carnoviensis, Krnovské knížectví, Księstwo Karniowskie) or Duchy of Jägerndorf (Herzogtum Jägerndorf) was one of the Duchies of Silesia, which in 1377 emerged from the Duchy of Troppau (Opava), itself a fief of the Bohemian Crown.

Ottokar II of Bohemia

Ottokar IIPřemysl Otakar IIOtakar II of Bohemia
The Principality of Opava (Opavské knížectví) (Księstwo Opawskie) or Duchy of Troppau (Herzogtum Troppau) was a historic territory split off from the Margraviate of Moravia before 1269 by King Ottokar II of Bohemia to provide for his natural son, Nicholas I.
He was never accepted as heir apparent to the Bohemian crown by the sitting pope, but was given the Duchy of Opava as fief in 1269.

Victor, Duke of Münsterberg

VictorVictor of PoděbradyVictor of Münsterberg and Opava
In 1465 King George gave Opava to his second son Victor, who also became Duke of Münsterberg in 1462.
From 1462 until his death, he was Duke of Münsterberg, and from 1465 to 1485 Duke of Opava.

Zavis of Falkenstein

ZávišZáviš, Lord of FalkenstejnZáviš, Lord of Falkenštejn
After Ottokar was killed in the 1278 Battle on the Marchfeld, Nicholas had to ward off against claims raised by his stepmother Kunigunda of Halych and her lover Zavis of Falkenstein residing at Hradec Castle near Opava.
Kunigunda was able to escape to Opava, where she allied with Zavis of Falkenstein, her late husband's enemy.

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownCrown of BohemiaBohemia
When the Opava branch became extinct in 1464, it fell back to the Bohemian Crown, from 1526 part of the Habsburg Monarchy.

Karl I, Prince of Liechtenstein

Karl IKarl I of LiechtensteinCharles
Prince Karl I of Liechtenstein was invested with the Duchy of Troppau in 1614 by Emperor Matthias of Habsburg.
In 1614, Karl added the Duchy of Troppau to his possessions.

Hlučín

HulczynHultschin
In 1742, in the course of the First Silesian War and the Treaty of Breslau, the Duchy was divided once more, with the part north of the Opava River including Głubczyce (Leobschütz, Hlubčice) and Hlučín (Hultschin) becoming part of Prussia.
Hlučín was part of the Duchy of Opava before the latter was partitioned along the Opava River between Habsburg Austria and the Kingdom of Prussia in 1742 by the Treaty of Berlin after the First Silesian War.

Głubczyce

LeobschützGlubczyceLeobschütz (Głubczyce)
In 1742, in the course of the First Silesian War and the Treaty of Breslau, the Duchy was divided once more, with the part north of the Opava River including Głubczyce (Leobschütz, Hlubčice) and Hlučín (Hultschin) becoming part of Prussia.
From about 1269, Hlubčice was part of the Moravian Duchy of Troppau (Opava), ruled by a cadet branch of the Bohemian Přemyslid dynasty since Nicholas I, a natural son of King Ottokar II, had received the lands from the hands of his father.

Bruntál

FreudenthalBruntalBruntál coat of arms
The southern part with Krnov, Bruntál (Freudenthal), Fulnek and Opava itself remained part of Austrian Silesia, a crown land of the Austrian Empire from 1804.
Bruntál was owned by various branches of the Přemyslid Dynasty (namely, the Margraves of Moravia, the Dukes of Opava (Troppau), and the Dukes of Krnov (Jägerndorf)) almost continuously from 1213 to 1474.

Opava (river)

Opava RiverOpavariver Opava
In 1742, in the course of the First Silesian War and the Treaty of Breslau, the Duchy was divided once more, with the part north of the Opava River including Głubczyce (Leobschütz, Hlubčice) and Hlučín (Hultschin) becoming part of Prussia.
After the 1742 First Silesian War the Opava river in the Duchy of Troppau by the terms of the Treaty of Breslau became the border between Austrian and Prussian Silesia (the later Province of Silesia).

John Corvinus

Ivaniš KorvinJohnJohn Corvin
Victor in turn had to cede it to the Bohemian anti-king Matthias Corvinus in 1485, who installed his illegitimate son John as duke.
He was also recognized as duke of Slavonia and Opava, but compelled to relinquish both titles five years later.

George of Poděbrady

George of PodebradyGeorge of BohemiaGeorge Podiebrad
Przemko's sons sold their shares to the Bohemian king George of Poděbrady by 1462; their Přemyslid cousins however retained Racibórz and Krnov.

Treaty of Breslau

Peace of BreslauBreslauannexation
In 1742, in the course of the First Silesian War and the Treaty of Breslau, the Duchy was divided once more, with the part north of the Opava River including Głubczyce (Leobschütz, Hlubčice) and Hlučín (Hultschin) becoming part of Prussia.
Based on the terms of the treaty, Maria Theresa ceded most of the Silesian duchies to Prussia except for the Duchy of Teschen, the districts of Troppau and Krnov south of the Opava river as well as the southern part of the Duchy of Nysa, that were all to become the province of Austrian Silesia.

Province of Silesia

SilesiaPrussian SilesiaSilesia Province
The Prussian share remained a part of the Silesian province until 1945, when it fell to Poland in accord with the Potsdam Agreement.
By the end of the First Silesian War in 1742, the Prussian forces had conquered almost all of the Habsburg crown land in Silesia, while according to the peace treaties of Breslau and Berlin, only some smaller parts in the extreme southeast, like the Duchy of Teschen as well as the southern parts of the duchies of Troppau and Nysa, remained possessions of the Habsburg Monarchy as Austrian Silesia.

Matthias Corvinus

Matthias Corvinus of HungaryKing MatthiasMatthias I
Victor in turn had to cede it to the Bohemian anti-king Matthias Corvinus in 1485, who installed his illegitimate son John as duke.
Matthias also forced Victor of Poděbrady to renounce the Duchy of Troppau in Silesia in favour of John Corvinus in 1485.

Silesian Wars

First Silesian WarSilesian WarSecond Silesian War
In 1742, in the course of the First Silesian War and the Treaty of Breslau, the Duchy was divided once more, with the part north of the Opava River including Głubczyce (Leobschütz, Hlubčice) and Hlučín (Hultschin) becoming part of Prussia.
Under British pressure, Austria agreed to cede to Prussia the large majority of Silesia, along with the County of Glatz in Bohemia, while Austria would retain two small portions of the extreme southern end of Silesia, including the Duchy of Teschen and parts of the Duchies of Jägerndorf, Troppau, and Neisse.

Nicholas I, Duke of Troppau

Nicholas INicholasNicholas I of Troppau
The Principality of Opava (Opavské knížectví) (Księstwo Opawskie) or Duchy of Troppau (Herzogtum Troppau) was a historic territory split off from the Margraviate of Moravia before 1269 by King Ottokar II of Bohemia to provide for his natural son, Nicholas I.
In 1269 he became Duke of Opava (at modern day Opava, Czech Republic) and thereby the progenitor of the Silesian cadet branch of the Přemyslid dynasty that lasted until 1521.

Austrian Silesia

SilesiaDuchy of Upper and Lower SilesiaUpper and Lower Silesia
The southern part with Krnov, Bruntál (Freudenthal), Fulnek and Opava itself remained part of Austrian Silesia, a crown land of the Austrian Empire from 1804.