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« Reply #1080 on: May 05, 2022, 12:31:01 AM »

Agnes of the Palatinate (1201–1267) was a daughter of Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine and his first wife Agnes of Hohenstaufen, daughter of Conrad, Count Palatine of the Rhine. Agnes was Duchess of Bavaria by her marriage to Otto II Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria.Agnes was the youngest of three children born to her father by both of his marriages. Her father's second wife, also called Agnes, was the daughter of Conrad II, Margrave of Lusatia. Agnes' older sister was Irmgard, wife of Herman V, Margrave of Baden-Baden and her brother was Henry VI, Count Palatine of the Rhine.Agnes married Otto II at Worms when he came of age in 1222 With this marriage, the Wittelsbach family inherited Palatinate and kept it as a Wittelsbach possession until 1918. Since that time also the lion has become a heraldic symbol in the coat-of-arms for Bavaria and the Palatinate.In 1231 upon the death of Otto's father, Louis I, Duke of Bavaria, Otto and Agnes became Duke and Duchess of Bavaria.Within thirty-one years of marriage, the couple had five children.


Agnes Wittelsbach (c. 1240–c. 1306), a nun. Daughter of Agnes of he Palatine and Otto II Wittelsbach.


Agnes of Landsberg (1192 or 1193 – 1266) was a German noblewoman. She was the third child of Conrad II (1159–1210), Margrave of Lusatia, and his wife, Elisabeth (c. 1153 – 1209), the daughter of Mieszko III the Old (1126–1202), Duke of Poland. She was a daughter-in-law of Henry the Lion. Agnes was the youngest daughter of the ruling family of Landsberg. Her elder brother was Conrad (died before 1210); her sister was Matilda (c. 1190 – 1225), who married Margrave Albert II of Brandenburg. Agnes married in 1211 to Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine (1173 – 28 April 1277 in Brunswick), the eldest son of Henry the Lion


Agnes of Rochlitz (died 1195) came from the Wettin family and was daughter of Dedi III, Margrave of Lusatia and his wife, Matilda of Heinsburg. She is also known as Agnes of Wettin.Agnes married Berthold IV, Duke of Merania. From this marriage Agnes gained the titles of Duchess of Merania and Countess of Andechs. In 1186, Agnes' husband accompanied Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor, to the Kingdom of Sicily. In 1189, he led the third division of the imperial army and was its standard-bearer on the Third Crusade.Agnes had eight children, among them, two queens, and a duchess


Agnes of Merania (1175 - July 1201) was Queen of France by marriage to King Philip II. She is called Marie by some of the French chroniclersAgnes Maria was the daughter of Berthold, Duke of Merania, who was Count of Andechs, a castle and territory near Ammersee, Bavaria. Her mother was Agnes of Rochlitz In June 1196 Agnes married Philip II of France, who had repudiated his second wife Ingeborg of Denmark in 1193. Pope Innocent III espoused the cause of Ingeborg; but Philip did not submit until 1200, when, nine months after interdict had been added to excommunication, he consented to a separation from Agnes Agnes died giving birth to their third child in July of the next year, at the castle of Poissy, and was buried in the Convent of St Corentin, near Nantes. Agnes and Philip had two children: Philip I, Count of Boulogne and Mary, who were legitimized by the Pope in 1201 at the request of the King


Agnes of Silesia (ca. 1190 – before 11 May 1214), daughter of Hedwig of Silesia ( 1174 – 15 October 1243) and Henry I the Bearded, Duke of Silesia.


Agnes of Silesia (123/1236 – 14 May after 1277), Abbess of St. Clara in Trebnitz. Daughter of Henry II the Pious, Duke of Silesia and Anne of Bohemia (c. 1203[1]/1204 – 26 June 1265)


Agnes (born c. 1243/50 – died 13 March 1265, buried Stuttgart Stiftskirche), married c. 1260/64 to Count Ulrich I of Württemberg. Daughter of Boleslaw II the Horned, Duke of Silesia and Hedwig of Anhalt


Agnes of Württemberg, daughter of Ulrich I, Count of Württemberg and his 1st wife Mechthild of Baden


Agnes of Württemberg (born: before 1300; died: before 1349), married Henry of Werdenberg-Sargans-Trochtelfingen. Daughter of Eberhard I, Count of Württemberg and Adelaide of Werdenberg-Heiligenberg


Agnes of Württemberg (born: around 1295; died: 1317), countess by marriage of Oettingen. Daughter of Eberhard I, Count of Württemberg and Irmengard of Baden-Baden.


Agnes of Trebnitz (c. 1236 – 14 May aft. 1277), left by her mother with the Franciscans at St. Clare in Wrocław. Daughter of Anne of Bohemia and  prince Henry II the Pious, member of the Silesian branch of the Piast dynasty


Agnes of Brandenburg (17 July 1584 - 26 March 1629) was a Princess of Brandenburg by birth and by marriage successively Duchess of Pomerania and of Saxe-Lauenburg.Agnes, a member of the house of Hohenzollern, was a daughter of the Elector John George of Brandenburg (1525–1598) from his third marriage with Elisabeth of Anhalt-Zerbst (1563–1607), daughter of Prince Joachim Ernest of Anhalt.On 25 June 1604 in Berlin, she married her first husband, Duke Philip Julius of Pomerania-Wolgast (1584–1625). After Philip Julius's death, Agnes lived on her wittum, the district of Barth. Dubslaff Christoph von Eickstedt auf Rothenklempenow, who had been adviser to her husband, served as her privy counsellor and captain. Elisabeth was married again on 9 September 1628, at Schloss Barth, to the ten years younger Duke Francis Charles of Saxe-Lauenburg (1594–1660), who was a general in the imperial army. With this second marriage, she lost her rights to Barth. However, Francis Charles persuaded Wallenstein to force Duke Bogislaw XIV to allow her to keep Barth until her death Both of her marriages were childless.


Agnes of Baden (1250 – 2 January 1295), was a German noblewoman by birth member of the House of Baden and by her two marriages Duchess of Carinthia and Countess of Heunburg.She was the second child of Herman VI, Margrave of Baden and his wife Gertrude, Duchess of Mödling, titular Duchess of Austria and Styria as the last member of the House of Babenberg. For her maternal ancestry, some historians consider Agnes as the last descendant of the Babenbergs.Shortly after her birth, her father died (4 October 1250) and her mother lost her inheritance when her aunt Margaret and her husband, Prince Ottokar of Bohemia (later King), were chosen rulers of Austria and Styria.During her childhood, Agnes lived in Meissen, Saxony, together with her mother, older brother Frederick and her youngest half-sister Maria Romanovna of Halicz (born from Gertrude's third brief marriage with a Rurikid prince). In 1263 Agnes (aged 13) married with the widower Ulrich III, Duke of Carinthia and landgrave of Carniola, a member of the House of Sponheim and thirty years her senior. They had no children.After the death of Duke Ulrich III on 27 October 1269, Agnes was married in 1271 to Count Ulrich II of Heunburg "in depressionem generis" (unequal match under the House of Babenberg). The House of Heunburg, originally only a Carinthian noble family raised to the rank of Ministerialis by Duke Ulrich III, wasn't befitted to a union with a member of the Baden and Babenberg houses. However, King Ottokar II rewarded Count Ulrich II in this way for his support after he took the Duchy of Carinthia.Despite this difficult beginning together, Ulrich II and Agnes apparently had a happy marriage, especially when the Count of Heunburg gradually took his distance from the Bohemian king. They had five children
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« Reply #1081 on: May 05, 2022, 12:31:09 AM »

Agnes of Brunswick-Lüneburg (before 1356 – 1430/1434) was a Duchess of Brunswick-Lüneburg by birth and, by marriage, Duchess of Pomerania and later Duchess of Mecklenburg. She was the daughter of Duke Magnus II of Brunswick-Lüneburg (d. 1373) and Catharine of Anhalt-Bernburg (d. 1390).In 1366 Agnes married Count Burkhard V (VIII) of Mansfeld (died 1389/1390).Between 1389 and 1391, Agnes married a second time to Duke Bogislaw VI of Pomerania (d.1393) in Celle.Agnes married a third time in Schwerin, on 12/13 February 1396 to the widowed former King Albert of Sweden, who at that time was Duke Albert III of Mecklenburg (b. c.1338 – d.1412). The couple had one son: Albert V (d.1423), who was Duke of Mecklenburg and Schwerin.Agnes is not considered a Queen of Sweden, because Albert had definitely been deposed in Sweden before they were married, but in Mecklenburg she was regarded as titular queen, since Albert did not renounce his claims on Sweden until 1405.Agnes died between 1 August 1430 and 22 December 1434 and was buried in Gadebusch.


Agnes of Loon (1150–1191), was a duchess consort of Bavaria, married to Otto I of Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria. She was regent of Bavaria during the minority of her son, Louis I, Duke of Bavaria, from 1183 to 1191.She was the daughter of Louis I, Count of Loon, and Agnes of Metz.She was regent of Bavaria during the minority of her son, Louis I, Duke of Bavaria, from 1183 to 1191. Agnes was described as a forceful regent, who managed to secure the inheritance of her son. Agnes and Otto had 11 children.

Agnes of Wittelsbach (1172–1200), married Count Henry of Plain (d. 1190). Daughter of Agnes of Loon and Otto I of Wittelsbach.


Agnes of Thuringia, daughter of Sophia of Wittelsbach (1170–1238) and Landgrave Hermann I of Thuringia. She married twice:  in 1225 to Henry "the Profane" of Babenberg (1208–1228), a son of Margrave Leopold IV of Austria and in 1229 to Duke Albert I of Saxony (c. 1175 – 1261)


Agnes of Baden (25 March 1408 – January 1473), was a German noblewoman member of the House of Zähringen and by marriage Countess of Holstein-Rendsburg.She was a daughter of Bernard I, Margrave of Baden by his second wife Anna of Oettingen.In Ettlingen on 23 February 1432 she was betrothed to Gerhard VII, Count of Holstein-Rendsburg. Her older brother Jacob, new Margrave of Baden was very anxious for this marriage because he wanted to obtain political advantages in Schleswig. The marriage was celebrated in Baden on 2 June of that year, but Gerhard VII quickly returned to his domains in order to secure his frontiers without an official wedding night. Officially, the marriage was consummated only on 5 October.On 15 January 1433 Agnes, pregnant at that time, fell from the stairs at Gottorf Castle. The next day she gave birth healthy twins, Henry and Catherine. This caused surprise and the scandal erupted, because it was clear that the consummation of the marriage and the date of birth were too close to produce living children.To stop the increased rumours about his paternity, in February Gerhard VII declared in the courtyard of Gottorf Castle in front of his knights that he secretly slept with Agnes before the wedding, and that she'd been a virgin then; therefore, the children were his, and Henry would be capable of inheriting his possessions. In Schleswig Cathedral and in a State Assembly before the clergy and nobility Gerhard VII reaffirmed his word, who was further confirmed by court ladies, doctors and midwives. The matter was ultimately settled by the Bishops of Lübeck and Schleswig. The Count's brother Adolphus VIII supported his declaration. All the scandal received the name of the "Twin Disaster of Gottorf" Gerhard VII suffered from a lung disease. Shortly after the declaration in Schleswig Cathedral, his condition worsened, and doctors are unable to help him. Against the medical advise, Agnes and her husband travelled to a spa in her native Baden; however, in the middle of the trip, Gerhard VII became worse and in Cologne they decided to return. Gerhard VII died on 24 July 1433 during the return journey in Emmerich am Rhein. He was buried there.During her return in Hamburg, Agnes received unexpected news: her brother-in-law Adolphus VIII refused her entry to Holstein, kidnapped her children and denied her rights as a widow, because her dowry was never paid and the recent scandal about the paternity of the twins. Without options, Agnes was forced to return to Baden. She never saw her children again: Henry was drowned in the Schlei River shortly after and Catherine entered in Preetz Priory as a nun. Both children were probably murdered.Her brother Margrave Jacob of Baden at first strongly supported her rights; however, on 2 June 1436 she was secretly betrothed and married with Hans von Höwen, a former admirer. Margrave Jacob, who at that time was negotiated a new marriage for his sister with one of the sons of Piast Duke Konrad V of Oleśnica, was furious. By order of her brother, in 1437 Agnes was imprisoned for life in Eberstein Castle in Ebersteinburg, where she died blind in the first weeks of 1473.


Agnes of Beaujeu (Agnès de Beaujeu)(? – 11 July 1231) was a French noblewoman, the daughter of Guichard IV of Beaujeu and his wife Sybil of Hainaut. Agnes was Countess of Champagne by her marriage to Theobald I of Navarre. Agnes married in 1223 to Theobald. For Theobald, this was his second marriage. Agnes and Theobald had Blanche of Navarre, Duchess of Brittany Agnes died 1231, and was buried at Clairvaux


Agnes Randolph, Countess of Dunbar and March (c. 1312 – 1369), known as Black Agnes for her dark complexion, was the wife of Patrick, 9th Earl of Dunbar and March. She is buried in the vault near Mordington House.She was the daughter of Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray, nephew and companion-in-arms of Robert the Bruce, and Moray's wife, Isabel Stewart, herself a daughter of John Stewart of Bonkyll. Agnes became renowned for her heroic defence of Dunbar Castle in East Lothian against an English siege led by William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury, which began on 13 January 1338 and ended on 10 June the same year during the Second War of Scottish Independence from 1331 to 1341. Some accounts describe her as Countess of Moray, on the assumption that she inherited the earldom when her brother John was killed at the Battle of Neville's Cross in 1346.[9] However, the earldom actually reverted to the crown. However, in 1371/2, Agnes's nephew, John Dunbar, was created Earl of Moray by Robert II, his father-in-law. Agnes's family was active in Scottish resistance against the English attempts to conquer Scotland in the fourteenth century. Her father, Thomas Randolph, earl of Moray was appointed regent from 1329 to 1332. Agnes's brother became joint regent in 1335, but was captured by the English shortly afterwards. In 1324 Agnes married Patrick, ninth earl of Dunbar and March, governor of Berwick. After the Scottish loss at the Battle of Halidon Hill, Patrick was forced to make peace with the English surrendering Berwick which was in his charge. He was ordered by the English to refortify Dunbar Castle. However, by the following year, he had returned to his natural allegiance to Scotland, fighting the English partisans wherever possible.It seems that there were no surviving children of the marriage between Agnes and the earl. Their estates were left to children of the marriage between the earl's cousin John de Dunbar of Derchester and Birkynside, and his wife, Isobel Randolph, Agnes's younger sister.


Agnes Dunbar (fl. late 14th century) was a mistress of King David II of Scotland, son of Robert the Bruce. She was the niece (and possibly fosterling) of Agnes Randolph, Countess of Dunbar and March. Her mother was Isabella Randolph, sister of Countess Agnes and daughter of Thomas Randolph, first Earl of Moray. Her father, Sir Patrick Dunbar, was the son of Sir Alexander Dunbar and grandson of Patrick, seventh Earl of Dunbar, and his wife, Cecilia.[1] She was also the "very dear sister" of George Dunbar, 10th Earl of March who granted to her the lands of Mordington and Whittinghame, on her marriage with Sir James Douglas of Dalkeith. She was first married to a man called Robert, and they had children.She become a mistress of King David II of Scotland around 1369. This is supported by the fact that he made support payments to her beginning in 1369. It was King David's desire to marry Agnes, however, he was still married to his second wife Margaret Drummond. King David attempted to divorce Margaret, on the grounds of infertility, however this was refused by Pope Urban V. He was still planning to marry Agnes when in February 1371 he suddenly died. A payment of 1000 merks, a very large sum at that time, was arranged for her a month before the king's death.On 21 November 1372 she married Sir James Douglas of Dalkeith. Their son was James Douglas, 1st Lord Dalkeith. Their great-grandson was James Douglas, 1st Earl of Morton.


Agnes Duff, Countess Fife (12 May 1829 – 18 December 1869), was an Irish-Scottish aristocrat.Lady Agnes Georgiana Elizabeth Hay was born at Dublin, Ireland. She was the third child of William Hay, 18th Earl of Erroll, and Elizabeth FitzClarence, one of the illegitimate children of William IV and his mistress Dorothea Jordan. On 16 March 1846, Agnes was married to James Duff, son of General Hon. Sir Alexander Duff and Anne Stein, at British Embassy, Paris, France. Duff later inherited the earldom of Fife upon the death of his uncle in 1857. Together, Agnes and James were the parents of six children, five girls and one boy.


Agnes Henriette Ida Mary Hope (1881–1920), who married Edwin Joseph Lisle March‑Phillipps de Lisle on 28 August 1889. Daughter of Lady Ida Louisa Alice Duff (1848–1918) and Adrian Elias Hope


Lady Agnes Elizabeth Audrey Townshend (1870–1955), daughter of Lady Anne Elizabeth Clementina Duff (1847–1925) and  John Townshend, 5th Marquess Townshend Who married James Cuninghame Durham, son of Rev. James Durham, on 2 December 1903. They had two children


Lady Agnes Cecil Emmeline Duff (1852–1925), daughter of  James Duff and Agnes Duff, Countess Fife. She married firstly George Hay-Drummond, son of George Hay-Drummond, 12th Earl of Kinnoull, and had issue. Married secondly Herbert Flower, with no issue. Married thirdly Alfred Cooper, with issue. David Cameron, the former British prime minister, is a descendant of this third marriage.


Hon. Agnes Blanche Marie Hay (?), daughter of George Robert Hay, Viscount Dupplin (27 May 1849 – 10 March 1886) and Lady Agnes Cecil Emmeline Duff (1852–1925)


Agnes of Essex, Countess of Oxford (1151– 1212 or later) was the daughter of a royal constable Henry of Essex and his second wife, Alice.[1] At the age of three she was betrothed to Geoffrey de Vere, brother of the first Earl of Oxford, and turned over to be raised by the Veres soon thereafter. She remained in the household of the earl of Oxford about three years, then moved to Geoffrey's care. In her eleventh year Agnes rejected the match with Geoffrey and by early 1163 was married to his eldest brother Aubrey de Vere III, 1st Earl of Oxford, as his third wife.In spring 1163, Agnes's father Henry was accused of treason and fought (and lost) a judicial duel. After her father's disgrace and the resulting forfeiture of his lands and offices, the earl of Oxford sought to have his marriage to Agnes annulled. On 9 May 1166, she appealed her case from the court of the bishop of London to the pope (the archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, being in exile at the time).[2] While the case was pending in Rome, the earl reportedly kept Agnes confined in one of his three castles, for which the bishop of London Gilbert Foliot reprimanded Aubrey.Pope Alexander III ruled in her favor, thus establishing the canon law requirement of consent by females in betrothal and the sacrament of marriage.The couple later jointly founded a Benedictine priory for nuns near their castle at Castle Hedingham, Essex around 1190. Countess Agnes long survived her husband and in 1198 paid the crown for the right to remain unmarried. She died sometime in or after 1212 and was buried in the Vere mausoleum at Colne Priory, EssexAgnes bore her husband four sons and a daughter, including two future earls of Oxford: Aubrey IV and Robert I. Her daughter Alice married 1) Ernulf de Kemesech, 2) John, constable of Chester. Agnes's son Henry appears to have become chancellor of Hereford Cathedral under his uncle, Bishop William de Vere, and later a royal clerk under King John of England.Little is known of Ralph de Vere except that he may have been the second son (from the order in which he witnessed his father's charters) and died before 1214, when his younger brother Robert succeeded to the earldom on the death of Aubrey IV, 2nd earl.
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« Reply #1082 on: May 05, 2022, 11:56:04 AM »

Ulrich, is a German given name, derived from Old High German Uodalrich, Odalric. It is composed of the elements uodal- meaning "(noble) heritage" and -rich meaning "rich, powerful". Attested from the 8th century as the name of Alamannic nobility, the name is popularly given from the high medieval period in reference to Saint Ulrich of Augsburg (canonized 993).


Ulrike is a female given name. The female version of Ulrich


Udalrich I, count in Alamannia (fl. 778–814), son of Gerold of Vinzgau

Udalrich II, son of Udalrich I, count in Alamannia (fl. 800/803)

Odalric, Count of Barcelona (fl. 850s)

Ulrich of Augsburg (890 – 4 July 973), sometimes spelled Uodalric or Odalrici, was Prince-Bishopric of Augsburg in Germany. He was the first saint to be canonized not by a local authority but by the Pope.[\Much of the information concerning Ulrich is derived from the Life of St Ulrich written by Gerhard of Augsburg sometime between 982 and 993. Ulrich was born in 890 at Kyburg, Zurich in present-day Switzerland. He was the son of Hupald, Count of Dillingen (d. 909) and Dietpirch of Swabia (also known as Theoberga).


Oldřich, Duke of Bohemia (c.  975 – 1034)

Ulric Manfred II of Turin (b. 1034), Count of Turin and Margrave of Susa

Ulric I of Carniola (d. 1070), the Margrave of Carniola and Carinthia

Ulric II of Carniola (d. 1112), the Margrave of Istria

Ulrich I of Passau, also called Udalrich (c. 1027 - 7 August 1121, Passau), was a monastery founder and bishop of the diocese of Passau.It was earlier assumed that Ulrich I was from Tyrol. Later, his ancestry was plausibly attributed to a Swabian or Bavarian noble family.


Oldřich of Olomouc (d. 1177), duke in Bohemia


Ulrich von Liechtenstein (1200–1275), medieval writer, poet and knight

Ulrich III, Duke of Carinthia (ca. 1220 – 1269)

Ulrich II, Count of Württemberg (ca. 1254 – 1279)

Ulrich III, Count of Württemberg (after 1286 – 1392)

Ulrich II von Graben (before 1300 – ca. 1361), Austrian nobleman

Ulrich III, Lord of Hanau (c. 1310 – 1369 or 1370)

Ulrich IV, Count of Württemberg (after 1315 – 1366)

Ulrich von Jungingen (1360–1410), 26th Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights

Ulrich II, Count of Celje (1406–1456)

Ulrich I, Count of East Frisia (1408–1466)

Ulrich V, Count of Württemberg (1413–1480)

Ulrich II, Duke of Mecklenburg-Stargard (probably before 1428 – 1471)

Ulrich Fugger the Elder (1441–1510), German businessman and member of the Fugger family

Ulrich Rülein von Calw (1465–1523), mayor of Freiberg, Saxony

Ulrich of Hardegg (after 1483–1535), Count of Hardegg

Ulrich, Duke of Württemberg (1487–1550)

Ulrich von Hutten (1488–1523), German knight, scholar, poet and reformer during Knights' Revolt

Ulrich III, Duke of Mecklenburg or Ulrich III of Mecklenburg-Güstrow (5 March 1527 – 14 March 1603) was Duke of Mecklenburg (-Güstrow) from 1555-56 to 1603.Ulrich was the third son of Duke Albrecht VII and Anna of Brandenburg. Ulrich was educated at the Bavarian court. Later, he studied theology and law in Ingolstadt. After the death of his father, he took up residence in Bützow and succeeded his cousin Duke Magnus III of Mecklenburg-Schwerin as Lutheran administrator of the Prince-Bishopric of Schwerin in 1550. Later, he married Magnus's widow, Elizabeth, a daughter of King Frederick I of Denmark. His wife was actually a first cousin of his maternal grandmother Elizabeth of Denmark, daughter of John, King of Denmark. They were first cousins, twice removed. After the death of Elizabeth he married Anna, daughter of Philip I, Duke of Pomerania.After the death of his uncle, Henry V, Duke of Mecklenburg, Ulrich participated in the national government, especially during Mecklenburg's participation in the Schmalkaldic War. It erupted from an inheritance dispute, which was settled by the "Ruppiner dictum" of the Elector of Brandenburg. He married Elisabeth of Denmark (14 October 1524 – 15 October 1586), with whom he had 1 child, a daughter Sophie.

Prince Ulrik John of Denmark, (30 December 1578 – 27 March 1624) was a son of King Frederick II of Denmark and his consort, Sophie of Mecklenburg-Güstrow. As the second-born son he bore the merely titular rank of Duke of Holstein and Schleswig, Stormarn and Ditmarsh and had no share in the royal-ducal condominial rule of Holstein and Schleswig, wielded by the heads of the houses of Oldenburg (royal) and its cadet branch Holstein-Gottorp (ducal). Since 1602 he held the religiously defunct position of Bishop of Schleswig, enjoying the revenues of the implied estates and manor. The year after he succeeded his grandfather as Administrator of the Prince-Bishopric of Schwerin, holding both posts until his death.


Duke Ulrich of Pomerania (12 August 1589 – 31 October 1622), was a Lutheran administrator of the Prince-Bishopric of Cammin and non-reigning Duke of Pomerania.Ulrich was the youngest son of Duke Bogislaw XIII of Pomerania (1544-1606) of the family of Griffins. After their father's death, Ulrich and his brothers agreed on the division of their inheritance. According to the agreement of 1 October 1606 the eldest brother, Philip II (1573-1618), became the reigning Duke of Pomerania-Stettin. Francis (1577-1620) was a Protestant Bishop of Cammin. Bogislaw XIV (1580-1637) and George II (1582-1617) jointly received the district of Rügenwalde. Ulrich, the youngest received only an annual pension.After Philip II died in 1618, he was succeeded by Francis as the ruler of Pomerania-Stettin, and Francis was succeeded by Ulrich as bishop of Cammin. Like Francis before him, Ulrich resided in Koszalin. Ulrich died on 31 October 1622. He was buried in the castle church in Stettin.Ulrich married in 1619 in Wolfenbüttel with Hedwig of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1595-1650). The marriage remained childless. After Ulrich's death, Duchess Hedwig resided as a widow in Neustettin. There, she founded a gymnasium in 1640, which was later named Hedwig's gymnasium, after her.

Frederick Ulrich (German Friedrich Ulrich)(5 April 1591 – 11 August 1634), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, was prince of Wolfenbüttel from 1613 until his death.Frederick Ulrich was the son of Duke Henry Julius of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1564-1613) and his second wife Princess Elisabeth of Denmark (1573-1625), the eldest daughter of King Frederick II of DenmarkFrederick Ulrich married Anna Sophia (1598-1659), daughter of John Sigismund, Elector of Brandenburg, in 1614. They had no children and Frederick tried to get a divorce from Anna, though he died before the divorce was completed. Anna Sophia spent her widowhood in Schöningen, where she founded a renowned school, the Anna-Sophianeum.

Prince Ulrik of Denmark (2 February 1611 – 12 August 1633) was a son of King Christian IV of Denmark and his consort Queen Anne Catherine of Brandenburg. As the fourth-born son, he bore the merely titular rank of Duke of Holstein and Schleswig, Stormarn and Ditmarsh; however, he had no share in the royal-ducal condominial rule of Holstein and Schleswig, wielded by the heads of the houses of Oldenburg (royal) and its cadet branch Holstein-Gottorp (ducal). In 1624 Ulrik was appointed administrator of the Prince-Bishopric of Schwerin as Ulrich III. However, in 1628 Wallenstein's conquest of the prince-bishopric de facto deposed him. His father had to renounce all his family claims to prince-bishoprics in 1629. When in 1631 Swedish forces reconquered the prince-bishopric Ulrik failed to reascend as administrator.

Ulrich, 10th Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau (German: Ulrich Ferdinand Adolf Antonius Bonaventura Maria Fürst Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau)( 15 August 1893 – 19 December 1938) was the titular pretender Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau.Ulrich was born at Chotzen, Kingdom of Bohemia the eldest child Count Ferdinand Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau (1866–1916) (sixth child of Ferdinand Bonaventura, 7th Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau and Countess Wilhelmine of Colloredo-Mansfeld) and Princess Aglaë of Auersperg (1868–1919) (fourth child of Prince Adolf of Auersperg and Countess Johanna Festetics de Tolna). Ulrich married on 19 January 1918 in Budapest to Countess Katalin Széchényi de Sárvár-Felsövidek (1893–1968), youngest daughter of Count Imre Széchényi de Sárvár-Felsövidék, and his wife, Countess Maria Andrássy de Csik-Szent-Király et Kraszna-Horka. They divorced in 1930. They had 3 children. He married secondly on 10 March 1932 in Munich to Baroness Marie von dem Bussche-Haddenhausen (1900–1974), eldest daughter of Baron Hilmar von dem Bussche-Haddenhausen, and his wife Maria Eleonore Martinez de Hoz, first cousin twice removed of Argentina's Minister of Economy José Alfredo Martínez de Hoz. They also had 3 children.

Count Ulrich Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau (9 December 1918 – 1929), son of Ulrich, 10th Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau and Countess Katalin Széchényi de Sárvár-Felsövidek


Franz Ulrich, 11th Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau (German: Franz Ulrich Johannes Clemens Christophorus Antonius Bonaventura Maria Fürst Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau)(7 October 1936 – 2 April 2009) was the titular pretender Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau as well the head of the House of Kinsky. Franz Ulrich was born at Vienna, Federal State of Austria youngest son of Ulrich, 10th Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau by his second marriage with Baroness Marie Julia Mathilde von dem Bussche-Haddenhausen. He became the titular Prince upon the death of his father in 1938. He was first cousin of Countess Marie Aglaë Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau that later became Princess consort of Liechtenstein, and second cousin of Claus von Amsberg, Prince consort of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, both being descendants of Baron Julius von dem Bussche-Haddenhausen.In 1940 he emigrated with his mother to Argentina where he lived until his death. Franz Ulrich married on 14 April 1965 in Buenos Aires to Roberta Cavanagh (1942–2002), daughter of Roberto Cavanagh and his wife, Anne Rowell. The divorced on 25 April 1977.They had 1 son. He married secondly on 24 October 1977 in Paris to Countess Helena Hutten-Czapska (born 1941), daughter of Count Stanislaus Hutten-Czapski and Verena Narkiewicz-Jodko, they had no issue. She died in 2012.After Kinsky's death, his son and Helen Hutten Czapski entered a great dispute for Kinsky's properties. The Civil Judge Nº 103 is in charge of the claims.The Prince died on 2 April 2009, aged 72. In 2012, some of his jewel collection was auctioned by Sothebys.


Ulrich-Wilhelm Graf von Schwerin von Schwanenfeld (21 December 1902 – 8 September 1944) was a German landowner, officer, and resistance fighter against the Nazi régime. His name is commonly shortened to Schwerin.Count Schwerin von Schwanenfeld was born in the Danish capital, Copenhagen, the son of the German diplomat Ulrich Graf von Schwerin (1864–1930) and his wife Freda von Bethmann-Hollweg, a cousin of Chancellor Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg. The Uradel House of Schwerin, named after the Mecklenburg capital, was first documented in the 12th century; the family held large estates in the Brandenburgian Uckermark region and the adjacent lands of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.Schwerin's family moved to Dresden, when he was twelve years old.By 1935, Schwerin had come to believe that the only way Adolf Hitler could be stopped was by assassinating him. Beginning in 1938 ahead of the German occupation of Czechoslovakia, Schwerin belonged to the tightest circle of the resistance along with his personal friends Peter Graf Yorck von Wartenburg and Fritz-Dietlof Graf von der Schulenburg, and later also to the Kreisau Circle. With the beginning of World War II, he was called up to the Wehrmacht as an officer in the staff of Generaloberst Erwin von Witzleben. After Witzleben's dismissal in 1942, Schwerin was transferred to Utrecht until in March 1943, Major General Hans Oster appointed him to the Abwehr office at the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht in Berlin.Schwerin participated in the failed attempt on Hitler's life and coup d'état on 20 July 1944 from his position at the Bendlerblock, where the plotters' headquarters were, although he had been saying for weeks that the chances for a successful coup were very slight. There, on the night of 21 July 1944, he was arrested, and on 21 August was sentenced to death by the Volksgerichtshof, with Roland Freisler presiding. The recordings of the show trial attest how a doomed Schwerin, ravaged by the conditions of his detention and brought to court without a belt and tie, tried to preserve his dignity. He stated that his opposition to Hitler was due to "the many murders (...) in Germany and abroad". He was constantly interrupted by a furious Freisler, who finally shouted him down in rage. On 8 September, Schwerin was hanged at Plötzensee Prison in Berlin. He is buried at the Waldfriedhof Dahlem.
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« Reply #1083 on: May 05, 2022, 11:56:12 AM »

Enno Friedrich Wichard Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff (22 December 1848 – 25 September 1931) was a German classical philologist. Wilamowitz, as he is known in scholarly circles, was a renowned authority on Ancient Greece and its literature.Wilamowitz-Moellendorff was born in Markowitz (Markowice), a small village near Hohensalza (Inowrocław), in the then Province of Posen (now part of the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship), to a Germanized family of distant Polish ancestry. His father, a Prussian Junker, was Arnold Wilamowitz, of Szlachta origin and using the Ogończyk coat of arms, while his mother was Ulrika, née Calbo. The couple settled in a small manor confiscated from a local noble in 1836. The Prussian part of their name, von Moellendorf, was acquired in 1813, when Prussian field marshal Wichard Joachim Heinrich von Möllendorf adopted Ulrich's ancestors. Wilamowitz, a third child, grew up in East Prussia.In 1878 he married Maria Mommsen, the eldest daughter of the famous ancient historian, Theodor Mommsen, whom he actively assisted in the completion of his Roman History. Wilamowitz spent his last years in seclusion, suffering from severe kidney problems. He died in Berlin on 25 September 1931, having been in a coma for a short time. He is buried in his native village, along with his wife, Maria (1855–1936), and their only son, Tycho. He also had a daughter, Dorothea Freifrau Hiller von Gaertringen, wife of archaeologist Friedrich Hiller von Gaertringen, who died on 24 March 1972. Wilamowitz is one of the central figures of 19th and 20th century Classical philology.


Ulrich Friedrich Woldemar Graf von Löwendal (Russian: Ульрих Фридрих Вольдемар граф фон Левендаль, tr. Ulrikh Fridrikh Vol'demar Graf fon Levendal'; 1700–1755) was a German officer and statesman Graf von Löwendal served first under German Emperor Charles VI in the Imperial Army. He joined the Danish Army for a short time, then he returned to the Imperial Army of the Holy Roman Empire. Later he served Augustus II the Strong, who made him Feldmarschall and Generalinspektor of the Saxon Infantery. 1734 to 1735 he commanded the troops of Saxony at the Rhine. Later, like so many Germans, he served in the Imperial Russian Army, fighting the Turks 1739 by Khotyn.Marshall Ulrich Friedrich Woldemar Graf von Löwendal died on 27 May 1755 in Paris. He had been married twice (first since 23 January 1722 to Theodora Eugenia von Schmettau, daughter of German General Gottlieb von Schmettau; since 13. November 1736 to Barbe Madeleine Gräfin von Szembek) and was father of eight children.



Ulrika Eleonora of Denmark (11 September 1656 – 26 July 1693) was Queen of Sweden as the wife of King Charles XI. She is often admired for her generosity and charity.The name Ulrike is a Danish version of the name; in Swedish she is called Ulrika Eleonora den äldre (English: Ulrica Eleanor the Elder), to distinguish her from her daughter, the future queen regnant.Ulrika Eleonora was the daughter of King Frederick III of Denmark and his spouse, Queen Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-LüneburgIn 1675 she was betrothed to King Charles XI of Sweden. The purpose of the match, though from the Swedish viewpoint, was to prevent Denmark from forming an alliance with the enemies of Sweden. Her brother, the King of Denmark, was not enthusiastic about the match, but he left the decision to her mother, who was very eager to complete it because it would give Ulrika the status of queen.The engagement was announced 13 July 1675.During the Scanian War between Denmark and Sweden in 1675–1679 she was encouraged to break the engagement. Her brother broke it for her in 1676, but she herself continued to regard herself engaged. She was considered as a possible bride by the Prince of Orange in 1676 and then by Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor, but she refused a different match. During the war, she gained a reputation for loyalty to her future home country by exhibiting kindness to Swedish prisoners: she pawned her jewelry and her engagement ring to buy food, ose, and medicine for the Swedish prisoners of war. She also refused to participate in the celebrations arranged in honor of Danish victories over Sweden.During the peace negotiations between Sweden and Denmark in 1679, the marriage between her and Charles XI was again on the agenda, and was ratified on 26 September 1679. The marriage contract was signed 6 February 1680, and when the Swedish representative Johan Göransson Gyllenstierna returned to Sweden, he escorted her to Sweden on his return home. During one of the celebrations in honor of her marriage, her name and the name of her groom was written with fireworks. One of the spectators pointed out that the person whose name died out first was the one who was going to die first. When her name went out first, she stated that she hoped it would truly be so, for she could not bear to outlive her spouse Ulrika Eleonora arrived in Helsingborg in Sweden on 4 May 1680, where she was welcomed by canon salutation, the Queen Dowager, the Swedish court and the local aristocracy. Two days later she met and married Charles at Skottorp Manor on 6 May 1680. The wedding was hasty and a relatively simple affair in the presence of a small circle of courtiers. The reasoning for this was that the King, who was at that time in a tense relationship with France, wished to avoid the presence of the French ambassador Feuqiéres, and could do so only if the time and place of the ceremony could be kept secret long enough for it to be impossible for the ambassador to attend. The ceremony was to officially take place in Halmstad, and Ulrika Eleonora was only to spend the night at Skottorp on her way there, but when she arrived she was hastily married instead. On 25 November 1680 she was crowned Queen at Storkyrkan in Stockholm. They had 7 children


Ulric of Sweden (2 August 1684 – 8 June 1685); died in infancy. Son of Ulrika Eleonora of Denmark and Charles XI of Sweden.


Ulrika Eleonora or Ulrica Eleanor (23 January 1688 – 24 November 1741), known as Ulrika Eleonora the Younger, was Queen of Sweden, reigning in her own right from 5 December 1718 until her abdication on 29 February 1720 in favour of her husband King Frederick, and then as his consort until her death.She was the youngest child of King Charles XI and Ulrika Eleonora of Denmark and named after her mother. After the death of her brother King Charles XII in 1718, she claimed the throne. Her deceased older sister, Hedvig Sophia, had left a son, Charles Frederick of Holstein-Gottorp, who had the better claim by primogeniture. Ulrika Eleonora asserted that she was the closest surviving relative of the late king (the idea of proximity of blood) and cited the precedent of Queen Christina. She was recognized as successor by the Riksdag after she had agreed to renounce the powers of absolute monarchy established by her father. She abdicated in 1720 in favor of her husband, Landgrave Frederick I of Hesse-Kassel.Ulrika suffered two miscarriages, one in 1715 and another in 1718, after which there are no further recorded pregnancies.


Ulrik Christian Gyldenløve, Count of Samsø (1678 – December 1719) was a Dano-Norwegian Admiral in the Royal Danish-Norwegian Navy and Governor of Iceland. He was an acknowledged illegitimate son of King Christian V of Denmark and his officially acknowledged royal mistress Sophie Amalie Moth.


Prince Ulrich Dietmar Maria Franz Ferdinand Karl Aloys Joseph Ignatius Benediktus Johannes Augustinus of Liechtenstein (29 August 1913– 13 October 1978), son of Prince Aloys of Liechtenstein (17 June 1869- 16 March 1955) and  Archduchess Elisabeth Amalie of Austria (7 July 1878 – 13 March 1960).Younger brother of Franz Joseph II, Prince of Liechtenstein and a paternal uncle of current Prince Hans Adam.

Prince Ulrich Constantin Wladimir Peter of Liechtenstein (12 August 1983), son of Prince Friedrich of Liechtenstein (30 September 1937 - 20 December 2010) and Annemarie Ortner (3 May 1948).


Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg (1568 – 18 October 1634) was an Austrian statesman, a son of Seyfried von Eggenberg, Lord of Erbersdorf (1526-1594), and great-grandson of Balthasar Eggenberger (died 1493). He was a prominent member of the House of Eggenberg and gained the title of Duke of Krumau.


Prince Ulrich of Schönburg-Waldenburg (b. 1940)


Ulrike Louise of Solms-Braunfels (1 May 1731 – 12 September 1792) was a German regent, Landgravine of Hesse-Homburg by marriage to Frederick IV of Hesse-Homburg , and regent of Hesse-Homburg, on behalf of her minor son Frederick V Louis William Christian from 1751 to 1766.Ulrike Louise was a daughter of Prince Frederick William of Solms-Braunfels (1696–1761) from his second marriage to Sophie Magdalene of Solms-Laubach-Utphe (1701–1744), a daughter of Count Otto of Solms-Laubach-Utphe (1673-1743) and Countess Luise Albertine of Schönburg-Glauchau (1686-1740).She married on 10 October 1746 in Hungen her cousin, Landgrave Frederick IV of Hesse-Homburg (1724–1751). Shortly after the wedding, troops from Hesse-Darmstadt marched into Hesse-Homburg and occupied it and city of Bad Homburg with Homburg Castle. The dispute could be arbitrated, and Frederick IV was reinstated as ruling Landgrave.After her husband died in 1751, she took up government, with imperial permission, together with Landgrave Louis VIII of Hesse-Darmstadt, for her son Frederick V, who was only three years old when his father died. She managed to preserve the sovereignty of Hesse-Homburg and marry her son to a daughter of Landgrave Louis IX of Hesse-Darmstadt.From her marriage with Frederick IV, Ulrike Louise had two children


Ulrica "Ulla" Elisabeth von Liewen (24 February 1747 – 16 May 1775), was a Swedish courtier and baroness. She was at one point the royal mistress of Adolf Frederick, King of Sweden and is known as the likely mother of Lolotte Forssberg.Ulla von Liewen was the daughter of the noble Carl Gustaf von Liewen and Ulrika Eleonora Ribbing af Zernava. She served as maid of honor to the queen of Sweden. Originally engaged to count Per Brahe, she was impregnated by the king and gave birth to a daughter. The queen was informed, and agreed to keep the matter a secret and care for the child.Princess Sophia Albertine stated to her intimate friend, countess Caroline Ehrencrona, the she had several reasons to believe that Ulla Liewen was the mother of Lolotte Forssberg, but that she would keep quite about it out of concern for the Liewen family, even though the matter seemed to be an open secret in high societyIn 1770, Ulla Liewen married the politician and courtier baron Charles De Geer (1747–1805). Their daughter Charlotte De Geer later married Hans Henric von Essen. The daughter of her spouse in his second marriage, Vilhelmina, served as mistress of the Robes to Désirée Clary and married Carl Edvard Gyldenstolpe, who was at one point engaged to marry Lolotte Forssberg.


Ulrik Christian Gyldenløve (7 April 1630 – 11 December 1658) was an illegitimate child of Christian IV of Denmark and his chambermaid and mistress Vibeke Kruse.In February 1645, Gyldenløve was given the estate Skinnerup gård by his father. He was not impressed with its name nor its derelict condition. He rebuilt the manor and renamed it Ulriksholm. He was subsequently made a count.Gyldenløve was general of the Realm (Danish: rigsgeneral) and commander-in-chief of the Danish army during the Dano-Swedish War of 1657–1658. Ulrik led the charge of a student army against the Swedish army during the siege of Copenhagen in 1658. When the Swedes stormed Kallebodstrand in Copenhagen, where Gyldenløve had his headquarters, a bloody struggle was fought between the Danish-Dutch defenders and the Swedish-German attackers. Gyldenløve was slain by several enemy gunshots.The Gyldenløvesgade streets in Copenhagen and Odense are named after him. Gyldenløve was remembered by the Danish nobility and peasantry as one of Denmark's foremost military commanders.Christian V also had a son with the same name.


Ulrik Frederik Gyldenløve, Count of Laurvig (20 July 1638 – 17 April 1704) was Governor-general of Norway (Stattholdere i Norge) from 1664–1699. He was the leading general in Norway during the Scanian War, whose Norwegian leg is conventionally named the Gyldenløve War after himGyldenløve was born in Bremen, Germany, the illegitimate son of Prince Frederick, later King Frederick III of Denmark, who was at the time Prince-Archbishop of Bremen and coadjutor of the Bishopric of Halberstadt. His mother was Margrethe Pape, (1620–1684) who was made Baronesse of Løvendal by King Christian IV on September 15 that same year. When his father became King of Denmark in 1648, Ulrik Frederik assumed the surname Gyldenløve which was used by illegitimate sons of Danish kings.Count Ulrik Frederik married three times: His first married 1659 Sophie Urne (1629-1714), daughter of Jørgen Urne and Margrete Marsvin, who he had to leave for his second Marriage with Marie Grubbe (1643–1718) 1660, from whom he was divorced after nine years in 1670. His third wife was Countess Antoinette Augusta von Aldenburg (1660-1701), eldest daughter of Anton I, Count von Aldenburg und Knyphausen (by his first wife, Countess Auguste Johanna zu Sayn-Wittgenstein-Hohenstein), legitimated son of Anton Gunther, who belonged to the Delmenhorst cadet branch of the House of Oldenburg whose senior line became hereditary kings of Denmark. Ulrik Frederik's two first marriages ended in divorces, but he has descendants from the first and third. He had many children, both legitimate and illegitimate, four of whom lived to adulthood, married and left descendants


Ulrikke Amalie Antoinette af Danneskiold-Samsøe (1686-1755), daughter of Ulrik Frederik Gyldenløve, Count of Laurvig and his 3rd wife Countess Antoinette Augusta von Aldenburg. She wed Count Carl von Ahlefeldt (1670–1722) They had the sons Conrad Ahlefeldt and Frederik Ahlefeldt (1702–73).


Christian Ulrik Gyldenløve (3 February 1611 – 6 October 1640) was a Danish diplomat and military officer. He was one of three acknowledged illegitimate sons of Christian IV of Denmark— the only one by Kirsten Madsdatter. He died in a fight with troops from the Netherlands at the churchyard of Meinerzhagen and was buried in Wesel.

Hans Ulrik Gyldenløve (10 March 1615 – 31 January 1645) was the illegitimate son of King Christian IV of Denmark and his mistress, Karen Andersdatter. He was also a Danish Navy officer and lensmann bailiff.Hans Ulrik was born at the Kronborg castle in Helsingør, Denmark, on 10 March 1615. He was given Gyldenløve [Golden Lion] as his surname by his father. It was the traditional surname for the illegitimate children of the Kings of Denmark in the 17th CenturyOn 10 October 1641, Hans married Regitze Grubbe (1618-1689).She was the daughter of Jørgen Grubbe and his wife Lene Knudsdatter Rud of Tostrup and Hageløs, both members of the Danish ancient nobility, and was a granddaughter of the statesman Eiler Grubbe.[Crazy She was also a relative of Erik Grubbe of Tjele, the father of Marie Grubbe. But she and Hans Ulrik never had any children
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« Reply #1084 on: May 05, 2022, 12:15:03 PM »

Agnes of the Palatinate (1201–1267) was a daughter of Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine and his first wife Agnes of Hohenstaufen, daughter of Conrad, Count Palatine of the Rhine. Agnes was Duchess of Bavaria by her marriage to Otto II Wittelsbach, Duke of Bavaria.Agnes was the youngest of three children born to her father by both of his marriages. Her father's second wife, also called Agnes, was the daughter of Conrad II, Margrave of Lusatia. Agnes' older sister was Irmgard, wife of Herman V, Margrave of Baden-Baden and her brother was Henry VI, Count Palatine of the Rhine.Agnes married Otto II at Worms when he came of age in 1222 With this marriage, the Wittelsbach family inherited Palatinate and kept it as a Wittelsbach possession until 1918. Since that time also the lion has become a heraldic symbol in the coat-of-arms for Bavaria and the Palatinate.In 1231 upon the death of Otto's father, Louis I, Duke of Bavaria, Otto and Agnes became Duke and Duchess of Bavaria.Within thirty-one years of marriage, the couple had five children.


Agnes Wittelsbach (c. 1240–c. 1306), a nun. Daughter of Agnes of he Palatine and Otto II Wittelsbach.


Agnes of Landsberg (1192 or 1193 – 1266) was a German noblewoman. She was the third child of Conrad II (1159–1210), Margrave of Lusatia, and his wife, Elisabeth (c. 1153 – 1209), the daughter of Mieszko III the Old (1126–1202), Duke of Poland. She was a daughter-in-law of Henry the Lion. Agnes was the youngest daughter of the ruling family of Landsberg. Her elder brother was Conrad (died before 1210); her sister was Matilda (c. 1190 – 1225), who married Margrave Albert II of Brandenburg. Agnes married in 1211 to Henry V, Count Palatine of the Rhine (1173 – 28 April 1277 in Brunswick), the eldest son of Henry the Lion


Agnes of Rochlitz (died 1195) came from the Wettin family and was daughter of Dedi III, Margrave of Lusatia and his wife, Matilda of Heinsburg. She is also known as Agnes of Wettin.Agnes married Berthold IV, Duke of Merania. From this marriage Agnes gained the titles of Duchess of Merania and Countess of Andechs. In 1186, Agnes' husband accompanied Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor, to the Kingdom of Sicily. In 1189, he led the third division of the imperial army and was its standard-bearer on the Third Crusade.Agnes had eight children, among them, two queens, and a duchess


Agnes of Merania (1175 - July 1201) was Queen of France by marriage to King Philip II. She is called Marie by some of the French chroniclersAgnes Maria was the daughter of Berthold, Duke of Merania, who was Count of Andechs, a castle and territory near Ammersee, Bavaria. Her mother was Agnes of Rochlitz In June 1196 Agnes married Philip II of France, who had repudiated his second wife Ingeborg of Denmark in 1193. Pope Innocent III espoused the cause of Ingeborg; but Philip did not submit until 1200, when, nine months after interdict had been added to excommunication, he consented to a separation from Agnes Agnes died giving birth to their third child in July of the next year, at the castle of Poissy, and was buried in the Convent of St Corentin, near Nantes. Agnes and Philip had two children: Philip I, Count of Boulogne and Mary, who were legitimized by the Pope in 1201 at the request of the King


Agnes of Silesia (ca. 1190 – before 11 May 1214), daughter of Hedwig of Silesia ( 1174 – 15 October 1243) and Henry I the Bearded, Duke of Silesia.


Agnes of Silesia (123/1236 – 14 May after 1277), Abbess of St. Clara in Trebnitz. Daughter of Henry II the Pious, Duke of Silesia and Anne of Bohemia (c. 1203[1]/1204 – 26 June 1265)


Agnes (born c. 1243/50 – died 13 March 1265, buried Stuttgart Stiftskirche), married c. 1260/64 to Count Ulrich I of Württemberg. Daughter of Boleslaw II the Horned, Duke of Silesia and Hedwig of Anhalt


Agnes of Württemberg, daughter of Ulrich I, Count of Württemberg and his 1st wife Mechthild of Baden


Agnes of Württemberg (born: before 1300; died: before 1349), married Henry of Werdenberg-Sargans-Trochtelfingen. Daughter of Eberhard I, Count of Württemberg and Adelaide of Werdenberg-Heiligenberg


Agnes of Württemberg (born: around 1295; died: 1317), countess by marriage of Oettingen. Daughter of Eberhard I, Count of Württemberg and Irmengard of Baden-Baden.


Agnes of Trebnitz (c. 1236 – 14 May aft. 1277), left by her mother with the Franciscans at St. Clare in Wrocław. Daughter of Anne of Bohemia and  prince Henry II the Pious, member of the Silesian branch of the Piast dynasty


Agnes of Brandenburg (17 July 1584 - 26 March 1629) was a Princess of Brandenburg by birth and by marriage successively Duchess of Pomerania and of Saxe-Lauenburg.Agnes, a member of the house of Hohenzollern, was a daughter of the Elector John George of Brandenburg (1525–1598) from his third marriage with Elisabeth of Anhalt-Zerbst (1563–1607), daughter of Prince Joachim Ernest of Anhalt.On 25 June 1604 in Berlin, she married her first husband, Duke Philip Julius of Pomerania-Wolgast (1584–1625). After Philip Julius's death, Agnes lived on her wittum, the district of Barth. Dubslaff Christoph von Eickstedt auf Rothenklempenow, who had been adviser to her husband, served as her privy counsellor and captain. Elisabeth was married again on 9 September 1628, at Schloss Barth, to the ten years younger Duke Francis Charles of Saxe-Lauenburg (1594–1660), who was a general in the imperial army. With this second marriage, she lost her rights to Barth. However, Francis Charles persuaded Wallenstein to force Duke Bogislaw XIV to allow her to keep Barth until her death Both of her marriages were childless.


Agnes of Baden (1250 – 2 January 1295), was a German noblewoman by birth member of the House of Baden and by her two marriages Duchess of Carinthia and Countess of Heunburg.She was the second child of Herman VI, Margrave of Baden and his wife Gertrude, Duchess of Mödling, titular Duchess of Austria and Styria as the last member of the House of Babenberg. For her maternal ancestry, some historians consider Agnes as the last descendant of the Babenbergs.Shortly after her birth, her father died (4 October 1250) and her mother lost her inheritance when her aunt Margaret and her husband, Prince Ottokar of Bohemia (later King), were chosen rulers of Austria and Styria.During her childhood, Agnes lived in Meissen, Saxony, together with her mother, older brother Frederick and her youngest half-sister Maria Romanovna of Halicz (born from Gertrude's third brief marriage with a Rurikid prince). In 1263 Agnes (aged 13) married with the widower Ulrich III, Duke of Carinthia and landgrave of Carniola, a member of the House of Sponheim and thirty years her senior. They had no children.After the death of Duke Ulrich III on 27 October 1269, Agnes was married in 1271 to Count Ulrich II of Heunburg "in depressionem generis" (unequal match under the House of Babenberg). The House of Heunburg, originally only a Carinthian noble family raised to the rank of Ministerialis by Duke Ulrich III, wasn't befitted to a union with a member of the Baden and Babenberg houses. However, King Ottokar II rewarded Count Ulrich II in this way for his support after he took the Duchy of Carinthia.Despite this difficult beginning together, Ulrich II and Agnes apparently had a happy marriage, especially when the Count of Heunburg gradually took his distance from the Bohemian king. They had five children


Ines, and variants, is a feminine given name related to Agnes.

Inés de Borbón-Dos Sicilias y Borbón-Parma, GE (18 February 1940) is a Spanish princess, the youngest child of Infante Alfonso, heir to the throne of the Two Sicilies, and Infanta Alicia.The last of three children and the second daughter of Infante Alfonso de Borbón-Dos Sicilias y de Borbón (1901–1964) and Princess Alicia of Bourbon-Parma (1917–2017), she was born during her parents' exile from republican Spain in Lausanne, Switzerland. Princess Inés was forbidden marriage with Luis de Morales y Aguado, a Granedian who was not a royal prince by birth. After the death of her father in 1964, and with persistence, she eventually married, in a ceremony that took place in San Jeronimo del Real, 30 January 1965. In the media, she was referred to as "the last great-grandchild of Alfonso XII of Spain". Both her cousin Prince Juan Carlos and his wife Princess Sofía attended, as well as the most distinguished Gotha of Europe. The couple had five children. In 1978, she became the first member of the Spanish royal family to go through legal divorce, after gaining permission from her cousin King Juan Carlos I and Pope John Paul II.Princess Inés was, at the time of her birth, 9th in line of succession to the Spanish throne


Inés de Borbón-Dos Sicilias y Orleáns (20 April 1971), daughter of Carlos Maria Alfonso Marcelo de Borbón-Dos Sicilias y de Borbón-Parma, Infante of Spain, Duke of Calabria (16 January 1938 – 5 October 2015)  and  Princess Anne of Orléans (born 4 December 1938) She married to Michele Carrelli Palombi (13 November 1965), with two children


Inês de Castro (1325 – 7 January 1355) was a Galician noblewoman and courtier, best known as lover and posthumously-recognized wife of King Peter I of Portugal. The dramatic circumstances of her relationship with Peter (at the time Prince of Portugal), which was forbidden by his father King Afonso IV, her murder at the orders of Afonso, Peter's bloody revenge on her killers, and the legend of the coronation of her exhumed corpse by Peter, have made Inês de Castro a frequent subject of art, music, and drama through the ages. Inês was the natural daughter of Pedro Fernández de Castro, Lord of Lemos and Sarria, and his noble Portuguese mistress Aldonça Lourenço de Valadares Inês came to Portugal in 1340 as a lady-in-waiting of Constance of Castile, recently married to Peter, the heir apparent to the Portuguese throne The prince fell in love with her and started to neglect his lawful wife, endangering the already feeble relations with Castile. Moreover, Peter's love for Inês brought the exiled Castilian nobility very close to power, with Inês's brothers becoming the prince's friends and trusted advisors. King Afonso IV of Portugal, Peter's father, disliked Inês's influence on his son and waited for their mutual infatuation to wear off, but it did not.Constance of Castile died in 1345. Afonso IV tried several times to arrange for his son to be remarried, but Pedro refused to take a wife other than Inês, who was not deemed eligible to be queen. Peter's legitimate son, future King Ferdinand I of Portugal, was a frail child, whereas Peter and Inês's illegitimate children were thriving; this created even more discomfort among the Portuguese nobles, who feared the increasing Castilian influence over Peter. Afonso IV banished Inês from the court after Constance's death, but Peter remained with her declaring her as his true love. After several attempts to keep the lovers apart, Afonso IV ordered Inês's death. Pêro Coelho, Álvaro Gonçalves, and Diogo Lopes Pacheco went to the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra, where Inês was detained, and killed her, decapitating her in front of her small child. When Peter heard of this he sought out the killers and managed to capture two of them in 1361. He executed them publicly by ripping their hearts out, claiming they didn't have one after having pulverized his own heart.Peter became king of Portugal in 1357 (Peter I of Portugal). He then stated that he had secretly married Inês, who was consequently the lawful queen, although his word was, and still is, the only proof of the marriage. During the 1383–85 Crisis of royal succession in Portugal, João das Regras produced evidence that allegedly established that Pope Innocent VI had refused Peter's request to recognize his marriage to Inês and legitimize his children by her, the elder of whom, John, Duke of Valencia de Campos would have a strong potential claim to the throne of Portugal. By negating these children's claimed legitimacy, João das Regras strengthened the claim of another illegitimate child of Peter I of Portugal: John, Master of Aviz, who ultimately took the throne and ruled as John I of Portugal.Some sources say that after Peter became king of Portugal, he had Inês' body exhumed from her grave and forced the entire court to swear allegiance to their new queen: "The king [Peter] caused the body of his beloved Inês to be disinterred, and placed on a throne, adorned with the diadem and royal robes. and required all the nobility of the kingdom to approach and kiss the hem of her garment, rendering her when dead that homage which she had not received in her life..."Some modern sources characterize the story of the Inês' post-mortem coronation is a "legend." and it is most likely a myth, since the story only appeared in 1577 in Jerónimo Bermúdez' play Nise Laureada. She was later buried at the Monastery of Alcobaça where her coffin can still be seen, opposite Peter's so that, according to the legend, at the Last Judgment Peter and Inês can look at each other as they rise from their graves. Both marble coffins are exquisitely sculpted with scenes from their lives and a promise by Peter that they would be together até ao fim do mundo (until the end of the world).Inês de Castro and Peter I had 4 children, who were legitimized by Peter I on 19 March 1361.

Inés Enríquez y Sandoval or Inés Enríquez Tavera de Saavedra, 1st Countess of la Torre (died after 1618) was a Spanish and later French court official. She served as Première dame d'honneur to the queen of France, Anne of Austria, from 1615 until 1618.Inés de la Torre was a daughter of Juan de Saavedra el Turquillo and Francisca Enríquez de Sandoval, and a cousin to the influential favorite of Philip III of Spain, Francisco Gómez de Sandoval, 1st Duke of Lerma. She was heiress of the house of Saavedra. She married Per Afán de Ribera y Guzmán, señor de la Torre de la Reina.Inés de la Torre served as lady-in-waiting to the queen, Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain. As a widow, she was created the first Countess de la Torre by the king.In 1615, was appointed head of the ladies-in-waiting of Anne of Austria prior to her departure from Spain to her wedding to Louis XIII of France. In an effort to retain their influence upon Anne in France, king Philip III and the Duke of Lerma appointed people they regarded a loyal to themselves to the offices of the household that was to accompany her to France, and as cousin to the duke of Lerma, Inés de la Torre, was given the highest position and expected to protect the interests of Spain at the French court. She was instructed by the Spanish king to make sure that Anne retained her life rules in France, and she was also to give him regular reports of his daughters doings.Inés de la Torre had a powerful influence over queen Anne.


Countess Inés de Castro Cabrera y Bobadilla {1665-1665)


Ines Pacheco, a native of Escalona, who was baptized on July 10, 1537, daughter of Diego López Pacheco, III Marquis of Villena, III Duke of Escalona, III Count of Xiquena and VI of San Esteban de Gormaz, and Of Luisa de Cabrera and Bobadilla, III marquesa de Moya; Granddaughter of ... and mother of Juan Perez de Cabrera and Bobadilla, II Marquis of Moya, and Ana de Mendoza, of the Dukes of the Infantado. She married Diego Fernández de Cabrera y Bobadilla (nc1535), III Count of Chinchón

Inés Enríquez Tavera de Saavedra

Inés de Guzmán, wife  of Andrés de Castro (of the counts of Lemos, cousin of her husband) and mother of the VI and the VIII Countess of Chinchón

Inés de Guzmán, daughter of María Pimentel de Fonseca ( = a daughter of Jerónimo de Acevedo, 4th Count of Monterrey and Enrique de Guzmán, 2nd Count of Olivares She married Álvaro Enríquez de Almansa, 6th Marquis of Alcañices

Inés de Velasco, wife of Jerónimo de Acevedo, 4th Count of Monterrey

Countess  Inés de Castro Cabrera y Bobadilla (c.1635-1665), VI Countess of Chinchón, II Marquesa de San Martín de la Vega, Queen of the Marian Queen of Austria, a member of the Second Count of Chinchón, daughter of the Comendador Andrés de Castro and granddaughter of the V Counts of Lemos. She was the second cousin of her predecessor for the line of succession of the house, which was the paternal of both, but also her carnal cousin, for their mothers were sisters. And he survived only two months, for he died in Madrid on December 27, 1665.16 At this time she came into possession of the mayorazgo and jurisdictions, but did not title.She married in the Royal Palace of Buen Retiro, on November 11, 1657,16 with Jose Alejo de Cárdenas Ulloa y Zúñiga (c.1630-1665), XI Count of Puebla del Maestre, X de Nieva and Villalonso, II Marquis Of Bacares, VI of La Mota and V of Auñón, lord of the house of Valda and added in Azcoitia, patron of the church of Santa Maria la Real of this town and of the convent of San Felipe el Real of Madrid, elect extraordinary ambassador From SMC In France (1685), butler of King Charles II and the gentleman of his Chamber with entry, son of Diego de Cárdenas y Herrera, X conde de la Puebla del Maestre, I marqués de Bacares and III de Auñón, knight of Santiago, assistant and Master of the general field of Seville, and Mariana de Ulloa Zúñiga and Velasco, his wife, IX Countess of Nieva and V Marquesa de la Mota.In 1666 her daughter succeeded

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« Reply #1085 on: May 05, 2022, 01:25:42 PM »

OT but I have always loved the name Ines or Inez. 
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« Reply #1086 on: May 05, 2022, 01:31:24 PM »

Blanca meaning "white" in Spanish, Blanche is a feminine given name. It means "white" in French, derived from the Late Latin word "blancus"

Princess Blanca of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (7 April 2011) daughter of  Sofía Landaluce y Melgarejo (23 November 1973) and Prince Pedro of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, Duke of Calabria (16 October 1968)

Blanca (Basque: Blanka Garzeitz, Spanish: Blanca Garcés)(aft. 1133 – August 12, 1156) was Queen of Castile, daughter of King García Ramírez of Navarre and his first wife, Margaret of L'Aigle. Blanca married Sancho III of Castile, regent of Castile (subject to his father Alfonso VII) on February 4, 1151 in Carrión de los Condes, Palencia, after travelling from Calahorra, Logroño, in January. The marriage was arranged to insure closer ties between León-Castile and Navarre. As was traditional, Blanca confirmed documents with her husband, so her activity may be traced until 1155.On November 11, 1155 she gave birth to the future king Alfonso VIII. There appears to be no record of her activities after December 1155, and she died on August 12, 1156. The cause of her death seems to have been complications of a new pregnancy, a child named García. In addition, she had other children buried in the church of San Pedro in Soria, although they are not identified.That her death was caused by a pregnancy is recorded in an epitaph engraved on her tomb; however, the engraving did not survive a sixteenth-century reconstruction of the royal tombs in Nájera. Her sarcophagus lid was preserved, and it represents the queen's deathbed with members of the court, including her husband, mourning her passing. Blanca was buried in the pantheon of the Navarrese kings in the monastery called Santa María la Real of Nájera, to which Sancho made donations on her behalf. The sarcophagus of the queen is regarded as a primary example of the ability to express human emotions in visual images in the 12th century.


Blanche of Navarre (c. 1177–1229) was Countess of Champagne by marriage to Theobald III, Count of Champagne, and regent of Champagne during the minority of her son Theobald I of Navarre between 1201 and 1222. She was the youngest daughter of Sancho VI of Navarre and Sancha of Castile, who died in 1179, about two years after Blanche's birth. Her eldest brother, Sancho VII, succeeded their father and was the last agnatic descendant of the first dynasty of kings of Navarre, the Pamplona dynasty, dying childless. Her elder sister Berengaria married Richard I of England.Blanche married Theobald III, Count of Champagne, on 1 July 1199 at Chartres, when she was 22-years-old and he was 20-years-old.Blanche had two children with Theobald III of Champagne


Blanche of Castile (Spanish: Blanca de Castilla)(4 March 1188 – 27 November 1252) was Queen of France by marriage to Louis VIII. She acted as regent twice during the reign of her son, Louis IX: during his minority from 1226 until 1234, and during his absence from 1248 until 1252. She was born in Palencia, Spain, 1188, the third daughter of Alfonso VIII, King of Castile, and Eleanor of England.

Blanche of France (1205 – died soon after), daughter of Blanche of Castile and Louis VIII of France.

Blanche of France (12 July/4 December 1240 – 29 April 1244), died in infancy. Daughter of Louis IX of France and Margaret of Provence (1221 – 21 December 1295)

Blanche of France (French: Blanche de France) (1253–1323) was a daughter of King Louis IX of France and Margaret of Provence In November 1269,[3] she married Ferdinand de la Cerda, Infante of Castile, eldest son of Alfonso X of Castile and Violant of Aragon.They had 2 sons.

Blanca de la Cerda y Lara (c. 1317 – 1347) was a Spanish noblewoman.She was the daughter of Fernando de la Cerda (1275–1322) ( = son of Blanche of France (1253-1323)) and Juana Núñez de Lara, called "la Palomilla".Blanca was the second wife of Juan Manuel, Prince of Villena (1282–1349), a member of the junior branch of the Castilian royal house. Their daughter Juana Manuel of Castile married the (illegitimate) Henry II of Castile and became queen consort of Castile.

Blanche of France (German: Blanca; c. 1282 – 1 March 1305), a member of the House of Capet, was Duchess of Austria and Styria as consort to the Habsburg Duke Rudolph III, eldest son of King Albert I of GermanyBlanche was born in Paris, the second child of King Philip III of France and his second wife, Maria of Brabant.Blanche was betrothed four times before her eventual marriage. Her first betrothal was to John I, Marquis of Namur, in September 1290. Her second betrothal was on 31 July 1291 to Edward, Prince of Wales, but he would instead marry Blanche's niece Isabella.Her third betrothal took place in 1293 and was to the Prince of Wales's father, Edward I of England, who had been widowed three years earlier. Edward broke off his son's betrothal to Blanche after hearing of her beauty and sent emissaries to negotiate the intended union with her half-brother, King Philip IV. Edward agreed and sent his brother Edmund Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster, to fetch the new bride, but Lancaster discovered that Blanche was already betrothed to another. Philip instead offered Edward her younger sister Margaret, who was at the time only eleven years old. Her fourth betrothal, in 1296, was to John, son of John II, Count of Holland.As King Albert I of Germany aimed at a dynastic relation with the French royal House of Capet, he had entered into negotiations with the Paris court about 1295. Blanche married Rudolph on 25 May 1300; however, she did not arrive in Vienna until Christmas. The Austrian court admired her rich endowment, but also noted a taste for luxury and pomp. The duchess accompanied her husband on a journey to the Styrian lands, where she proved supportive to the Habsburg pretensions.Blanche bore Rudolf a stillborn daughter in 1304 and a short-lived son who was probably poisoned in March 1306. She died on 1 March 1305, possibly of complications after a miscarriage.Since 1784, Blanche is buried at the Minoritenkirche in Vienna. Upon her death, Rudolf secondly married the Piast princess Elizabeth Richeza of Poland.

Blanca Sánchez of Navarre, Countess of Champagne (died 1229), also Blanche de Navarre

Blanche of Navarre (1226 – 12 August 1283), also known as Blanche of Champagne, was the daughter of Theobald the Troubador, King of Navarre and Count of Champagne, and his second wife Agnes of Beaujeu. She was a member of the House of Champagne. By her marriage to John I, Duke of Brittany, she became Duchess consort of Brittany. They had 8 children

Blanche of Brittany (1271–1327) was a daughter of John II, Duke of Brittany, and his wife Beatrice of England. She is also known as Blanche de Dreux. Through her mother she was the granddaughter of King Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence.Blanche was married in Paris sometime after November 1281 to Philip of Artois, who was the son of Robert II of Artois and Amice de Courtenay. The couple had seven children


Blanche de Foix, married in 1328 Jean de Grailly, Viscount of Castillon, Captal de Buch, by whom she had two children, including Jean III de Grailly, Captal de Buch. Daughter of Joan of Artois, Countess of Foix, Viscountess of Béarn (née of Artois) and Gaston I of Foix or Gaston VIII of Foix-Béarn


Blanche of Namur (Swedish and Norwegian: Blanka; 1320–1363) was Queen of Norway and Sweden as the wife of King Magnus VII / IV.Blanche was the eldest daughter of John I, Marquis of Namur and Marie of Artois. On her father's side, she was a member of the powerful House of Dampierre, being a grandchild of Count Guy of Flanders. On her mother's side Blanche was related to the French royal house, as her mother was a daughter of Philip of Artois, a patrilineal great-grandson of Louis VIII of France, and thus a member of a junior line of the House of Capet.It is unknown why a marriage was arranged between the king of Sweden and Norway and a member of the House of Namur. In June 1334 king Magnus travelled from Norway to Namur to propose. They were engaged in Namur and Magnus returned to Sweden in the fall of 1334. Blanche left Namur in the fall of 1335 and the wedding took place in October or early November 1335, possibly at Bohus Castle. As a wedding gift Blanche received the province of Tunsberg in Norway and Lödöse in Sweden as fiefs; Tunsberg was exchanged in 1353 to Bohus, Marstrand, Elfsyssel, Rånrike and Borgarsyssel. Blanche's coronation took place in July 1336, possibly 22 July, in the Great Church in StockholmBlanche and Magnus had two sons, Eric and Haakon, plus at least three daughters who died as children. In 1343, it was agreed that the two kingdoms of Sweden and Norway should again be divided, and that their eldest son Eric should inherit Sweden and their second son Haakon Norway


Blanche of Brittany (born c. 1300); considered to have died young. Daugter of Arthur II, Duke of Brittany and his 2nd wife Yolande of Dreux (20 March 1263 – 2 August 1330)

Blanche I (6 July 1387– 1 April 1441) was Queen of Navarre from the death of her father, King Charles III, in 1425 until her own death. She had been Queen of Sicily from 1402 to 1409 by marriage to King Martin I, serving as regent of Sicily from 1404 to 1405 and from 1408 to 1415.Blanche was the second eldest daughter of King Charles III of Navarre and infanta Eleanor of Castile. She became the heiress to the throne of Navarre on the death of her elder sister, Joan, in 1413.Blanche married firstly Martin the Younger, King of Sicily and Prince of Aragon.They were married by proxy on 21 May 1402 in Catania. Blanche traveled to meet Martin, and they were married in person on 26 December 1402. The bride was about 15 years old and the groom 28.Martin had been in need of legitimate heirs, as he had survived his previous wife and former co-ruler, Queen Maria of Sicily, and their only son. From October 1404 to August 1405, she served as regent of Sicily during the absence of her spouse in Aragon.From August 1408 to July 1409, she served as regent of Sicily during the absence of her spouse in Sardinia. When Martin died on 25 July 1409, he was succeeded by his own father, Martin I of AragonHer former father-in-law allowed her to continue as regent of Sicily, which she did also after his death, during the years of succession struggle in Aragon. She was a popular regent in Sicily, where she was seen as a symbol of Sicilian independence against Aragon, and Bernardo Cabrera made an unsuccessful attempt to abduct her to marry Nicolas Peralta, a descendant of the Sicilian royal house, and thereby restore the Sicilian royal house with her and Nicolas as king and queen.With the victory of Ferdinand I in Aragon, Blanche lost her regency power in Sicily, which was annexed to Aragon in November 1415, and left for Navarre.Upon her return to Navarre, Blanche was sworn in as heir to the throne in Olite the 28 October 1415 and was given allegiance by the lords. On 6 November 1419, Blanche married her second husband, John,[2] duke of Peñafiel, the second son of Ferdinand I of Aragon and Eleanor of Alburquerque, by proxy in Olite. Ferdinand had succeeded his maternal uncle Martin I in 1412.John travelled to meet her. On 10 June 1420, they were married in person in Pamplona. The couple first lived in Peñafiel, but were called to live in Navarre by her father in 1422.Charles III died on 8 September 1425 and Blanche succeeded him as Queen regnant of Navarre.John became King of Navarre in her right as John II,[2] and the couple were crowned together in Pamplona 15 May 1429.Blanche died in Santa María la Real de Nieva in 1441. After her death, John kept the government of Navarre in his own hands, from the hands of their own son Charles of Viana, the rightful heir of the line of Navarrese kings. He would become King of Aragon and King of Sicily upon the death of his elder brother Alfonso V of Aragon in 1458.Blanche and Martin had one child together. Blanche and John II of Aragon had four children together.


Blanche II (Spanish: Blanca, Basque: Zuria)( 9 June 1424 – 2 December 1464), was the titular queen of Navarre between 1461 and 1464. She was the daughter of John II of Aragon and Blanche I of Navarre. She was also Princess of Asturias by marriage to Henry of Castile.Blanche was born on 9 June 1424 in Olite, Navarre. She was the second child and eldest daughter born to John II of Aragon, who was Duke of Montblanc at the time, and his wife, Blanche of Navarre.In 1427, she, her brother Charles, and her sister Eleanor were proclaimed the rightful heirs of the kingdom of Navarre. Blanche was promised to the heir of Castile in the peace treaty between Navarre and Castile in 1436. She married Henry, Prince of Asturias (later King Henry IV of Castile) in 1440. The marriage was reputedly never consummated.In 1453, after thirteen years, Henry sought the annulment of the marriage. An official examination confirmed the virginity of Blanche. A divorce was granted by the Pope on the grounds that some "witchcraft" had prevented Henry from consummating the marriage. After this, Blanche was sent home to Navarre, where she was imprisoned by her family: from 1462, she was under the custody of her sister. She remained childless throughout her life.


Blanche of Navarre (French: Blanche d'Évreux)( c. 1331 – 5 October 1398), was a French princess and Infanta of Navarre as a member of the House of Évreux (a cadet branch of the House of Capet) and by marriage Queen of France from 29 January until 22 August 1350.Blanche d'Évreux was intended become the bride of John, Duke of Normandy, heir of the throne of France — whose first wife had just died of the Black Death— but eventually married his father, King Philip VI of France. Only a few months after their wedding, the French king died prematurely and Blanche found herself a widow.After giving birth in 1351 to a posthumous daughter, Blanche refused to remarry King Peter of Castile and retired to the large dower lands that were granted by her late husband. Despite her widowhood, she played an essential role in 1354 by attempting to reconcile her brother King Charles II of Navarre with King John II of France. In 1389, she organized the coronation of Isabeau of Bavaria, the wife of King Charles VI of France.Blanche was the third daughter of King Philip III and Queen Joan II of NavarreBlanche was engaged on 19 August 1335 to Andrew, only son and heir of the Dauphin Humbert II of Viennois, but the project was abandoned after the premature death of her fiancé two months later. Then, on 15 March 1340, a marriage contract was signed between Blanche and Louis of Male, only son and heir of Louis I, Count of Flanders, which provided for payment of a dowry of 50,000 livres for the Infanta of Navarre. The engagement was nullified on 6 June 1347 by the marriage of Louis of Male to Margaret, daughter of John III, Duke of Brabant. Finally, on 1 July 1345, while still officially engaged with the heir of Flanders, a marriage contract was drawn up between Blanche and Peter, son and heir of King Alfonso XI of Castile.[6] Nevertheless, it was almost immediately abandoned by the Castilian court in favor of a marriage with Joan, daughter of King Edward III of England.On 29 January 1350 at Brie-Comte-Robert, Blanche married King Philip VI of France, forty years her senior. Initially, she was intended to marry John, Duke of Normandy, heir of the throne of France,but, being considered as one of the most beautiful princesses of her time — which explains her nickname "Beautiful Wisdom" (French: Belle Sagesse)— King Philip VI became captivated by her beauty and decided to marry her, while the Duke of Normandy was married with Blanche's first cousin Joan I, Countess of Auvergne.


Infanta Blanca of Spain (7 September 1868 – 25 October 1949) was the eldest child of Carlos, Duke of Madrid, Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain and his wife Princess Margherita of Bourbon-Parma. Blanca was a member of the House of Bourbon and - according to the Carlists - an Infanta of Spain by birth. In 1889 she married Archduke Leopold Salvator of Austria. The couple had ten children. The family left Austria after the end of the Monarchy and finally settled in Barcelona. When the male line of Blanca's family died out at the death of her uncle, Alfonso Carlos, Duke of San Jaime, some of the Carlists recognized her as the legitimate heiress to the Spanish throne.Infanta Blanca of Spain was born in Graz, Styria, Austria-Hungary, the eldest child of Carlos, Duke of Madrid, the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain under the name Carlos VII and of his wife Princess Margherita of Bourbon-Parma. At the time of her birth, her parents were living in Styria in order to be close to her maternal great-grandmother, the Duchess of Berry. Her father left the same day for Paris where he learnt of the revolution that deposed Queen Isabella II of Spain. Don Carlos was joined in Paris by his wife and daughter and from there they moved to Switzerland.Blanca's childhood was marked by the third Carlist War (1872–1876) in which her father tried, unsuccessfully, to gain the throne of Spain by force. To be near the Spanish border Margherita moved with her children to Pau. For a time in 1875, Blanca lived in Elizondo, Navarre at the court established by her father. After the war ended badly, crushing Don Carlos' hopes of taking the throne of Spain, the family lived mostly in the Parisian district of Passy. In 1881 they were expelled from France due to Carlos's political activities. By then Blanca's parents had drifted apart. Her father went to live in his palace in Venice, while her mother retired to Tenuata Reale, an estate in Viareggio, Italy inherited in 1879 from Blanca's great-grandmother, Duchess Maria Teresa of Parma. Blanca and her siblings divided their time between their parents. In 1881 Blanca and her sisters entered the Sacre Coeur, a Catholic school run by nuns in Florence. Blanca played the mandolin and was very fond of horses. In 1883, upon finishing her schooling, she visited Spain incognito with her parents' permission. At her return she was officially introduced to the court in Vienna.At the court of the Habsburgs, Blanca, the eldest and the best looking of four sisters, attracted the attention of Archduke Leopold Salvator of Austria, second child and eldest son of Archduke Karl Salvator of Austria and his wife Princess Maria Immaculata of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. They were married on 24 October 1889 at Schloss Frohsdorf in Lanzenkirchen, Lower Austria, Austria. The marriage was happy and produced ten children.


Blanca Maria de Habsburg y Orlandis (1926–1969) married in 1948 Raul Ereñu (1908–1969). They had five children She is de daughter of Archduchess Maria Antonia of Austria (1899–1977) and her 1st husband Ramon Orlandis y Villalonga (1896–1936), who belonged to the minor Spanish nobility


Blanche of Portugal (25 February 1259 – 17 April 1321 in Burgos; Branca in Portuguese and Blanca in Spanish), was an infanta, the firstborn child of King Afonso III of Portugal and his second wife Beatrice of Castile. Named after her great-aunt Blanche of Castile,She had a son out of wedlock by a Portuguese nobleman named Pedro Nunes Carpinteiro, or Pedro Estevanez Carpenteyro as recorded in the chronicles of Rui de Pina and of Alfonso XI
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« Reply #1087 on: May 05, 2022, 01:31:56 PM »

Blanche of France (1313 – 26 April 1358), nun at Longchamp Abbey, was the fourth and youngest daughter of King Philip V of France and Countess Joan II of Burgundy.Blanche was born in 1313, before either of her parents ascended their respective thrones, during the reign of her paternal grandfather, King Philip IV of France. She was named after her mother's ill-fated sister, Blanche of Burgundy. A year after Blanche's birth, her mother and both paternal aunts, Blanche and Margaret of Burgundy, were implicated in the Tour de Nesle Affair. The marriage of her parents was successful enough for her father to insist on her mother's acquittal, but her aunts were imprisoned.By the time Blanche was seven years old, her parents had become king and queen of France and Navarre and count and countess palatine of Burgundy. Queen Joan decided that her youngest daughter should join the Order of Saint Francis, probably wishing that the girl's cloistered life could compensate for the sins of her imprisoned namesake aunt.[3] Blanche's mother did not make the decision easily, however, and not before procuring several papal dispensations that would serve to alleviate the harshness of monastic life. The Queen secured a special dispensation that allowed her and the King to visit their daughter frequently, but was later cautioned by the pope against visiting Blanche too often.Despite her religious vows, Blanche is more often mentioned as daughter of a French king by primary sources than any of her titled sisters - Countess Joan III of Burgundy, Countess Margaret I of Burgundy and Dauphine Isabella of Viennois. She is presumed to have at some point owned a richly decorated Franciscan breviary, the earliest known work of Jean Pucelle. Blanche died as a Poor Clare on 26 April 1358, outliving all her siblings except Margaret.


Blanche of Burgundy (c. 1296 – c. 1326) was Queen of France and Navarre for a few months in 1322 through her marriage to King Charles IV the Fair. The daughter of Count Otto IV of Burgundy and Countess Mahaut of Artois, she was led to a disastrous marriage by her mother's ambition. Eight years before her husband's accession to the thrones, Blanche was arrested and found guilty of adultery with a Norman knight. Her sister-in-law, Margaret of Burgundy, suffered the same fate, while her sister Joan was acquitted. Blanche was imprisoned and not released even after becoming queen, until her marriage was annulled when she was moved to the coast of Normandy. The date and place of her death are unknown; the mere fact that she died was simply mentioned on the occasion of her husband's third marriage in April 1326.Blanche was the younger daughter of Otto IV, Count of Burgundy, and Mahaut, Countess of Artois. Her father died in 1303, leaving the county to Blanche's elder sister, Joan. Joan was supposed to marry King Louis the Headstrong of Navarre, the eldest son and heir apparent of King Philip the Fair of France, but Philip the Fair changed his mind and arranged for her to marry his second son, Count Philip the Tall of Poitiers, in 1307. The same year, Louis married Margaret of Burgundy.The Countess of Artois was proud of this achievement and quickly started negotiating her younger daughter's marriage to Count Charles the Fair, King Philip's third son, offering a huge dowry. The negotiations were successful and on 23 September 1307, the eleven-year-old Blanche and two years older Charles concluded a marriage contract. The marriage ceremony was hastily performed at Countess Mahaut's castle in Hesdin in January 1308. At first, Charles and Blanche had an unremarkable marriage that was neither as flawed as that of the King and Queen of Navarre nor as harmonious as that of the Count and Countess of Poitiers. Charles was created Count of La Marche in 1314, so Blanche was accordingly referred as Countess.In 1313, the Countess of la Marche's sister-in-law and brother-in-law, Queen Isabella and King Edward II of England, paid a visit to King Philip. Isabella presented her brothers and sisters-in-law with embroidered coin purses. Later that year, upon their return to London, Isabella and Edward held a banquet during which the Queen noticed that the coin purses she had given to Blanche and Margaret were now in the possession of the Norman knights Gautier and Philippe d'Aunay. From that she concluded that the brothers were having relationships with her sisters-in-law. When she visited Paris again in 1314, she informed King Philip about her suspicions.Blanche and Margaret were soon accused of inappropriate conduct, such as drinking and eating with the knights, and of eventually committing adultery with them in Paris guard tower known as the Tour de Nesle. Blanche's sister Joan was accused of hiding the affair and later of participating in it.The accusations against Countess Blanche and Queen Margaret were more than likely true, but several 14th-century chroniclers believed that their father-in-law's popularly despised chamberlain Enguerrand de Marigny might have falsely incriminated them and the knights. After a certain period of time, King Philip ordered the arrest of all his daughters-in-law and the knights. Following torture, the knights confessed to adultery[5] and admitted that it had lasted three years. The Countess of la Marche and the Queen of Navarre were tried before the Paris Parlement and were found guilty of adultery. Their heads were shaven and both were sentenced to life imprisonment underground in Château Gaillard, while their lovers were condemned to death and duly executed. Her first child, a son named Philip, was born around 5 January 1314 and thus before the accusation of adultery levelled at his mother, so presumably his paternity was not challenged; her second child, a daughter named Joan, was born in 1315 after the trial, so some doubt about her paternity was suggested by the contemporary Continuatio of the Chronicle of Guillaume de Nangis, moreover because reportedly Blanche became pregnant either by one of her jailers or by her own husband ("a serviente quodam eius custodiæ deputato dicebatur...a proprio [comite] diceretur"); however, she was presumably accepted as part of the royal family according to later sources. Despite her disgrace, Blanche remained in contact with her ambitious mother and often received gifts from her.King Philip, severely shocked by the scandal, died within a year. Margaret, now queen of France, died while kept imprisoned soon thereafter. Louis' reign was cut short by his sudden death. Soon, Philip the Tall and Blanche's sister Joan became king and queen of France and Navarre. It was suggested that Blanche was treated better once her sister became queen, but that was concluded from a single misinterpreted document and may not be entirely accurate. Queen Joan did, however, arrange for her youngest daughter Blanche to become a nun, hoping that the seven-year-old's cloistered life would atone for her sister's transgression.On Philip the Tall's death on 3 January 1322, Blanche's husband inherited the crowns. Blanche thus became queen of France and Navarre, but her husband still refused to release her.[11] Both of her children died in infancy, Philip before 24 March 1322 and Joan on 17 May 1321. Charles requested annulment of their marriage, to which Blanche reluctantly agreed. The annulment was justified by the claim that Blanche's mother was Charles's godmother, although probably the real reason was Blanche's pregnancy during her imprisonment. Pope John XXII declared their marriage null and void on 19 May 1322,[1] and gave both Charles and Blanche permission to remarry. The Countess of Artois requested, among other things, the return of her daughter's enormous dowry.Though she was replaced immediately by Marie of Luxembourg, there was no hope for Blanche to remarry, as she was sent to Gavray Castle. There is no evidence that supports the common belief that she died as a nun at Maubuisson Abbey.[9] Having spent eight years imprisoned underground, the former queen suffered from poor health. The date of her eventual death is unknown; the Pope mentioned her as dead in a document of 5 April 1326 issuing a dispensation for the marriage of her former husband and Jeanne d'Évreux.


Blanche of France (1 April 1328 – 8 February 1393) was the posthumous daughter of King Charles IV of France and his third wife, Joan of Évreux (the daughter of Louis, Count of Évreux and Margaret of Artois). She was the last direct Capetian and the last-surviving member of her family, and her marriage to her second-cousin, Philip, Duke of Orléans, proved childless. With Blanche's death in 1393, the House of Capet continued to exist only via its numerous cadet branches.As with his brothers before him, King Charles IV died without a male heir, thus ending the direct line of the House of Capet. Twelve years earlier, a rule against succession by females, arguably derived from the Salic law, had been recognized as controlling succession to the French throne. Application of this rule barred Charles's 1-year-old daughter Marie from succeeding as the monarch.Jeanne was also pregnant at the time of his death. Since it could have been possible that she would give birth to a son, a regency was set up under Philip of Valois, the closest agnate. After two months, Queen Jeanne gave birth to Blanche. The regent thus became king and in May was consecrated and crowned. At this time, a further rule of succession, again arguably based on the Salic law, was recognized as forbidding not only inheritance by a woman, but also inheritance through a female line.Blanche married on 8 January 1345 her cousin Philip, Duke of Orléans (1336–1375), son of King Philip VI of France and Queen Joan the Lame. They had no children but Philip had illegitimate children. He had died in 1376, his title and lands returning to the royal domain.Blanche died in 1393


Blanche of England, LG (spring 1392 – 22 May 1409), also known as Blanche of Lancaster, was a member of the House of Lancaster, the daughter of King Henry IV of England by his first wife Mary de Bohun.Born at Peterborough Castle (now in Cambridgeshire), Blanche was the sixth of the seven children born during the marriage of Henry of Lancaster and his wife Mary de Bohun. At the time of her birth, Henry was only Earl of Derby and, thanks to his marriage, Earl of Northampton and Earl of Hereford; as the only surviving son of John of Gaunt and Blanche of Lancaster, he was the heir of the Duchy of Lancaster. Blanche was named after her paternal grandmother.Blanche's mother died on 4 June 1394 in Peterborough Castle after giving birth to her last child, Philippa. Five years later, on 30 September 1399, Blanche's father deposed his cousin Richard II and usurped the throne. Three years later in 1402, her father was remarried, to Joanna, daughter of King Charles II of Navarre and widow of Duke John V of Brittany. There were no children of this marriage.After his accession to the English throne, King Henry IV wanted to make important alliances in order to maintain and legitimise his rule. One needed ally was King Rupert of Germany, who had also ascended following his predecessor's deposition: a marriage between Rupert's eldest surviving son Louis and Henry IV's eldest daughter Blanche was soon arranged.Blanche's restored tombstone at the church in Neustadt an der Weinstrasse The marriage contract was signed on 7 March 1401 in London; the bride's dowry was fixed in the amount of 40,000 Nobeln (over 300 kg of gold). The formal marriage between Blanche and Louis took place one year later, on 6 July 1402 at Cologne Cathedral, Germany.[1] Blanche's dowry included the oldest surviving royal crown known to have been in England.Despite its political nature, the marriage was said to be happy. Four years later, on 22 June 1406 in Heidelberg, Blanche gave birth to a son, called Rupert after his paternal grandfather.In 1408 Blanche was made Lady of the Garter. One year later, pregnant with her second child, she died of fever in Haguenau, Alsace and was buried in the Church of St. Mary (today St. Aegidius) in Neustadt in the Palatinate.Her widower became Elector Palatine as Louis III in 1410 after the death of his father King Rupert and in 1417 married Matilda, daughter of Amadeo, Prince of Achaea, member of the House of Savoy, who bore him six children. Blanche's son Rupert (nicknamed the English) died aged nineteen in 1426, unmarried and without issue.


Blanche of Anjou (1280 – 14 October 1310) was Queen of Aragon as the second spouse of King James II of Aragon. She was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou, she is also known as Blanche of Naples. She served as Regent or "Queen-Lieutenant" of Aragon during the absence of her spouse in 1310 Blanche was the daughter of King Charles II of Naples and Mary of Hungary.The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James II of Aragon, and the Treaty of Anagni was signed: James was to marry Blanche and was promised the investiture, by the pope, of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted.On 29 October or 1 November 1295 at Vilabertran, Blanche and James were married.Blanche died on the 14 October 1310, during her regency in the absence of James. Her death was probably linked to the birth of her daughter Violante, who was born in October 1310. Blanche was buried at Santes Creus. She was survived by her husband, children and mother. Blanche and James had 10 children.


Blanche of Castile (August 1319 – 1375) was by birth a member of the Castilian House of Burgundy. She was the only child of Infante Peter of Castile, Lord of Los Cameros (son of King Sancho IV of Castile) and Infanta Maria of Aragon (daughter of King James II of Aragon).Blanche was born in the city of Alcocer, Guadalajara in August 1319, two months after the death of her father in the Disaster of the Vega de Granada (25 June 1319). Her parents had married in December 1311 in the city of Calatayud. Her father, Infante Peter, was Lord of Los Cameros, Almazán, Berlanga de Duero, Monteagudo and Cifuentes and Mayordomo mayor of his brother, King Ferdinand IV of Castile; after the latter's death (which occurred in 1312) he was appointed guardian of his nephew Alfonso XI of Castile and joint Regent of the Kingdom together with the infant King's grandmother (and Peter's mother), Maria de Molina and Infante John of Castile, Lord of Valencia de Campos (son of King Alfonso X of Castile), who was also killed in la Vega de Granada with Peter.In 1325 King James II planned to marry his granddaughter to John of Castile, Lord of Biscay, nicknamed the One-Eyed, an enemy of Philip of Castile, Garci Lasso de la Vega and Alvar Núñez Osorio, who were the new confidants to Alfonso XI of Castile. In 1325 Alfonso XI attained his majority and annulled the betrothal of Blanche and John, fearing that the Lord of Biscay would take possession of Blanche's lands bordering the Kingdoms of Castile and Aragon, and from there he rebelled against him. On 31 October 1326, John of Castile was murdered in the town of Toro by orders of Alfonso XI.In October 1327, Álvar Núñez Osorio negotiated with King Afonso IV the marriage contracts of Blanche and Infante Peter of Portugal, the king's son and heir, and that of Infante Peter's sister, Maria and the future Alfonso XI of Castile. Since both Peter and Blanche were minors, the marriage had to wait. Blanche was taken to be raised in Portugal until she was of age for marriage.[7] According to the Chronicle of Pedro I of Portugal by Fernão Lopes, during her stay, she began to show signs of illness and "defects of judgement" which made her unsuitable for marriage and for procreation. She was examined by physicians, including those sent by Alfonso XI, who confirmed her weak mental health and incapacity,[Crazy and, because of "Infante Pedro's refusal and the evident mental disorder of doña Blanca" the proposed marriage never took place.During this time, Juan Manuel secretly negotiated with King Alfonso IV the marriage of his daughter Constance Manuel with Infante Pedro.[13] Blanche returned to Aragon accompanied by Martim Fernandes de Portocarreiro and an entourage of Portuguese nobles with her entire dowry and money.In 1329, during the meetings between Kings Alfonso IV of Aragon and Alfonso XI of Castile in the cities of Ágreda and Tarazona, the Castilian King, using his presence in the Aragonese Kingdom, disposed that his cousin Blanche, who was living with her mother in Aragon, returned with him to Castile, according to the Gran Crónica de Alfonso XI.Alfonso XI gradually confiscated the lordships that had belonged to Blanche, and as of 1336, began to distribute these among his illegitimate children with Eleanor de GuzmánOnce in the Kingdom of Castile, Blanche was named Lady of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, the last one to hold the civil dominion over the monastery.Blanche was buried in Las Huelgas, alongside her parents
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« Reply #1088 on: May 05, 2022, 01:32:03 PM »

Blanche of Aragon (b. 1307 – d. 1348), Prioress of Sixena.Daughter of Blanche of Anjou and King James II of Aragon


Lady Blanche Arundell (née Lady Blanche Somerset)(1583 or c. 1584 – 28 October 1649) was an English noblewoman, known as the defender of Wardour Castle, where she defended the castle for nearly a week with just 25 men and her maidservants against a force of 1300.Arundell was born Blanche Somerset in 1583 or 1584, daughter of Edward Somerset, 4th Earl of Worcester, and Lady Elizabeth Hastings. On 11 May 1607 (date of settlement for the marriage) she married Thomas Arundell, 2nd Baron Arundell of Wardour, son of Thomas Arundell, 1st Baron Arundell of Wardour, and Lady Mary Wriothesley. They had three children


Blanche de Brienne, Baroness Tingry (c. 1252 – c. 1302) was the wife of William II de Fiennes, Baron of Tingry (c. 1250 – 11 July 1302). She was also known as Dame de La Loupeland, and Blanche of Acre.Blanche was born in about the year 1252 in France. She was the only child and heiress of Jean de Brienne, Grand Butler of France, and his first wife, Jeanne, Dame de Chateaudun, widow of Jean I de Montfort. Her paternal grandparents were John of Brienne, King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople, and Berenguela of Leon, and her maternal grandparents were Geoffrey VI, Viscount de Chateaudun and Clémence des Roches. Blanche had a uterine half-sister Beatrice de Montfort, Countess of Montfort-l'Amaury from her mother's first marriage to Jean I de Montfort (died 1249 in Cyprus). In 1260, Beatrice married Robert IV of Dreux, Count of Dreux, by whom she had six children.Blanche was co-heiress to her mother, by which she inherited Loupeland in MaineIn the year 1269, Blanche married William II de Fiennes, Baron of Tingry and Fiennes, son of Enguerrand II de Fiennes and Isabelle de Conde. His other titles included Lord of Wendover, Buckinghamshire, of Lambourne, Essex, of Chokes and Gayton, Northamptonshire, of Martock, Somerset, of Carshalton and Clapham, Surrey, and custodian of the county of Ponthieu. The settlement for the marriage had been made in February 1266/67.[2] William and Blanche had at least one son and two daughters


Blanche del Carretto (1432 – 1458), was Lady of Monaco by marriage to Catalan, Lord of Monaco. She has also been called Marguerite del Carretto. She was the daughter of Galeotto I del Carretto, Margrave of Finale. Blanche and Catalan had only one child. Her husband designated their daughter Claudine as ruler of Monaco upon his death. When he died in 1457, he was succeeded by their daughter Claudine, then only a child, but the regency government was assigned to Blanche's mother-in-law Pomellina Fregoso rather than to BlanchePomellina was deposed by Claudine's cousin Lambert in 1458, who assumed the Lordship of Monaco himself. Blanche died the same year of the accession of Lambert.


Blanche Grimaldi, married in 1501 to Honoré (baron de Tourette) de Villeneuve d'Espinouse, co-regent for Lucien's son Honoré I, Lord of Monaco with Nicolas Grimaldi in 1532. Daughter of Claudine, Lady of Monaco  (c. 1451 – 19 November 1515)  and  her cousin Lamberto Grimaldi (c. 1420 – March 1494)


Blanche of Valois (baptised Marguerite)(1317–1348) was Queen of Germany and Bohemia by her marriage to King and later Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV. She was the youngest daughter of Charles of Valois and his third wife Mahaut of Châtillon.Blanche grew up at the French court of her cousin Charles IV of France, who was a nephew to her father. She spent much time with Charles' wife Marie, who was an aunt to her future husband.At Prague in May 1329, Blanche and Charles were married. The couple lived apart for the first several years of marriage as they were both about 13 years old; Blanche lived in Luxembourg whilst Charles was in Italy focusing on securing the Empire with his father. The couple began to live together upon Charles' return in 1334, when they are now about 18 years old, at which time, the couple were made Margrave and Margravine of Moravia. Blanche entered Prague on 12 June with French ladies and courtiers. The couple clashed with the Bohemian nobility who had gained strength because of King John's frequent trips abroad; despite this challenge, Blanche learned Czech and German, had a social life and would remain in Bohemia when Charles traveled abroad. Within the first year of married life, the couple had a short-lived son.Blanche and Charles had two daughters


Blanche of Lancaster (25 March 1342 – 12 September 1368) was a member of the English royal House of Plantagenet and the daughter of the kingdom's wealthiest and most powerful peer, Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. She was the first wife of John of Gaunt, the mother of King Henry IV, and the grandmother of King Henry V of England.Blanche was born on 25 March 1342, according to her father's inquisitions post mortem.[3] She is also said to have been born as late as 1347, but this has been called into question as that would mean she had her first child at only about age 13.She was the younger daughter of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster, and his wife Isabel de Beaumont. She and her elder sister Maud, Countess of Leicester, were born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lindsey. Maud married Ralph de Stafford and then William I, Duke of Bavaria. Since Maud left no surviving children upon her death, her younger sister inherited the entirety of her father's titles and very considerable estates.On 19 May 1359, at Reading Abbey, Reading, Berkshire, Blanche married her third cousin, John of Gaunt, third son of King Edward III. The whole royal family was present at the wedding, and the King gave Blanche expensive gifts of jewellery. The title Duke of Lancaster became extinct upon her father's death without male heirs in 1361. However, as he was married to Blanche, John of Gaunt became Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Derby, Earl of Lincoln and Earl of Leicester, although he did not receive all of these titles until the death of Blanche's older sister, Maud, in 1362. The Duchy of Lancaster (second creation) was later bestowed on Gaunt. The influence associated with the titles would lead him to become Lord High Steward.Gaunt and Blanche's marriage is widely believed to have been happy, although there is little solid evidence for this. The assumption seems to be based on the fact that Gaunt chose to be buried with Blanche, despite his two subsequent marriages, and on the themes of love, devotion and grief expressed in Chaucer's poem (see below) – a rather circular argument, as it is partly on the basis of these themes that the couple's relationship is identified as the inspiration for the poem. Blanche and Gaunt had seven children, three of whom survived infancy.


Blanche (13 July 1388 – 6 March 1389), died in infancy at the age of 7 months, in Lisbon, and was buried in Lisbon Cathedral. Daughter of Philippa of Lancaster (Portuguese: Filipa)(31 March 1360 – 19 July 1415) and John I (Portuguese: João)(11 April 1357 – 14 August 1433)


Blanche Cavendish, Countess of Burlington (née Howard)(11 January 1812 – 27 April 1840), was the wife of William Cavendish, 2nd Earl of Burlington, who would later become the 7th Duke of Devonshire.Born on 11 January 1812, she was the eighth child of George Howard, 6th Earl of Carlisle, and his wife Georgiana, sister of the 6th Duke of Devonshire. The latter, known as the "Bachelor Duke", favoured Blanche and it has been suggested that his decision not to marry and have children of his own may have been coloured by his affection for her and her husband.In February 1816, Blanche's maternal aunt Harriet described the young girl in a letter to her sister, writing that Blanche is "too great a darling; she is shy in general, and I suppose it is from some likeness in voice and manner that she forgets with me that I am not you, calls me Mama, and is full of jokes and animation. How pretty she is!"Blanche's unmarried maternal uncle, the Duke of Devonshire, favoured a marriage between his heir, William Cavendish, and his niece. The Duke felt Blanche had humility and lacked self-consciousness, while William was intelligent but overly serious. Before the couple were even introduced, the Duke made preparations; he held a ball for Blanche, then seventeen years old, and weeks later the William proposed to her and was quickly accepted. Blanche married William Cavendish on 6 August 1829, a few years prior to his inheriting the earldom of Burlington from his grandfather, George Cavendish, 1st Earl of Burlington.It would prove to be a happy marriage, as the pair shared the same political views and deeply religious values. The couple had five children, one of whom died in infancy


Lady Blanche Katharine Cavendish (2 February 1898 - 1987), daughter of  Lady Evelyn Petty-FitzMaurice and Victor Cavendish, 9th Duke of Devonshire


Blanche of Montferrat (Italian: Bianca di Monferrato)(1472 – 30 March 1519) was Duchess of Savoy as the wife of Charles I of Savoy. She acted as regent for her only son Charles from 1490 until his accidental death in 1496. Blanche was the eldest daughter of Marquess William VIII Palaiologos of Montferrat and Elisabetta Sforza, daughter of Duke Francesco I Sforza of Milan and Bianca Maria Visconti, after whom Blanche was named. Her mother, Elisabetta, died at age 17 when Blanche was less than a year old.On 1 April 1485, Blanche married Duke Charles I of Savoy. The marriage produced two surviving children out of five


Lady Blanche Maynard (14 February 1864 – 17 August 1945), daughter of daughter of Col. Hon. Charles Henry Maynard and Blanche (née Fitzroy) Maynard. The wife of Colonel Lord Algernon Charles Gordon-Lennox (19 September 1847 - 3 October 1921), married at Easton on 31 August 1886 Together, they had one child: Ivy.


Blanche FitzRoy was descended from Charles II through his mistress Nell Gwyn via her mother, Jane Beauclerk, and Henry Fitzroy. Blanche FitzRoy was also descended from the Dukes of Grafton via her grandfather Rev. Henry Fitzroy, and through them from Charles II and his mistress Barbara Palmer. Blanche's maternal grandmother, Charlotte Ogilvie, was a daughter of the second marriage of Emily Lennox, one of the Lennox sisters, and through her was again a descendant of Charles II, and his French mistress, Louise de Keroualle. She married Colonel Charles Maynard. Blanche was only 18 when she gave birth to Frances, whilst Charles was aged 50. Frances would always be known as Daisy. The Maynards' younger daughter and Daisy's sister was named after her mother and was always known as Blanchie. Charles Maynard was the eldest son and heir apparent of Henry Maynard, 3rd Viscount Maynard. As Charles died three months before the Viscount, it was Daisy who inherited the Maynard estates in 1865, including her ancestral home of Easton Lodge in Little Easton, Essex. Two years after her father's death, her mother married 33-year-old Lord Rosslyn, a favourite courtier of Queen Victoria. They had five children, Daisy's half-sisters, including the noted Sybil Fane, Countess of Westmorland; Millicent Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland; and Lady Angela Forbes.
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« Reply #1089 on: May 05, 2022, 01:33:09 PM »

OT but I have always loved the name Ines or Inez.  

It was one of the names my mom had in mind for me. But eventually my dad came up with my RL first name and my mom agreed.
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« Reply #1090 on: May 05, 2022, 01:51:34 PM »

Virginia is a Germanic and Romance feminine given name derived from the Ancient Roman family name Verginius or Virginius, a name widely assumed to derive from the Latin word virgo, meaning "maiden" or "virgin." According to legend, Virginia was a Roman girl who was killed by her father in order to save her from seduction by the corrupt government official Appius Claudius Crassus

Princess Virginia von Fürstenberg (Virginia Carolina Theresa Pancrazia Galdina Prinzessin zu Fürstenberg)(18 April 1940), known professionally as Ira von Fürstenberg, is a European socialite, actress, jewelry designer and former public relations manager for the fashion designer Valentino Garavani. She is a member by birth of the princely family of Fürstenberg and a former member by marriage of the princely family of Hohenlohe-Langenburg.The daughter of Prince Tassilo zu Fürstenberg and his first wife, Clara Agnelli, she was born in Rome, Italy. Her paternal grandparents were Prince Karl Emil von Fürstenberg (1867–1945) and the Hungarian Countess Mária Matild Georgina Festetics von Tolna (24 May 1881– 2 March 1953), who was the daughter of Prince Tassilo Festetics von Tolna and Lady Mary Victoria Douglas-Hamilton. Her maternal great-grandmother was an American heiress, Jane Bourbon del Monte, Princess di San Faustino (née Campbell).Her first husband, whom she married at Venice, Italy, on 17 September 1955, was Prince Alfonso of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1924–2003), who founded the Marbella Club, a Spanish resort. At the time of the wedding, the bride was 15 and the groom was 31. They were divorced in 1960, and the marriage was annulled in 1969. They had two children. Her second husband was Francisco "Baby" Pignatari (1916–1977), a Brazilian industrialist. They married in Reno, Nevada, on 12 January 1961. They divorced in Las Vegas in January 1964 and had no children. Later on she was a companion for / of Prince Rainier III of Monaco.


Princess Virginia Maria Clara von und zu Fürstenberg (Virginia Maria Clara Prinzessin von und zu Fürstenberg)(5 October 1974) is an Italian artist, poet, filmmaker, and fashion designer. Princess Virginia von Fürstenberg was born in Genoa, Italy on 5 October 1974 to Prince Sebastian zu Fürstenberg and Elisabetta Guarnati. She is a member of the House of Fürstenberg. Her paternal grandparents were Prince Tassilo zu Fürstenberg and Clara Agnelli. She is a niece of actress Princess Ira von Fürstenberg and fashion designer Prince Egon von Fürstenberg, the ex-husband of Diane von Fürstenberg. Von Fürstenberg is a first cousin of Prince Alexandre von Fürstenberg, Tatiana von Fürstenberg, Prince Hubertus of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, and the late Prince Christoph of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. Von Fürstenberg is a fashion designer and creator of the fashion label Virginia Von Zu FurstenbergVon Fürstenberg married Baron Alexandre Csillaghy de Pacsér, a Hungarian nobleman, in 1992. Their son, Baron Miklós Tassilo Csillaghy, is an equestrian. Their daughter, Baroness Ginevra Csillaghy, has modeled for the Virginia Von Zu Furstenberg fashion line. She and Csillaghy de Pacsér divorced in 2003. In 2002, a year before her divorce was finalized, she gave birth to a daughter, Clara Bacco Dondi dall'Orologio, from her relationship with Giovanni Bacco Dondi dall'Orologio. In 2004 she married Paco Polenghi with whom she had two children, Otto Leone Maria Polenghi and Santiago Polenghi. Von Fürstenberg and Polenghi later divorced.


Virginia Kapoʻoloku Poʻomaikelani (1839–1895) was a member of the royal family of the Kingdom of Hawaii.She was born at Piʻihonua, Hilo, Hawaiʻi Island on April 7, 1839, the second daughter of Princess Kinoiki Kekaulike of Kauaʻi and High Chief Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole of Hilo.[ She was the granddaughter of Kaumualiʻi, the last king of the island of Kauaʻi before being ceded to the unified Hawaiian Islands governed by Kamehameha I. She was also the stepdaughter of Queen Regent Kaʻahumanu.She was elder sister of Victoria Kinoiki Kekaulike and younger sister of Queen Kapiʻolani, who married to King Kalākaua. Some sources give her different first names; for example Esther, Abigail or even Victoria. The situation was that the three sisters rarely used their Christian names.On March 20, 1855, she married Hiram Kahanawai, a steward of Queen Emma Poʻomaikelani and her husband served as in the household as retainers of Queen Emma. She was one of the trusted ladies-in-waiting for many years, but left Emma's employment to join her brother-in-law's court The couple did not have any children of their own but adopted and raised her nephew Prince Edward Abnel Keliʻiahonui, the second son of her sister Kekaulike.Her sister's husband became the king of Hawaiʻi in 1874 and she was granted the title of Princess and style of Her Royal Highness, in 1883 during Kalākaua's coronation. She was made Governor of Hawaiʻi island in 1884 by her brother-in-law and was paid an annual salary of 3500 dollars per year. Suffering from paralysis in her right leg, Poʻomaikelani had been largely incapacitated for the last ten years of her life having to be carried about, especially to service at St. Andrew's Cathedral where she regularly attended. Her condition worsened over the years until she was unable to leave her house. She died at Kalihi Valley, Oahu, October 2, 1895, aged 56, two years after Queen Liliʻuokalani was overthrown. The cause of death was heart failure


Virginia de' Medici (29 May 1568 – 15 January 1615) was an Italian princess, a member of the House of Medici and by marriage Duchess of Modena and Reggio.Regent of the Duchy of Modena and Reggio in 1601 during the absence of her husband, she was able to protect the autonomy of the city of Modena from the attacks of the local Podestà and Judge. Her husband's infidelities increased her already erratic behavior and led to a permanent mental illness, which lasted until her death.Born in Florence on 29 May 1568, Virginia was the illegitimate daughter of Cosimo I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany and his mistress Camilla Martelli. Her paternal grandparents were the famous condottiere Giovanni dalle Bande Nere and his wife Maria Salviati (in turn the granddaughter of Lorenzo the Magnificent) and her maternal grandparents were Antonio Martelli and Fiammetta Soderini, both members of the most important families among the Florentine patricians. Virginia was born after the formal resignation of her father of the government on behalf of her half-brother Francesco. Cosimo I contracted a morganatic marriage with Camilla Martelli on 29 March 1570 on the advice of Pope Pius V, and this allowed him to legitimize their daughter on the principle of per subsequens. Since that time, she lived with her parents at the Villa di Castello during the summer and in Pisa in winter. Cosimo I's older children resented their father's second marriage, and after the death of the Grand Duke in 1574, they imprisoned Camilla in the Florentine convent of Murate Despite the controversy about her illegitimate birth and ambiguous position in the Grand Ducal house, Virginia's older brothers began negotiations with the House of Sforza of a marriage between her and one of his members. In 1581 she was betrothed to Francesco Sforza, Count of Santa Fiora, but the wedding didn't take place because the groom chose the ecclesiastical career and became a Cardinal. After this, it was decided to arrange her marriage with a member of the House of Este with the purpose to improve the relations between both families and break the isolation of the Grand Duchy of Tuscany from the other Italian states. Virginia's half-brother Cardinal Ferdinando has agreed with Cardinal Luigi d'Este for the marriage of his nephew and Virginia. In addition, the second wife of Grand Duke Francesco I, Bianca Cappello, also played a big role in the conclusion of this alliance. In Florence on 6 February 1586 Virginia married Cesare d'Este, son of Alfonso, Marquis of Montecchio, in turn the illegitimate (but later legitimized) son of Alfonso I, Duke of Ferrara. The union produced ten children, six sons and four daughtersIn 1596, the first signs of madness were manifested in Virginia, who suffered from this condition until her death. Nevertheless, she coped with her motherly duties with her numerous offspring and showed herself as a clever and far-sighted ruler when in January 1601, in the absence of her husband (who was in Reggio) the heavily pregnant Duchess took the position of Regent. During this time she stopped the attempts of the Podesta and Judge of Modena to deprive her of the government. However, Virginia was unable to control her unpredictable anger fits: when in March 1608 her confessor, the Jesuit Jerome Bondinari claimed that she was possessed by the devil, the Duchess violently attacked him with shouts and nearly beat him to death with a stick. After this, exorcism sessions were held in her, during which it became clear that Virginia's mental illness was caused by the fact that she was married against her will, and worsened due to the infidelities of her husband. The attempts of expulsion the demons in her finally originated that Virginia became completely insane. She only recovered her sense on the day of her death; in her deathbed, she blessed all her children and died peacefully. Virginia died on 15 January 1615 in Modena aged 46; there were rumors that she was poisoned by her husband.


Virginia Oldoïni, Countess of Castiglione (22 March 1837 – 28 November 1899), better known as La Castiglione, was an Italian aristocrat who achieved notoriety as a mistress of Emperor Napoleon III of France. She was also a significant figure in the early history of photography.Virginia Elisabetta Luisa Carlotta Antonietta Teresa Maria Oldoïni (French: Virginie Élisabeth Louise Charlotte Antoinette Thérèse Marie Oldoïni) was born on 22 March 1837 in Florence, Tuscany to Marquis Filippo Oldoini and Isabella Lamporecchi, members of the minor Tuscan nobility; she was often known by her nickname of "Nicchia". Ignored by her father, she was educated by her grandfather Ranieri. She married Francesco Verasis, Count of Castiglione, at the age of 17. He was twelve years her senior. They had a son, Giorgio.Her cousin, Camillo, Count of Cavour, was a minister of Victor Emmanuel II, King of Sardinia (that included also Piedmont, Val d'Aosta, Liguria and Savoy). When the Count and Countess traveled to Paris in 1855, the Countess was under her cousin's instructions to plead the cause of Italian unity with Napoleon III of France. She achieved notoriety by becoming Napoleon III's mistress, a scandal that led her husband to demand marital separation. In 1855, she had a brief affair with King Victor Emmanuel II of Italy, who nicknamed her "Nini".In 1856–1857, she entered the social circle of European royalty. During her relationship with the French emperor, she met Augusta of Saxe-Weimar, Otto von Bismarck and Adolphe Thiers. She had many lovers, including a banker of the Rothschild family and the then director of the Louvre Museum.The Countess was known for her beauty and her flamboyant entrances in elaborate dress at the imperial court. One of her most infamous outfits was a "Queen of Hearts" costume.[3] George Frederic Watts painted her portrait in 1857.  She was described as having long, wavy blonde hair, a fair complexion, a delicate oval face, and eyes that constantly changed colour from green to an extraordinary blue-violet. The Countess returned to Italy in 1857 when her affair with Napoleon III was over. Four years later, the Kingdom of Italy was proclaimed, conceivably in part due to the influence that the Countess had exerted on Napoleon III. That same year, she returned to France and settled in Passy.In 1856 she began sitting for Mayer and Pierson, photographers favored by the imperial court. Over the next four decades she directed Pierre-Louis Pierson to help her create 700 different photographs in which she re-created the signature moments of her life for the camera. She spent a large part of her personal fortune and even went into debt to execute this project. Most of the photographs depict the Countess in theatrical outfits, such as the Queen of Hearts dress. A number of photographs depict her in poses that were risqué for the era – notably, images that expose her bare legs and feet. In these photos, her head is cropped out.Virginia spent her declining years in an apartment in the Place Vendôme, where she had the rooms decorated in funeral black, the blinds kept drawn, and mirrors banished—apparently so she would not have to confront her advancing age and loss of beauty. She would only leave the apartment at night. In the 1890s she began a brief collaboration with Pierson again, though her later photographs clearly show her loss of any critical judgement, possibly due to her growing mental instability. She wished to set up an exhibit of her photographs at the Exposition Universelle (1900), though this did not happen. She died on November 28, 1899, at the age of sixty-two, and was buried at the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris


Virginia Cherrill (April 12, 1908 – November 14, 1996) was an American actress best known for her role as the blind flower girl in Charlie Chaplin's City Lights (1931).Virginia Cherrill was born on a farm in rural Carthage, Illinois to James E. and Blanche (née Wilcox) Cherrill. She initially did not plan on a film career, but her friendship with Sue Carol (who later married Alan Ladd) eventually drew her to Hollywood.Cherrill married four times. She had no children Her first husband, Irving Adler, was a rich Chicago lawyer (not the famed scientist Irving Adler).They were married in 1925 and divorced in 1928. Considerable publicity attended an engagement to the wealthy William Rhinelander Stewart Jr. (1888-1945) that was announced in July 1932. The two sailed from Hawaii on Vincent Astor's yacht, on which the ceremony was planned, but returned thereafter, having broken off the wedding by mutual consent. Cherrill married actor Cary Grant on February 9, 1934, in London. She received a divorce on March 26, 1935, in Los Angeles after alleging that Grant was abusive toward her. Her third husband was George Child-Villiers, 9th Earl of Jersey, from 1937 to 1946. She changed her legal name to Virginia Child-Villiers, countess of Jersey. They divorced in 1946 without having had children together Cherrill finally settled down with Florian Martini, a Polish airman whose squadron she had looked after during World War II. He found a job working for Lockheed Martin in Santa Barbara, California, where they lived from 1948 until her death in 1996 at age 88.


Virginia Fortune Ogilvy, Countess of Airlie, DCVO (née Ryan)(9 February 1933) is a Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth II.Lady Airlie was born in Newport, New Jersey, the daughter of John Barry Ryan Jr., and Margaret Kahn. Her mother was the daughter of German-American financier Otto Kahn, and her father was the grandson of Thomas Fortune Ryan. Lady Airlie has been a Lady of the Bedchamber since 1973. She was appointed a Dame Commander of the Royal Victorian Order (DCVO) in 1995.As a Lady of the Bedchamber she is a senior lady-in-waiting, and attends the Queen on major occasions and overseas tours. In May 2007, she accompanied the Queen on her trip to the United States to commemorate the 400th anniversary of England's first American settlement at Jamestown, Virginia. On 7 May 2007, she attended a state dinner at the White House, hosted by President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush. On 23 October 1952, she married David Ogilvy, Lord Ogilvy, who in 1968 became the Earl of Airlie. With her husband, Lady Airlie has six children





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« Reply #1091 on: May 05, 2022, 02:45:45 PM »

Georgina is a given name and the feminine form of George, along with Georgia and Georgiana. It comes from the Greek word γεωργός(γέω,"earth"+έργο,"work"), meaning farmer.

Princess Georgina Brandolini d'Adda, Contessa di Valmareno (born Princess Georgina Maria Natividad de Faucigny-Lucinge et Coligny)(23 December 1949) is a French-Brazilian fashion executive and designer.Princess Georgina Maria Natividad de Faucigny-Lucinge et Coligny was born on 23 December 1949 in Rio de Janeiro. Her father was Prince Jean-Louis de Faucigny-Lucinge, a French aristocrat, and her mother was Sylvia Régis de Oliveira, the only daughter of Raul Régis de Oliveira, a Brazilian diplomat who served as Brazil’s Ambassador to the United Kingdom from 1925 to 1939. On 12 June 1975, she married Rodrigo Tiberto Brandolini d'Adda, Conte di Valmareno, an Italian nobleman who was the son of Cristiana Brandolini d'Adda and nephew of Gianni Agnelli, in a Catholic ceremony at St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Paris, becoming Countess of ValmarenoThey have two children, Donna Cornelia Brandolini d'Adda and Donna Bianca Brandolini d'Adda.

Georgina Susan Fitzalan-Howard, Duchess of Norfolk (30 January 1962), is the wife of Edward William Fitzalan-Howard, 18th Duke of Norfolk.She was born Georgina Susan Gore, the younger daughter of John Temple ("Jack") Gore (1931-2018) and his first wife, Serena Margaret Mounsey. Her parents divorced in 1969.Jack Gore was very distantly connected to the Earls Temple of Stowe[1] and was descended from Sir John Gore, Lord Mayor of London.Her paternal grandmother, Lady Barbara Montgomerie (23 August 1909 – 1992), was eldest daughter of Archibald Montgomerie, 16th Earl of Eglinton, by his former wife Lady Beatrice Dalrymple, daughter of the 11th Earl of Stair.Georgina's elder sister Charlotte Gore married Major Sir Hervey James Hugh Bruce-Clifton, 7th Bt. and her elder brother Christopher Gore (d. 2015) was remarried to Catherine Dickens, a descendant of the novelist Charles Dickens, and lived in Hungary.She married Edward Fitzalan-Howard, then Earl of Arundel and Surrey, son of Miles Stapleton-Fitzalan-Howard, 17th Duke of Norfolk, and his wife, Anne Mary Teresa Constable-Maxwell, on 27 June 1987 at Arundel Cathedral; the wedding had 800 guests including, the Princess of Wales (a personal friend of Edward Fitzalan-Howard). The couple moved into the East wing of Arundel Castle after their marriageT hey have five children (three sons and two daughters)


Georgina Charlotte Gascoyne-Cecil, Marchioness of Salisbury, VA, CI (née Alderson)(1827 – 20 November 1899) was the wife of British Prime Minister Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury. The eldest daughter of a judge, her lack of wealth and social connections earned the disapproval of the 2nd Marquess of Salisbury; despite this, Alderson married his son Robert in 1857.Though the marriage was happy and grew to include eight children, Robert and Georgina's first years together were pinched financially. To supplement their income, Lady Georgina aided her husband as he contributed political articles to various newspapers. Their circumstances improved when Lord Robert became his father's heir in 1865, and in 1868 he inherited the Salisbury title. She hosted parties and receptions at Hatfield House and in London that aided his political career in the Conservative Party.Few biographical details have been published about Georgina Charlotte Alderson. Born in 1827,she was the eldest daughter of Sir Edward Hall Alderson (d. 1857), a judge. In 1834, he was made a Baron of the Exchequer. Her mother was Georgina Catherine Drewe (d. 1871), a daughter of the Reverend Edward Drewe of Broadhembury, Devonshire. The Aldersons had a large family.On 11 July 1857, Georgina Alderson married Lord Robert Cecil, a younger son of James Gascoyne-Cecil, 2nd Marquess of Salisbury. The period leading up to the wedding was contentious. Georgina did not come from an aristocratic or wealthy background  She was also nearly thirty-years old, two years older than his son, and Lord Salisbury feared her ability to produce an heirHe tried to dissuade the union, and required them to remain separated for six months, hoping the match would end. This period did not lead to a dissolution of the relationship; instead, Lord Robert wrote to his father at the end of the break and said he was engaged to Georgina. The furious marquess considered disinheriting his son; after the wedding he and Robert became estranged.A love match, the marriage would prove to be happy. Their family grew quickly, beginning with the birth of a daughter within a year of their marriage. Seven children followed – five sons and three daughters in total. The Cecils' lifestyle changed in 1865 upon the death of the Marquess of Salisbury's eldest son. Robert, now Viscount Cranborne, suddenly became the heir to his father's title and estates.  In 1868 Robert inherited the title of Marquess of Salisbury upon the death of his father. Robert, now known as Lord Salisbury, had a reserved nature in public and disliked social occasions. His wife thus took a prominent role during parties and gatherings, regularly hosting national and international political figures in London and at Hatfield House. These activities aided her husband's political career. She also acted as his confidante and regularly advised him, based on their surviving correspondenceA member of the Conservative Party, he became Prime Minister in June 1885. He held the premiership until January 1886, then attained it again from July 1886–August 1892 and June 1895–July 1902


Georgina Elizabeth Ward, Countess of Dudley RRC DStJ (9 August 1846 – 2 February 1929) was a British noblewoman and a noted beauty of the Victorian era.Georgina was born in Dunbarney, Perthshire, Scotland – "the third of a series of sisters all famous for their good looks" – to Sir Thomas Moncreiffe of that Ilk, 7th Baronet, and Lady Louisa Hay-Drummond, daughter of Thomas Hay-Drummond, 11th Earl of Kinnoull. Her sister Harriet became Lady Mordaunt; another sister, Louisa, married John Stewart-Murray, 7th Duke of Atholl.In the summer of 1865, the engagement was announced between the 17-year-old Georgina and the 48-year-old William Ward, 1st Earl of Dudley, a wealthy land and mine owner. The earl had been widowed since November 1851 as his first wife, Selina Constance (née de Burgh), died six months into their marriage. Georgina and the earl married on 21 November 1865 in London, and Dudley was proud to show off his beautiful new wife across Europe Over the course of their marriage, Georgina and Dudley had one daughter and six sons


Countess Georgina von Wilczek (24 October 1921 – 18 October 1989) was Princess of Liechtenstein from 1943 to 1989 as the wife of Prince Franz Joseph II. She was the mother of Prince Hans-Adam II[1][2] and was widely known as Gina. Princess Georgina was born on 24 October 1921, in Graz, Austria. She was the daughter of Count Ferdinand von Wilczek (1893-1977) and Countess Norbertine "Nora" Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau (1888-1923). In 1923, when Georgina was just two years old, her mother died after giving birth to a stillborn child.Georgina probably met her future husband, Prince Franz Joseph II, in early 1942. He was also her third cousin, and he had been the reigning Prince of Liechtenstein since 1938. They had an age difference of 15 years, and their friendship eventually turned to love. Their engagement was announced on 30 December 1942. They were married on 7 March 1943 at the Cathedral of St. Florin in Vaduz. It was the first time that the wedding of a ruling Prince had taken place in Liechtenstein. During the following weeks, the newlyweds visited all eleven communes of Liechtenstein. The couple had five children.


Princess Georgina of Liechtenstein, daughter of Prince Constantin of Liechtenstein (15 March 1972) and Countess Marie Gabriele Franziska Kálnoky de Kőröspatak (16 July 1975)


Georgina, Lady Kennard (née Wernher; formerly Phillips)(17 October 1919 – 28 April 2011) was a British aristocrat who was considered "one of the best connected women in the country."[1] She was connected to many prominent families such as the royal family and the Mountbattens, Grosvenors, Hamiltons and Burnetts.Born Georgina Wernher in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 17 October 1919, she was the second child and elder daughter of Sir Harold Augustus Wernher, 3rd Bt, and Countess Anastasia de Torby.She was a maternal granddaughter of Grand Duke Michael Mikhailovich of Russia (grandson of Tsar Nicholas I and first cousin of Tsar Alexander III), and also claimed direct descent from the Russian writer Alexander Pushkin and the Afro-Russian military officer Abram Petrovich Hannibal. On 10 October 1944, Gina Wernher married Lt.-Col. Harold Phillips (1909–1980). They had five children Lady Kennard's first husband, Harold Phillips, died in 1980. She was remarried in 1992 to Sir George Arnold Ford Kennard, 3rd Bt. (1915–1999).


Georgiana (or Georgina) Russell, Duchess of Bedford (18 July 1781 – 24 February 1853), formerly Lady Georgiana Gordon, was a British aristocrat, patron of the arts and wife of John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford. Georgiana was born at Gordon Castle in Scotland, a younger daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon, and his first wife, Jane. In 1802, after the Treaty of Amiens, the Duchess of Gordon took Georgiana to Paris to pursue the option of a marriage with Eugène de Beauharnais, stepson of Napoleon, who was around her own age, but political sensitivities put an end to the plan. As a second option, the Duchess of Gordon then arranged for her to become engaged to Francis Russell, 5th Duke of Bedford; he died, aged 36, before they could marry. The duchess advised Georgiana to wear black when meeting Francis's younger brother, who had inherited the title and had been widowed with several children. On 23 June 1803, Georgiana married, as his second wife, John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford, already known as a politician under the title Lord John RussellHe was fifteen years her senior, and had previously been married for fifteen years to Georgiana Byng, daughter of George Byng, 4th Viscount Torrington, by whom he had three sons. She had died in 1801, prior to his inheriting the dukedomThe Duke of Bedford and his second wife had seven sons and three daughters


Georgiana Byng, daughter of George Byng, 4th Viscount Torrington. The first wife of John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford, by whom she had three sons.


Lady Georgiana Elizabeth Russell (1810 – 22 March 1867), daughter of Georgiana Gordon and John Russel, 6th Duke of Bedford Who married Charles Romilly and had children
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« Reply #1092 on: May 05, 2022, 02:45:55 PM »

Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire (née Spence)(7 June 1757 – 30 March 1806), was an English socialite, political organiser, style icon, author, and activist. Of noble birth from the Spencer family, married into the Cavendish family, she was the first wife of William Cavendish, 5th Duke of Devonshire, and the mother of the 6th Duke of Devonshire.As the Duchess of Devonshire, she garnered much attention and fame in society during her lifetime. With a pre-eminent position in the peerage of England, the Duchess was famous for her charisma, political influence, beauty, unusual marital arrangement, love affairs, socializing, and gambling.She was the great-great-great-great aunt of Diana, Princess of Wales. Their lives, centuries apart, have been compared in tragedy. The Duchess was born Miss Georgiana Spencer, on 7 June 1757, as the first child of John Spencer (later Earl Spencer) and his wife, Georgiana (née Poyntz, later Countess Spencer), at the Spencer family home, Althorp.On her seventeenth birthday, 7 June 1774, Lady Georgiana Spencer was married to society's most eligible bachelor, William Cavendish, the 5th Duke of Devonshire (aged 25). The wedding took place at Wimbledon Parish Church. From the beginning of the marriage, the Duke of Devonshire proved to be an emotionally reserved man who was quite unlike the Duchess's father and who did not meet the Duchess' emotional needs. The spouses also had little in common He would seldom be at her side and would spend nights at Brooks's playing cards The Duke continued with adulterous behaviour throughout their married life, and discord followed pregnancies that ended in miscarriage or failure to produce a male heir. Before their marriage, the Duke had fathered an illegitimate daughter, Charlotte Williams, born from a dalliance with a former milliner, Charlotte Spencer (of no relation to the House of Spencer). This was unknown to the Duchess until years after her marriage to the Duke. After the death of the child's mother, the Duchess was compelled to raise Charlotte herself The Duchess was "very pleased" with Charlotte, although her own mother Lady Spencer expressed disapproval: "I hope you have not talk'd of her to people". The besotted Georgiana replied, "She is the best humoured little thing you ever saw" In 1782, while on a retreat from London with the Duke, the Duchess met Lady Elizabeth Foster (widely known as "Bess") in the City of Bath. She became close friends with Lady Elizabeth, who had become destitute after separating from her husband and two sons. Given the bond that developed between the two women (and the difficult position her new friend was in), with the Duke's acquiescence, the Duchess agreed to have Lady Elizabeth live with them. When the Duke began a sexual relationship with Lady Elizabeth, a ménage à trois[3] was established, and it was arranged that Lady Elizabeth live with them permanently. While it was common for male members of the upper class to have mistresses, it was not common or generally acceptable for a mistress to live so openly with a married couple. Furthermore, the Duchess had been desperately lonely since her marriage to the Duke, and finally having found what she believed to be the ideal friend, she became emotionally codependent on Lady Elizabeth. Having no alternative, the Duchess became complicit in her best friend's affair with her husband the Duke. The arrangement among the three is more commonly referred to as a ménage à trois, but, while the relationship between the Duke and Lady Elizabeth was obviously sexual, there is no concrete evidence of anything beyond emotional dependence, and a particular and open affection, on the part of the Duchess, towards Lady Elizabeth. In one of her letters, the Duchess of Devonshire wrote to Lady Elizabeth, "My dear Bess, Do you hear the voice of my heart crying to you? Do you feel what it is for me to be separated from you?" Nevertheless, Lady Elizabeth Foster herself envied her and wished for her position. However despite her envy, Lady Elizabeth did indeed love Georgiana; at her death years later, a locket of Georgiana's hair was found around Elizabeth's neck, as well as a bracelet also containing hair of the Duchess on a table beside her deathbed. Lady Elizabeth insinuated her way into the marriage by taking advantage of the Duchess's friendship and codependency on her, and "engineered her way" into a sexual relationship with the Duke. Lady Elizabeth engaged in well documented sexual relations with other men while she was in the "love triangle" with the Duke and Duchess. Among their contemporaries, the relationship between the Duchess of Devonshire and Lady Elizabeth Foster was the subject of speculation which has continued beyond their time. The love triangle itself was a notorious topic; it was an irregular arrangement in a high-profile marriage. Lady Elizabeth's affair with the Duke resulted in two illegitimate children: a daughter, Caroline Rosalie St Jules, and a son, Augustus Clifford. Despite her unhappiness with her detached and philandering husband and volatile marriage, the duchess, as contemporary norms dictated, was not socially permitted to take a lover without producing an heir. The first successful pregnancy resulted in the birth of Lady Georgiana Dorothy Cavendish on 12 July 1783. Called "Little G," she would become the Countess of Carlisle and have her own issue. The Duchess had developed a strong mothering sentiment since raising Charlotte, and she insisted on nursing her own children (contrary to the aristocratic custom of having a wet nurse). On 29 August 1785, a second successful pregnancy resulted in another daughter: Lady Harriet Elizabeth Cavendish, called "Harryo," who would become Countess Granville and also have children of her own. Finally, on 21 May 1790, the Duchess gave birth to a male heir to the dukedom: William George Spencer Cavendish, who took the title of Marquess of Hartington at birth, and was called "Hart." He would never marry and became known as "the bachelor duke." With the birth of the Marquess of Hartington, the Duchess was able to take a lover. While there is no evidence of when the Duchess began her affair with Charles Grey (later Earl Grey), she did become pregnant by him in 1791. Sent off to France, the Duchess believed she would die in childbirth. In this spirit, she wrote a letter to her recently born son stating, "As soon as you are old enough to understand this letter, it will be given to you. It contains the only present I can make you—my blessing, written in my blood...Alas, I am gone before you could know me, but I lov'd you, I nurs'd you nine months at my breast. I love you dearly." On 20 February 1792, Eliza Courtney was born without complications to mother and child. The Duchess was forced to give away the illegitimate daughter to Grey's family.The Duchess would later be allowed to pay visits to her daughter, providing her with presents and affection, and Eliza would grow up to marry Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Ellice and bear a daughter named Georgiana.While in exile in France in the early 1790s, the Duchess of Devonshire suffered from isolation and felt her separation from her children. To her eldest, she wrote, "Your letter dated the 1st of Nov was delightful to me tho' it made me very melancholy my Dearest Child. This year has been the most painful of my life. . . when I do return to you, never leave you I hope again—it will be too great a happiness for me Dear Georgiana & it will have been purchased by many days of regret – indeed ev'ry hour I pass away from you, I regret you; if I amuse myself or see anything I admire I long to share the happiness with you – if on the contrary, I am out of spirits I wish for your presence which alone would do me good". To return to England and her children, she conceded to her husband's demands and renounced her love for Charles Grey. Records of her exile in France were subsequently erased from the family records. However, the children of the duke and duchess had at one point been informed as to the reason of her absence during that period of their lives. While the Duchess of Devonshire coped with the marital arrangements on the surface throughout her marriage, she nevertheless suffered emotional and psychological distress. She sought further personal consolation from a "dissipated existence"


Georgiana Dorothy Howard, Countess of Carlisle (née Cavendish)(12 July 1783 – 8 August 1858) was a British noblewoman. She was born after nine years of childless marriage between William Cavendish, 5th Duke of Devonshire, and his wife, Lady Georgiana Spencer, the political hostess and socialite. As such, she was a member of one of the country's grandest and richest families.In 1801, the young Georgiana married George Howard, Viscount Morpeth, later becoming Countess of Carlisle upon her husband's accession in 1825. Their twelve children included the 7th and 8th Earls of Carlisle. Another child, the Duchess of Sutherland, was Mistress of the Robes and a close friend to Queen Victoria.The Earl and Countess of Carlisle had twelve children


Lady Georgiana Howard (1804 – 17 March 1860), daughter of Georgiana Cavendish and George Howard, Count of Carlisle. She married George Agar-Ellis, 1st Baron Dover on 7 March 1822. They have four children.


Lady Georgiana Fullerton (née Leveson-Gower)( 23 September 1812 – 19 January 1885) was an English novelist, philanthropist, biographer, and school founder. She was born into a noble political family. She was one of the foremost Roman Catholic novelists writing in England during the nineteenth century Lady Georgiana Fullerton, born as Lady Georgiana Charlotte Leveson-Gower, was born at home in Tixall Hall, Staffordshire, England. She was the second daughter of Lord Granville Leveson-Gower, the first Earl of Granville, and Lady Harriet Elizabeth Cavendish.On 13 July 1833 she married embassy attaché Alexander George Fullerton, in Paris. In 1855, her only son died at the age of 21


Jane Georgiana Seymour, Duchess of Somerset (née Sheridan)(5 November 1809 – 14 December 1884), was the wife of Edward, Duke of Somerset Jane Georgiana Sheridan was the third daughter of Thomas Sheridan and his wife the novelist Caroline Callander, daughter of Sir James Callander of Craigforth and Ardkinglas. She was the younger sister of Helen Lady Dufferin, songwriter, composer, poet, and author, and Caroline Norton, society beauty, feminist, social reformer, and author She married Duke Edward on the 10th of June 1830, when he was twenty-five and she was twenty. They had two sons and three daughters


Margaret Georgiana Spencer, Countess Spencer (née Poyntz)( 8 May 1737 – 18 March 1814), was an English philanthropist. She was born at St James's Palace as the daughter of a diplomat and a maid of honour to Caroline of Ansbach. In 1754, she married John Spencer, one of the wealthiest men of the era. A love match, the marriage resulted in the births of three surviving children, who included Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire. The Spencers became earl and countess in 1765, a reward granted by the Duke of Newcastle for John's political loyalty to the Whig party.Margaret Georgiana Poyntz, known as Georgiana to her family, was born on 8 May 1737 at St James's Palace, the fourth surviving child of Stephen Poyntz and Anna Maria Mordaunt Her diplomat father, the son of a successful linen draper (though distantly descended from an old landowning family), had been sent to Eton College as a boy to begin a career in society, and eventually became the steward to the young Duke of Cumberland's household and a Privy Councillor to King George II. Georgiana's mother, a maid of honour to Queen Caroline, was the daughter of Brigadier-General the Hon. Lewis Mordaunt and a granddaughter of John Mordaunt, Earl of Peterborough. Georgiana had four siblings, three brothers and one sister. Stephen Poyntz died when Georgiana was thirteen, leaving the family, never rich, in comfortable surrounding In 1754, seventeen-year-old Georgiana Poyntz met twenty-year-old John Spencer,, who had inherited enormous wealth from his great-grandmother, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough. She considered him "handsomer than an angel," and they felt an instant attraction for each other. She wrote to a friend, "I will own it, and never deny it that I do love Spencer above all men on Earth." Spencer was uncertain if he would have his family's approval for the match and opted to spend several months travelling until his twenty-first birthday, when their approval would no longer be necessary. On his return they recognised their love had persisted, and shortly after his birthday they married in a secret ceremony on 20 December 1755 at Althorp, the Spencer family seat in Northamptonshire.The ceremony, held in an upper bedroom, occurred during a ball held in Spencer's honour with five hundred guests in attendance.The marriage was made public five days later, and the couple was presented at court during the following year.Their early years together were happy, and their eldest child, Georgiana, was born in 1757 at Althorp. Georgiana preferred her firstborn, "Dear little Gee", to her younger children, George (born 1758) and Henrietta (born 1761).With John Spencer, 1st Earl Spencer, Georgiana Poyntz had five children (including two daughters who died in infancy).


Lady Georgiana Charlotte Spencer (1794–1823), daughter of George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer and  Lady Lavinia Bingham (1762–1831) She married Lord George Quin, son of Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort, and had issue.


Lady Georgiana Frances Spencer (1832–1852), who died unmarried. Daugher of Frederick Spencer, 4th Earl Spencer and Georgiana Poyntz (1799–1851)


Georgiana Poyntz (1799–1851) daughter of William Stephen Poyntz. Married on  23 February 1830 her second cousin Frederick Spencer, 4th Earl Spencer as his 1st wife. They had three children.


Lady Georgiana Sarah Ponsonby (15 August 1807 – 25 June 1861), married Rev. Sackville Bourke, nephew of the Earl of Mayo Daughter of  Lady Maria Fane ( = daughter of John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland) and John Ponsonby, 4th Earl of Bessborough


Georgina Melita Maria Ponsonby (16 February 1829 – 18 February 1895), unmarried Daughter of Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby and Lady Emily Charlotte (died 1877) ( = the youngest daughter of Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst).


Georgiana Caroline Clavering-Cowper, Countess Cowper (born Georgiana Caroline Carteret)(12 March 1715 – 21 August 1780), was an English noblewoman.Countess Cowper was the third daughter of John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, by his first wife, the former Frances Worsley. Her first husband, whom she married on 14 February 1732, was John Spencer MP.They had two children.


Georgiana Huntly McCrae (15 March 1804 – 24 May 1890) was an English-Australian painter and diarist. Born in London, she was the illegitimate daughter of George Gordon, the Marquis of Huntly, son and heir to Alexander, 4th Duke of Gordon. Her mother was Jane Graham, about whom little is known: ‘whether she was a housemaid or a milliner, a singer or an actress, she did not belong to Lord Huntly’s world’  Her father, although he publicly acknowledged her, played little part in her life but he financially supported her mother. On 20 January 1830 Andrew McCrae proposed to her, and she accepted later that month. They were married in Scotland in September that year. In the first decade of their marriage, their address alternated between London and Edinburgh. Her first child Elizabeth was born in 1831, followed by George in 1833, William in 1835, and Alexander in 1836. All were born in Edinburgh, which suggests a conscious decision to affirm their children's Scottish identity. This decade also brought its share of tragedy. Her daughter Elizabeth died of fever in 1834, her father in 1836, her mother in 1838. Financially, too, they were in some trouble. Andrew McCrae’s legal career did not prosper, and they were disappointed on the issue of some expected legacies. Her father failed to sign his will, leaving her stepmother Elizabeth responsible for any financial gifts to his three illegitimate children She immigrated to Australia, where she lived untill she died.


Georgiana Hare-Naylor born Georgiana Shipley (circa 1755–1806) was an English painter and art patron. Georgiana was born at St Asaph in 1752, the fourth daughter of Anna Maria, born Mordaunt, and Jonathan Shipley, then a canon of Christ Church, Oxford and later Bishop of Llandaff and of St Asaph. Her eldest sister Anna Maria married Sir William Jones, who proposed the existence of the Indo-European language.She was a few years older than her cousin and namesake Georgiana Spencer, later Georgiana Cavendish, Duchess of Devonshire. The duchess introduced her to Francis Hare-Naylor The duchess settled an annuity of £200 on the young couple and with that they married, travelling first to Karlsruhe, and then to the north of Italy Her four sons were Francis, Augustus, Julius, and Marcus, all born in Italy. Her only daughter, Anna Maria Clementina, was named after her elder sister.
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« Reply #1093 on: May 09, 2022, 10:57:47 AM »

Especially for Cordelia:

Rebecca or Rebekah (Hebrew: רִבְקָה (Rivkah)) is a feminine given name originating from the Hebrew language. The name comes from the verb רבק (rbq), meaning "to tie firmly"; Jones' Dictionary of Old Testament Proper Names and the NOBS Study Bible Name List suggest the name means captivating beauty, or "to tie", "to bind"

Apparently there is a Disney princess:
Princess Rebecca is the princess of Galonia who appears in Elena of Avalor. She first meets Elena when her ship crashes near Avalor.


I assume there are noble ladies called Rebecca, but up till now I haven't found them yet.


Martha Grey, Countess of Stamford (c. 1838 – 21 August 1916) was born Martha Solomons in Cape Town, South Africa. She was the daughter of a freed slave named Rebecca and man from Wellington named Solomon. Her mother Rebecca was a well known character at the Cape, sometimes referred to as "Queen Rebecca"

Thank you!   Hug

Off to look up more about Queen Rebecca of Cape Town!   Grin


Lets not forget a relatively new royal:

The wife of Big Mama's baby George Mikhailovich Romanov is originally named Rebecca Virginia Bettarini. Upon conversion to the Russian Orthodox Faith she took upon the name  Victoria Romanovna
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« Reply #1094 on: May 09, 2022, 11:32:37 AM »

Audrey  is an English feminine given name. It is the Anglo-Norman form of the Anglo-Saxon name Æðelþryð, composed of the elements æðel "noble" and þryð "strength". The Anglo-Norman form of the name was applied to Saint Audrey (d. 679), also known by the historical form of her name as Saint Æthelthryth. The same name also survived into the modern period in its Anglo-Saxon form, as Etheldred,[1] e.g. Etheldred Benett (1776–1845).


Audrey Yvonne Quarles van Ufford (born 10 May 1954), daughter of Jonkheer Ian Edgar Bruce Quarles van Ufford (1924–2010) and Yvonne Scholtens (1928–2000), a niece of Audrey Hepburn (Ian is an elder half brother of Audrey Hepburn, on mothers side).

Audrey Kathleen Ruston (4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993), commonly known as Audrey Hepburn. Daughter of Joseph Victor Anthony Ruston (1889–1980) and Baroness Ella van Heemstra, DStJ (12 June 1900 – 26 August 1984) Audrey Kathleen Ruston (later, Hepburn-Ruston[3]) was born on 4 May 1929 at number 48 Rue Keyenveld in Ixelles, Brussels, Belgium.[4] She was known to her family as Adriaantje.[5]
Hepburn's mother, Baroness Ella van Heemstra (12 June 1900 – 26 August 1984), was a Dutch noblewoman. Ella was the daughter of Baron Aarnoud van Heemstra, who served as mayor of Arnhem from 1910 to 1920 and as governor of Dutch Suriname from 1921 to 1928, and Baroness Elbrig Willemine Henriette van Asbeck (1873–1939), a granddaughter of Count Dirk van Hogendorp.[6] At age 19, she married Jonkheer Hendrik Gustaaf Adolf Quarles van Ufford, an oil executive based in Batavia, Dutch East Indies, where they subsequently lived. They had two sons, Jonkheer Arnoud Robert Alexander Quarles van Ufford (1920–1979) and Jonkheer Ian Edgar Bruce Quarles van Ufford (1924–2010), before divorcing in 1925, four years before Hepburn's birth. Hepburn's father, Joseph Victor Anthony Ruston (21 November 1889 – 16 October 1980), was a British subject born in Auschitz, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary.. He was the son of Victor John George Ruston, of British and Austrian background and Anna Juliana Franziska Karolina Wels, who was of Austrian origin and born in Kovarce. In 1923–1924, Joseph was an Honorary British Consul in Semarang in the Dutch East Indies, and prior to his marriage to Hepburn's mother, was married to Cornelia Bisschop, a Dutch heiress. Although born with the surname Ruston, he later double-barrelled his name to the more "aristocratic" Hepburn-Ruston, perhaps at Ella's insistence, as he mistakenly believed himself descended from James Hepburn, third husband of Mary, Queen of Scots. After Britain declared war on Germany in September 1939, Hepburn's mother moved her daughter back to Arnhem in the hope that, as during the First World War, the Netherlands would remain neutral and be spared a German attack. While there, Hepburn attended the Arnhem Conservatory from 1939 to 1945. She had begun taking ballet lessons during her last years at boarding school, and continued training in Arnhem under the tutelage of Winja Marova, becoming her "star pupil". After the Germans invaded the Netherlands in 1940, Hepburn used the name Edda van Heemstra, because an "English-sounding" name was considered dangerous during the German occupation. Her family was profoundly affected by the occupation, with Hepburn later stating that "had we known that we were going to be occupied for five years, we might have all shot ourselves. We thought it might be over next week… six months… next year… that's how we got through". In 1952, Hepburn became engaged to industrialist James Hanson, whom she had known since her early days in London. She called it "love at first sight", but after having her wedding dress fitted and the date set, she decided the marriage would not work because the demands of their careers would keep them apart most of the time. She issued a public statement about her decision, saying "When I get married, I want to be really married". In the early 1950s, she also dated future Hair producer Michael Butler.At a cocktail party hosted by mutual friend Gregory Peck, Hepburn met American actor Mel Ferrer, and suggested that they star together in a play. The meeting led them to collaborate in Ondine, during which they began a relationship. Eight months later, on 25 September 1954, they were married in Bürgenstock, Switzerland, while preparing to star together in the film War and Peace (1955). She and Ferrer had a son, Sean Hepburn Ferrer. Despite the insistence from gossip columns that their marriage would not last, Hepburn claimed that she and Ferrer were inseparable and happy together, though she admitted that he had a bad temper. Ferrer was rumoured to be too controlling, and had been referred to by others as being her "Svengali" – an accusation that Hepburn laughed off. William Holden was quoted as saying, "I think Audrey allows Mel to think he influences her." After a 14-year marriage, the couple divorced in 1968.Hepburn met her second husband, Italian psychiatrist Andrea Dotti, on a Mediterranean cruise with friends in June 1968. She believed she would have more children and possibly stop working. They married on 18 January 1969, and their son Luca Andrea Dotti was born on 8 February 1970. While pregnant with Luca in 1969, Hepburn was more careful, resting for months before delivering the baby via caesarean section. Both Dotti and Hepburn were unfaithful, with Dotti having affairs with younger women and Hepburn having a romantic relationship with actor Ben Gazzara during the filming of the movie Bloodline (1979). The Dotti-Hepburn marriage lasted thirteen years and was dissolved in 1982.From 1980 until her death, Hepburn was in a relationship with Dutch actor Robert Wolders, the widower of actress Merle Oberon. She had met Wolders through a friend during the later years of her second marriage. In 1989, she called the nine years she had spent with him the happiest years of her life, and stated that she considered them married, just not officially.Upon returning from Somalia to Switzerland in late September 1992, Hepburn began suffering from abdominal pain. While initial medical tests in Switzerland had inconclusive results, a laparoscopy performed at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles in early November revealed a rare form of abdominal cancer belonging to a group of cancers known as pseudomyxoma peritonei.


Audrey Young, second wife of John Francis Godolphin Osborne, 11th Duke of Leeds (12 March 1901 – 26 July 1963) They married  on 21 December 1948 (marriage dissolved in 1955) They had one daughter.


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