Dan Davies (politician)

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Dan Davies
MLA Dan Davies - Peace River North.jpg
Member of the British Columbia Legislative Assembly
for Peace River North
Assumed office
May 9, 2017
Preceded byPat Pimm
Personal details
Political partyBC Liberal
ResidenceFort St. John, British Columbia
Alma materSimon Fraser University (B.Ed.) Gonzaga University
ProfessionTeacher

Dan Davies is a Canadian politician, who was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the 41st Parliament of British Columbia in the 2017 provincial election.[1] He represents the riding of Peace River North as a member of the British Columbia Liberal Party caucus.

Prior to his election to the legislature, Davies was as a Fort St. John City Councillor since 2005, he has a master's degree in Leadership from Gonzaga University and a Bachelor of Education from Simon Fraser University. He was also an elementary school teacher at Duncan Cran and truck driver.[2]

Electoral record[edit]

2020 British Columbia general election: Peace River North
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Dan Davies 6,746 55.76 −10.51 $32,293.82
Conservative Trevor Bolin 4,150 34.30 $0.00
New Democratic Danielle Monroe 1,202 9.94 +3.37 $739.00
Total valid votes 10,480 100.00
Total rejected ballots    
Turnout    
Registered voters
Source: Elections BC[3][4]
2017 British Columbia general election: Peace River North
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Dan Davies 9,707 66.27 +7.33 $53,883
Independent Bob Fedderly 2,785 19.01 $31,928
New Democratic Robert Dempsey 962 6.57 -3.27 $1,739
Independent Rob Fraser 917 6.27 $25,354
Independent Jeff Richert 275 1.88 $1,064
Total valid votes 14,646 100.00
Total rejected ballots 65 0.44
Turnout 14,711 56.74
Source: Elections BC[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dan Davies elected MLA in Peace River North". Alaska Highway News, May 9, 2017.
  2. ^ Dan Davies - Today's BC Liberals[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ "2020 Provincial General Election Final Voting Results". Retrieved 9 November 2020.
  4. ^ "Election Financing Reports". Elections BC. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  5. ^ "Statement of Votes – 41st Provincial General Election – May 9, 2017" (PDF). Elections BC. Retrieved December 7, 2019.

External links[edit]