Marie Louise d’Orléans, Queen of Spain

by Susan Flantzer
© Unofficial Royalty 2022

Marie Louise d’Orléans, Queen of Spain; Credit – Wikipedia

Marie Louise d’Orléans was the first wife of Carlos II, King of Spain. She was born on March 26, 1662, at the Palais-Royal in Paris, France. Marie Louise had an impeccable royal genealogy. Her parents were first cousins. Her father was Philippe I, Duke of Orléans, the younger of the two sons of Louis XIII, King of France and Anne of Austria, Infanta of Spain and Portugal, and the only sibling of Louis XIV, King of France. Her mother was Henrietta of England, the youngest child of Charles I, King of England and Henrietta Maria of France. Philippe’s father Louis XIII and Henrietta’s mother Henrietta Maria were siblings, the children of Henri IV, King of France and Marie de Medici from the famous House of Medici. As the granddaughter of Louis XIII, King of France, Marie Louise was entitled to the style and title Her Royal Highness Petite-fille de France (Granddaughter of France).

French Royal Family in a mythological setting: Henrietta Maria of France, Queen of England; Philippe I, Duke of Orléans; his daughter Marie Louise; his wife Henrietta of England; Anne of Austria, Queen Mother; King Louis XIV: Louis XIV’s children Louis, Marie Thérèse, and Philippe; Marie Teresa of Austria, Queen of France; Anne Marie Louise d’Orleans, la Grande Mademoiselle; Credit – Wikipedia

Marie Louise had two younger siblings. The Jacobite claim to the British throne goes through Marie Louise’s younger sister Anne Marie because their brother had died in childhood and Marie Louise had no children. Through her mother, Anne Marie was a granddaughter of King Charles I of England. When Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) and his brother Cardinal Henry Stuart, both died without legitimate issue, Anne Marie’s descendants inherited the Jacobite claim.

Marie Louise’s siblings:

Philippe I, Duke of Orléans with his favorite daughter Marie Louise by Pierre Mignard, circa 1670; Credit – Wikipedia

Marie Louise had a happy early childhood, living at the Palais-Royal in Paris and at the Château de Saint-Cloud, overlooking the Seine, just outside of Paris. She spent a lot of time with both her paternal grandmother Anne of Austria, Infanta of Spain who left most of her fortune to her when she died in 1666, and her maternal grandmother Henrietta Maria of France (died 1669), the widow of the beheaded King Charles I of England, who had returned to her native France after her husband was deposed and executed.

Marie Louise with her mother Henrietta; Credit – Wikipedia

In 1670, when Marie Louise was eight-years-old, her mother Henrietta died at the age of 26. Marie Louise’s uncle King Louis XIV wanted a male heir for her father to continue the Orléans line and looked for a second wife for Philippe himself. King Louis XIV rejected many potential second brides for his brother before settling on the Protestant Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate, known as Liselotte. She was the only daughter of Karl I Ludwig, Elector Palatine and his first wife Charlotte of Hesse-Kassel. Liselotte’s paternal grandmother was Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I of England and granddaughter of Mary, Queen of Scots. Liselotte converted to Roman Catholicism and married Philippe on November 19, 1671.

Marie Louise’s stepmother Liselotte with her two surviving children, Marie Louise’s step-siblings; Credit – Wikipedia

Due to the attitude of the court, as well as the homosexual relations of her husband Philippe, which he did not hide, Liselotte devoted much attention to Philippe’s daughters. Liselotte acted as a mother to Marie Louise and her younger sister Anne Marie and maintained correspondence with them throughout their lives. As with his first marriage, Philippe had homosexual affairs but was intent on fulfilling his dynastic responsibility of having children. Philippe and Liselotte had three children who were the half-siblings of Marie Louise:

Maria Louise’s husband Carlos II, King of Spain, 1680; Credit – Wikipedia

After the 1678 Treaties of Peace of Nijmegen were signed between France and Spain, a marriage was arranged between 16-year-old Marie Louise and 17-year-old Carlos II, King of Spain. King Louis XIV was married to Carlos II’s half-sister Maria Teresa of Austria, Infanta of Spain, who was also his double first cousin. Carlos II was also a was a first cousin of Louis XIV and Louis XIV wanted to have his brother-in-law/first cousin, weakened by years of inbreeding in the House of Habsburg, under French influence. Having no daughter, King Louis XIV offered his elder niece Marie Louise as a bride for Carlos II, King of Spain. Thinking to the future, Louis XIV knew that if Marie Louise and Carlos II had a child who became the monarch of Spain, then French influence would remain. If Marie Louise and Carlos II did not have children, Louis XIV’s own line could inherit the Spanish throne. Louis XIV’s wife Maria Teresa was the elder surviving of two daughters of King Felipe IV of Spain and had senior succession rights after her half-brother King Carlos II of Spain, also a child of Felipe IV.

The House of Habsburg, which ruled over Austria, Spain, and their many territories, was notorious for its inbreeding. The Habsburgs had built their empire by marriage and they wanted to keep the land they amassed all in the family, so they began to intermarry more and more frequently among themselves. Seven of King Carlos II of Spain’s eight great-grandparents were descended from Juana I, Queen of Castile and León and Aragon and her husband Philip of Habsburg, Duke of Burgundy. While a person in the fifth generation normally has thirty-two different ancestors, Carlos II had only ten different ancestors in the fifth generation.

King Carlos II of Spain had a severe type of mandibular prognathism (Habsburg jaw) which can be seen in this painting; Credit – Wikipedia

Carlos was a weak, sick child from birth. He did not learn to talk until he was four years old and could not walk until he was eight years old. Like many members of the Habsburg family, Carlos had the Habsburg jaw (mandibular prognathism), a disfiguring genetic disorder in which the lower jaw outgrows the upper jaw. However, Carlos’ very pronounced Habsburg jaw was so severe that he swallowed his food without thoroughly chewing. Carlos was educated by the Jesuit priests, however, because of his developmental disability, both physically and mentally, he only received a basic education. Carlos’ conditions showed clear signs of the long-time inbreeding of the House of Habsburg.

Even though the French ambassador to Spain wrote that Carlos “… is so ugly as to cause fear, and looks ill”, Carlos’ appearance and condition were considered irrelevant to the political benefits. Marie Louise was distressed by the arranged marriage and spent most of her time crying. She even confronted her uncle King Louis XIV, who retorted with irony, that it was not worthy that the “Catholic Queen” (nickname of the Spanish Queens) throws herself at the feet of “The Very Christian King” (nickname of the Kings of France). Trying to reason with his niece, King Louis XIV asked Marie Louise if she thought he could have found a better marriage for his own daughter if he had one. Marie Louise replied, “No, but you could have found a better marriage for your niece,” referring to her desire to marry Louis XIV’s only surviving (legitimate) child and her first cousin, Louis, Le Grand Dauphin of France.

On August 30, 1679, Marie Louise and Carlos II, King of Spain were married via a proxy marriage at the Palace of Fontainebleau in France with Louis Armand de Bourbon, Prince of Conti, a cousin of the bride, standing in for the groom. When Marie Louise left France for Spain, her uncle King Louis XIV, worried that like his first cousin Marguerite-Louise d’Orléans, who married Cosimo III de Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, Marie Louise would leave her husband to return to France, said to his niece, “Goodbye Madame, and forever.” Marie Louise never returned to France.

On November 19, 1679, Marie Louise married Carlos II in person in Quintanapalla, near Burgos, Spain. She found the Spanish court etiquette even more regulated and restrictive than the French court. Marie Louise did not speak Spanish and Carlos II did not speak French, so they were dependent on an interpreter when they first met. Carlos had fallen in love with Marie Louise the first time he saw her portrait. Despite not feeling passion for her husband, over time Marie Louise became fond of Carlos. Carlos taught her Spanish and Marie Louise taught him French. The Spanish court became more and more desperate regarding the delay in the arrival of an heir. More likely than not, it was Carlos who was infertile. He did not have any children with his second wife either. The lack of a child and the strict Spanish court caused Marie Louise to show signs of depression. She longed more and more for her happy life in France, developed an enormous appetite, and became overweight.

Marie Louise, Queen of Spain, lying in state in the Royal Alcazar of Madrid by Sebastián Muñoz; Credit – Wikipedia

The childless marriage last ten years. One day after taking a ride on horseback, Marie Louise began to feel strong pain in her stomach. She died the next day, aged 26, on February 12, 1689, at the Royal Alcázar of Madrid in Spain. Although many reasons were considered as causes of Marie Louise’s death including poison, it is most likely that she died from appendicitis, a fatal infection until the mid-nineteenth century when the advent of anesthesia and new surgical techniques allowed for successful appendectomies. Marie Louise was interred in Chapel IX of the Pantheon of the Infantes at the Royal Basilica of San Lorenzo de El Escorial in San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain. The Pantheon of the Infantes is the burial place for Infantes and Infantas of Spain and for Queen Consorts of Spain who were not mothers of Kings of Spain. Infante and Infanta are Spanish royal titles that basically correspond to Prince and Princess.

In 1690, Carlos II married Maria Anna of Neuberg but that marriage was also childless. Carlos II’s autopsy revealed he had only one atrophied testicle, the cause of infertility in his two marriages. In September 1700, Carlos became ill and was no longer able to eat. Louis, Le Grand Dauphin, the heir to the French throne and the only surviving child of King Louis XIV of France and Maria Teresa of Austria, Infanta of Spain, Carlos’ half-sister, had the strongest genealogical claim to the throne of Spain, just as King Louis XIV of France had thought could happen. However, neither Louis, Le Grand Dauphin nor his elder son, Louis, Duke of Burgundy, Le Petit Dauphin (the father of King Louis XV who succeeded his great-grandfather King Louis XIV) could be displaced from their place in the succession to the French throne. Therefore, in his will, Carlos II, King of Spain named 16-year-old Philippe of France, Duke of Anjou, the second son of Louis, Le Grand Dauphin, and the grandson of Carlos II’s half-sister Maria Teresa of Austria, Infanta of Spain and her husband King Louis XIV of France, as his successor. When Carlos II, King of Spain died on November 1, 1700, five days before his thirty-ninth birthday, he was succeeded by his half-sister’s grandson Philippe of France, Duke of Anjou who reigned as Felipe V, King of Spain, the first monarch of the House of Bourbon which still reigns in the Kingdom of Spain today.

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Works Cited

  • Flantzer, Susan. (2022) Carlos II, King of Spain, Unofficial Royalty. Available at: https://www.unofficialroyalty.com/carlos-ii-king-of-spain/ (Accessed: October 23, 2022).
  • Flantzer, Susan. (2019) Philippe I, Duke of Orléans, Unofficial Royalty. Available at: https://www.unofficialroyalty.com/philippe-i-duke-of-orleans/ (Accessed: October 23, 2022).
  • María Luisa de Orleans (2022) Wikipedia (Spanish). Wikimedia Foundation. Available at: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mar%C3%ADa_Luisa_de_Orleans (Accessed: October 23, 2022).
  • Marie Louise d’Orléans (2022) Wikipedia (German). Wikimedia Foundation. Available at: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Louise_d%E2%80%99Orl%C3%A9ans (Accessed: October 23, 2022).
  • Marie Louise d’Orléans (2022) Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Louise_d%27Orl%C3%A9ans (Accessed: October 23, 2022).
  • Marie-Louise d’Orléans (2022) Wikipedia (French). Wikimedia Foundation. Available at: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie-Louise_d%27Orl%C3%A9ans (Accessed: October 23, 2022).
  • Мария луиза орлеанская (2021) Wikipedia (Russian). Wikimedia Foundation. Available at: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9C%D0%B0%D1%80%D0%B8%D1%8F_%D0%9B%D1%83%D0%B8%D0%B7%D0%B0_%D0%9E%D1%80%D0%BB%D0%B5%D0%B0%D0%BD%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B0%D1%8F (Accessed: October 23, 2022).
  • Wheatcroft, Andrew (1995). The Habsburgs. London: Viking.

December 3: Today in Royal History

© Unofficial Royalty 2022

Princess Louise of the United Kingdom, Duchess of Argyll; Credit – Wikipedia

December 3, 1764 – Birth of Augusta of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Princess Friedrich of Württemberg, first wife of the future King Friedrich I of Württemberg, in Brunswick, Duchy of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, now in Lower Saxony, Germany
Full name: Augusta Caroline Friederike Luise
Augusta was the daughter of Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and Princess Augusta of Great Britain, a sister of King George III. In 1780, Augusta married Prince Friedrich of Württemberg, later King Friedrich I of Württemberg. Despite a very unhappy marriage, Augusta and Friedrich had four children. Augusta wanted to leave her husband as early as her first pregnancy.  In 1782, Friedrich had impressed Catherine II (the Great), Empress of All Russia while visiting Russia, and she made him Governor-General of Eastern Finland. Four years later, while they were visiting Catherine II in St. Petersburg, Augusta asked Catherine for protection from her husband. She claimed that Friedrich was abusive to her, and was having affairs with several men. Catherine took Augusta in and told Friedrich to leave the country. Augusta hoped to obtain a divorce, but her father would not permit it. So Catherine provided Augusta with a home at Koluvere Castle in Estonia, along with a custodian, Wilhelm von Pohlmann. Soon, Augusta and von Pohlmann began an affair and she became pregnant. On September 27, 1788, Augusta went into premature labor. Fearing that their affair would become known, von Pohlmann refused to call for a doctor and Augusta died of blood loss.
Unofficial Royalty: Augusta of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

December 3, 1821 – Birth of Jane Loftus, Marchioness of Ely, Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Victoria
Born Jane Hope-Vere, the daughter of  James Hope-Vere and Lady Elizabeth Hay, a daughter of the 7th Marquess of Tweeddale. she married John Loftus, 3rd Marquess of Ely.
Unofficial Royalty: Jane Loftus, Marchioness of Ely

December 3, 1838 – Birth of Luise of Prussia, Grand Duchess of Baden, wife of Grand Duke Friedrich I of Baden, in Berlin, Kingdom of Prussia, now in Brandenburg, Germany
Full name: Luise Marie Elisabeth
Luise was the daughter of Wilhelm I, King of Prussia and Augusta of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach. She had one older brother Friedrich III, German Emperor and King of Prussia. In 1856, Luise married the future Grand Duke Friedrich I of Baden. The couple had three children including Friedrich II, Grand Duke of Baden and Victoria who married King Gustav V of Sweden. Luise became involved in charitable causes in Baden, particularly those which helped and promoted women. Luise’s husband died in 1907. At the end of World War I, Luise along with her daughter Queen Victoria of Sweden, who was visiting, fled to Zwingenberg Palace in Zwingenberg, now in the German state of Baden-Württemberg. The new Baden government then granted Luise permission to stay at Langenstein Castle, owned by the Swedish Count Douglas, who was related to the Baden Grand Ducal family through marriage. The Baden government ordered that Luise and her family be protected, primarily because her daughter was Queen of Sweden, and they did not want to cause any sort of diplomatic problems.  In 1919, Luise was given permission to return to Neues Schloss (New Castle) in Baden-Baden, Baden-Württemberg, Germany where she died at the age of 85.
Unofficial Royalty: Louise of Prussia, Grand Duchess of Baden

December 3, 1839 – Death of King Frederik VI of Denmark and Norway at Amalienborg Palace in Copenhagen, Denmark; buried at Roskilde Cathedral in Roskilde, Denmark
Frederik VI was the only son and the eldest of the two children of King Christian VII of Denmark and Norway and his and Caroline Matilda of Wales, sister of King George III of the United Kingdom. Frederik’s father King Christian VII suffered from mental illness. His ill-treated mother Caroline Matilda had an affair with physician Johann Friedrich Struensee. After the affair was discovered Struenss was executed and Caroline Matilda was imprisoned in a castle and never saw her children again. In 1790, Frederik married his cousin Princess Marie of Hesse-Kassel. Frederik and Marie had eight children but unfortunately, six of them, including two boys, died in infancy. Only two daughters survived and both daughters had childless marriages. In 1808, 1808, Frederik became king upon the death of his father. After the French defeat in the Napoleonic Wars in 1814 and the loss of Norway, Frederik became more authoritarian and reactionary, giving up his former liberal ideas. He died at the age of 71.
Unofficial Royalty: King Frederik VI of Denmark and Norway

December 3, 1882 – Death of Bernhard II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen in Meiningen, Duchy of Saxe-Meinigen, now in Thuringia, Germany; buried in the Ducal Crypt Chapel in the Meiningen municipal cemetery until 1977, when his remains were removed from the chapel, cremated and buried elsewhere in the cemetery
Bernhard was the only son of Georg I, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and the younger brother of Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen who married King William IV of the United Kingdom.  In 1803, three-year-old Bernhard became Duke of Saxe-Meiningen upon the death of his father. In 1825, Bernhard married Princess Marie Friederike of Hesse-Kassel and the couple had two children. Although he had earlier aligned himself with Prussia, in the mid-1860s, Bernhard instead sided with Austria during the Austro-Prussian War of 1866. Following Austria’s defeat, the Prussians forced Bernhard to abdicate on September 20, 1866, in favor of his son, Georg II. Now the former Duke, Bernhard took up residence at the Great Palace in Meiningen, previously built as a dower home for his mother. He died there at the age of 81.
Unofficial Royalty: Bernhard II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen

December 3, 1935 – Death of Princess Victoria of the United Kingdom, daughter of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, at her home Coppins in Iver, Buckinghamshire, England; buried at the Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore in Windsor, England
Victoria’s mother Alexandra was extremely possessive, demanded complete devotion from her children, and insisted that they call her Motherdear. Victoria’s sisters Louise and Maud escaped into marriage, leaving her at home as her mother’s constant companion. She had several suitors including Prince Adolphus of Teck, Sir Arthur Davidson who was one of her father’s equerries, and Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery. Lord Rosebery was a former Prime Minister who had been widowed, and both he and Victoria would have liked to have married. However, Victoria’s mother actively discouraged her from marrying anyone. Instead, she remained a companion to her mother, Queen Alexandra, whom she lived with until the Queen’s death in 1925. Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna, Victoria’s first cousin, described her as little more than “a glorified maid.”  When her mother died, Victoria was 57 and was able to live her own life at last. She purchased a country home, Coppins, in Iver, Buckinghamshire, England. Victoria became active in the village life of Iver and was the honorary president of the Iver Horticultural Society. Victoria’s last years were plagued with health issues and she suffered from neuralgia, migraines, indigestion, depression, colds, and influenza. Princess Victoria died at her home Coppins at the age of 67.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Victoria of the United Kingdom

December 3, 1939 – Death of Princess Louise of the United Kingdom, Duchess of Argyll, daughter of Queen Victoria, at Kensington Palace in London, England; cremated and ashes buried at the Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore in Windsor, England
Louise developed a strong interest in the arts. Queen Victoria permitted her to enroll at The National Art Training School, to pursue her interests and she became a very skilled painter and sculptress. She sculpted a statue of Queen Victoria which stands today on the grounds of Kensington Palace. In 1871, Louise married John Campbell, Marquess of Lorne and heir to the Dukedom of Argyll. Queen Victoria found this to be a wonderful match, infusing ‘new blood’ into the royal family. Others, including the Prince of Wales, found it appalling that the Princess should marry below her class. Louise and her husband had no children. From 1878 – 1883, Louise’s husband was the Governor-General of Canada and the couple resided at Rideau Hall in Ottawa. Louise was widowed in 1914 when her husband passed away after a lengthy illness. She would survive him by more than 25 years. During this time, she remained an active member of the royal family, taking part in official events and maintaining contact with many of her patronages and charities. Louise spent her remaining years at Kensington Palace, where she died at the age of 91.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll

December 3, 1944 – Death of Prince Andreas (Andrew) of Greece, son of King George I of Greece and father of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, at the Metropole Hotel in Monte Carlo, Monaco; first buried at the Russian Orthodox Church in Nice, France; in 1946, his remains were reinterred in the royal cemetery at Tatoi Palace in Greece
The father of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Andreas was the son of King George I of Greece (born a Prince of Denmark) and Grand Duchess Olga Konstantinovna of Russia. In 1903, he married Princess Alice of Battenberg, daughter of Prince Louis of Battenberg and Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine. The couple had four daughters and one son. Andreas’ life was often interrupted by the political turmoil in Greece. By the early 1930s, Andreas had less and less contact with his family. His wife suffered a nervous breakdown and was institutionalized, his four daughters had all married into former German royal families, and his son was attending school first in Germany and then in the United Kingdom. Somewhat at a loss, having been basically forced into a life of retirement, Andreas moved to the French Riviera. The onset of World War II brought an end to the little contact Andreas had with his wife and children. His wife had returned to Greece, his daughters were all behind German lines, and his son was fighting for the British forces. Prince Andreas died at the Metropole Hotel in Monte Carlo on December 3, 1944, at the age of 62.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Andreas of Greece

December 3, 2005 – Birth of Prince Sverre Magnus of Norway, son of Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, at the Rikshospitalet University Hospital in Oslo, Norway
Sverre Magnus is the youngest of the two children of Crown Prince Haakon of Norway and his wife Crown Princess Mette-Marit (née Mette-Marit Tjessem Høiby), and one of the five grandchildren of King Harald V of Norway. The prince is third in the line of succession to the Norwegian throne, behind his father and sister Princess Ingrid Alexandra.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Sverre Magnus of Norway

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Royal News Recap for Friday, December 2, 2022

Join us at our Facebook group at Facebook: Unofficial Royalty.

Royal News Recaps are published Mondays – Fridays and on Sundays except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will publish a breaking news article and/or a recap as necessary.

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

* * * * * * * * * *

Japan

Monaco

United Kingdom

* * * * * * * * * *

Disclaimer: Please be advised that any media article titles or content that appear in the Royal News which identify members of royal families with their maiden names, nicknames, incorrect style or title, etc., come directly from the media source and not from Unofficial Royalty. We encourage you to contact the media sources to express your concern about their use of the incorrect name, style, title, etc. Contact information can usually be found at the bottom of each media source’s main page.

Royal News Recap for Thursday, December 1, 2022

Join us at our Facebook group at Facebook: Unofficial Royalty.

Royal News Recaps are published Mondays – Fridays and on Sundays except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will publish a breaking news article and/or a recap as necessary.

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

* * * * * * * * * *

Japan

Monaco

Netherlands

Spain

United Kingdom

* * * * * * * * * *

Disclaimer: Please be advised that any media article titles or content that appear in the Royal News which identify members of royal families with their maiden names, nicknames, incorrect style or title, etc., come directly from the media source and not from Unofficial Royalty. We encourage you to contact the media sources to express your concern about their use of the incorrect name, style, title, etc. Contact information can usually be found at the bottom of each media source’s main page.

December 2: Today in Royal History

© Unofficial Royalty 2022

Archduchess Maria Leopoldina of Austria, Empress of Brazil, Queen of Portugal; Credit – Wikipedia

December 2, 1767 – Birth of Leopold I, Prince of Lippe in Detmold, County of Lippe-Detmold, now in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Full name: Wilhelm Leopold
As a child, Leopold’s lack of strength of character, lack of interest, lack of concentration, and a tendency to mental disorders became apparent. In 1782, Leopold’s father died and the fourteen-year-old succeeded him. In 1790, Leopold’s mental disorders interfered in his role as reigning prince and he was deemed legally incapacitated and placed under guardianship. In 1795, the guardianship was conditionally lifted after Leopold’s condition improved. Leopold married Princess Pauline of Anhalt-Bernburg in 1796 and the couple had two sons. Because of Leopold’s tenuous mental condition, Pauline became his governmental adviser and colleague. Within the next few years, Leopold developed intestinal tuberculosis and his mental disorders returned with memory loss. He died at the age of 34 and his five-year-old son Leopold II, Prince of Lippe succeeded him with his mother Pauline very capably acting as Regent of the Principality of Lippe.
Unofficial Royalty: Leopold I, Prince of Lippe

December 2, 1826 – Death of Archduchess Maria Leopoldina of Austria, Empress of Brazil, Queen of Portugal, wife of Pedro I of Brazil/Pedro IV of Portugal, at São Cristóvão Palace in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; first buried at the Church of the Ajuda Convent in Rio de Janeiro, reinterred in 1954 at the Monument to the Independence of Brazil in São Paulo, Brazil
Known as Leopoldina, she was the daughter of Emperor Franz I of Austria and the second of his four wives, Maria Theresa of Naples and Sicily. In 1817, she married Pedro, Crown Prince of Portugal and Prince of Brazil, son of King João VI of Portugal. At that time, Brazil was ruled as a kingdom united with Portugal. The couple had seven children. In 1821, Pedro became Regent of Brazil. In August 1822, Pedro appointed Leopoldina Regent of Brazil while he was away on a trip. While Pedro was away, Leopoldina received news that Portugal intended to recall Pedro and relegate Brazil to the status of a colony. Leopoldina met with the Council of State and signed the Decree of Independence, declaring Brazil independent from Portugal. Pedro I was declared Emperor of Brazil and Leopoldina became Empress of Brazil. In 1826, 29-year-old Leopoldina died from puerperal fever (childbed fever) after a miscarriage.
Unofficial Royalty: Maria Leopoldina of Austria, Empress of Brazil, Queen of Portugal

December 2, 1849 – Death of Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, Queen of the United Kingdom, wife of King William IV of the United Kingdom, at Bentley Priory in Stanmore, Middlesex, England; buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, in Windsor, England
After twenty-one-year-old Princess Charlotte of Wales, the only child of George, Prince of Wales, died delivering a stillborn son, the unmarried, aging sons of King George III began a frantic search for brides to provide for the succession. One of the sons was William, Duke of Clarence (the future King William IV). William had never married but had lived for 20 years with actress Dorothea Jordan. Soon after the death of Princess Charlotte of Wales, negotiations began for the marriage of William to Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, and the engagement was announced on April 19, 1818. William was 52 and Adelaide was 25. Adelaide loved children but was destined not to have one of her own. Sadly, Adelaide had babies who died in early infancy, a miscarriage, and two stillbirths. A child of William and Adelaide would have succeeded to the throne as William’s two elder brothers (George IV and Frederick, Duke of York) had no surviving children.  Adelaide wrote to her widowed sister-in-law the Duchess of Kent, “My children are dead, but your child lives, and she is mine too.” That child was the future Queen Victoria. In 1830, Adelaide’s husband William became king upon the death of his brother King George IV.  He reigned only seven years and was succeeded by his niece Victoria. Adelaide survived William by 12 years, dying at the age of 57.
Unofficial Royalty: Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, Queen of the United Kingdom

December 2, 1865 – Birth of Olga Valerianovna Karnovich, the second, morganatic wife of Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia, in St. Petersburg, Russia
Olga first married Major General Erich Augustinovich von Pistohlkors, an officer of the Imperial Guard and an aide to Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich. As a friend of Pistohlkors, Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich often spent his evenings with him and his wife Olga. Paul appreciated Olga’s elegance and lively spirit and an affair began. Pistohlkors turned a blind eye to the affair. Olga gave birth in 1897 to a son who was then known as Vladimir von Pistohlkors because his mother was still married to Pistohlkors. Eventually, Olga divorced her husband and Paul asked for permission to marry Olga from his nephew Nicholas II, Emperor of All Russia. Olga gave birth in 1897 to a son who was then known as Vladimir von Pistohlkors because his mother was still married to Pistohlkors. Eventually, Olga divorced her husband and Paul asked for permission to marry Olga from his nephew Nicholas II, Emperor of All Russia but Nicholas II denied permission. Paul made a morganatic marriage to Olga on October 10, 1902. Paul was banished from Russia, dismissed from his military commissions, and all his property was seized. Ten years later, Nicholas II relented and decided to pardon his only surviving paternal uncle. Grand Duke Paul’s titles and properties were returned and Nicholas II recognized Paul’s marriage to Olga. Olga and Paul had one son and two daughters. During the Russian Revolution, her son Prince Vladimir Pavlovich Paley was one of the five Romanovs executed on July 18, 1918, with Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna. On January 28, 1919, her husband Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich along with three other Grand Dukes were executed by a firing squad in the courtyard of the Peter and Paul Fortress.
Unofficial Royalty: Olga Valerianovna Karnovich, Princess Paley

December 2, 1915 – Birth of Prince Mikasa of Japan, son of Emperor Taishō of Japan, at the Tokyo Imperial Palace in Tokyo, Japan
Prince Mikasa was the youngest of the four sons of Emperor Taishō and Empress Teimei, and the youngest brother of Emperor Hirohito (Shōwa). He studied archaeology, Middle Eastern studies, and Semitic languages at the University of Tokyo. From 1954 until his death in 2016, he directed the Japanese Society for Middle East Studies. He also held visiting and guest faculty appointments in Middle Eastern studies and archaeology at universities in Japan and abroad. In 1941, Prince Mikasa married Yuriko Takagi, daughter of Japanese noble Viscount Masanari, who was known as Princess Mikasa after her marriage. The couple had three sons and two daughters. All three sons predeceased their parents. Prince Mikasa died of heart failure on October 27, 2016, at the age of 100, a little more than a month before his 101st birthday. At the time of his death, he was the world’s oldest royal, the longest-lived member of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the last of the five Japanese princes in the line of succession. (Today, there are only three princes in the line of succession. See The Japanese Succession Crisis) Prince Mikasa lived during the reigns of three emperors: his father Emperor Taishō, his brother Emperor Hirohito, and his nephew Emperor Akihito.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Mikasa of Japan

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Royal News Recap for Wednesday, November 30, 2022

Please join us on our new Facebook group at Facebook: Unofficial Royalty

* * * * * * * * * *

Royal News Recaps are published Mondays-Fridays and on Sundays, except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will add an update as necessary.

* * * * * * * * * *

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

* * * * * * * * * *

Denmark

Monaco

Multiple Monarchies

Netherlands

Spain

United Kingdom

* * * * * * * * * *

Disclaimer:Please be advised that any media article titles or content that appear in the Royal News which identify members of royal families with their maiden names, nicknames, incorrect style or title, etc., come directly from the media source and not from Unofficial Royalty. We encourage you to contact the media sources to express your concern about their use of the incorrect name, style, title, etc. Contact information can usually be found at the bottom of each media source’s main page.

December 1: Today in Royal History

© Unofficial Royalty 2022

King Henry I of England, Credit – Wikipedia

December 1, 1135 – Death of King Henry I of England at St. Denis-le-Fermont, France; buried at Reading Abbey in Berkshire, England
Henry I was the fourth and the youngest son of William the Conqueror (King William I). In 1100, Henry married Edith of Scotland (renamed Matilda upon her marriage), the daughter of King Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret of Scotland (born an Anglo-Saxon princess). Through her mother, Matilda merged the bloodline of the Anglo-Saxon kings with Henry’s Norman bloodline. Henry and Matilda had two surviving children. In 1120, William Ætheling, Henry’s only legitimate son, was returning to England from Normandy when his ship, the White Ship, hit a submerged rock, capsized, and sank. William Ætheling and many others drowned. King Henry I holds the record for the British monarch with the most illegitimate children, 25 or so illegitimate children, but the tragedy of the White Ship left him with only one legitimate child, his daughter Matilda. Henry died around the age of 67. He had fallen ill after eating a number of lampreys against his doctor’s advice. It is possible the cause of death was ptomaine poisoning. Upon hearing of Henry’s death, Stephen of Blois, one of Henry’s nephews, quickly crossed the English Channel from France, seized power, and was crowned King of England. This started the terrible civil war between Stephen and Henry’s daughter Matilda known as The Anarchy. England did not see peace for eighteen years until Matilda’s son acceded to the throne as King Henry II of England in 1153.
Unofficial Royalty: King Henry I of England

December 1, 1241 – Death of Isabella of England, Holy Roman Empress, daughter of King John of England, at Foggia, Kingdom of Sicily, now in Italy; buried at the Cathedral of Andria in Andria, Kingdom of Sicily, now in Italy
In 1235, 21-year-old Isabella married the twice-widowed 40-year-old Friedrich II, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily. There is controversy over how many children Isabella and Friedrich had, but they had at least four children. Isabella rarely appeared in public and had no political influence. She lived in seclusion mostly at the castle in Noventa Padovana, near Venice and Padua in present-day Italy. Isabella died at the age of 27 after giving birth to her last child.
Unofficial Royalty: Isabella of England, Holy Roman Empress

December 1, 1463 – Death of Mary of Guelders, Queen of Scots, wife of  James II, King of Scots, at Ravenscraig Castle in Scotland;  buried in Trinity College Kirk in Edinburgh, Scotland; in 1848, Mary’s remains were moved to Holyrood Abbey in Edinburgh
Mary was educated in the court of her great uncle Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy and his third wife Isabella of Portugal, who was a granddaughter of John of Gaunt, son of King Edward III of England. Isabella, who had been well educated by her parents, King João I of Portugal and Philippa of Lancaster, was known for her intelligence, her patronage of the arts, and her political influence on her husband and son. She was a great influence on Mary and helped arrange Mary’s marriage to James II, King of Scots in 1449. Mary and James II had seven children. In 1460, Mary’s husband 29-year-old James II was accidentally killed when a cannon nearby where he was standing exploded. Mary became the regent for her nine-year-old son King James III. Mary of Guelders survived her husband by only three years, dying at the age of thirty.
Unofficial Royalty: Mary of Guelders, Queen of Scots

December 1, 1825 – Death of Alexander I, Emperor of All Russia at Taganrog, Russia; buried at the Peter and Paul Cathedral, St. Petersburg, Russia
In 1793, fifteen-year-old Alexander married fourteen-year-old Louise of Baden who took the Russian name Elizabeth Alexeievna. Two daughters were born during the marriage and both died in early childhood. It is possible that the daughters were not Alexander’s. Both Alexander and his wife had affairs and their marriage was one in name only. Alexander became Emperor of All Russia in 1801 upon the assassination of his father Paul I, Emperor of All Russia. The most important event during Alexander’s reign was the Napoleonic Wars, a series of major conflicts (1803 – 1815) pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against various coalitions of European powers. In 1812, Napoleon’s army invaded Russia. The French forces eventually were repelled by the brutal Russian winter and retreated to the borders of Russia, pursued by the Russian army. The French Army was almost completely destroyed and it was the motivation for composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture, written in 1882 to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Russia’s defense against Napoleon’s invading army. Toward the end of his life, Alexander somewhat reconciled with his wife. By 1825, Elizabeth Alexeievna’s health was suffering due to lung problems and the doctors recommended getting away from the harsh climate of St. Petersburg. Alexander and Elizabeth Alexeievna relocated to the city of Taganrog, Russia by the Sea of Azov. Alexander had a cold, which developed into typhus. He died at the age of 47. Elizabeth Alexeievna survived him by five months.
Unofficial Royalty: Alexander I, Emperor of All Russia

December 1, 1844 – Birth of Alexandra of Denmark, Queen of the United Kingdom, wife of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, at the Yellow Palace in Copenhagen, Denmark
Full name: Alexandra Carolina Marie Charlotte Louise
The daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark, Alexandra, known as Alix, married the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom (Bertie) in 1863. The couple had six children including King George V of the United Kingdom and Queen Maud of Norway. In 1901, Alix’s husband succeeded to the British throne upon the death of his mother Queen Victoria. Alix and her husband had begun the idea of the royal family’s public appearances as we now know them during Queen Victoria’s withdrawal after her husband’s death, and they continued this during Bertie’s reign. During his marriage, Bertie had quite a number of mistresses. Apparently, Alix knew about many of them and accepted them. When Bertie died in 1910, Alix quipped, “Now at least I know where he is.”
Unofficial Royalty: Alexandra of Denmark, Queen of the United Kingdom

December 1, 2001 – Birth of Princess Aiko of Japan, the only child of Emperor Naruhito of Japan, at the Hospital of the Imperial Household in Tokyo, Japan
Princess Aiko is the only child of Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako. She graduated from Gakushūin Primary School in March 2014, and the following month, she entered the Gakushūin Girls Junior High School. In 2017, Aiko entered the Gakushuin Girls High School, graduating in March 2020. In April 2020, Princess Aiko began her studies at Gakushuin University where she is majoring in Japanese language and literature. Despite being the child of the Emperor, Princess Aiko is not in the line of succession to the throne, as The Imperial Household Law of 1947 limits succession to males only. After Aiko’s birth, there was much discussion about changing the succession laws. In 2005, the Prime Minister vowed to submit a bill to the government to change The Imperial Household Law, based on recommendations from an independent, government-appointed panel. However, the birth of a male cousin, Prince Hisahito, son of Crown Prince Akoshino, in 2006, ended the efforts, and the proposal was dropped. In practicality, with the current succession laws, the Imperial Family now has only one person who can provide any heirs, a boy born in 2006 who will not marry for years. In November 2020, it was recommended that the discussion regarding succession be shelved until Prince Hisahito becomes an adult and has children.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Aiko of Japan
Unofficial Royalty: Japanese Succession Crisis

December 1, 2004 – Death of Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, born Count Bernhard of Biesterfeld, raised to Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld, father of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, husband of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands, at the University of Utrecht Medical Center in Utrecht, the Netherlands; buried at Nieuwe Kerk in Delft, the Netherlands
Bernhard was the elder son of Prince Bernhard of Lippe (younger brother of Leopold IV, the reigning Prince of Lippe) and his wife Armgard von Cramm. Bernhard and Armgard’s marriage was considered morganatic, Bernhard was styled Graf von Biesterfeld (Count of Biesterfeld) at birth. In 1916, Bernhard’s uncle, Leopold IV, the reigning Prince of Lippe, created Armgard Princess of Lippe-Biesterfeld with the style Serene Highness and this title and style was also extended to her two sons. In 1937, Bernhard married  Princess Juliana of the Netherlands, the only child, and heir of Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands. Bernhard and Juliana had four daughters including Juliana’s successor Queen Beatrix. In 2004, eight months after Juliana’s death, it was announced that Prince Bernhard had lung cancer. An additional announcement was made two weeks later stating that he also had a malignant tumor in the intestines. Bernhard died soon afterward at the age of 93.
Unofficial Royalty: Bernhard von Lippe-Biesterfeld

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Royal News Recap for Tuesday, November 29, 2022

Join us at our Facebook group at Facebook: Unofficial Royalty.

Royal News Recaps are published Mondays – Fridays and on Sundays except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will publish a breaking news article and/or a recap as necessary.

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

* * * * * * * * * *

Denmark

Multiple Monarchies

Netherlands

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

* * * * * * * * * *

Disclaimer: Please be advised that any media article titles or content that appear in the Royal News which identify members of royal families with their maiden names, nicknames, incorrect style or title, etc., come directly from the media source and not from Unofficial Royalty. We encourage you to contact the media sources to express your concern about their use of the incorrect name, style, title, etc. Contact information can usually be found at the bottom of each media source’s main page.

November 30: Today in Royal History

© Unofficial Royalty 2022

King Christian VI of Denmark, Credit – Wikipedia

November 30, 1016 – Death of King Edmund II (Ironside) of England; buried at Glastonbury Abbey in Glastonbury, Somerset, England
Edmund was the third of the six sons of Æthelred II (the Unready), King of the English. Edmund was not expected to become king as he had two elder brothers but they both predeceased their father. Edmund became king upon the death of his father on April 23, 1016. Edmund was now king but had to fight to keep the Kingdom of England. He earned the added name “Ironside” because of his bravery in resisting the Danish invasion led by Cnut the Great. The war between Edmund and Cnut ended in a decisive victory for Cnut at the Battle of Assandun on October 18, 1016. Because Edmund’s reputation as a warrior was great, Cnut agreed to divide England, with Edmund taking Wessex and Cnut the rest of the country beyond the River Thames. However, Edmund died on November 30, 1016, and Cnut the Great became King of England.
Unofficial Royalty: King Edmund II of England

November 30, 1699 – Birth of King Christian VI of Denmark and Norway at Christiansborg Palace in Copenhagen, Denmark
Christian married  Sophia Magdalene of Brandenburg-Kulmbach in 1721. The couple had one son and two daughters including Frederik V, King of Denmark and Norway. Christian became King of Denmark and Norway upon the death of his father Frederik IV, King of Denmark and Norway in 1730. Christian VI is known as a religious ruler and remained devoted to Pietism. His court was considered dull. Only religious music was played and dancing was not allowed. Christian was a shy person, anxious about responsibility and decisions, and uncomfortable about carrying out his ceremonial obligations as the king. He never traveled except for one trip to Norway in 1733. Christian died at the age of 46.
Unofficial Royalty: King Christian VI of Denmark and Norway

November 30, 1719 – Birth of Augusta of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg, Princess of Wales, wife of Frederick, Prince of Wales and mother of King George III of Great Britain, in Gotha, Duchy of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg, now in Thuringia, Germany
In 1736, at the age of 16, and still very young for her age, clutching a doll, and knowing no English, Augusta arrived in England for her marriage to Frederick, Prince of Wales, the son of King George II of Great Britain. Frederick and Augusta had nine children including King George III who succeeded his grandfather King George II, and Caroline Matilda, Queen Consort of Denmark whose marriage was a tragic story. In 1751, Augusta’s husband died at the age of 44. At the time of Frederick’s death, his 32-year-old widow was pregnant with her ninth child. Augusta spent her years as a widow raising her nine children and improving the gardens at Kew Palace, which today are a world-class botanical garden. Her eldest son George succeeded his grandfather as king in 1760. Augusta died of cancer of the throat in 1772, at the age of 52.
Unofficial Royalty: Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, Princess of Wales

November 30, 1834 – Death of Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester, great-grandson of King George II, nephew and son-in-law of King George III, and husband of Princess Mary of the United Kingdom, at Bagshot Park in Surrey, England; buried in the Gloucester Vault at St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle in Windsor, England
William Frederick was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge and like his father, Prince William Henry, 1st Duke of Gloucester (brother of King George III), had a career in the British Army, attaining the rank of Field Marshal in 1816. He was an advocate for the abolition of slavery, served as President of the African Institution, and was Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. In 1816, 40-year-old William Frederick married his 40-year-old first cousin Princess Mary, the daughter of King George III.  Mary and William’s marriage was childless and the couple lived at Gloucester House in Piccadilly, London and Bagshot Park, now the home of Queen Elizabeth II’s youngest child Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex. William Frederik died at the age of 58 after being ill with a fever for fifteen days.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester

November 30, 1934 – Birth of Albert, Margrave of Meissen, disputed Head of the House of Saxony and pretender to the former throne of the Kingdom of Saxony, in Bamberg, Bavaria, Germany
Full name: Albert Joseph Maria Franz-Xaver, Prince of Saxony
Albert, Margrave of Meissen was briefly one of the disputed Heads of the House of Saxony, and pretender to the former throne of the Kingdom of Saxony.
Unofficial Royalty: Albert, Margrave of Meissen

November 30, 1965 – Birth of Crown Prince Akishino of Japan, son of Emperor Emeritus Akihito of Japan, brother of Emperor Naruhito of Japan, at the Imperial Household Agency Hospital, Tokyo Imperial Palace in Tokyo, Japan 
After his early education, Akishiono attended Gakushuin University in Tokyo, studying law and biology. He later studied at St John’s College, Oxford, England and received a Ph.D. in ornithology from the Graduate University for Advanced Studies in Japan in 1996. In June 1990, Akishino married Kiko Kawashima. The couple had two daughters and one son. As his elder brother Emperor Naruhito has no sons, Akishino became the heir presumptive to the Chrysanthemum Throne upon Naruhito’s accession in 2019. Crown Prince Akishino is followed in the line of succession only by his son Prince Hisahito and his elderly uncle Prince Hitachi. This situation causes a succession crisis. Unless Emperor Naruhito has a son (unlikely) or the laws of succession are changed, it is very likely that Prince Hisahito will one day inherit the throne and that the line of succession will depend upon Hisahito marrying and producing sons.
Unofficial Royalty: Crown Prince Akishino of Japan
Unofficial Royalty: Japanese Succession Crisis

November 30, 2011 – Death of Crown Prince Leka I of Albania, pretender to the Albanian throne, at Mother Teresa Hospital in Tirana, Albania; first buried at Sharra Cemetery in Tirana, Albania, in November 2012 his remains were reinterred in the newly rebuilt Royal Mausoleum in Tirana, Albania
Leka was the only child of  King Zog I of the Albanians who reigned from 1928-1939. Just two days after Leka’s birth, Fascist forces invaded Albania, and the family quickly fled into exile. They settled briefly in France before moving to England where they lived through the end of World War II and eventually moved to Egypt in 1946. During that time, Leka attended the British Boys School and Victoria College in Egypt before graduating from Aiglon College in Switzerland in 1956. In 1975, Leka married Susan Cullen-Ward and the couple had one son who is styled Crown Prince Leka II. Leka I and his family were allowed to return to Albania in 2002. When Leka I died in 2011 at the age of 72,  the government declared a National Day of Mourning, and he was given a state funeral, with full military honors.
Unofficial Royalty:  Crown Leka I Prince of Albania

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Royal News Recap for Monday, November 28, 2022

Please join us on our new Facebook group at Facebook: Unofficial Royalty

* * * * * * * * * *

Royal News Recaps are published Mondays-Fridays and on Sundays, except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will add an update as necessary.

* * * * * * * * * *

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

* * * * * * * * * *

Denmark

Jordan

Multiple Monarchies

Netherlands

Spain

United Kingdom

* * * * * * * * * *

Disclaimer:Please be advised that any media article titles or content that appear in the Royal News which identify members of royal families with their maiden names, nicknames, incorrect style or title, etc., come directly from the media source and not from Unofficial Royalty. We encourage you to contact the media sources to express your concern about their use of the incorrect name, style, title, etc. Contact information can usually be found at the bottom of each media source’s main page.