Wenceslas I | king of Bohemia | Britannica

Wenceslas I

king of Bohemia
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Wenceslas I, (born 1205—died Sept. 23, 1253), king of Bohemia from 1230 who brought Austria under his dynasty while using the influence of German colonists and craftsmen to keep Bohemia strong, prosperous, and culturally progressive.

Succeeding his father, Přemysl Otakar I, in 1230, Wenceslas prevented Mongol armies from attacking Bohemia (1241) but could not defend Moravia, which was subsequently ravished by the Mongols before they moved into Hungary. The King’s main foreign policy objective then became the acquisition of Austria. On the death of the last Babenberg duke of Austria, Frederick II (1246), Wenceslas secured the hand of the Duke’s niece for his son Vladislas. But Vladislas soon died, and Wenceslas lost Austria. After suppressing a Bohemian revolt in 1248–49, however, he finally forced the Austrian estates to accept his son Přemysl Otakar II as their duke in 1251. Bohemia prospered under Wenceslas’ reign. Towns grew and German merchants and colonists added considerably to the wealth of the country, while German influence at the court caused a rich flowering of the arts, especially literature and architecture.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.
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