David Soslan | History Forum

David Soslan

May 2018
52
turkey
what is ancestry of david soslan? some sources say that his ancestry is bagratid.

some sources say that his ancestry is Tsarazon family.

which is true?
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
3,863
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
what is ancestry of david soslan? some sources say that his ancestry is bagratid.

some sources say that his ancestry is Tsarazon family.

which is true?
In a situation like you describe, it is reasonable to suspect that the correct answer is probably "nobody knows".

David Soslan seems to have certainly been a member of the royal family of Alania/Ossetia, and thus would normally be supposed to be a member of a different royal family and not a Bagratid.

But the Bagratid dynasty had some different branches that ruled different principalities and fiefs in Armenia and in Georgia and at one time different branches were the royal families of Armenia and Georgia.

So it was certainly possible for David Soslan to belong to a Bagratid branch that become the royal family of Alania/Ossetia.

David Soslan (d. 1207) married Queen of kings Tamar in 1187/89. As early as the reign of their son George IV Lasha (reigned 1212-1223) a chronicle claimed that David had Bagratid ancestry. In the 18th century Prince Vakhushti Bagrationi wrote that David was the son of King Jaderon of Alania the son of King Aton, son of David who fled to Alania and married a princess, son of Demitrius who claimed the throne of Georgia, son of King George I of Georgia.

On one hand, people have often been known to lie about their ancestry in their own lifetimes, and on the other hand, it is perfectly possible that Vakhushti Bagrationi writing centuries later had access to accurate earlier and now lost sources.

Also during the 13th century it was claimed that David Soslan was a member of the dynasty of Ephraim, which would seem to be a different dynasty unless it was a branch of the Bagratids.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Soslan

It is possible that someone familiar with medieval Georgian history might have something to say about this question.

But it seems to me that the only way to answer the question for certain would be to compare the Y chromosome of DNA from the skeletons of pre 1200 members of the Bagratid Dynasty with that of modern Bagratids descended in the male line from David Soslan.