Philip of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, King of Castile and León

by Susan Flantzer
© Unofficial Royalty 2022

Philip of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, King of Castile and León; Credit – Wikipedia

Also known as Philip of Habsburg, and Philip the Handsome, Philip was born in Bruges in the  County of Flanders, now in Belgium, on July 22, 1478. He was the husband of Juana I, Queen of Castile and León and Queen of Aragon. Philip was the elder of the three children and the elder but the only surviving of the two sons of Maximilian I, Archduke of Austria, Duke of Styria, Carinthia, and Carniola, and Holy Roman Emperor, and the first of his three wives, Mary, Duchess of Burgundy, the ruler of the Burgundian State in her own right. The Burgundian State consisted of parts of the present-day Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, France, and Germany. Philip’s paternal grandparents were Friedrich III, Holy Roman Emperor (also Friedrich V, Archduke of Austria and Duke of Styria, Carinthia, and Carniola) and Eleanor of Portugal. His maternal grandparents were Charles I (the Bold), Duke of Burgundy and the second of his three wives Isabella of Bourbon.

Philip had two younger siblings but only his sister survived childhood:


Philip’s parents; Credit – Wikipedia

Philip was the heir to both his father’s and mother’s dominions. His mother Mary was the only child of Charles I (the Bold), Duke of Burgundy, and succeeded him after his death at the Battle of Nancy during the Burgundian Wars in 1477. Philip’s father Maximilian was the heir to the Archduchy of Austria and the Duchies of Styria, Carinthia, and Carniola, today part of Austria and Slovenia. Maximilian was elected King of the Romans in 1486. The Holy Roman Empire was an elective monarchy. No person had a legal right to the succession simply because he was related to the current Holy Roman Emperor. However, the Holy Roman Emperor could, and often did, have a relative (usually a son) elected to succeed him after his death. This elected heir apparent bore the title King of the Romans. Maximilian became Holy Roman Emperor, Archduke of Austria, and Duke of Styria, Carinthia, and Carniola when his father Friedrich III died in 1493. However, Philip predeceased his father and never succeeded to his father’s dominions but his eldest son Carlos did.

In March 1482, Philip’s parents Mary and Maximilian were participating in a hunt. Mary was an experienced rider and she held her falcon in one hand and the reins in the other hand. However, her horse stumbled over a tree stump while jumping over a newly dug canal. The saddle belt under the horse’s belly broke causing Mary to fall out of the saddle and into the canal with the horse on top of her. Twenty-five-year-old Mary, who was pregnant, was seriously injured and died several weeks later from internal injuries.

Philip at the age of five; Credit – Wikipedia

Philip, who was not quite four years old, succeeded his mother as ruler of the Burgundian State under the guardianship of his father Maximilian. Philip now held the following titles and was the ruler of the following:

Beginning in 1480, Philip was educated by Olivier de la Marche, a soldier, diplomat, poet, and chronicler of the Burgundian court, and François de Busleyden (link in French), a priest and later Archbishop of Besançon and Philip’s chancellor in Flanders. In September 1494, Philip was declared of legal age and released from his father’s guardianship.

Philip’s bride, then Infanta Juana of Aragon; Credit – Wikipedia

During the First Italian War (1494 – 1495), Philip’s father Maximilian made an alliance with the husband and wife rulers of what is now Spain, Ferdinand II, King of Aragon and Isabella I, Queen of Castile and León, for a double marriage between their children. Juan, Prince of Asturias, the only son and heir of Ferdinand and Isabella, would marry Maximilian’s only daughter Margaret of Austria, and Ferdinand and Isabella’s second daughter Infanta Juana of Aragon would marry Maximilian’s only son Philip. These marriages were part of the foreign policy of Ferdinand and Isabella to build a network of alliances through the marriages of their children to strengthen their kingdoms, destined to be inherited by their son Juan, against France, their major rival at that time. The double marriages were never intended to allow the Spanish kingdoms to fall under the control of the House of Habsburg, which they eventually did. Philip’s intended bride Juana was third in line to the thrones of Aragon, Castile, and León after her elder brother Juan and her elder sister Isabella, and would fall further down the line of succession if her elder siblings had children.

18-year-old Philip and 16-year-old Juana were married by proxy at the Palacio de los Vivero in Valladolid, Kingdom of Castile. On August 22, 1496, Juana began her journey to her new home. The wedding was formally celebrated on October 20, 1496, at the Collegiate Church of Saint Gummarus in the small town of Lier, then in the County of Flanders, now in Belgium, near the city of Antwerp.

The three eldest children of Philip and Juana: Eleanor, Carlos, and Isabella; Credit – Wikipedia

Philip and Juana had six children, all were kings or queen consorts:

Within four years of her marriage to Philip, Juana became the heir to her parents’ kingdoms after the death of her childless only brother Juan, Prince of Asturias in 1497, the death of her eldest sister Isabella of Aragon, Princess of Asturias, Princess of Portugal in childbirth in 1498, and the death of her sister Isabella’s only child Prince Miguel da Paz of Portugal in 1500, shortly before his second birthday.

Juana and Philip, stained glass, Basilica of the Holy Blood in Bruges, Belgium; Credit – Wikipedia

Although Juana was deeply in love with Philip, their married life was unhappy. Philip was unfaithful and politically insecure. He constantly attempted to usurp Juana’s legal birthrights. This led to the rumors of Juana’s insanity because those rumors benefited Philip politically. Most historians now agree Juana was clinically depressed and not insane as commonly believed.

On November 26, 1504, Juana’s mother Isabella I, Queen of Castile and León died. Juana became Queen of Castile and León but her father Ferdinand II, King of Aragon proclaimed himself Governor and Administrator of Castile and León. In 1506, Juana’s husband Philip became King of Castile and León jure uxoris (by the right of his wife) as Philip I, initiating the rule of the Habsburgs in the Spanish kingdoms which would last until 1700. However, Philip’s rule lasted only from July 12, 1506 to September 25, 1506, when he died, aged 28, at Casa del Cordón in Burgos, Castile, apparently of typhoid fever, although an assassination by poisoning was rumored at the time.

A 19th-century painting of Juana holding vigil over Philip’s coffin by Francisco Pradilla Ortiz, 1877; Credit – Wikipedia

Philip had spread rumors about Juana’s supposed madness when he was still alive and her misunderstood behavior after his death may have reinforced these rumors. Juana decided to transfer Philip’s remains from Burgos in the north of present-day Spain, where he had died and had already been buried, to Granada in the south of present-day Spain. Apparently, Philip wanted to be buried in Granada. The distance from Burgos to Granada is 423 miles/681 kilometers, a 6 1/2 hour car ride today, but an extraordinary distance in 1506. Pregnant with her last child, Juana traveled with her husband’s body from Burgos to Granada. The trip would take eight months. During the trip, Juana gave birth to her last child named Catherine after her youngest sister, Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of King Henry VIII of England. Finally, Philip was interred at the Royal Chapel of Granada where his mother-in-law Isabella I, Queen of Castile and León was interred and where his father-in-law Ferdinand II, King of Aragon and his wife Juana I, Queen of Castile and León, Queen of Aragon would also be interred.

Was Juana mad or was she manipulated by her father, husband, and son? Juana’s father Ferdinand, her husband Philip, and eventually her son Carlos had a lot to gain from Juana being declared unfit to rule. Juana did show excessive grief as she traveled through Castile with Philip’s coffin. What is overlooked is that her 28-year-old husband died suddenly after a five-day illness and that she was fulfilling Philip’s wish to be buried in Granada. In addition, her father Ferdinand deliberately blocked Philip’s burial in Granada causing delays in Juana’s journey.

In 1509, Juana’s father Ferdinand convinced the parliament that Juana was too mentally ill to govern, and was appointed her guardian and regent of Castile and León. Juana was confined in the Royal Convent of Santa Clara in Tordesillas, Castile, now in Spain, under the orders of her father. In 1516, Ferdinand II, King of Aragon died. In his will, Ferdinand named his daughter Juana and her eldest son Carlos (also known as Charles in history) as the co-heirs of the Kingdom of Aragon. However, Juana would never really reign as she would not be released from her confinement until her death.

Philip and Juana’s son Carlos; Credit – Wikipedia

It would be Philip and Juana’s son Carlos who would reign and inherit the dominions of his mother Juana (Castile, León, and Aragon), the dominions of his father Philip (the Burgundian State which were parts of the present-day Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, France, and Germany, see the list of Philip’s titles above), and also the dominions of his paternal grandfather Maximilian I, Archduke of Austria, Duke of Styria, Carinthia, and Carniola, and Holy Roman Emperor who died after Philip’s death. When Juana died in 1555, it resulted in the personal union of Spain and the Holy Roman Empire, as her son Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, among many other titles, also became King of Castile and León and King of Aragon, effectively creating the Kingdom of Spain. Carlos I was not only the first King of a united Spain and Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, but he was also Charles I, Archduke of Austria, and Charles II, Lord of the Netherlands, among many other titles.

Tomb of Philip and Juana at the Royal Chapel of Granada; Credit – By Javi Guerra Hernando – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=35974698

Juana survived her husband Philip by forty-nine years, dying on April 12, 1555, aged 75, at the Royal Convent of Santa Clara in Tordesillas. She had spent the last forty-six years of her life confined, living through decades of internment, isolation, and sometimes inhumane treatment by the guards.

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Works Cited

  • En.wikipedia.org. 2022. Mary of Burgundy – Wikipedia. [online] Available at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary,_Duchess_of_Burgundy> [Accessed 17 July 2022].
  • En.wikipedia.org. 2022. Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor – Wikipedia. [online] Available at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximilian_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor> [Accessed 17 July 2022].
  • En.wikipedia.org. 2022. Philip I of Castile – Wikipedia. [online] Available at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_I_of_Castile> [Accessed 17 July 2022].
  • Es.wikipedia.org. 2022. Felipe I de Castilla – Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre. [online] Available at: <https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felipe_I_de_Castilla> [Accessed 17 July 2022].
  • Flantzer, Susan, 2022. Juana I, Queen of Castile and León and Queen of Aragon. [online] Unofficial Royalty. Available at: <https://www.unofficialroyalty.com/juana-i-queen-of-castile-and-leon-and-queen-of-aragon/> [Accessed 17 July 2022].

September 24: Today in Royal History

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Pedro I, Emperor of Brazil/Pedro IV, King of Portugal; Credit – Wikipedia

September 24, 1513 – Birth of Katharina of Saxe-Lauenburg, Queen of Sweden, first wife of King Gustav I of Sweden, in Ratzeburg, Duchy of Saxe-Lauenburg, now in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein
The first of the three wives of Gustav Vasa I, King of Sweden, Katharina was the daughter of Magnus I, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg and Katharina of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. The fledgling King of Sweden needed heirs for his new House of Vasa. After being rejected by several potential brides’ families, Gustav Vasa was advised to consider the Duchy of Saxe-Lauenburg. Although the duchy was small and poor, the ducal family was related to many of the most powerful dynasties of Europe and was Protestant, which was important for the ongoing Swedish Reformation. With all this in mind, Gustav Vasa chose Katharina to be his wife.
Unofficial Royalty: Katharina of Saxe-Lauenburg, Queen of Sweden

September 24, 1704 – Birth of Karl August, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont in Hanau, Principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont, now in Hesse, Germany
As the second son, Karl August was destined for a military career. He served briefly in a French regiment and then entered the Prussian army. Upon the death of his father on January 1, 1728, his elder brother Christian Philipp briefly was Prince of Waldeck-Pyrmont until his death on May 17, 1728. Karl August then became the reigning Prince of Waldeck-Pyrmont.
Unofficial Royalty: Karl August, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont

September 24, 1812 – Death of Friedrich Karl August, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont in  Arolsen, Principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont, now in Hesse, Germany; first buried at the Stadt-Kirche Bad Wildungen in Bad Wildungen now in the German state of Hesse. In 1962, his remains were transferred to the Princely Burial Chapel of St. Nicholas at the Church of St. Mary in Netze, a district of Waldeck, now in the German state of Hesse.
Full name: Friedrich Karl August Friedrich
In 1763, Friedrich Karl August’s father died and he succeeded him as reigning Prince of Waldeck-Pyrmont. However, his mother Christiane Henriette served as Regent of the Principality of Waldeck-Pyrmont until 1766. After a visit to England in 1775 to learn about ways to modernize Waldeck-Pyrmont, Friedrich Karl August instituted plans for road construction, improvements to agriculture, production of wool and linen, and the mining of iron. The education system was improved and a gymnasium, the term for a German secondary school was constructed in Korbach. Friedrich Karl August died at age 68 and because he was unmarried, his brother Georg succeeded him.
Unofficial Royalty: Friedrich Karl August, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont 

September 24, 1834 – Death of King Pedro IV of Portugal/Emperor Pedro I of Brazil at Queluz Palace in Lisbon, Portugal; first buried at the Monastery of São Vicente de Fora in Lisbon; re-buried in 1972 at the Museu do Ipiranga in São Paulo, Brazil
As Emperor Pedro I, he was the founder and first ruler of the Empire of Brazil. As King Pedro IV, he reigned briefly over Portugal. On April 7, 1831, after a political crisis that ended with the resignation of his ministers and in the middle of an economic crisis, Pedro abdicated the throne of Brazil in favor of his six-year-old son who reigned as Emperor Pedro II of Brazil. Pedro returned to Portugal where he died at the age of 35, from tuberculosis at his birthplace.
Unofficial Royalty: Pedro I, Emperor of Brazil/Pedro IV, King of Portugal

September 24, 1860 – Death of Marie of Württemberg, Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, second wife and niece of Ernst I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, at Schloss Friedenstein in Gotha, Duchy of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, now in Thuringia, Germany; buried in the Ducal Mausoleum in the Glockenberg Cemetery in Coburg, Duchy of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, now in Bavaria, Germany
Marie was the eldest child and the only daughter of Duke Alexander of Württemberg and Antoinette of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld.  Marie had four brothers, but only two survived childhood. Marie and her brothers were first cousins of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.  In 1832, Marie married her uncle Ernst I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. The groom was 48 and the bride was 33. Ernst had been anxious to find a new bride after the death of his first, estranged wife, Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg. However, Ernst’s age and his negative reputation left him with limited choices for a bride. His mother, Augusta, Dowager Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, arranged the marriage between her son and her granddaughter. After her marriage, Marie was not only the first cousin but also the stepmother of her husband’s sons from his first marriage, Ernst (later Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) and Albert (later husband of Queen Victoria). Marie and Ernst had no children, but Marie had a good relationship with her stepsons and maintained a correspondence with Albert throughout their lives.
Unofficial Royalty: Marie of Württemberg, Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

 September 24, 1861 – Birth of Prince Franz Joseph of Battenberg, son of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine, in Padua, Kingdom of Lombardy–Venetia, now in Italy
The Battenberg /Mountbatten family descends from Franz Joseph’s parents Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine and his morganatic wife Countess Julia von Hauke. While visiting Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom who was on holiday in Cimiez, France, Franz Joseph met Princess Anna of Montenegro. She was the daughter of King Nikola I of Montenegro and Milena Vukotić, and was in Cimiez visiting her sister and brother-in-law. The two quickly fell in love, and their engagement was announced. They married in Cetinje, Montenegro on May 18, 1897, in both Eastern Orthodox and Protestant ceremonies. The marriage was a very happy one from all accounts, but the couple did not have any children.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Franz Joseph of Battenberg

September 24, 1891 – Death of Alexandra of Greece and Denmark, Grand Duchess Alexandra Georgievna of Russia, daughter of King George I of Greece, wife of Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia, at Ilyinskoye, the country estate outside of Moscow of her brother-in-law Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich of Russia; originally buried in the Peter and Paul Cathedral in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1939, she was reburied at the Royal Cemetery in the grounds of Tatoi Palace in Greece
Alexandra gave premature birth to a son, Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich (a conspirator in the murder of Grigori Rasputin), and then she lapsed into a coma. She did not recover consciousness and died six days later.
Unofficial Royalty: Alexandra of Greece and Denmark, Grand Duchess Alexandra Georgievna of Russia

September 24, 1930 – Death of Marie Juliette Louvet, mistress of Prince Louis II of Monaco, mother of his only child Princess Charlotte of Monaco, grandmother of Prince Rainier III of Monaco, great-grandmother of Prince Albert II of Monaco, in Paris, France
In 1898, Marie Juliette gave birth to the future Prince Louis II’s daughter Charlotte. While Louis’ father Prince Albert I would not permit the couple to marry, their daughter Charlotte was later recognized as a member of the Monegasque Princely Family, and in 1919, was formally adopted by Prince Louis, becoming Princess Charlotte of Monaco, Duchess of Valentinois. She would also later become heir to the Monegasque throne following her father’s accession in 1922, later relinquishing her succession rights in favor of her son, the future Prince Rainier III.
Unofficial Royalty: Marie Juliette Louvet

September 24, 1950 – Death of Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, Marchioness of Milford Haven, granddaughter of Queen Victoria, at Kensington Palace in London, England; buried at St. Mildred’s Church Cemetery, Whippingham on the Isle of Wight, England
Victoria was the daughter of Princess Alice, daughter of Queen Victoria, and Grand Duke Ludwig IV of Hesse and by Rhine.  She married Prince Louis of Battenberg and was the maternal grandmother of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. By the 1930s, Victoria had become a surrogate mother to her grandson Prince Philip. Her daughter Alice had suffered several breakdowns and spent many years institutionalized. Victoria, along with her two sons, took over the care of the young Philip, overseeing his education and social ventures. In 1948, Victoria served as godparent to her great-grandson Prince Charles.  In the summer of 1950, while staying at Broadlands, the home of her son Lord Mountbatten, Victoria developed bronchitis and suffered a heart attack in August. Sensing the end was near, she insisted on returning home to Kensington Palace. It was here, on the morning of September 24, 1950, that she passed away, surrounded by her three surviving children.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, Marchioness of Milford Haven

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Royal News Recap for Friday, September 23, 2022

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September 23: Today in Royal History

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Feodora of Leiningen, Princess of Hohenlohe-Langenburg; Credit – Wikipedia

September 23, 1158 – Birth of Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany, son of King Henry II of England
Geoffrey’s father King Henry II of England was determined to expand and maintain his French territory. Through political action, military action, and a marriage, Henry obtained the Duchy of Brittany. Henry II had now provided his three surviving sons with territories of their own: Henry would become King of England and have control of Anjou, Maine, and Normandy; Richard would inherit Aquitaine and Poitiers from his mother and Geoffrey would become Duke of Brittany. Henry II’s youngest son John would be born later in 1166 and would have no land, hence his nickname John Lackland. (Except things did not work out the way Henry II had envisioned.)
Unofficial Royalty: Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany

September 23, 1535 – Death of Katarina of Saxe-Lauenburg, Queen of Sweden, first wife of King Gustav Vasa I of Sweden, in Stockholm, Sweden; buried at Uppsala Cathedral in Uppsala, Sweden
In 1531, Katarina married King Gustav Vasa I of Sweden, and two years later, she fulfilled her most important duty as queen consort when she gave birth to a son, the future Erik XIV, King of Sweden. In September 1535, during a ball given in honor of her brother-in-law, Christian III, King of Denmark and Norway, who was visiting Sweden, the pregnant Katharina fell while dancing with Christian III. The fall confined her to bed and led to complications, and she died the day before her twenty-second birthday along with her unborn child.
Unofficial Royalty: Katarina of Saxe-Lauenburg, Queen of Sweden

September 23, 1555 – Birth of Louise de Coligny, Princess of Orange, fourth wife of Willem I, Prince of Orange (the Silent), at Châtillon-sur-Loing, France
In 1583, Willem I, Prince of Orange married his fourth wife French Huguenot Louise de Coligny, daughter of Gaspard II de Coligny. Louise’s father was a French nobleman and admiral but is best remembered as a leader of the Huguenots (French Calvinist Protestants). Both Louise’s father and her first husband Charles de Teligny were killed during the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre in 1572 when thousands of Huguenots were murdered.  Willem and Louise had one son Frederik Hendrik, Prince of Orange whose son Willem II, Prince of Orange was the father of Willem III, Prince of Orange who was later King William III of England. On July 10, 1584, a little more than six months after the birth of her son, Louise was widowed for the second time when Willem I, Prince of Orange was assassinated.
Unofficial Royalty: Louise de Coligny, Princess of Orange

September 23, 1713 – Birth of King Fernando VI of Spain at the Real Alcázar de Madrid in Madrid, Spain
Wikipedia: King Fernando VI of Spain (Unofficial Royalty article coming soon)

September 23, 1759 – Birth of Marie Clotilde of France, Queen of Sardinia, wife of Carlo Emanuele IV, King of Sardinia, at the Palace of Versailles in Versailles, France
Full name: Marie Adélaïde Clotilde Xavière
Marie Clotilde was the daughter of Louis, Dauphin of France who predeceased his father Louis XV, King of France. Three of Marie Clotilde’s brothers were Kings of France: the ill-fated Louis XVI, and two kings of the Bourbon Restoration: Louis XVIII and Charles X. For political reasons, her brother Louis XVI arranged for her to marry the future Carlo Emanuele IV, King of Sardinia. Their marriage was childless. Marie Clotilde died from typhoid fever on March 7, 1802, aged 42. Pope Pius VII, who had personally known Marie Clotilde, declared her The Venerable Marie Clotilde of France in 1808. In the Catholic Church, after a deceased Catholic has been declared a Servant of God by a bishop and proposed for beatification by the Pope, they may next be declared Venerable (“heroic in virtue”) during the investigation and process leading to possible canonization as a saint.
Unofficial Royalty: Marie Clotilde of France, Queen of Sardinia

September 23, 1781- Birth of Juliane of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna of Russia, in Coburg, Duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, now in Bavaria, Germany
Juliane was an aunt to both Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. In 1796, Julianne married Grand Duke Konstantin Pavlovich of Russia. Konstantin was the second son of the future Paul I, Emperor of All Russia, and younger brother of the future Alexander I, Emperor of All Russia. Konstantin was forced into marrying and had no real interest in Juliane. Both were still teenagers, had little in common, and Konstantin was focused solely on his military career. He was also known to be quite violent toward her. In 1799, Juliane left Russia under the auspices of medical treatment but was soon forced to return. In 1801, her mother came to Russia to accompany Juliane to Coburg to recover from ill-health. Upon arriving back home in Coburg, she refused to ever return to Russia and soon began to negotiate for a divorce. However, the Russian court would not allow a formal end to the marriage.
Unofficial Royalty:  Juliane of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna

September 23, 1818 – Birth of Elizabeth Russell, Duchess of Bedford, Queen Victoria’s Mistress of the Robes 1880–1883 and Acting Mistress of the Robes 1886
Born Lady Elizabeth Sackville-West, she was the daughter of George Sackville-West, 5th Earl De La Warr. She married Francis Russell, 9th Duke of Bedford
Unofficial Royalty: Elizabeth Russell, Duchess of Bedford

September 23, 1864 – Birth of Draga Mašin, Queen of Serbia, wife of King Alexander I of Serbia, born Draga Lunjevica in Gornji Milanovac, Serbia
Draga Mašin was the wife of King Alexander I of Serbia, the last ruler of Serbia from the House of Obrenović. Alexander’s reign ended with his and Draga’s brutal assassinations. Draga and Alexander met while she was serving as a lady-in-waiting to Draga’s mother. Draga was twelve years older than Alexander but despite the age difference, the two fell in love. In Belgrade, everyone knew about the affair of Alexander and Draga. Draga appeared at every important court function and was praised for her tact, elegance, beauty, wit, and restraint. However, everyone also thought that it was just an affair. On July 8, 1900, 24-year-old King Alexander suddenly announced his engagement to 36-year-old Draga, and the couple married later that year. Their marriage and their lives ended in 1903 when Alexander and Draga were brutally shot, mutilated, and thrown out a window of the palace.
Unofficial Royalty: Draga Mašin, Queen of Serbia

September 23, 1872 – Death of Feodora of Leiningen, Princess of Hohenlohe-Langenburg at the Villa Hohenlohe in Baden-Baden, Principality of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, now in Baden-Württemberg, Germany; buried in the Main Cemetery in Baden-Baden,  Principality of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, now in Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Feodora was the elder maternal half-sister of Queen Victoria. In 1828, Feodora married Ernst I, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg at Kensington Palace in London, and the couple had six children. Victoria and Feodora wrote to each other religiously. Victoria and her mother visited Feodora and Feodora visited Victoria and their mother in England. Whenever she came, Victoria paid Feodora £300 for her expenses. Feodora came to England when Victoria needed her the most, in the summer of 1861 following the death of their mother and then in December 1861 following Prince Albert’s death. After getting a telegram informing her of Feodora’s death following a serious illness, Victoria wrote in her journal: “Can I write it? My own darling, only sister, my dear excellent, noble Feodora is no more!… I stand so alone now, no near & dear one nearer my own age, or older, to whom I could look up to, left! All, all gone! How good & wise, beloved Feodora was, so devoted to me, so truly pious & religious. She is gone to that world she was so fit for & entered it, just sleeping away. What a blessed end! but what a loss to those who are left! She was my last near relative on an equality with me, the last link with my childhood & youth.”
Unofficial Royalty: Feodora of Leiningen, Princess of Hohenlohe-Langenburg

September 23, 1914 – Birth of Omar Ali Saifuddien III, Sultan of Brunei in Brunei Town, Brunei
When Omar’s brother Ahmad Tajuddin, Sultan of Brunei died in 1950 without any male heirs, Omar succeeded to the throne of Brunei. On October 4, 1967, Omar voluntarily abdicated in favor of his eldest son Hassanal Bolkiah but he still wielded most of the power in Brunei for a number of years. At the coronation of his son, Omar placed the crown upon Hassanal Bolkiah’s head. Omar became his son’s personal adviser and guided him in carrying out the duties as the Sultan in preparation for the time Brunei would eventually become an independent and sovereign country.
Unofficial Royalty: Omar Ali Saifuddien III, Sultan of Brunei

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Royal News Recap for Thursday, September 22, 2022

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Royal News Recap for Thursday, September 21, 2022

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Due to the coronavirus pandemic, many royal families have curtailed and/or canceled events, both in their own countries and in foreign countries. Therefore, we expect a continued decrease in the usual number of royal news articles.

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Denmark

Jordan

Monaco

Netherlands

Spain

United Kingdom

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Disclaimer:Please be advised that any media article titles or content that appear in the Royal News which identify members of royal families with their maiden names, nicknames, incorrect style or title, etc., come directly from the media source and not from Unofficial Royalty. We encourage you to contact the media sources to express your concern about their use of the incorrect name, style, title, etc. Contact information can usually be found at the bottom of each media source’s main page.

September 22: Today in Royal History

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Anne of Austria, Queen of France; Credit – Wikipedia

September 22, 1601 – Birth of Anne of Austria, Queen of France, wife of King Louis XIII of France, at Benavente Palace in Valladolid, Spain
Full name: Ana María Mauricia
Anne was the eldest daughter of King Felipe III of Spain and married King Louis XIII of France in 1615. After several stillbirths and nearly 23 years of marriage, Anne gave birth to two healthy sons: the future King Louis XIV of France and Philippe I, Duke of Orléans. King Louis XIII died in 1643, leaving his five-year-old son as the new King Louis XIV. In his will, the late King had sought to limit any power that Queen Anne might have had, including becoming Regent. He instructed that a regency council be established instead. However, just days after his death, Queen Anne was able to convene the Parliament of Paris and had that part of his will overturned. Anne was named sole Regent for her young son.
Unofficial Royalty: Anne of Austria, Queen of France

September 22, 1780 – Birth of Prince Alfred of Great Britain, son of King George III of the United Kingdom, at Windsor Castle in Windsor, England
Prince Alfred was the ninth and youngest son and fourteenth of the fifteen children of King George III and his wife Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Alfred was probably a “blue baby” due to a heart defect and was always in delicate health. Before Edward Jenner developed the smallpox vaccine that contained the cowpox virus in 1796 and that ultimately lead to the eradication of smallpox, there was another way to possibly prevent smallpox called variolation. George III had his children vaccinated via variolation. About 3% of those inoculated via variolation developed a severe case of smallpox and died but that was preferable to catching smallpox with its mortality rate of 20–40% and scarred survivors. Sadly, two of the 3% who died after receiving the smallpox inoculation were the two younger sons of King George III, Prince Octavius and Prince Alfred. After suffering from prolonged bouts of fever, Alfred died on August 20, 1782, a month short of his second birthday.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Alfred of Great Britain
Unofficial Royalty: Smallpox Knew No Class Boundaries

September 22, 1840 – Death of Princess Augusta of the United Kingdom, daughter of King George III of the United Kingdom, at Clarence House in London, England; buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle in Windsor, England
Princess Augusta was the second of the six daughters and the sixth of the fifteen children in her family. Augusta’s childhood was very sheltered and she spent most of her time with her parents and sisters.  The living conditions of King George’s daughters came to be known as “the Nunnery.” None of the daughters was allowed to marry at the age when most princesses would marry. Three of Augusta’s six sisters did eventually marry, all of them later than was the norm for the time. Starved for male companionship, Sophia got pregnant by her father’s 56-year-old equerry and secretly gave birth to a boy who was placed in a foster home. Following the wedding of her niece Queen Victoria in 1840, Augusta’s health deteriorated. On July 2, 1840, a Windsor newspaper reported “the serious and alarming illness of the Princess Augusta.” Three days later, Queen Victoria ordered the gates of Green Park, which borders Clarence House, to be kept closed so that traffic would not bother Princess Augusta. With her sister-in-law Queen Adelaide, her surviving sisters Mary and Sophia, and her brother Adolphus at her bedside, Augusta died at the age of 71.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Augusta Sophia of the United Kingdom

September 22, 1875 – Birth of Adelheid of Schaumburg-Lippe, Duchess of Saxe-Altenburg, wife of Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg at Ratibořice Castle in Bohemia, now in the Czech Republic
Full name: Friederike Adelheid Marie Luise Hilda Eugenie
In 1898,  Adelheid married the future Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg and the couple had four children. In 1908, Adelheid became the last Duchess of Saxe-Altenburg when her husband succeeded his father as Duke. Their reign, however, would be relatively short-lived. Her husband was forced to abdicate on November 13, 1918, when the German Empire was abolished. Following the abdication, Adelheid felt that she no longer had to endure her husband’s affairs and the shame it brought to her marriage. The couple separated and was divorced on January 17, 1920.
 Unofficial Royalty: Adelheid of Schaumburg-Lippe, Duchess of Saxe-Altenburg

September 22, 1948 – Death of Prince Adalbert of Prussia, son of Wilhelm II, German Emperor and King of Prussia, in La Tour de Peilz, Switzerland; buried at Vassin Cemetery in La Tour de Peilz, Vaud, Switzerland
In 1914,  Adalbert married Princess Adelheid of Saxe-Meiningen and the couple had three children. During World War I, Adalbert served in the Prussian Navy, eventually taking command of the SMS Dresden. Following the end of the monarchy in November 1918, Adalbert left his family and initially took refuge on his yacht. He soon moved to Bad Homburg, Germany where he purchased a villa – Villa Adelheidswert – and was joined by his wife and children. They often traveled to Switzerland due to his wife’s health and eventually settled there permanently in 1928. They adopted the names Count and Countess von Lingen, lived a very quiet and private life, and took no part in German politics.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Adalbert of Prussia

September 22, 1948 – Birth of Mark Phillips, first husband of Anne, Princess Royal in Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England
Full name: Mark Anthony Peter
Mark Phillips was the first husband of Anne, Princess Royal, and the father of her two children. The couple divorced in 1992. An avid horseman, Mark was a member of the British Equestrian Team with whom he won the Team Three-Day Event world title in 1970, the European title in 1971, and Olympic Gold in 1972. He also won Silver at the 1988 Olympics and is a four-time champion at the Badminton Horse Trials. Mark is a regular columnist for Horse & Hound magazine, remains a leading figure in British equestrian circles, and serves as the Chef d’Equipe (team manager) of the United States Eventing Team.
Unofficial Royalty: Mark Phillips

September 22, 1971 – Birth of Princess Märtha Louise of Norway, daughter of King Harald V, at the Rikshospitalet in Oslo, Norway
In 2002, Märtha Louise married Ari Behn and the couple had three daughters. In August 2016, it was announced that the couple separated, and they divorced in 2017. Sadly, Ari Behn died by suicide on December 25, 2019. Märtha Louise has often faced criticism in Norway for her claims of being clairvoyant and for commercially exploiting her title of princess. In May 2019, Princess Märtha Louise announced that she was in a relationship with an American citizen, a shaman named Durek Verrett who has faced strong criticism in Norway and has been characterized by Norwegian media and other critics as a conman. Together Märtha Louise and Verrett have held seminars titled “The Princess and the Shaman,” which also were widely criticized. In August 2019, Märtha Louise stated that she would no longer use the princess title in commercial contexts. In June 2022, Märtha Louise and Durek Verrett announced their engagement.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Märtha Louise of Norway

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September 21: Today in Royal History

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Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, Credit – Wikipedia

September 21, 1327 – Death of King Edward II of England at Berkeley Castle in Berkeley, England, buried at Gloucester Cathedral in Gloucester, England
Edward II succeeded his father King Edward I in 1307. The granting of favors to Edward II’s favorites greatly displeased the English nobility. His wife and her lover Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March decided to depose Edward II resulting in his forced abdication. Edward II and Isabella’s son was crowned King Edward III, and Isabella and Mortimer served as regents for the teenage king. King Edward II was sent to Berkeley Castle where castle records indicate he was well treated. The circumstances of what happened to him are uncertain. One theory is that he died at Berkeley Castle on September 21, 1327, murdered on the orders of Isabella and Mortimer. When King Edward III reached the age of 18, he conducted a coup d’état against Mortimer and Isabella resulting in the execution of Mortimer and the confinement of his mother at Castle Rising in Norfolk.
Unofficial Royalty: King Edward II of England

September 21, 1411 – Birth of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, claimant to the English throne, father of King Edward IV of England and King Richard III of England
Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York was a claimant to the English throne, the leader of the Yorkist faction during the Wars of the Roses until his death in battle in 1460, the father of King Edward IV of England and King Richard III of England, and the great-grandfather of King Henry VIII of England and his sister Margaret Tudor. Through Margaret Tudor, Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York is an ancestor of the British royal family and many other European royal families.
Unofficial Royalty: Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York

September 21, 1558 – Death of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Spain, Archduke of Austria, Lord of the Netherlands, Duke of Burgundy, at the Monastery of Yuste in Extremadura, Spain.; originally buried at the Monastery of Yuste, reburied at the Royal Site of San Lorenzo de El Escorial in El Escorial, Spain
Wikipedia: Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (Unofficial Royalty article coming soon.)

September 21, 1640 – Birth of Philippe I, Duke of Orléans, son of King Louis XIII of France and brother of King Louis XIV of France, at the Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France
During the English Civil War, Philippe’s paternal aunt Henrietta Maria, wife of King Charles I of England, and her youngest child and Philippe’s first cousin Henrietta sought refuge at the French court. The cousins married in 1661. Philippe had homosexual affairs but apparently, he was intent on fulfilling his dynastic responsibility of having children. Philippe and Henrietta had three children. Today’s Jacobite claim to the British throne goes through their younger daughter Anne Marie. After Henrietta’s death, Philippe married Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate, known as Liselotte, and they had three children. Philippe’s careful investment and management of his various estates made him a wealthy man but his wealth was greatly increased when he inherited the fortune of his extremely wealthy paternal first cousin Anne Marie Louise of Orléans, Duchess of Montpensier upon her death in 1693. Philippe is acknowledged as being not only the biological founder of the House of Orléans but as its financial founder.
Unofficial Royalty: Philippe I, Duke of Orléans

September 21, 1706 – Birth of Polyxena of Hesse-Rheinfels-Rotenburg, Queen of Sardinia, second wife of Carlo Emanuele III, King of Sardinia, in Langenschwalbach in the Landgraviate of Hesse-Rheinfels-Rotenburg, now in Hesse, Germany
Polyxena of Hesse-Rheinfels-Rotenburg was the second of the three wives, all of whom died young, of Carlo Emanuele III, King of Sardinia. Polyxena and Carlo Emanuele III had six children including her husband’s successor Vittorio Amedeo III, King of Sardinia. Polyxena was active in charity work, founding a home for young mothers in Turin. She worked with Italian architect Filippo Juvarra, the architect of the great Basilica of Superga in Turin, to remodel and renovate several buildings.
Unofficial Royalty: Polyxena of Hesse-Rheinfels-Rotenburg, Queen of Sardinia

September 21, 1788 – Birth of Wilhelmine of Baden, Grand Duchess of Hesse and by Rhine, wife of Ludwig II, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine, in Karlsruhe, Margraviate of Baden, now in Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Full name: Wilhelmine Luise
In 1804, Wilhelmine married her first cousin, the future Ludwig II of Hesse and by Rhine, and they had five children including Prince Alexander whose morganatic marriage created the Battenberg/Mountbatten family, and Marie who married Alexander II, Emperor of All Russia. Wilhelmine’s marriage was never happy, and she separated from her husband after the birth of their first three children. Wilhelmine had a large garden built on a hill in Darmstadt called the Rosenhöhe. She added several buildings, including a summer residence and a tea house. When her daughter Elisabeth died, Wilhelmine decided to have a mausoleum built in the park instead of using the traditional grand-ducal tomb in the Darmstadt Stadtkirche. It is because of this that the Rosenhöhe has become the traditional burial site for the Grand Ducal Family.
Unofficial Royalty: Wilhelmine of Baden, Grand Duchess of Hesse and by Rhine

September 21, 1819 – Birth of Louise Marie Thérèse of France, Duchess of Parma and Regent of Parma, wife of Carlos III, Duke of Parma, at the Élysée Palace in Paris, France
The granddaughter of King Charles X of France, Louise Marie Thérèse was the wife of Carlos III, Duke of Parma and Regent for their son Roberto I, Duke of Parma until the Duchy of Parma was abolished during the Italian unification movement. In 1845, Louise Marie Thérèse married the future Carlo III, Duke of Parma and the couple had four children. In 1854, Louise Marie Thérèse’s husband was assassinated and she became Regent for their six-year-old son Roberto. After the Duchy of Parma was abolished, Louise Marie Thérèse took her children to Venice, Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia, now in Italy where she spent the rest of her life in exile.
Unofficial Royalty: Louise Marie Thérèse of France, Duchess of Parma, Regent of Parma

September 21, 1845 – Birth of Ernst August II, the last Crown Prince of Hanover in Hanover, Kingdom of Hanover, now in Lower Saxony, Germany
The only son of King Georg V of Hanover, Ernst August was the last Crown Prince of Hanover, as well as the last to hold the British Dukedoms of Cumberland and Teviotdale. Ernst August became Crown Prince of Hanover upon his father’s accession in November 1851. However, in 1866, Hanover was annexed by the Kingdom of Prussia. The family went into exile in Austria but spent much of their time in Paris. In 1878, Ernst August married Princess Thyra of Denmark, the daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark and the couple had six children. Upon his father’s death in June 1878, Ernst August inherited his titles, becoming the 3rd Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale, and Earl of Armagh in the United Kingdom, as well as head of the House of Hanover. He was also made a Knight of the Order of the Garter by Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, his father’s first cousin. However, Ernst August was removed from the roll of the Order of the Garter in 1915, and in 1917 was stripped of his title of Prince of the United Kingdom. As a result of the Titles Deprivation Act, in 1919 he was stripped of his British peerages for bearing arms against Great Britain during World War I. The titles – Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale – remain in abeyance, and his direct descendants could petition to have them restored. To date, no such petition has been made.
Unofficial Royalty: Ernst August II, Crown Prince of Hanover

September 21, 1957 – Death of King Haakon VII of Norway, born Prince Carl of Denmark, at the Royal Palace in Oslo, Norway; buried at the Royal Mausoleum at Akershus Fortress in Norway
A Danish prince who became King of Norway and one of a few elected monarchs, Prince Carl of Denmark was the son of King Frederik VIII of Denmark and Princess Louise of Sweden. He married his first cousin Princess Maud of Wales, the daughter of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom. Upon the dissolution of the Union between Sweden and Norway, Carl was elected King of Norway and took the name Haakon. During World War II, King Haakon and his son fled to the United Kingdom where he maintained a government in exile. Haakon continued to broadcast speeches to the Norwegian people. Despite pressure from Hitler, Haakon refused the Norwegian Parliament’s request to abdicate. Following the war, King Haakon and his family returned to Norway, exactly five years from the date they had been evacuated to the United Kingdom.
Unofficial Royalty: King Haakon VII of Norway

September 21, 1962 – Death of Princess Marie Bonaparte, Princess George of Greece in Saint-Tropez, France; buried at Royal Cemetery, Tatoi Palace, Greece
Marie came from an immensely wealthy family. Her maternal grandfather was François Blanc, who was the principal developer of Monte Carlo and the Monte Carlo Casino in Monaco. He had amassed a large fortune that passed to his children upon his death, and Marie inherited a large amount of money upon her mother’s death. Following her father’s death, she inherited over 60 million francs. In 1907, Marie married Prince George of Greece, the son of King George I of Greece. As part of the marriage agreement, Marie retained sole control over her fortune, with Prince George refusing any sort of financial settlement or allowance. The couple had two children. In the years that the Greek Royal Family was in exile, Marie used her wealth to support many of them. She provided the use of several of her homes in France, as well as paying for education and living expenses. Those who benefited from Marie’s generosity included Prince Andrew of Greece and his family, including the young Prince Philip, the future husband of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Marie Bonaparte, Princess George of Greece

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Royal News Recap for Tuesday, September 20, 2022

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Royal News Recaps are published Mondays – Fridays and on Sundays except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will publish a breaking news article and/or a recap as necessary.

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Denmark

Jordan

Multiple Monarchies

Netherlands

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

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This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Royal News Recap for Monday, September 19, 2022

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Royal News Recaps are published Mondays-Fridays and on Sundays, except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will add an update as necessary.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, many royal families have curtailed and/or canceled events, both in their own countries and in foreign countries. Therefore, we expect a continued decrease in the usual number of royal news articles.

* * * * * * * * * *

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

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Denmark

Luxembourg

Multiple Monarchies

Netherlands

Serbia

United Kingdom

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Disclaimer:Please be advised that any media article titles or content that appear in the Royal News which identify members of royal families with their maiden names, nicknames, incorrect style or title, etc., come directly from the media source and not from Unofficial Royalty. We encourage you to contact the media sources to express your concern about their use of the incorrect name, style, title, etc. Contact information can usually be found at the bottom of each media source’s main page.