Charles Alongside

by The Laird o’Thistle (Special Edition)
© Unofficial Royalty 2022

Embed from Getty Images

I believe that this is the first time that I have been asked by the staff of Unofficial Royalty to address a particular topic, and not a small one at that. On Tuesday, 10 May 2022, Prince Charles presided at the State Opening of the new session of the U.K. Parliament in the Queen’s behalf. It was announced the previous day that the Queen, upon the advice of her doctors, had “reluctantly decided not to attend” the State Opening due to the “episodic mobility problems” that have limited her activities since early last autumn. In an unprecedented, but entirely legitimate and appropriate move, she issued “Letters Patent” designating Prince Charles and Prince William as “Counsellors of State” to act in her behalf, with Prince Charles taking the lead. Charles and William did so on Tuesday, also accompanied by Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall.

All of this was done under provisions of the 1937 Regency Act, which was adopted following the Accession of George VI as a contingency for what would happen if he were to die before Princess Elizabeth came of age. (The Act was subsequently updated in 1946 and 1953; and the need for further revisions is currently being discussed. See note.) The pertinent section invoked for Tuesday’s State Opening reads as follows:

[Section 6] Power to delegate royal functions to Counsellors of State.
(1) In the event of illness not amounting to such infirmity of mind or body as is mentioned in section two of this Act, or of absence or intended absence from the United Kingdom, the Sovereign may, in order to prevent delay or difficulty in the despatch of public business, by Letters Patent under the Great Seal, delegate, for the period of that illness or absence, to Counsellors of State such of the royal functions as may be specified in the Letters Patent, and may in like manner revoke or vary any such delegation.
(https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Edw8and1Geo6/1/16/section/6)

With two Counsellors of State being required, at least implicitly and by precedent, Prince William was called upon to accompany his father in this instance. Though some are questioning whether, in the Queen’s absence, it was actually a “State Opening” (versus simply an “Opening”), I would argue that it was… precisely due to H.M.’s invoking of the provisions of Section 6. This was further reinforced by the symbolic inclusion of the Imperial State Crown in the ceremony… placed on a small table on the very spot where H.M.’s throne usually stands.

So much for the facts of what occurred, and why. The question raised anew by it all concerns the degree to which we are seeing the emergence of a sort of “dual monarchy” in which Prince Charles and Camilla become the “public face” of the Crown, while the Queen… still the Sovereign… retreats more and more from public view. This, I think, is increasingly the case, with Prince Charles and Camilla being assisted by Prince William and Katherine, the Princess Royal, and Prince Edward and Sophie. (Although still officially active, the Duke of Gloucester, the Duke of Kent, and Princess Alexandra, are increasingly stepping back and “aging out” of their longtime service as “working” royals.) The question behind the question is whether this de facto situation may… sooner or later… shift to an official (de jure) designation.

My layperson’s read of the Regency Act is that it does not provide for the possibility of a co-Regency shared by the Queen and Prince Charles. Nor would the plural wording allow Prince Charles to be solely designated as Counsellor of State without a second Counsellor. Either would, I think, require a revision by Parliament of the legislation.

The focus then shifts to the Queen, and what she is willing to do? By all accounts she has, always and still, totally ruled out the idea of abdication. (One wonders if the future Charles III may hold a different attitude when his turn comes.) By all accounts the Queen is still fully compos mentis (i.e., sound of mind, memory, and understanding), and thus able to do the “desk job” of monarchy, as it were. The issues at hand are her great age, and her apparent physical disability to attend public events going forward.

She’s now at the age where Prince Philip chose to withdraw from public duties. There was talk in the press at the time that she might eventually follow suit. But, as recently as her statement released for the 70th anniversary of her Accession, it is clear that she takes her 1947 pledge that “my whole life, whether it be long or short, will be devoted to your service” VERY seriously. Her Coronation Oath, likewise. The thing that I wonder about, however, is whether she may be at, or near, the point at which that service needs to become vicarious? When does she reach the point at which her devotion to service itself requires her to step further back, if not away?

As in most families, this is probably not something that her family feel they can broach with their mother/grandmother, at least not yet. At some point her U.K. and Commonwealth governments may feel the need to raise the question. The U.K. press has begun making some noises on the topic in recent months. My own gut is telling me that once we get beyond the official Platinum Jubilee celebrations in June, something may significantly shift over the summer. Whether and how that involves some sort of more official and permanent “viceregal” role for Prince Charles will emerge.

All that being said, the one thing that I am absolutely confident about is that Queen Elizabeth II will continue to do her conscientious best in her stewardship of the Crown and her service to the peoples of the U.K. and the Commonwealth to her life’s end, in whatever form that takes. That is her never-wavering sacred trust.

Yours aye,
Ken Cuthbertson, the Laird o’ Thistle

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Royal News Recap for Thursday, May 12, 2022

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May 13: Today in Royal History

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Maria Theresa, Archduchess of Austria, and Queen of Hungary, Croatia, and Bohemia; Credit – Wikipedia

May 13, 1568 – Death of Sophie of Pomerania, Queen of Denmark and Norway, second wife of Frederik I, King of Denmark and Norway, in Kiel, County of Holstein, now in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany; buried in Schleswig Cathedral now in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
In 1518, Sophie became the second wife of King Frederik I of Denmark. Sophie became the stepmother of Frederik’s two children from his first marriage and had six children with Frederik. Sophie had a long dispute with her stepson King Christian III and then his son and successor King Frederik II about her property. First, Christian III claimed Gottorp Castle for himself and forced Sophia to retire to Kiel Castle. Sophie considered the lands that her husband had bestowed upon her as her private property and she had conflicts over revenue management and the appointment of civil servants. Sophie survived her husband King Frederik I by thirty-five years, dying at Kiel Castle at the age of 70.
Unofficial Royalty: Sophie of Pomerania, Queen of Denmark and Norway

May 13, 1629 – Birth and death of Charles James Stuart, Duke of Cornwall, son of King Charles I of England, at Greenwich Palace, London; buried at Westminster Abbey in London, England
Charles, the eldest son of Charles I and his wife Henrietta Maria of France, was born prematurely after his mother had been frightened by a large dog jumping at her.
The Peerage: Charles James Stuart, Duke of Cornwall

May 13, 1717 – Birth of Maria Theresa, Archduchess of Austria, and Queen of Hungary, Croatia, and Bohemia, at the Hofburg Palace in Vienna, Austria
Full name: Maria Theresa Walburga Amalia Christina
Maria Theresa’s only brother died several weeks before she was born and her two younger siblings were sisters.  Throughout his reign, her father Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI expected to have a male heir and never really prepared Maria Theresa for her future role as sovereign. Upon her father’s death, Maria Theresa became Queen of Hungary, Croatia, and Bohemia in her own right. She was unable to become the sovereign of the Holy Roman Empire because she was female. Via a treaty, Maria Theresa arranged for her husband Francis Stephen, Duke of Lorraine to be elected Holy Roman Emperor. Despite the snub, Maria Theresa wielded the real power. Maria Theresa and her husband had had sixteen children but eight of them died in childhood. Two of their sons were Holy Roman Emperors and their daughter Maria Antonia married King Louis XVI of France, and became Queen Marie Antoinette of France.
Unofficial Royalty: Maria Theresa, Archduchess of Austria, and Queen of Hungary, Croatia, and Bohemia

May 13, 1767 – Birth of King João VI of Portugal at the Queluz Palace in Lisbon, Portugal
Full name: João Maria José Francisco Xavier de Paula Luís António Domingos Rafael
Wikipedia: King João VI of Portugal (Unofficial Royalty article coming soon)

May 13, 1822 – Birth of Francisco, Duke of Cadiz, King Consort of Queen Isabella II of Spain, at the Royal Palace of Aranjuez in Aranjuez, Spain
Full name: João Maria José Francisco Xavier de Paula Luís António Domingos Rafael
Francisco married his double first cousin, the sixteen-year-old Queen Isabella II of Spain. Francisco and Isabella’s marriage was not happy and there were persistent rumors that few, if any, of her children, were fathered by her husband. Nevertheless, Francisco claimed all the children as his.  Only five of the nine reached adulthood.  The only surviving son was King Alfonso XII of Spain, who is the great-great-grandfather of the current Spanish monarch, King Felipe VI.
Unofficial Royalty: Francisco, Duke of Cadiz, King Consort of Spain

May 13, 1883 – Birth of Caroline Lacroix, mistress of Leopold II, King of the Belgians, in Bucharest, Romania
Caroline was the mistress of King Leopold II from 1900 until his death in 1909. She was just sixteen years old when their relationship began, while Leopold was nearly fifty years her senior. The couple had two sons. Caroline frequently accompanied Leopold on his travels including accompanying him to London in 1901 for the funeral of his first cousin Queen Victoria.
Unofficial Royalty: Caroline Lacroix, mistress of Leopold II, King of the Belgians

May 13, 1895 – Birth of Heinrich XLV, Hereditary Prince Reuss of Gera, son of Heinrich XXVII, 5th and the last reigning Prince Reuss of Gera, at Schloss Ebersdorf in Ebersdorf, Principality of Reuss-Gera, now in Saalburg-Ebersdorf in Thuringia, Germany
Heinrich XLV was a lover of theater and worked in the theater as a director, author, and consultant. He became a Nazi sympathizer and member of the Nazi Party. After World War II, the area that included the property and assets of Heinrich XLV was in the area of Germany that was controlled by the Soviet Union. It eventually became part of East Germany. In August 1945, Heinrich XLV was arrested by the Soviet military and has been missing ever since. He was likely imprisoned and killed at NKVD special camp Nr. 2, the former German concentration camp Buchenwald, which was transformed into one of the post–World War II internment camps in the Soviet-occupied parts of Germany. He was legally pronounced dead in 1962.
Unofficial Royalty: Heinrich XLV, Hereditary Prince Reuss of Gera

May 13, 1900 – Birth of Georg Moritz, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Altenburg, Head of the House of Saxe-Altenburg
Full name: Wilhelm Georg Moritz Ernst Albrecht Friedrich Karl Constantine Eduard Maximilian
Georg Moritz was the Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Altenburg and the last Head of the House of Saxe-Altenburg. Upon his death with no heir, the House of Saxe-Altenburg merged into the House of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.
Unofficial Royalty: Georg Moritz, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Altenburg, Head of the House of Saxe-Altenburg

May 13, 1979 – Birth of Prince Carl Philip of Sweden, son of King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, at the Royal Palace in Stockholm, Sweden
Full name: Carl Philip Edmund Bertil
Carl Philip is the only son and the second of the three children of King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden. In 1979, the Riksdag, the Swedish legislature, introduced an Act of Succession that changed the succession to absolute primogeniture, meaning that the eldest child of the monarch, regardless of gender, is first in the line of succession. This Act of Succession became law on January 1, 1980, making Sweden the first country to adopt absolute primogeniture. The previous 1810 Act of Succession allowed for only males to inherit the throne. Carl Philip had been born Crown Prince and retained his title and first place in the succession for seven months until January 1, 1980, when his elder sister Victoria became Crown Princess and heir apparent.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Carl Philip of Sweden

May 13, 2008 – Death of Saad Al-Abdullah Al-Salim Al-Sabah, 4th Emir of Kuwait at Shaab Palace in Kuwait City, Kuwait; buried at Sulaibikhat Cemetery in Sulaibikhat, Al Asimah, Kuwait
Saad Al-Abdullah Al-Salim Al-Sabah reigned only a little more than a week from January 15-24, 2006. He abdicated due to ill health.
Unofficial Royalty: Saad Al-Abdullah Al-Salim Al-Sabah, 4th Emir of Kuwait

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Royal News Recap for Wednesday, May 11, 2022

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May 12: Today in Royal History

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King Gustav I of Sweden; Credit – Wikipedia

May 12, 1191 – Wedding of King Richard I of England and Berengaria of Navarre at the Chapel of St. George in Limassol, Cyprus
Richard and Berengaria were to have married in Sicily, but Richard postponed the wedding and set off for the Holy Land to fight in the Third Crusade accompanied by Berengaria and his widowed sister Joan who were on a separate ship. Two days after setting sail, Richard’s fleet was hit by a strong storm. Several ships were lost and others were way off course. Richard landed safely in Crete, but the ship Berengaria and Joan were on was marooned near Cyprus. Berengaria and Joan were about to be captured by the ruler of Cyprus when Richard’s ships appeared to rescue them. Richard married Berengaria of Navarre at the Chapel of St George in Limassol, Cyprus, and then his fleet, along with Berengaria and Joan, traveled to the Holy Land. Berengaria and Richard’s marriage was childless.
Unofficial Royalty: King Richard I of England
Unofficial Royalty: Berengaria of Navarre, Queen of England

May 12, 1496 – Birth of King Gustav I Vasa of Sweden at Rydboholm Castle in Lindholmen, Uppland, Sweden
Gustav Vasa I, the first king of the House of Vasa, is considered the founding father of the modern Swedish state. He ranks among Sweden’s greatest monarchs and some argue that he was the most significant ruler in Swedish history. He ended foreign domination in Sweden, centralized and reorganized the government, cut religious ties to Rome, established the Church of Sweden, and founded Sweden’s hereditary monarchy. In the late 1550s, Gustav I’s health declined. He died, aged 64, at Tre Kronor Castle (Three Crowns Castle) which stood on the site of the present Stockholm Palace in Stockholm, Sweden. The official cause of death was cholera but it may have been dysentery or typhoid.
Unofficial Royalty: King Gustav I Vasa of Sweden

May 12, 1686 – Birth of Anne Sophia Stuart, daughter of Queen Anne of Great Britain, at Windsor Castle in England
Anne Sophia was one of the five of Queen Anne’s 17 children who were born alive and one of the three who lived longer than a day.  At the age of nine months, she died of smallpox.  Her sister Mary, aged 21 months, died of smallpox six days later.
The Peerage: Anna Sophia

May 12, 1876 – Birth of Prince Frederick Harald of Schleswig-Holstein, grandson of Queen Victoria, at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor, England
Full name: Frederick Christian Augustus Leopold Edward Harald
Prince Frederick Harald was the son of Princess Helena of the United Kingdom and Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein.  He lived only 8 days.
The Peerage: Prince Frederick Harald of Schleswig-Holstein

May 12, 1893 – Death of Georg Viktor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont in Marienbad, Bohemia, now in the Czech Republic; buried at Princely Burial Crypt in Rhoden, Principality of Waldeck-Pyrmont, now in Hesse, Germany
In 1845, Georg Viktor’s father died and his mother Emma served as Regent of the Principality of Waldeck-Pyrmont until he reached his majority in 1852. In 1853, Georg Victor married Helena of Nassau. Helena proved to be very successful in finding suitable marriages for their children by making contacts with various European royal houses. Because of her efforts, the relatively poor House of Waldeck-Pyrmont was linked to the richer ruling dynasties of Würtemberg, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. Their daughter Emma married King Willem III of the Netherlands and their daughter Helena married Queen Victoria’s son Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany. Georg Viktor and his wife Helena are the ancestors of the Dutch royal family through their daughter Emma and the Swedish royal family through their daughter Helena. Three years after Georg Viktor’s wife Helena died in 1888, he married Louise of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg. They had one son, Prince Wolrad, who was killed in action during World War I. A year after the birth of his son Wolrad, Georg Viktor, aged 62, died from pneumonia on May 12, 1893.
Unofficial Royalty: Georg Viktor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont

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May 11: Today in Royal History

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Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich of Russia; Credit – Wikipedia

May 11, 1366 – Birth of Anne of Bohemia, Queen of England, first wife of King Richard II of England, in Prague, Kingdom of Bohemia, now in the Czech Republic
When Richard II was 15, a bride was sought for him, and Anne, daughter of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia, seemed a logical choice as Bohemia and the Holy Roman Empire were seen as potential allies against France in the ongoing Hundred Years’ War. Their marriage was childless and Anne died from the plague at the age of 28.
Unofficial Royalty: Anne of Bohemia, Queen of England

May 11, 1857 – Birth of Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich of Russia, son of Alexander II, Emperor of All Russia, at the Catherine Palace at Tsarskoye Selo, near St. Petersburg, Russia
Sergei married  Princess Elisabeth “Ella” of Hesse and by Rhine, a granddaughter of Queen Victoria but their marriage was childless. The couple was very close with Alexander III, Emperor of All Russia and his wife Empress Maria Feodorovna, and were often asked to represent them at royal events elsewhere in the world.  In 1891, Alexander III appointed his brother Serge Governor-General of Moscow. In 1905 in Moscow, Sergei was killed when an assassin threw a nitroglycerin bomb into his carriage. The bomb landed in Sergei’s lap and exploded.
Unofficial Royalty: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich of Russia

May 11, 1942 – Birth of Princess Irene of Greece and Denmark, daughter of King Paul of Greece, in Cape Town, South Africa
Irene is the younger sister of Queen Sofia of Spain and Constantine II, the former King of Greece. She was born in South Africa, where her family was living in exile during World War II. They returned to Greece in 1946, and the following year, Irene’s father became King of Greece. Irene never married and by the time of her mother’s death in 1981, she had been spending large amounts of time in Spain, which became her permanent residence. Irene ives in an apartment at Zarzuela Palace in Madrid, Spain, the home of her sister Sofia. In 2018, Irene was granted Spanish citizenship by Royal Decree.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Irene of Greece and Denmark

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Royal News Recap for Tuesday, May 10, 2022

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Royal News Recap for Monday, May 9, 2022

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Ascension Convent and Cathedral at the Moscow Kremlin in Moscow, Russia

by Susan Flantzer
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Ascension Monastery in 1900; Ascension Cathedral, with four of the five towers showing, is in the middle of the photo; Credit – Wikipedia

The Ascension Convent was a Russian Orthodox nunnery in the Moscow Kremlin in Moscow, Russia. The Moscow Kremlin is a fortified complex founded by the Rurik dynasty in the late 15th century. It includes five palaces, four cathedrals, and the enclosing Kremlin Wall. Before the founding of St. Petersburg by Peter I (the Great), Emperor of All Russia in 1703, the Moscow Kremlin was the seat of power for the Rurik and early Romanov rulers of Russia. The Moscow Kremlin now serves as the official residence of the President of the Russian Federation.

Women of the Rurik dynasty and women of the early Romanov dynasty along with some Russian noblewomen were interred at the Ascension Cathedral of the Ascension Convent. When Peter I (the Great), Emperor of All Russia, moved the capital of Russia from Moscow to the new city of St. Petersburg, the new Peter and Paul Cathedral became the Romanov burial site.

In 1929, the Ascension Convent and its cathedral were destroyed by the Soviets to make room for the Red Army School. At that time, the remains of those buried there were moved to the crypt of the Archangel Cathedral in the Moscow Kremlin.

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History of the Church

The Ascension Cathedral in the 1800s; Credit – Wikipedia

Around 1386, the first wooden church of the nunnery was founded by Evdokia Dmitrievna of Suzdal, Grand Princess of Moscow, wife of Dmitry Donskoy, Grand Prince of Moscow. The church was dedicated to the Ascension of Jesus, the Christian teaching that Jesus physically departed from Earth by rising into Heaven. After the death of her husband, Evdokia Dmitrievna became a nun under the name Euphrosyne at the nunnery and was buried in the church upon her death. She was canonized by the Russian Orthodox Church and is known as St. Euphrosyne of Moscow.

Shrine of St. Euphrosyne of Moscow in the Archangel Cathedral in the Moscow Kremlin; Credit – By Иерей Максим Массалитин – originally posted to Flickr as Святая Евфросиния Московская, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12193132

In 1415, the church was mostly destroyed by fire and was rebuilt in 1467 by Maria Yaroslavna of Borovsk, Grand Princess of Moscow, wife of Vasily II, Grand Prince of Moscow. Another fire in 1483 resulted in another restoration. From 1587 – 1588, the church was completely rebuilt as a cathedral with five domes, mirroring the Archangel Cathedral which had been built nearby in the Moscow Kremlin in 1508.

Ascension Cathedral in 1907; Credit – Wikipedia

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Destruction of the Convent and Cathedral

Nuns at the Ascension Convent in 1904; Credit – Wikipedia

In 1907, the nunnery had a mother superior, 62 nuns, and 45 lay sisters. Ten years later, during the Russian Revolution, the nunnery and its buildings suffered much damage and the nuns were ordered to leave. In 1918, the Kremlin Commission was established to restore and preserve the Kremlin buildings. However, due to insufficient funding, the plans were not fully implemented and work stopped in 1920. In 1924, the ground on which the Ascension Convent sat began to sink and some walls of the buildings started to collapse.

The iconostasis, the wall of icons and religious paintings separating the nave from the sanctuary in an Orthodox church, of the Ascension Cathedral which was saved and is now in the Church of the Twelve Apostles; Credit – Wikipedia

In 1929, it was announced that plans were being prepared for the construction of the Red Army School on the land occupied by the Ascension Cathedral and other historical buildings. A plea was made to change the location to preserve the historical buildings but it was ignored. In December 1929, on the orders of Joseph Stalin, the dismantling and demolition work began. The work was done in a hurry and archaeologists were not allowed to remove valuable frescoes in the churches and only a few church decorations were saved.

Removing the sarcophagi before the destruction of the Ascension Monastery; Credit – Wikipedia

Thanks to Nikolai Nikolaevich Pomerantsev, an art restorer and art curator, the sarcophagi in the Ascension Cathedral were saved. Pomerantsev organized architectural measurements and photographing of the monastery, a survey of the burials, and the removal of the sarcophagi to the crypt in the Archangel Cathedral. In January 1934, Pomerantsev was arrested and accused of trying to discredit the Soviet government by opposing the demolition of unnecessary monuments of antiquity. In May 1934, he was sentenced to three years of exile.

Nikolai Nikolaevich Pomerantsev, who is responsible for saving the sarcophagi at the Ascension Cathedral; Credit – Wikipedia

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Burials

Tsarevna Praskovia Ivanovna of Russia, daughter of Ivan V, Tsar of All Russia, was the last person interred at Ascension Cathedral; Credit – Wikipedia

Listed below are relatives of Grand Princes of Moscow, Tsars of Russia, and Emperors of Russia who were interred at the Ascension Convent and were moved in 1929 to the Archangel Cathedral in the Moscow Kremlin. Relatives of Russian nobles were also buried there but are not included in the list below.

  • Grand Prince (Великий князь Velikiy Knyaz: literally great prince, sometimes translated as grand duke) was the title of the male ruler of the Russian principalities before they were united into the Tsardom of Russia. A Grand Prince’s wife was titled a Grand Princess.
  • Tsar was used 1547 – 1721 to denote the male ruler of Russia. Tsar comes from Caesar, the Latin title of a Roman emperor. Tsar remained the popular designation of the Russian ruler despite the official change of style to Emperor in 1721.
  • Tsaritsa or Tsarina was the title of the female ruler of Russia or the title of a Tsar’s wife. It was officially used from 1547 – 1721 when the title changed to Empress although Tsaritsa or Tsarina was sometimes still used.
  • Tsarevich was the title given to Tsars’ sons before the 18th century.
  • Tsarevna was used before the 18th century as the title for the daughter of a Tsar or the wife of a Tsarevich.

Patronymic: In Russian, a patronymic is the second name derived from the father’s first name: the suffix -vich means “son of” and the suffixes -eva, -evna, -ova, and -ovna mean “daughter of”.

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Works Cited

  • En.wikipedia.org. 2022. Ascension Convent – Wikipedia. [online] Available at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascension_Convent> [Accessed 21 March 2022].
  • Ru.wikipedia.org. 2022. Вознесенский монастырь (Москва) — Википедия. [online] Available at: <https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%92%D0%BE%D0%B7%D0%BD%D0%B5%D1%81%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%B9_%D0%BC%D0%BE%D0%BD%D0%B0%D1%81%D1%82%D1%8B%D1%80%D1%8C_(%D0%9C%D0%BE%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B2%D0%B0)> [Accessed 21 March 2022].
  • Ru.wikipedia.org. 2022. Некрополь Вознесенского монастыря — Википедия. [online] Available at: <https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9D%D0%B5%D0%BA%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%BF%D0%BE%D0%BB%D1%8C_%D0%92%D0%BE%D0%B7%D0%BD%D0%B5%D1%81%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%BE%D0%B3%D0%BE_%D0%BC%D0%BE%D0%BD%D0%B0%D1%81%D1%82%D1%8B%D1%80%D1%8F> [Accessed 21 March 2022].

May 10: Today in Royal History

© Unofficial Royalty 2022

Ekaterina Pavlovna of Russia, Queen Catherina of Württemberg; Credit – Wikipedia

May 10, 1726 – Death of Charles Beauclerk, 1st Duke of St Albans, an illegitimate son of King Charles II of England and Nell Gwynne in Bath, England; buried at Westminster Abbey in London, England
Wikipedia: Charles Beauclerk, 1st Duke of St Albans

May 10, 1743 – Death of Melusine von der Schulenburg, Duchess of Kendal, mistress of King George I of Great Britain, at her home Kendal House in Isleworth, London, England; buried at Grosvenor Chapel in South Audley Street, London, England
In 1691, Melusine became the mistress of George, Electoral Prince of Hanover, the future Elector of Hanover and King George I of Great Britain. Despite the fact that the future King George I had affairs while he lived in Hanover, when his wife had one, she was divorced, sent off to a German castle for the rest of her life, and her lover disappeared, supposedly murdered. Melusine was more like a wife to George. She accompanied him to London when he became King of Great Britain and became a naturalized British citizen. After George I’s death, Melusine lived out the remainder of her life at her London home in the companionship of a large bird, probably a raven, in which she believed that George’s soul had been reincarnated. Melusine died, aged 75, at her London home Kendal House.
Unofficial Royalty: Melusine von der Schulenburg, Duchess of Kendal, mistress of King George I of Great Britain

May 10, 1752 – Birth of Amalie of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld-Bischweiler, Queen of Saxony, wife of King Friedrich August I of Saxony, in Mannheim, Palatinate-Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld-Bischweiler, now in Baden-Württemberg Germany
Full name: Maria Amalie Auguste
At the time of her marriage, Amalie became the Electress of Saxony, the last to hold this title. In addition to three stillborn children, Amalie and her husband had one daughter.  In 1806, Amalie became the first Queen of Saxony when the Electorate of Saxony was elevated to a Kingdom, and her husband assumed the throne as King Friedrich August I.
Unofficial Royalty: Amalie of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld-Bischweiler, Queen of Saxony

May 10, 1774 – Death of King Louis XV of France at the Palace of Versailles; buried at the Basilica of Saint-Denis near Paris, France
When he was five years old, Louis XV succeeded his great-grandfather King Louis XIV and reigned as King of France for 59 years. He is the second-longest reigning King of France after his great-grandfather King Louis XIV who reigned for 72 years. In 1725, Louis XV married Maria Leszczyńska, daughter of the deposed King Stanisław I of Poland. The couple had ten children but all their sons predeceased Louis XV and so he was succeeded by his grandson, the ill-fated KIng Louis XVI. King Louis XV’s reign saw France’s entry in The War of the Austrian Succession in 1740, with France gaining significant amounts of territory.  However, at the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748, Louis returned the lands back to their rightful owners.  For this, he was greatly praised throughout Europe but became very unpopular within his own country.  A few years later, Louis would find France at war with Great Britain in the French and Indian War and soon pulled into the Seven Years War. King Louis XV died of smallpox at the Palace of Versailles on May 10, 1774.
Unofficial Royalty: King Louis XV of France

May 10, 1775 – Death of Caroline Matilda of Wales, Queen of Denmark, wife of King Christian VII of Denmark, sister of King George III of the United Kingdom, at Celle Castle in Celle, Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg, now in Lower Saxony, Germany; buried at Stadtkirche St. Marien in Celle
Soon after her marriage to her first cousin Christian VII, Caroline Matilda discovered he was severely mentally ill. Johann Friedrich Struensee, Christian’s doctor, had some success dealing with the king but he also became the lover of the ill-treated Caroline Matilda, whose marriage was less than satisfactory. When the affair became known, Sturensee was brutally executed and Caroline Matilda’s marriage was dissolved, she lost her title of Queen and was forcibly separated from her children whom she never saw again. She was held in custody for the rest of her life at Celle Castle in the Kingdom of Hanover. Her time in custody proved to be short.  Three years later, Caroline Matilda died of “a putrid fever and sore throat,” probably scarlet fever at the age of 23.
Unofficial Royalty: Caroline Matilda of Wales, Queen of Denmark

May 10, 1788 – Birth of Queen Catherina of Württemberg, second wife of King Wilhelm I of Württemberg, born Grand Duchess Ekaterina Pavlovna of Russia at the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo, Russia
Catherina was the daughter of Paul I, Emperor of All Russia and the sister of Alexander I, Emperor of All Russia, and Nicholas I, Emperor of All Russia. She had a short marriage and two sons with her first cousin Duke Georg of Oldenburg, who died from typhoid fever. She then married the future King Wilhelm I of Württemberg in 1816 and they had two daughters. Despite having a happy marriage, Wilhelm continued his relationships with numerous mistresses, including the Italian Blanche de la Flèche. When Catharina was made aware of this, she drove to Scharnhausen Castle on January 3, 1819, where she found Wilhelm and his mistress together. She quickly returned to Stuttgart and just six days later, 30-year-old Catharina died of complications from pneumonia
Unofficial Royalty: Grand Duchess Catherine Pavlovna of Russia, Queen of Württemberg

May 10, 1794 – Execution of Madame Elisabeth of France, sister of King Louis XVI of France, at the Place de la Révolution in Paris; first buried in a common grave at the Errancis Cemetery in Paris, later reburied with other victims of the guillotine in the Catacombs of Paris
Elisabeth was devoted to her brother King Louis XVI and with his permission declined all marriage offers so that she could remain in France. She accompanied her brother and his family to imprisonment in the notorious Temple where they were imprisoned. On May 9, 1794, Elisabeth was transferred to the Conciergerie where she was tried and condemned to be executed the next day.  She was executed by the guillotine at the Place de la Révolution in Paris (now called Place de la Concorde) with 23 other people.  A very religious person, Elisabeth comforted and prayed with several others awaiting execution.
Unofficial Royalty: Madame Elisabeth of France

May 10, 1978 – Birth of Princess Lalla Salma of Morocco, wife of King Mohammed VI of Morocco, born Salma Bennani in Fez, Morocco
On March 21, 2002, Salma Bennani married King Mohammed VI of Morocco at the Royal Palace in Rabat. She was granted the style Her Royal Highness and the title Princess Lalla. The couple had two children, Crown Prince Moulay Hassan, born in 2003 and Princess Lalla Khadija, born in 2007.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Lalla Salma of Morocco

May 10, 2020 – Birth of Prince Charles of Luxembourg, son of Hereditary Prince Guillaume of Luxembourg, at the Grand Duchess Charlotte Maternity Hospital in Luxembourg City, Luxembourg
Full Name: Charles Jean Philippe Joseph Marie Guillaume
Prince Charles is the second in the line of succession to the throne of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg after his father.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Charles of Luxembourg

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