Tyszowce

Tishevitz
Tyszowce (טישעוויץ Tishevitz) is a town (since January 1, 2000) in Tomaszów Lubelski County, Lublin Voivodeship, Poland, with 359 inhabitants (2004).wikipedia
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Tomaszów Lubelski County

TomaszówTomaszów Lubelski
Tyszowce (טישעוויץ Tishevitz) is a town (since January 1, 2000) in Tomaszów Lubelski County, Lublin Voivodeship, Poland, with 359 inhabitants (2004).
The only other towns in the county are Tyszowce, lying 28 km north-east of Tomaszów, and Łaszczów, lying 25 km east of Tomaszów.

Czermno, Lublin Voivodeship

CzermnoCzerwień
Following the Mongol Invasion of Poland, in which most local towns were burned to the ground, Tyszowce emerged as a center of trade and administration, at the expense of the destroyed town of Czermno.
It lies approximately 4 km north-west of Tyszowce, 30 km north-east of Tomaszów Lubelski, and 103 km south-east of the regional capital Lublin.

Lublin Voivodeship

LublinLubelskieLublin Voivodship
Tyszowce (טישעוויץ Tishevitz) is a town (since January 1, 2000) in Tomaszów Lubelski County, Lublin Voivodeship, Poland, with 359 inhabitants (2004).

Tyszowce Confederation

Tyszowce
In 1655 the Tyszowce Confederation was formed here. On December 29, 1655, the Tyszowce Confederation was signed here, with the purpose of pushing Swedes out of Poland, and bringing back King Jan Kazimierz Waza.
The Tyszowce Confederation (in Polish Konfederacja tyszowiecka) was set up by the Polish army under the command of Great Crown Hetman Stanisław Rewera Potocki and Field Crown Hetman Stanisław Lanckoroński 29 December 1655 in Tyszowce, east of Zamość.

Gmina Tyszowce

Tyszowce
Its seat is the town of Tyszowce, which lies approximately 28 km north-east of Tomaszów Lubelski and 107 km south-east of the regional capital Lublin.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
Tyszowce (טישעוויץ Tishevitz) is a town (since January 1, 2000) in Tomaszów Lubelski County, Lublin Voivodeship, Poland, with 359 inhabitants (2004).

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
The history of Tyszowce dates back to the Middle Ages, when a gord probably existed among swampy meadows of the Huczwa river.

Gord (archaeology)

gordgródgords
The history of Tyszowce dates back to the Middle Ages, when a gord probably existed among swampy meadows of the Huczwa river.

Second Mongol invasion of Poland

Mongol invasion of Poland1259/12601258–1260 invasion of Halych-Volhynia, Lithuania and Poland
Following the Mongol Invasion of Poland, in which most local towns were burned to the ground, Tyszowce emerged as a center of trade and administration, at the expense of the destroyed town of Czermno.

Magdeburg rights

Magdeburg Lawcity rightsMagdeburg city rights
By the 15th century, Tyszowce had the status of a ducal town, with Magdeburg rights granted to it probably in the early 14th century by Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia.

Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia

Siemowit IVSiemowit IV of MasoviaDuke Siemowit IV of Masovia
By the 15th century, Tyszowce had the status of a ducal town, with Magdeburg rights granted to it probably in the early 14th century by Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia.

Duchy of Belz

BelzPrincipality of Belzduchy
The charter was confirmed in 1453 by Duke of Belz, Wladyslaw I.

Belz

BełzBełskBelsk
The charter was confirmed in 1453 by Duke of Belz, Wladyslaw I.

Kingdom of Poland (1385–1569)

Kingdom of PolandPolandPolish
In 1462, the Duchy of Belz was incorporated into the Kingdom of Poland, and renamed into Belz Voivodeship.

Belz Voivodeship

Bełz VoivodeshipBelzVoivode of Bełz
In 1462, the Duchy of Belz was incorporated into the Kingdom of Poland, and renamed into Belz Voivodeship.

Starostwo

starostastaroststarostwa
Tyszowce was named a royal town, and a starostwo was created, consisting of the town itself, and four local villages.

Crimean Tatars

Crimean TatarTatarTatars
In 1500, Tyszowce was destroyed in a Crimean Tatar raid; the destruction was so widespread that for the next 10 years no taxes were collected.

Polish Golden Age

Golden AgeGolden Age of the CommonwealthGolden Age of Poland
In the period known as Polish Golden Age, Tyszowce began to prosper, together with whole Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth

Polish-Lithuanian CommonwealthPolandPolish
In the period known as Polish Golden Age, Tyszowce began to prosper, together with whole Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Starosta

starostgovernorMayor
Some time in the early 16th century, a castle was constructed, which served as a residence of the starosta.

Khmelnytsky Uprising

Chmielnicki UprisingKhmelnytskyi UprisingChmielnicki massacres
In the early 17th century, Tyszowce was raided by Tatars, and in 1649, the town was destroyed during the Khmelnytsky Uprising.

John II Casimir Vasa

John II CasimirJohn II Casimir of PolandJan II Kazimierz Vasa
On December 29, 1655, the Tyszowce Confederation was signed here, with the purpose of pushing Swedes out of Poland, and bringing back King Jan Kazimierz Waza.

Hetman

HatmanhejtmanGrand Hetman
The document was signed by Hetmans Stanislaw Potocki and Stanislaw Lanckoronski, as well as several senators, military leaders and members of nobility.

Stanisław "Rewera" Potocki

Stanisław Rewera PotockiStanisław PotockiPotocki
The document was signed by Hetmans Stanislaw Potocki and Stanislaw Lanckoronski, as well as several senators, military leaders and members of nobility.

Stanisław Lanckoroński (hetman)

Stanisław LanckorońskiStanislaw Lanckoronski
The document was signed by Hetmans Stanislaw Potocki and Stanislaw Lanckoronski, as well as several senators, military leaders and members of nobility.