Royal Birthdays & Anniversaries: January 16 – January 22

Princess Claire of Belgium, wife of Prince Laurent of Belgium; Photo Credit – www.zimbio.com

48th birthday of Princess Claire of Belgium, wife of Prince Laurent of Belgium; born Claire Louise Coombs in Bath, England on January 18, 1974
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Claire of Belgium

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Princess Birgitta of Sweden; Credit – Wikipedia

85th birthday of Princess Birgitta of Sweden, Princess of Hohenzollern, born at the Haga Palace in Solna, Sweden on January 19, 1937
Full name: Birgitta Ingeborg Alice
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Birgitta of Sweden

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Princess Margriet of the Netherlands; Photo Credit- Royall House of the Netherlands © RVD photo Jeroren van der Meyde

79th birthday of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands, daughter of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands; born at the Ottawa Hospital in Ottawa, Canada on January 19, 1943
Full name: Margriet Francisca
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Margriet of the Netherlands

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Sophie, Countess of Wessex; Credit – Wikipedia

57th birthday of The Countess of Wessex, wife of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex; born Sophie Rhys Jones at Radcliffe Infirmary in Oxford, England on January 20, 1965
Full name: Sophie Helen
Unofficial Royalty: Sophie, Countess of Wessex

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Queen Mathilde of the Belgians; Credit – Wikipedia

49th birthday of Queen Mathilde of Belgium, wife of King Philippe of the Belgians, born  Mathilde d’Udekem d’Acoz in Uccle, Belgium on January 20, 1973
Full name: Mathilde Marie Christine Ghislaine
Unofficial Royalty: Queen Mathilde of Belgium

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Embed from Getty Images

18th birthday of Princess Ingrid Alexandra of Norway, daughter of Crown Prince Haakon of Norway; born at the Rikshospitalet University Hospital in Oslo, Norway on January 21, 2004
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Ingrid Alexandra of Norway

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January 16: Today in Royal History

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Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught; Credit – Wikipedia

January 16, 1245 – Birth of Edmund Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster and Leicester, son of King Henry III of England, at the Palace of Westminster in London, England
Edmund was named after his father’s favorite saint, Edmund the Martyr, King of East Anglia who was killed in 869 by Vikings on the orders of Ivar the Boneless and his brother Ubba. A couple of 14th-century chroniclers misinterpreted “Crouchback” as meaning Edmund had a physical deformity, but it is probable that “Crouchback” refers to his participation in the Ninth Crusades when he would have worn a cross on his back. Edmund first married Aveline de Forz, Countess of Aumale and Lady of Holderness in 1269, but she died childless five years later. In 1276, Edmund married Blanche of Artois, widow of King Henri I of Navarre, and they had three sons. Edmund was a loyal supporter of his brother King Edward I of England who succeeded to the throne in 1272. In 1271, Edmund had accompanied his elder brother Edward on the Ninth Crusade to Palestine. In 1277, Edmund was appointed commander of Wales. In 1282, Edmund ambushed and executed Llewellyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of Gwynedd, the last native and sovereign Prince of Wales. This lead to the final defeat and annexation of Wales in 1283.
Unofficial Royalty: Edmund Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster and Leicester

January 16, 1362 – Birth of Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland, Marquess of Dublin, 9th Earl of Oxford, favorite of King Richard II of England
In 1376, Robert married Philippa de Coucy, daughter of Enguerrand VII, Lord of Coucy and Isabella of England, the eldest daughter of King Edward III of England. Robert was often at court in his role as Lord Great Chamberlain and as the husband of King Richard II’s first cousin. He quickly became a favorite of the young king and a member of the Privy Council. Robert became very unpopular with the other nobles and his close relationship with Richard II was one of the causes for the emergence of organized opposition to Richard called the Lords Appellant. In 1387, the Lords Appellant launched an armed rebellion against King Richard II and defeated an army under Robert de Vere at the Battle of Radcot Bridge on the River Thames, outside Oxford. Robert fled to France and was attainted, found guilty of treason, lost his titles and land, and sentenced to death in absentia. In 1392, in Louvain, Duchy of Brabant, now in Belgium, 30-year-old Robert de Vere died in exile and poverty from the wounds received while hunting a wild boar.
Unofficial Royalty: Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland, Marquess of Dublin, 9th Earl of Oxford

January 16, 1831 – Birth of Alexander, Prince of Lippe in Detmold, Principality of Lippe, now in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Full name: Karl Alexander
As the fifth of the six sons of Leopold III, Prince of Lippe, Alexander was not expected to succeed to the throne. He served as a captain in the army of the Kingdom of Hanover, and in 1851, when he was 20-year-old, he had a fall from his horse. Over the subsequent years, he developed the first signs of mental disorder. In 1870, due to the worsening of his mental disorder, Alexander was legally declared incapacitated. The following year, it became necessary to place Alexander in the St. Gilgenberg Sanatorium, a private sanatorium for men with nervous and mental disorders, near Bayreuth, Kingdom of Bavaria, now in the German state of Bavaria, where he spent the remainder of his life. When Alexander’s father Leopold II died in 1851, he was succeeded by his eldest son as Leopold III. The childless Leopold III died in 1875 and he was succeeded by his next brother Woldemar who was also childless. During Woldemar’s reign, Alexander became Woldemar’s only surviving brother, the last of the line of the House of Lippe, and therefore his heir. When Woldemar died in 1895, his incapacitated brother Alexander succeeded him as Prince of Lippe, with a regency. There was a huge disagreement about who should be regent and who should be Alexander’s successor, so huge that Wilhelm II, German Emperor became involved. (Read more about it in Alexander’s article.)
Unofficial Royalty: Alexander, Prince of Lippe

January 16, 1836 – Birth of Francesco II, King of the Two Sicilies in Naples, Kingdom of the Two Sicilies
Full name: Francesco d’Assisi Maria Leopoldo
Francesco II was the last King of the Two Sicilies. In 1859, he married Maria Sophie of Bavaria. The couple had one daughter. Three months after his marriage Francesco’s father died and he became King of the Two Sicilies. During the reign of Francesco II, Giuseppe Garibaldi’s 1860-1861 invasion called the Expedition of the Thousand led to the fall of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, which then was annexed to the new Kingdom of Italy in 1861. After losing his throne, Francesco lived in Rome but in 1870, the annexation of the Papal States to Italy, including Rome, forced Francesco and Maria Sophie to find refuge in Austria, France, and Bavaria. Maria Sophie purchased Garatshausen Castle on Lake Starnberg in the Kingdom of Bavaria, now in the German state of Bavaria from her brother Ludwig, and the castle became their home.
Unofficial Royalty: Francesco II, King of the Two Sicilies

January 16, 1928 – Death of Bernhard III, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen at Schloss Altenstein in Bad Liebenstein, Germany where he was buried
Bernhard III was the last reigning Duke of Saxe-Meiningen, a scholar, a Field Marshal in the Prussian army, and the husband of Queen Victoria’s granddaughter Princess Charlotte of Prussia. He was interested in the Greek language and was the author and translator of several works. Between 1873 and 1894, he made numerous study trips to Greece and Asia Minor, where he visited archaeological sites and had worked with well-known archaeologists. In 1878,  Bernhard married Princess Charlotte of Prussia, the eldest daughter of Friedrich III, German Emperor and King of Prussia and Victoria, Princess Royal, and the sister of Wilhelm II, German Emperor. Bernhard and Charlotte had one child. After his abdication in 1918 at the end of World War I, Bernhard lived his remaining years at Schloss Altenstein in Bad Liebenstein, now in Germany. His wife Charlotte died in 1919. Bernhard survived her by nine years, dying at the age of 76,
Unofficial Royalty: Bernhard III, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen

January 16, 1935 – Death of Alicia of Parma, Titular Grand Duchess of Tuscany, wife of Ferdinando IV, Grand Duke of Tuscany at Schloss Schwertburg in Schwertburg, Austria; first buried in Schwertburg, and in 2007, her remains were reburied in the cemetery of the parish church in St. Gilgen, near Salzburg, Austria.
Alicia was the daughter of Carlo III, Duke of Parma and Princess Louise Marie Thérèse of France, who was a granddaughter of King Charles X of France. Alicia’s father was assassinated in 1854 and her six-year-old brother Roberto became Duke of Parma. Roberto lost his throne in 1859 during the Italian unification movement. In 1868, Alicia became the second wife of the former Ferdinando IV, Grand Duke of Tuscany. Ferdinando lost his throne due to the Italian unification and was in exile like Alicia’s family. Alicia and Ferdinando had ten children. Ferdinando and Alicia lived at the Villa Tuscany in Lindau, Austria during the summer, and during the winter they lived in a wing of the Salzburg Residenz, formerly the residence of the Prince-Archbishops of Salzburg. Both residences were provided by Ferdinando’s second cousin Franz Joseph I, Emperor of Austria. Alice’s husband Ferdinando Ferdinando died in 1908, at the age of 72. Alicia survived him by twenty-seven years, dying on January 16, 1935, aged 85.
Unofficial Royalty: Alicia of Bourbon-Parma, Grand Duchess of Tuscany

January 16, 1942 – Death of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught, son of Queen Victoria, at Bagshot Park in Surrey, England; buried at the Royal Burial Ground at Frogmore in Windsor, England
Arthur had a 40-year military career and participated in many missions in various parts of the British Empire. In 1879, Arthur married Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia and the couple had three children. Through their daughter Margaret, who married the future King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden, Arthur and Louise Margaret are the ancestors of the Danish and Swedish royal families. Two of their great-grandchildren are current monarchs: Queen Margrethe II of Denmark and King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden. In 1911, in order to strengthen the links between the British monarchy and Canada, Arthur was appointed the first Governor-General of Canada who was a member of the Royal Family. After his time in Canada, Arthur returned to the British Army and served for the rest of World War I. Louise Margaret, who had been ill during their stay in Canada, died of influenza and bronchitis in 1917, at the age of 56. Arthur withdrew from public life in 1928 and died on January 16, 1942, at his home Bagshot Park in Surrey, England at the age of 91. His sister Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll also died at the age of 91, making both Arthur and Louise the longest-lived of Victoria and Albert’s children.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught

January 16, 1957 – Death of Alexander Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone, husband of Queen Victoria’s granddaughter Princess Alice of Albany, at Kensington Palace in London, England; buried at the Royal Burial Grounds at Frogmore in Windsor, England
Born Prince Alexander of Teck, and called Alge, his mother was Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge, a male-line granddaughter of King George III and a first cousin of Queen Victoria.  His sister was Queen Mary, wife of King George V. In 1904, Alge married Princess Alice of Albany, the daughter of Queen Victoria’s hemophiliac son Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany. Alice and Alge had two surviving children, a son Rupert and a daughter May. In 1928, 20-year-old Rupert died from an injury received in a car accident which he probably would have recovered from had he not been a hemophiliac. Upon the orders of King George V, during World War I, Alge and other royal family members relinquished the use of all German titles and dignities. Alge became Alexander Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone. From 1924-1930, Alge was Governor-General of South Africa and he was the Governor-General of Canada from 1940-1946. In 1946, Alge retired and he and Alice took a grace and favor apartment at Kensington Palace in London. Alge died on January 16, 1957, at Kensington Palace at the age of 82. His wife Alice survived him by 24 years, dying on January 3, 1981, one month short of her 98th birthday, the last surviving grandchild of Queen Victoria.
Unofficial Royalty: Alexander Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone

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Countess Leopoldine von Sternberg, Princess of Liechtenstein

by Susan Flantzer
© Unofficial Royalty 2022

Countess Leopoldine von Sternberg, Princess of Liechtenstein Credit – Wikipedia

Countess Leopoldine von Sternberg was the wife of Franz Josef I, who reigned as Prince of Liechtenstein from 1772 – 1781. She was a member of an influential discussion group called the Salon of the Five Princesses that acted as the political advisers of Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor. Marie Leopoldine Walburga Eva was born in Vienna, Austria on December 11, 1733. She was the second of the six children and the eldest of the four daughters of Count Franz Philipp von Sternberg (1708 – 1786 – link in German) and Eleonore Marie Leopoldine von Starhemberg (1712 – 1800).

Leopoldine had five siblings:

  • Count Franz Philipp Christian von Sternberg (1732 – 1811), married Countess Augusta Leopolda von Manderscheid-Blankenheim, had sixteen children
  • Countess Maria Josepha von Sternberg (1735 – 1803), married Prince Karl Borromäus Egon von Fürstenberg, had three children
  • Count Thomas Gundakar von Sternberg (1737 – 1802), unmarried
  • Countess Sophie von Sternberg (1738 – 1803), married Count Johann Vinzenz von Waldstein, had three children
  • Countess Maria Carolina von Sternberg (1741 – 1771), married Major General Johann Nepomuk von Lützow

Leopoldine’s father Count Franz Philipp von Sternberg came from an important Bohemian noble family and served in several diplomatic roles in the Holy Roman Empire. From 1745 – 1748, he was the ambassador to the Reichstag (parliament) in the Free Imperial City of Regensburg. For fourteen years, from 1749 – 1763, Count Franz Philipp was the Austrian ambassador to both the Polish royal court and the Saxony electoral court. For his services to the Holy Roman Empire, he received the Order of the Golden Fleece in 1763. From 1765 to 1780, Count Franz Philipp served as Hofmeister, the highest office in the court of the formidable Empress Maria Theresa.

Leopoldine’s mother Countess Eleonore Marie Leopoldine von Starhemberg was the daughter of Count Konrad Sigismund von Starhemberg who also served the Habsburgs as the imperial ambassador to the Reichstag in Regensburg and the imperial ambassador to Great Britain. Count Konrad Sigismund had married Princess Maria Leopoldina of Löwenstein-Wertheim (1689–1763) and the marriage brought him many family ties to German royal and noble families.

Leopoldine’s husband Franz Josef I, Prince of Liechtenstein; Credit – Wikipedia

Because of the service to the Habsburgs of Leopoldine’s father and maternal grandfather, it should be no surprise that she made an excellent marriage. On July 6, 1750, she married Prince Franz Josef of Liechtenstein, the eldest of the thirteen children of Prince Emanuel of Liechtenstein and Countess Maria Anna Antonia of Dietrichstein-Weichselstädt, Baroness of Hollenburg and Finkenstein.

Leopoldine and Franz Josef had eight children:

  • Prince Josef Franz of Liechtenstein (1752 – 1754), died in childhood
  • Princess Leopoldina of Liechtenstein (1754 – 1823), married Karl Emanuel, Landgrave of Hesse-Rheinfels-Rotenburg, had one son
  • Princess Maria Antonia of Liechtenstein (1756 – 1821), became a nun
  • Prince Franz de Paula Josefof Liechtenstein (1758 – 1760), died in childhood
  • Aloys I, Prince of Liechtenstein (1759 – 1805), married Karoline von Manderscheid-Blankenheim, no children
  • Johann I Josef, Prince of Liechtenstein (1760 – 1836), married Landgravine Josepha of Fürstenberg-Weitra, had fourteen children
  • Prince Philipp Josef of Liechtenstein (1762 – 1802), unmarried
  • Princess Maria Josefa of Liechtenstein (1768 – 1845), married Nikolaus 7th Prince Esterházy von Galántha, had two children

Franz Josef’s father was the younger brother of Joseph Wenzel I, Prince of Liechtenstein who reigned from 1712 – 1718, was Regent from 1732 – 1745, and then reigned again from 1748 until his death in 1772. Joseph Wenzel had five children, including three sons, and all five died in early childhood. Noting that his nephew Franz Josef might be a future Sovereign Prince of Liechtenstein, Joseph Wenzel took him under his wing. Like Leopoldine’s father and grandfather, her husband participated in a number of diplomatic missions on behalf of the Holy Roman Empire. On February 10, 1772, Franz Josef’s uncle Josef Wenzel, Prince of Liechtenstein died with no surviving sons. Because he was the nearest male relative, Franz Josef succeeded his uncle as the Sovereign Prince of Liechtenstein.

From 1768 – 1790, Princess Eleonore of Liechtenstein (1745 – 1812) who was married to Prince Franz Josef’s brother Prince Karl Borromeo of Liechtenstein, held a discussion group called the Salon of the Five Princesses that was influential in the affairs of state for over twenty years. Leopoldine was a member of the group along with Eleonore’s half-sister Maria Leopoldine, Countess von Kaunitz-Rietberg (1741- 1795) Princess Maria Josepha von Clary und Aldringen (1728 – 1801), Princess Maria Sidonia Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau (1729 – 1815). Count Franz Moritz von Lacy (1725 -1801), an Austrian Field Marshal and Chief Treasurer Prince Franz Xaver Wolfgang von Orsini-Rosenberg (1723 -1796) frequently attended the group’s meetings. The discussion group acted as the political advisers of Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor, who met with the group to discuss state affairs once a week and then four times a week after 1780. The group lost its influence upon Joseph II’s death in 1790.


Leopoldine’s sons Aloys I, Prince of Liechtenstein and Johann I Josef, Prince of Liechtenstein; Credit- Wikipedia

Franz Josef I, Prince of Liechtenstein, died August 18, 1781, aged 54, in Metz, France. He was buried in the Old Crypt at Chuch of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary in Vranov, Moravia, now in the Czech Republic. After her husband’s death, Leopoldine lived with her youngest daughter Maria Josefa in Vienna, Austria. Leopoldine saw two of her sons, Aloys I and Johann I Josef, become the Sovereign Prince of Liechtenstein. Leopoldine survived her husband by twenty-eight years, dying at the age of 75 on June 27, 1809, in Valtice, Moravia, now in the Czech Republic. She was buried at St. Andrew’s Church in Vienna-Hütteldorf, Austria.

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Works Cited

  • Cs.wikipedia.org. 2021. Konrád Zikmund Starhemberg – Wikipedie. [online] Available at: <https://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konr%C3%A1d_Zikmund_Starhemberg> [Accessed 4 December 2021].
  • De.wikipedia.org. 2021. Franz Philipp von Sternberg – Wikipedia. [online] Available at: <https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Philipp_von_Sternberg> [Accessed 4 December 2021].
  • De.wikipedia.org. 2021. Leopoldine von Sternberg – Wikipedia. [online] Available at: <https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopoldine_von_Sternberg> [Accessed 4 December 2021].
  • En.wikipedia.org. 2021. Eleonore of Liechtenstein – Wikipedia. [online] Available at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleonore_of_Liechtenstein> [Accessed 4 December 2021].
  • En.wikipedia.org. 2021. Leopoldine von Sternberg – Wikipedia. [online] Available at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopoldine_von_Sternberg> [Accessed 4 December 2021].
  • Flantzer, Susan, 2022. Franz Josef I, Prince of Liechtenstein. [online] Unofficial Royalty. Available at: <http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/franz-josef-i-prince-of-liechtenstein/> [Accessed 4 December 2021].

January 15: Today in Royal History

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Margaret of Connaught, Crown Princess of Sweden; Credit – Wikipedia

January 15, 1478 – Wedding of Richard, Duke of York, son of King Edward IV of England, and Lady Anne Mowbray at St. Stephen’s Chapel, Palace of Westminster in London, England
Richard was one of the “Little Princes in the Tower.”  Anne Mowbray was the only daughter and heiress of John Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.  Richard was 5 when he married and Anne was 6.  Anne predeceased Richard, dying in 1481, two years before Richard disappeared.
Wikipedia: Richard, Duke of York
Wikipedia: Lady Anne Mowbray

January 15, 1776 – Birth of Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester, great-grandson of King George II, nephew and son-in-law of King George III, and husband of Princess Mary of the United Kingdom, at Palazzo Teodoli in Via del Corso, Rome, Italy
William Frederick was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge and like his father, Prince William Henry, 1st Duke of Gloucester (brother of King George III), had a career in the British Army, attaining the rank of Field Marshal in 1816. He was an advocate for the abolition of slavery, served as President of the African Institution, and was Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. In 1816, 40-year-old William Frederick married his 40-year-old first cousin Princess Mary, the daughter of King George III.  Mary and William’s marriage was childless and the couple lived at Gloucester House in Piccadilly, London and Bagshot Park, now the home of Queen Elizabeth II’s youngest child Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex. William Frederick died at the age of 58 after being ill with a fever for fifteen days.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester

January 15, 1781 – Death of Mariana Victoria of Spain, wife of King José I of Portugal at Barraca Real of Ajuda, Portugal; first buried at the Church of São Francisco de Paula in Lisbon, Portugal, her remains were later transferred to the Pantheon of the House of Braganza in Monastery of São Vicente de Fora in Lisbon, Portugal
Wikipedia: Mariana Victoria of Spain, Queen of Portugal

January 15, 1875 – Birth of King Abdulaziz (Ibn Saud) of Saudi Arabia in Riyadh, then in the Emirate of Nejd and Hasa, now the capital of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Abdulaziz was an Arab tribal leader who founded the Kingdom of  Saudi Arabia. He was King of Saudi Arabia from 1932 until his death in 1953. He had ruled parts of the kingdom since 1902, having previously been Emir, Sultan, and King of Nejd, and King of Hejaz. Abdulaziz had a polygamous household comprising of several wives at a time and numerous concubines. It is thought he had a total of 22-24 wives. He was the father of almost a hundred children, including 45 sons of whom 36 survived to adulthood. The six Kings of Saudi Arabia who followed King Abdulaziz were all his sons including Salman, the current King of Saudi Arabia. At the age of 78, Abdulaziz died in his sleep from a heart attack with his son Prince Faisal, a future King of Saudi Arabia, at his bedside.
Unofficial Royalty: King Abdulaziz (Ibn Saud) of Saudi Arabia

January 15, 1882 – Birth of Princess Margaret of Connaught, Crown Princess of Sweden, daughter of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught, granddaughter of Queen Victoria, and first wife of the future King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden, at Bagshot Park in Surrey, England
Full name: Margaret Victoria Augusta Charlotte Norah
Margaret was the daughter of Queen Victoria’s son Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught. In 1905, Margaret married the future King Gustaf VI Adolf, then Prince Gustaf Adolf of Sweden, Duke of Skåne. The couple had four sons and one daughter, and the Danish and Swedish Royal Families are the descendants of Margaret and Gustaf Adolf. Margaret was eager to learn the Swedish language and history, endearing her to the Swedish public. During World War I in neutral Sweden, Margaret organized supply drives and acted as a go-between for her relatives whose Allied and Axis countries were divided by the war. In 1907, when Gustaf Adolf’s grandfather King Oscar II died and his father then became King Gustaf V, Gustaf Adolf and Margaret became the Crown Prince and Princess of Sweden. Margaret was eight months pregnant with her sixth child in 1920 when she underwent mastoid surgery. An infection set in, killing Margaret, at the age of 38, and her unborn child on May 1, 1920, her father’s 70th birthday. Her family along with the Swedish and British public mourned her death greatly.
Unofficial Royalty:  Princess Margaret of Connaught, Crown Princess of Sweden

January 15, 1902 – Birth of King Saud of Saudi Arabia at the home of his paternal grandfather Abdul Rahman bin Faisal Al Saud, Emir of Nejd in Kuwait City, Kuwait
Upon the death of his father King Abdulaziz in 1953, Saud became the second King of Saudi Arabia and reorganized the government. Saud sought to maintain friendly relations with the United States, while also supporting other Arab countries in their conflicts against Israel. Saud’s inability to deal with the Saudi national debt brought him into a power struggle with his half-brother Crown Prince Faisal. This resulted in the forced abdication of Saud by senior members of the royal family and Faisal becoming KIng of Saudi Arabia. Saud lived the rest of his life in exile.
Unofficial Royalty: King Saud of Saudi Arabia

January 15, 1945 – Birth of Princess Michael of Kent, wife of Prince Michael of Kent, born Baroness Marie-Christine von Reibnitz in Carlsbad, then in the German-controlled Sudetenland, now known as Karlovy Vary in the Czech Republic. 
Full name: Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida
After her first marriage to English banker Thomas Troubridge ended in divorce and an annulment from the Roman Catholic Church, Marie-Christine married Prince Michael of Kent, a grandson of King George V and a first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. Because his wife was Roman Catholic, Prince Michael forfeited his place in the line of succession under the terms of the Act of Settlement 1701. When the Succession to The Crown Act 2013 went into effect, eliminating the exclusion of anyone who marries a Roman Catholic, Prince Michael was returned to his place in the line of succession. Marie-Christine and Michael had two children who were raised in the Church of England. Neither Princess Michael nor her husband have official royal duties or receive public funds. However, they occasionally represent Queen Elizabeth II at events abroad. Princess Michael works as a writer, historian, lecturer, interior designer, and art consultant.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Michael of Kent

January 15, 1968 – Birth of Inaki Urdangarin y Liebaert in Zumarraga, Spain, husband of Infanta Cristina of Spain
Iñaki was a professional handball player and was a member of the Spanish Olympic Handball Team in the 1992, 1996, and 2000 Olympics, winning bronze in 1996 and 2000, and serving as team captain in 2000. While participating in the 1996 Olympics, he met Infanta Cristina of Spain. They married in 1997, and had four children. In 2003, he was a founding partner of the Nóos Institute and served as President until 2006. At that time, he became a director at Telefónica International in Barcelona. In 2009, Iñaki and his family moved to Washington DC after he was appointed director and president of the Public Affairs Committee for Telefónica Latin America and the United States. In early 2011, allegations were made against Iñaki regarding the misappropriation of public funds through his Nóos Institute. He was charged with embezzlement, fraud, breach of trust, forgery, and money laundering. Infanta Cristina was also charged with tax fraud and money laundering. In 2017, Infanta Cristina was acquitted of tax fraud and money laundering, and Iñaki was found guilty of embezzling and of political corruption. He was sentenced to six years and three months in prison. In 2018, the Supreme Court in appeal reduced his sentence to a term of five years and ten months.
Unofficial Royalty: Inaki Urdangarin

January 15, 1996 – Death of King Moshoeshoe II of Lesotho in the Maloti Mountains, Lesotho; buried on Thaba Bosiu, a plateau in Lesotho, the stronghold of King Moshoeshoe I (reigned 1822 – 1870) and once the capital of Lesotho
Moshoeshoe II was Paramount Chief of Basutoland (the former name of Lesotho) from 1960 – 1965 and King of Lesotho from 1965 – 1990. The Kingdom of Lesotho is a country completely within the borders of South Africa. In December 1990, he was deposed and his elder son became king, reigning as King Letsie III. Letsie III was embarrassed at being king while his father was still alive, and tried to persuade the government to reinstate his father as king. In August 1994 he enacted a new coup d’état with the army. Having obtained power, Letsie promised to return power to the previous government on the condition that Moshoeshoe II would return to being King of Lesotho. Moshoeshoe II’s second reign was brief. In the Maloti Mountains in Lesotho, Moshoeshoe’s car plunged off a mountain road during the early hours of January 15, 1996, killing him and his chauffeur. Tens of thousands of people attended the funeral ceremony. The procession stretched for miles along the road from the king’s favorite farm in Matsieng to Thaba Bosiu, the birthplace of the Basotho nation and the burial place of its kings.
Unofficial Royalty: King Moshoeshoe II of Lesotho

January 15, 2006 – Death of Jaber III al-Ahmad al-Jaber al-Sabah, 3rd Emir of Kuwait in Kuwait City, Kuwait; buried at Sulaibikhat Cemetery in Sulaibikhat, Al Asimah, Kuwait
Jaber III Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah reigned as the 13th Ruler and 3rd Emir of Kuwait from 1977 – 2006. He was Emir of Kuwait during the 1990 invasion of Kuwait by Iraq and the subsequent Persian Gulf War. Unlike many other rulers in the Middle East, Emir Jaber stood out for his modest style. He declined to put his own image on the nation’s currency and he lived in what Kuwaitis considered a relatively simple home. The Kuwaiti people often referred to him as Baba Jaber or Father Jaber. Jaber suffered from some health problems in his last years, and he traveled outside Kuwait to receive treatment a number of times, including in September 2001, when he suffered a stroke and went to the United Kingdom for treatment. On January 15, 2006, Jaber III Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah, 3rd Emir of Kuwait, aged 79, died from a cerebral hemorrhage at Dasman Palace in Kuwait City, Kuwait.
Unofficial Royalty: Jaber III al-Ahmad al-Jaber al-Sabah, 3rd Emir of Kuwait

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Royal News Recap for Friday, January 14, 2022

Royal News Recaps are published Mondays – Fridays and on Sundays except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will publish a breaking news article and/or a recap as necessary.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, many royal families have curtailed and/or canceled events, both in their own countries and in foreign countries. Therefore, we expect a continued decrease in the usual number of royal news articles.

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Queen Margrethe II of Denmark – Fifty Years on the Throne

by Susan Flantzer
© Unofficial Royalty 2022

Queen Margrethe II of Denmark; Credit – Wikipedia

On January 14, 2022, Queen Margrethe II marked fifty years on the Danish throne. She is the second longest-reigning Danish monarch after King Christian IV who reigned for 59 years, 330 days, from April 4, 1588 until February 28, 1648. As of January 14, 2022, the only current monarchs who reigned longer than Queen Margrethe II were Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom (reigned since February 6, 1952) and Hassanal Bolkiah, Sultan of Brunei (reigned since October 5, 1967). Queen Margrethe II stated several times that she had no intention of abdicating as several other European monarchs had done. She viewed her position as a job for life and recognized Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom as a source of inspiration for her devotion to duty.

In January 1972, shortly after King Frederik IX of Denmark had given his New Year speech, he became ill with flu-like symptoms. On January 3, 1972, he had a cardiac arrest and was rushed to Copenhagen Municipal Hospital. The king improved for a time but then took a turn for the worse, and on January 14, 1972, King Frederik IX died at the age of 72. His eldest daughter succeeded him as Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. She became the first female monarch in Denmark since Margrethe I, Queen of Denmark (reigned 1387 – 1412), Norway (reigned 1388 – 1412), and Sweden (reigned 1389 – 1412).

Margrethe and her family in 1956: left to right Princess Benedikte, Princess Anne-Marie, Queen Ingrid, Princess Margrethe, and King Frederik IX 

In 1947, King Frederik IX had succeeded to the Danish throne upon the death of his father King Christian X. At that time, women were excluded from the line of succession. Having only three daughters, and unlikely that there would be more children, King Frederik IX’s heir presumptive was his younger brother Prince Knud. Frederik soon began to work toward changing the succession laws in Denmark. Finally, in 1953, a new Act of Succession was passed, changing the succession to male-preference cognatic primogeniture – meaning that sons would come before daughters. (A 2009 succession law now allows for the succession of the firstborn child regardless of gender.) The 1953 Act of Succession meant that in the absence of a son, King Frederik IX’s daughters could succeed to the throne, and Frederik’s eldest daughter Margrethe became the heiress-presumptive. Her uncle Prince Knud, who had held the title of Hereditary Prince of Denmark, was not very happy with the new laws, as he and his two sons were now pushed further down the line. In somewhat of a consolation, Knud was given the title Hereditary Prince Knud even though he was no longer the direct heir to the throne. However, Margrethe, as heiress-presumptive, was never given the title of Crown Princess.

Prime Minister Jens Otto Krag proclaiming Margrethe Queen of Denmark on January 15, 1972; Credit – photo: Radical Royalist

On January 15, 1972, in keeping with tradition, Margrethe was formally proclaimed Queen of Denmark by Prime Minister Jens Otto Krag from the balcony at Christiansborg Palace in Copenhagen. To the crowds gathered below, she gave a brief speech: “My beloved father, our King, is dead. The task that my father had carried for nearly 25 years is now resting on my shoulders. I pray to God to give me help and strength to carry the heavy heritage. May the trust that was given to my father also be granted to me.” After being joined briefly on the balcony by her husband Prince Henrik, the couple traveled back to Amalienborg where they again appeared on the balcony, this time with their two young sons, three-and-a-half-year-old Crown Prince Frederik and two-and-a-half-year-old Prince Joachim.

Queen Margrethe II with her husband Prince Henrik and their sons Crown Prince Frederik and Prince Joachim on the balcony at Amalienborg on January 15, 1972

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The first official photograph of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark, 1972

Due to COVID-19, a number of the events that had been scheduled in mid-January 2022 to mark the 50th anniversary were rescheduled for September 2022. These include a celebration at the Copenhagen City Hall, a command performance at the Royal Danish Theatre’s Old Stage, a celebratory church service in Copenhagen Cathedral, and a gala banquet at Christiansborg Palace.

Queen Margrethe’s youngest sister Queen Anne-Marie of Greece was unable to participate in the limited number of events on January 14, 2022. Her husband former King Constantine II of Greece was ill with COVID-19 and because she had been exposed to COVID-19, Anne-Marie was not allowed to travel to Denmark.

The program for January 14, 2022 was as follows.

  • 9:30 AM – Queen Margrethe II began the day with a Council of State at Christiansborg Palace together with her son Crown Prince Frederik
  • 10:00 AM – Queen Margrethe II, her son Crown Prince Frederik and his wife Crown Princess Mary, her son Prince Joachim and his wife Princess Marie, and her sister Princess Benedikte attended the Danish Parliament’s official celebration of the anniversary of Her Majesty’s accession to the throne.
  • 12:00 PM – Queen Margrethe II, her son Crown Prince Frederik and his wife Crown Princess Mary, her son Prince Joachim and his wife Princess Marie, and her sister Princess Benedikte participate in a wreath-laying ceremony at King Frederik IX and Queen Ingrid’s grave outside Roskilde Cathedral.

For more information see:

This article is the intellectual property of Unofficial Royalty and is NOT TO BE COPIED, EDITED, OR POSTED IN ANY FORM ON ANOTHER WEBSITE under any circumstances. It is permissible to use a link that directs to Unofficial Royalty.

Works Cited

  • Flantzer, Susan, 2015. King Frederik IX of Denmark. [online] Unofficial Royalty. Available at: <http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/king-frederik-ix-of-denmark/> [Accessed 14 January 2022].
  • Kongehuset.dk. 2022. The 50 years anniversary of HM The Queen’s accession to the throne. [online] Available at: <https://www.kongehuset.dk/en/news/the-50-years-anniversary-of-hm-the-queens-accession-to-the-throne> [Accessed 14 January 2022].
  • Kongehuset.dk. 2022. The 50th anniversary of Her Majesty The Queen’s accession to the throne. [online] Available at: <https://www.kongehuset.dk/en/news/the-50th-jubilee-of-her-majesty-the-queens-accession-to-the-throne> [Accessed 14 January 2022].
  • Mehl, Scott, 2014. Accession of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. [online] Unofficial Royalty. Available at: <http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/january-14-1972-accession-of-queen-margrethe-ii-of-denmark/> [Accessed 14 January 2022].
  • Mehl, Scott, 2014. Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. [online] Unofficial Royalty. Available at: <http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/queen-margrethe-ii-of-denmark/> [Accessed 14 January 2022].

January 14: Today in Royal History

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Princess Mary of Great Britain, Landgravine of Hesse-Kassel; Credit – Wikipedia

January 14, 1236 – Wedding of King Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence at Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, England
King Henry III of England was in marriage talks for the hand of Joan, Countess of Ponthieu when his brother Richard, Earl of Cornwall told him of the beauty of the Provence sisters. Henry immediately canceled the marriage talks for Joan and made an offer to marry Eleanor of Provence. Eleanor traveled from Provence in the south of France to the court of King Louis IX of France to visit her sister Margaret, and then continued her journey to England, landing in Dover. On January 14, 1236, 28-year-old King Henry III and Eleanor, who was about 12 years old, were married at Canterbury Cathedral by Edmund Rich, Archbishop of Canterbury. Eleanor was crowned Queen of England at Westminster Abbey on January 20, 1236. Despite the couple’s age difference, their marriage was a happy one. Henry III and Eleanor had five children including Henry’s successor King Edward I.
Unofficial Royalty: King Henry III of England
Unofficial Royalty: Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England

 January 14, 1766 – Death of King Frederik V of Denmark and Norway at Christiansborg Palace in Copenhagen, Denmark; buried at Roskilde Cathedral in Roskilde, Denmark
Frederik had a very sensual nature and loved wine and women. He spent so much time visiting Copenhagen’s pubs and brothels that his father King Christian VI considered disinheriting him from the throne. When he married Louisa of Great Britain in 1743, the Danish government hoped (incorrectly) that marriage would put a damper on his affairs and drunkenness. Frederik and Louisa had five children. When Frederik became king, he did take part in the government by attending council meetings but was afflicted with alcoholism, and most of his reign was dominated by his very able ministers. In 1752, a year after Louisa died due to complications from a miscarriage. Frederik married Juliana Maria of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and the couple had one son. In 1760, Frederik broke his leg in a drunken accident, which affected his health for the rest of his life. He died on January 14, 1766, at Christiansborg Palace in Copenhagen, Denmark at the age of 42.
Unofficial Royalty: King Frederik V of Denmark and Norway

January 14, 1767 – Birth of Maria Theresia of Austria, Queen of Saxony, wife of King Anton of Saxony, in Florence, Grand Duchy of Tuscany, now in Italy
Full name: Maria Theresia Josepha Charlotte Johanna
Maria Theresia was the eldest child of Pietro Leopoldo I, Grand Duke of Tuscany (later Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor) and Infanta Maria Luisa of Spain. In 1787, she married the future King Anton of Saxony. The couple had four children, none of whom lived past infancy. In 1827, Maria Theresia and her husband became King and Queen of Saxony. Sadly, her tenure as Queen was short-lived. Just six months after her husband’s accession, Queen Maria Theresia died at the age of 60.
Unofficial Royalty: Maria Theresia of Austria, Queen of Saxony

January 14, 1772 – Death of Princess Mary of Great Britain, Landgravine of Hesse-Kassel, daughter of King George II of Great Britain, at Hanau, Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel, now in Hesse, Germany; buried at the Reformed Church in Hanau
In 1740, Mary married Friedrich II, the future Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel. As Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel, Friedrich became famous during the American Revolution as a supplier of thousands of Hessian soldiers who fought on behalf of the British. Mary and Friedrich had four sons and they are the ancestors of six of the ten current European monarchs. The marriage was unhappy, and Friedrich reportedly abused Mary to spousal abuse. The couple separated in 1754 on Frederick’s conversion to Roman Catholicism. Mary was supported by her father-in-law as she did not wish to return to Great Britain because she believed it was her duty to remain in the place that God had placed her and that she would ensure her sons would be brought up Protestant. In 1756, Mary moved to Denmark, to take care of the children of her sister Louisa of Great Britain (wife of King Frederik V above), who had died in 1751. She took her children with her, and they were raised at the Danish court and her sons were married to Danish princesses. Her husband succeeded his father as Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel in 1760, and so Mary was technically Landgravine consort for the last twelve years of her life, despite her estrangement from her husband. Mary died on January 14, 1772, in Hanau, Landgraviate of Hesse-Kassel, now in Hesse, Germany, at the age of 48.
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Mary of Great Britain, Landgravine of Hesse-Kassel

January 14, 1823 – Birth of Carlo III, Duke of Parma at the Villa delle Pianore near Lucca in the Duchy of Lucca, now in Italy
Full name: Ferdinando Carlo Vittorio Giuseppe Maria Baldassarre
Carlo’s father was in financial difficulty and so he decided to marry his son to a princess with a large dowry. The chosen bride was Louise Marie Therese of France, the granddaughter of King Charles X of France. Carlo and Louise Therese Marie were married in 1847 had four children.  Carlo became Duke of Parma upon the abdication in 1849 of his very unpopular father Carlo II Ludovico. Carlo III, Duke of Parma reigned for only five years and was assassinated for his authoritarian policies. His six-year-old son Roberto became Duke of Parma with his mother as regent but had a short reign. In 1859, the Duchy of Parma was abolished during the Italian unification movement. It was merged with the Kingdom of Sardinia as part of the unification of Italy. In 1861, Vittorio Emanuele II, King of Sardinia was proclaimed the first King of the new, united Kingdom of Italy.
Unofficial Royalty: Carlo III, Duke of Parma

January 14, 1831 – Birth of Georg Viktor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont in Arolsen, Principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont, now in Hesse, Germany
In 1845, Georg Viktor’s father died and his mother Emma served as Regent of the Principality of Waldeck-Pyrmont until he reached his majority in 1852. In 1853, Georg Victor married Helena of Nassau. Helena proved to be very successful in finding suitable marriages for their children by making contacts with various European royal houses. Because of her efforts, the relatively poor House of Waldeck-Pyrmont was linked to the richer ruling dynasties of Würtemberg, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. Their daughter Emma married King Willem III of the Netherlands and their daughter Helena married Queen Victoria’s son Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany. Georg Viktor and his wife Helena are the ancestors of the Dutch royal family through their daughter Emma and the Swedish royal family through their daughter Helena. Three years after Georg Viktor’s wife Helena died in 1888, he married Louise of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg. They had one son, Prince Wolrad, who was killed in action during World War I. A year after the birth of his son Wolrad, Georg Viktor, aged 62, died from pneumonia on May 12, 1893.
Unofficial Royalty: Georg Viktor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont

January 14, 1850 – Birth of Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia, son of Alexander II, Emperor of All Russia, at the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg, Russia
Alexei is most well-known for his coast-to-coast official visit to the United States in 1871 where one of the highlights was buffalo hunting with Buffalo Bill Cody, General George Armstrong Custer, and General Philip Sheridan. Being the fourth of six sons, Alexei had a career in the Russian Imperial Navy. He was ultimately promoted to Admiral-General and Chief of the Fleet and Naval Department and Chairman of the Admiralty Board. At the end of the Russo-Japanese War in 1905, when the Russian naval fleet was defeated, Alexei was dismissed from all naval posts.  He then spent most of the time in Paris, France in a house he had bought in 1897. There he welcomed writers, painters, actors, and actresses. He loved living in Paris and was a familiar figure in restaurants and theaters. He died of pneumonia on November 27, 1908, in Paris at the age of 58.
Unofficial Royalty: Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia

January 14, 1880 – Death of Friedrich VIII, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein in Wiesbaden, Kingdom of Prussia, now in Hesse, Germany; buried in the Ducal Graveyard in Primkenau, Kingdom of Prussia, now in Przemków, Poland
In 1864, following the Second Schleswig War, the Duchy of Holstein and the Duchy of Schleswig became occupied territories of the German Confederation and two years later, following the Austro-Prussian War, part of the new Prussian Province of Schleswig-Holstein. However, Prussia recognized Friedrich as the mediatized duke of these two duchies, with the rank and all the titles. In 1856, Friedrich married Princess Adelheid of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. She was the daughter of Ernst I, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg and Princess Feodora of Leiningen (the half-sister of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom). Together they had seven children. At just 50 years old, Friedrich VIII died in Wiesbaden, Kingdom of Prussia, now in Hesse, Germany on January 14, 1880.
Unofficial Royalty: Friedrich VIII, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein

January 14, 1892 – Death of Prince Albert Victor (Eddy), eldest son of the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, at Sandringham House in Norfolk, England; buried in the Albert Memorial Chapel at St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle in Windsor, England
Eddy, as he was known, was second in line of succession to the British throne after his father, the future King Edward VII. Eddy was inattentive and lazy and never excelled in his studies. Perhaps this was due to his premature birth which can be associated with learning disabilities. Eddy’s family decided that finding a suitable wife might help correct his attitude and behavior. In December 1891, Eddy became engaged to Princess Victoria Mary of Teck, known as May, the daughter of Queen Victoria’s first cousin Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge. The wedding was set for February 27, 1892. In the midst of the wedding preparations, Eddy developed a high fever on January 7, 1892. His sister Victoria and other household members had been ill with influenza, which Eddy also developed. Two days later, his lungs became inflamed and pneumonia was diagnosed. In the early morning hours of January 14, 1892, a chaplain was summoned to Eddy’s bedroom. There, surrounded by his parents, the Prince and Princess of Wales, his brother George, his sisters Louise, Victoria, and Maud, his fiancée May, and her mother the Duchess of Teck, Eddy died at 9:35 a.m. Eddy’s funeral was held at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor and he was buried in the Albert Memorial Chapel in St. George’s Chapel in Windsor, England. May’s wedding bouquet of orange blossoms lay on his coffin. May eventually married Eddy’s brother George and they became the beloved King George V and Queen Mary.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence

January 14, 1939 – Death of Prince Valdemar of Denmark, son of King Christian IX of Denmark, at the Yellow Palace in Copenhagen, Denmark; buried in Roskilde Cathedral in Roskilde, Denmark
Valdemar was the youngest of the six children of King Christian IX of Denmark and Louise of Hesse-Kassel. He was the brother of King Frederik VIII of Denmark, Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom, King George I of Greece, and Empress Maria Feodorovna of Russia. In 1885, Valdemar married Princess Marie of Orléans. Valdemar and Marie had four sons and one daughter. Three of their sons made unequal marriages and relinquished their position within the Danish Royal Family upon marrying without official consent from the monarch. Valdemar had a lifelong naval career which frequently caused him to be away from home. When his wife Marie died in 1909, after a long illness, Valdemar was on a long naval voyage. Valdemar survived Marie by 30 years, dying on January 14, 1939, at the age of 80.
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Valdemar of Denmark

January 14, 1972 – Death of King Frederik IX of Denmark at Copenhagen Municipal Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark; buried outside Roskilde Cathedral in Roskilde, Denmark
In 1935, Frederik married Princess Ingrid of Sweden, daughter of King Gustav VI Adolf of Sweden and his first wife Princess Margaret of Connaught, a granddaughter of Queen Victoria. The couple had three daughters including Frederik’s successor Queen Margrethe II. In 1947, Frederik succeeded to the throne upon the death of his father King Christian X. During Frederik’s reign the 1953 Danish Act of Succession was adopted which allowed for female succession in the event that the monarch had no sons. A 2009 succession law now allows for the succession of the firstborn child regardless of gender. Frederik had a great love for music and was a talented pianist and conductor. Several recordings of orchestral music originally heard on Danish radio conducted by King Frederik have been released on CDs. In January 1972, shortly after Frederik had given his New Year speech, he became ill with flu-like symptoms. On January 3, 1972, he had a cardiac arrest and was rushed to Copenhagen Municipal Hospital. The king improved for a time but took a turn for the worse on January 11, and on January 14, 1972, King Frederik IX died at the age of 72.  Unlike other Danish monarchs who had been buried inside Roskilde Cathedral, Frederik wanted to be buried outside the cathedral in sight of the sea. Frederik had a career in the Royal Danish Navy where he had several senior commands and attained the rank of Rear Admiral.
Unofficial Royalty: King Frederik IX of Denmark

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Royal News Recap for Thursday, January 13, 2022

Royal News Recaps are published Mondays – Fridays and on Sundays except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will publish a breaking news article and/or a recap as necessary.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, many royal families have curtailed and/or canceled events, both in their own countries and in foreign countries. Therefore, we expect a continued decrease in the usual number of royal news articles.

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Breaking News: Prince Andrew loses military affiliations and royal patronages and will stop using the title ‘His Royal Highness’ in any official capacity

Credit by Chatham House – Chatham House Prize 2013 Award CeremonyUploaded by January, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=28971972

On January 13, 2020, Buckingham Palace released the following statement:

With The Queen’s approval and agreement, The Duke of York’s military affiliations and Royal patronages have been returned to The Queen. The Duke of York will continue not to undertake any public duties and is defending this case as a private citizen. 

The BBC article stated: “All Prince Andrew’s roles have been returned to the Queen with immediate effect, and will be redistributed to other members of the Royal Family, a Royal Source said. He will stop using the title ‘His Royal Highness’ in any official capacity, they added.”

Royal News Recap for Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Royal News Recaps are published Mondays-Fridays and on Sundays, except for Thanksgiving in the United States, Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. The Royal News Recap for Sundays will be a weekend recap. If there is any breaking or major news, we will add an update as necessary.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, many royal families have curtailed and/or canceled events, both in their own countries and in foreign countries. Therefore, we expect a continued decrease in the usual number of royal news articles.

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