Bird Nest Identification? | History Forum

Bird Nest Identification?

FLK

Jul 2015
1,331
United States
Does anyone know what kind of bird might have built this nest? It's nearly a perfect sphere with a little entrance tunnel pointing downward at the front. The whole thing has the general shape of a retort beaker from a chemistry lab. It measures about 4.5 inches in diameter, and the entrance is about 1.5 inches wide. The location is in the vicinity of Corpus Christi, Texas. The area is kind of a mix of prairie land and chaparral-ish scrub brush. The nest itself is at the edge of some thick brush on a bluff directly over a shallow salt water bay. It really has me perplexed. I wonder if I might have to join a birding site to find an answer.

Nest 1 close up.JPG

Nest 2 close up.jpg

Nest 2 Highlight 2.jpg
 

Tammuz

Ad Honorem
Nov 2016
4,496
Munich
Maybe from a magpie.

By the way, they are not harmless and like to destroy human eyes (in Australia 1 x per yr a person loses an eye this way).

1633983083994.png
 
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FLK

Jul 2015
1,331
United States
Maybe from a magpie.

By the way, they are not harmless and like to destroy human eyes (in Australia 1 x per yr a person loses an eye this way).

View attachment 48596
Magpies don't range as far as south Texas, though. The closest relative we have is the green jay
but a quick google search shows that their nests appear to be the classic open bowl shape. I think they'd be much too large for this nest as well.
 

FLK

Jul 2015
1,331
United States
Bald eagle?
In this area, it would be extraordinary to see a bald eagle, but I think that there might have been one sighted a few years ago. If someone reports a bald eagle, it's more likely to be a vaguely similar looking bird called the crested caracara:

A search on google seems to show that they create massive bowl shaped nests in the tops of trees and cactus. I think this nest would be much too small for a caracara. I've only seen one true eagle's nest in person myself, and it was almost like a large mattress of sticks and twigs on a ledge over the side of a cliff. So I think the same issues come in considering a true eagle.
 
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FLK

Jul 2015
1,331
United States
Here the magpie is listed.


This is a magpie´s nest, described as spherical, though definitely bigger than that on your photos.

View attachment 48597
I hadn't realized we had them here in the state. I've only seen them on trips to Colorado, which I think is closer to the heart of their range. If they were to appear in Texas, I would expect that they might be likely to show up in the very far north of the panhandle, or perhaps in the far west where there are some mountains. I could imagine harsh winter weather pushing some farther into the state, likely around the areas bordering New Mexico.
 

Willempie

Ad Honoris
Jul 2015
10,966
Netherlands
In this area, it would be extraordinary to see a bald eagle, but I think that there might have been one sighted a few years ago. If someone reports a bald eagle, it's more likely to be a vaguely similar looking bird called the crested caracara:

A search on google seems to show that they create massive bowl shaped nests in the tops of trees and cactus. I think this nest would be much too small for a caracara. I've only seen one true eagle's nest in person myself, and it was almost like a large mattress of sticks and twigs on a ledge over the side of a cliff. So I think the same issues come in considering a true eagle.
I don't know I think they mainly sit on top, so I am not sure the size that is needed.

Plus it is much cooler to have a bald eagle in your area than some simple magpie ;)
 

FLK

Jul 2015
1,331
United States
I don't know I think they mainly sit on top, so I am not sure the size that is needed.

Plus it is much cooler to have a bald eagle in your area than some simple magpie ;)
We've got lot's of cool birds around here. About two hundred white pelicans flew overhead the other day. Hearing the wind rushing under their wings was what made me look up to see them going by.